Page 1

Columbia University . GSAPP 2011 – 2014

Michael E. Schissel New York , New York


p105

p155

p178

p188

p196

p208

Fabulous Factory

Architectural Technology V Spring 2013 Jay Hibbs

After Bridget Riley

Advanced Curtain Wall Spring 2014 Bob Heintges

Paper Space

ADR II Spring 2012 Michael Young

Private Infrastructure GIS Spring 2013 Leah Meisterlin

Pop The Bubble

Workshop . Brazil Summer 2013 Alejandro de Castro Mazarro & Fancisco Diaz

Crop Line

Competition . Finland Spring 2013 Kymenlaakson Univerisity

Content Architectural Technology, Visual Studies, Workshops


Water

Typological Correction Advanced Studio VI Spring 2014 Juan Herreros, Critic

p3

An Extra National Forum For Alternative Futures

Adaptive Reuse & Historic Preservation Advanced Studio V Fall 2013 Jorge Otero-Pailos & Craig Konyk, Critics

The End Of The Line

Adapting Infrastructure - C BIP Advanced Studio IV Spring 2013 Laura Kurgan, Janette Kim, & Scott Marble Critics

p30

p56

Housing Infrastructure Core Studio III Fall 2012 Douglas Gauthier, Critic

p76

Investmentopia!

Studios

Spectacle & Risk Core Studio II Spring 2012 Christina Goberna, Critic

p122

Public Food

The Manhattanville Expansion Core I Fall 2011 Cristoph A. Kumpusch, Critic

p140

Vessel for One

Water Cell Core I Fall 2011 Cristoph A. Kumpusch, Critic

p166


Typological Correction

Advanced Studio VI

Ballard Estate . 1910 . George Wittet

Mumbai, India

Estuary


4


These are the two scales of water infrastructure that exist in Mumbai. Neither is a viable solution to the problem of the equitable provision of water.

5


6


The boundaries of Mumbai, both physical and social, are permeated by water. Floating in an estuary, the physical limit of the city is an indeterminate edge: land perfused by sea. Fluid occupancies, permeable boundaries, gradients of publicness; these relationships are traced through the physical and political role of water in Mumbai and translated into a conceptual framework to organize a new solution to the ever present problem of housing in the metropolis.

7


This is a bathroom. Two of them, as well as two kitchens, two water storage tanks and two storage spaces. If the bathroom functions become redundant one can easily be adapted into a temple.

Wet Cores

8


0m 9

1m

5m


The basic unit revolves centripetally around the structural core unit of the bathroom, pushing back against the linearity and repetition that characterizes many housing projects. The unit is highly modifiable, allowing for various configurations for differing social structures.

10


Prototypical Unit 0m 11

1m

5m


12


Typical Unit Array

13


Water has no shape, but it has properties of density, pressure, and phase change. These properties inform the spatial relationships of that define the architectural expression of the project. Exterior and interior boundaries are indeterminate and negotiable. Columns function as water conveyance, bathrooms function as structural elements, shading devices perform water collection and solar distalliation functions, and public space leaks into private space.

Typical Section 0m 1m

5m 14


Typical Plan 0m 1m

15

0m

5m

5m


16


Typical Elevation 0m 17

5m


Typological Correction: Single Loaded Corridor Becomes a Double Loggia

Centripetal vs. Linear

18


An analysis of the chawls of Mumbai, a common housing typology built for mill workers in the 19th century, reveals a gradient between interior and exterior, privacy and publicity. They are criticized for being overcrowded and having inadequate plumbing, but they are also praised for the strong community ties that developed amongst the inhabitants. The exterior corridors and courtyards used for circulating through the chawls provided an expanded interior/exterior boundary, promoting both environmental temperance and social engagement through the definition of the building envelope.

Chawl Section

19


The extremes of the region’s seasonal cycle, defined by a 4 month deluge and then 8 months of dryness, adds a temporal dimension to the fluid dynamics of the city, suggesting a fluidity of occupancy contingent upon the monsoon cycle. The building is not independent; it is the cleaving of an existing building type, and investment of infrastructural capacity. The adapted building is an environmental management apparatus serving varied interests of housing and work. The system is seasonally attenuated, adapting its own operations to the monsoon cycle. It moves from the purification of ground water to the collection of rain water, registered by flooding of the central space and altering the occupational potential of the space.

Diagrammtic Section

20


Solar Distillation Array and Ground Water Wells

Weeping Columns / Water Conveyance / Secondary Structure

Bathrooms / Primary Structure

Floor Plates

Existing Typology, Corrected

Systems: Exploded Axonometric

21

Subterrainean Tank


B4

T

ROAD

Y STREE

TATA

TRINIT

JAMSHETJI

DI ROAD

WA TATA

AN ND JAMSHETJI

CHA RG

RG

RG

RG

RG

BELL LANE

S S & PG

B4 B5

B4

22


The Ballard Estate, master planned and designed by George Wittet between 1910 and 1914, was built on in-filled land, using material excavated for the construction of the docks to the north and east. The Estate sits outside of the primary north/south traffic flows of the city, leaving its wide streets eerily quiet by comparison. The plan provided service access alleys, as wide as many streets in Mumbai, that are now gated off, keeping the internal courtyards under utilized.

0m

100m

200m

500m

Site: Mumbai in an Estuary

23


1,400 Max Units @ 25% Porosity 1,050 Units ~4,200 People who need 567,000 L water/day Column Capacity 5.5M L ~10 days capacity

24


25


It is a discrete apparatus. It does not advertise, It appropriates. It punctures wholes into the colonial street fronts to pull air through the site, allowing it to breath.

26


27


The column becomes indistinguishable from the pipe, from the screen, and from the wall. The pipes incorporate a micro porous surface, allowing small amounts of water to permeate its outer skin. Everywhere smells of wet concrete.

28


29


Adaptive Reuse – Historic Preservation

Advanced Studio V

US Embassy . 1958 . Eero Saarinen

Olso, Norway

AN EXTRA NATIONAL FORUM FOR ALTERNATIVE FUTURES


SOUTH-WEST

TSAE-HTUOS

LEVEL TWO NORTH

SNOITAVELE DNA SNALP

TSEW-HTUOS

.GDLB YSSABME SETATS DETINU YAWRON ,OLSO

SETAICOSSA DNA NENIRAAS OREE

NAGIHCIM ,SLLIH DLEIFMOOLB

.ON TEEHS

1

STCETIHCRA

ETAD

3102 ,81 REBEMETPES

.ON TCEJORP 3055

DEKCEHC SM

NWARD SM

ELACS

’1 = ”61/1

HTRON

As Built 0m

5m

15m

LEVEL ONE 32


TSEW-HTUOS

SOUTH-EAST The U.S. Embassy in Oslo was constructed during a building boom of diplomatic facilities in the late 1950s, the majority of which are now being decommissioned as they are unableto meet ever increasing security demands. The Overseas Building Office has penned new “design excellence standards” that attempt to resolve the contradictory desires for openness and security. The public O W T L Efunction V E L of an embassy, however, is symbolic representation and it is therefore understood as a target for violence in the climate of fear and political tension that we live in today. As such the embassies can no longer operate openly and accessibly.

HTRON

PLANS AND ELEVATIONS

UNITED STATES EMBASSY BLDG. OSLO, NORWAY

SOUTH-EAST

EERO SAARINEN AND ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS

DRAWN MS

SCALE

1/16” = 1’

CHECKED MS

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICHIGAN

DATE

SEPTEMEBER 18, 2013

SHEET NO.

PROJECT NO. 5503

SOUTH-WEST

1

The US has built 88 new diplomatic facilities since 1999, and has 41 in designS O orUunder TH-WEST construction. This Embassy is one of many around the world whose existence hangs precariously between its original, designed use and the open question of its future usevalue as an ex-US embassy. These buildings are both historically and architecturally significant, built by some of the greatest architects of the mid 20th century for an international political climate that no longer exists. These abandoned corridors of power are poignant sites for a new network of critical space whose purpose is to mediate a conversation about the future freed of existing, normative constraints: freed from the nation-state. This project aspires to nurture a new conversation, one that might help to create a cultural shift through art, dialogue, and critical thought that, on the larger scale of generations, might one day inflect N Oa Rpolicy TH shift at the level of institutionalized, global politics.

NORTH

PLANS AND ELEVATIONS

UNITED STATES EMBASSY BLDG. OSLO, NORWAY

EERO SAARINEN AND ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS

BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICHIGAN

AS BUILT CONDITIONS DRAWN MS

ENO LEVEL 33

SCALE

1/16” = 1’

CHECKED MS

DATE

SEPTEMEBER 18, 2013

PROJECT NO. 5503

SHEET NO.

1


Symmetry, Presence, and the Question of Preservation

34


Saarrinen’s Embassy is a single loaded corridor building, folded to fill the triangular form of its site, responding to the geometrical constraint of the site and using it to its advantage. He utilized a single loaded corridor, implicitly mandated by the program, folded around the perimeter of the site and stacked 4 levels high and then placed two triangular cores in the kinks of the fold. This folded corridor creates a void in the center that is filled with a shallow, parallelogram shaped pool of water. This space is difficult to use‌ in a way functionless. It is the result of the rigid maintainance of symmetry and tension between the ideal efficiencies of the corridor and the idealized geometry of the site. But this ambiguity and difficulty lend the space a specialness that allows anyone and everyone to assign their own function to this space. It can be a space of reflection, of gathering, of loitering, or of transit. It can be useless and overflowing with use at the same time. It is the left-over space that results from the formation of the corridor, but it is also reinforces the corridor.

35


Corridor

Field

36


The word corridor was, initially, a person – not an architectural device, but a messenger - a courier. Later, 16th and 17th century merchants adopted the architectural form of the corridor to represent their need to “be kept abreast of world events by fleet-footed messengers.” The corridor was a symbolic space built to emphasize status and communicate political importance. Its first extensive architectural use is found in the design of 19th century military barracks and fortifications where it served to channel and regiment people and also to expedite communications between front lines and command structures. In the Twentieth Century it was adopted to create efficient spatial hierarchies to serve the expanding managerial needs of the global marketplace and it is largely due to this ubiquitous deployment in the modern office building that we are all so familiar with the architectural device of the corridor today. Both the historical significance and the circulatory logic of the corridor generate an ontological reality within the building, one defined by speed and connectivity, linear lines of communication and thought. Thus, the corridor serves to direct and manage the concentration and maintenance of power. In Mark Jarzombek’s words, “These [corridor] spaces encode the building with the terminology of couriered messages, international power brokerage…” This spatial reality must be overwhelmed for a new space of exchange to be possible. The Embassy has a deeply embedded identity as a symbolically charged building that has known only one use and that identity will persist in public perception despite its abandonment.

37


E VA C U A T E D S P A C E 1m

5m

10m

20m

N

Evacuated Space

38


The first phase of the project, therefore, opens the building to the public in its abandoned state. This allowance for informal observation and exploration of what has been a closed and mysterious space for decades will create a temporal space of consideration, a buffer, for the building and the community in which it exists, making possible a sense of public repossession. Releasing control of the building in this way will alter the perception of the building as a part of the fabric of Oslo and allow the embedded identity of the US embassy to be utilised as a tool for the genesis of a new form of conversation, a new negotiation of cultural exchange that is not possible within the corridic confines of the nation-state and contemporary diplomatic structures.

39


L4

L3

V2

L2

Ground Level

40


V2

To make this exchange possible the corridor is deployed again, but as a field condition. This combination of multiple, singular corridors generates a non-hierarchical hypostyle hall, a nomadic space constituted by multiple, simultaneous possibilities of navigation, not a multiplicity, but multiple coexisting singularities. This field is then manipulated vertically throughout the building to create a heterogenous network of trajectories. Nicolas Bourriaud uses the botanical metaphor of the radicant to characterize this new conception of exchange and cultural production. Radicants are plants, like Ivy or Mangroves, which do not emanate from a single origin or root, as does the deleuzian rhizome, but instead produce new roots as they move in multiple directions simultaneously. “It is a matter of replacing the question of origin with that of destination.� L2 The Extra National Forum for Alternative Futures.

L1

V1

L0

Floor Plans

FLOOR PLANS

0m 1m

41

5m

10m

20m

5m

15m

N

30m


Floor System

42


0m 43

5m

15m

Building Sections 30m


Re-Structuring

44


To facilitate the articulation of this new space within the existing building, one of the two structural cores, one of the brick screen walls defining the atrium and all four floors spanning between are removed. The space opened by the removal of the core creates the possibility of more centralizing moments within the volume and distorts the rigid symmetry of the building. As the previous floors spanned from the load-bearing labradorite/concrete facade to the atrium walls and cores,and their removal requires a new strategy for lateral reinforcement of the facade.

45


Built Up Roof On Cast-in-place Concrete Slab

Structural glass fins, arranged at 45 degree angles and coated with a two-way mirror film effectively reinforce the load bearing facade while thematically tying the structure into the renovation strategy. These reflective structural devices create a doubling and a visual translation of objects in space: simultaneously confronting you with your own presence in the space, while multiplying and distorting the location of your reflection. The fins are located along the north facade where the regulating grid of the corridic field meets the facade obliquely, preventing the ramping system that is deployed across this grid from continuously bracing the facade. The roof on this side of the building must be replaced as well, as its load bearing members have been removed, and a field of columns supports the system of ramps and takes the loads of the new roof.

Operable Wood Frame Window

Pre-cast Concrete Facade

Cast-in-place Concrete Slab

Hung Ceiling

Radiant Heat

Existing Wall Section 1

5

46


Casement Windows Chrome Trim

Labradorite - Concrete Structural Modules

Structural Glass With Two Way Mirror Coating Bolted, Chromed Steel Spandrel Joint

Reflection Displacement

0

15

3 0cm

Structural Glass Fins - Reinforce Load Bearing Facade And Prevent Buckling

Existing Floors To Be Removed

Structural Ramps Span From Column To Load Bearing Facade

Columns Introduced To Support Ramp System And Support The New New Half Of The Roof

Reinforced Structural Facade

47


North Elevation

South Elevation

48


49


50


The parallelogram reflecting pool and benches that define the regulating grid are preserved and the system of ramps carefully negotiates the edges of the atrium space throughout the volume, however due to the removal of all existing floors, the benches are dropped down to the ground level and the pool is extruded, maintaining the datum of its top surface, but extending the shallow pool downward, into a cubic volume of water. As you negotiate a path through the space, you are confronted with multiple possible trajectories, multiple possible entries and exits, and multiple possible interpretations of the function of varied spaces created by irregular arrangements within the field of ramps.

51


The ramps begin to puddle, creating an amphitheatre like arrangement, a potential space of gathering. The vertical movement slows, allowing larger flat areas for performances, large group discussions. The preserved structure pushes against the freedom of the field, reminding it of it’s past life as a corridor. The flat spaces are smaller, more intimate and slightly removed from continuous connection to the field through visual and some aural separation. Views of the larger space of the field are framed through the core, visually connecting you back to the totality of the space at the moment of greatest isolation.

52


53


54


55


Adapting Infrastructure

Advanced Studio IV CBIP

Newtown Creek Waste Water Treatment Plant

Brooklyn, New York


Project Team Talene Montgomery Michael Schissel Jim Stoddart

THE END OF THE LINE


2020 . Purification

NYC’s largest wastewater treatment facility at Newtown Creek is a vital site for preventative intervention in response to imminent sea level rise. The plant contains untapped potential for the collaborative proximity of multiple infrastructures: flood prevention, waste management, recreation and funeration. The three-phase intervention is long-term and large-scale. In the first phase, a traversable flood barrier barricades the plant against extreme projections of sea level rise while also creating a new public space. The barrier is modulated to facilitate growth over time, generating connective tissue between the surrounding, disjointed neighborhoods, while simultaneously cultivating calibrated proximity to the waste management infrastructure below. This exposure aims to re-condition the perceived “yuck factor� associated with wastewater treatment. As public perception evolves, the third phase introduces to society a waterbased, alternative method of burial: aquamation. With the addition of this crucial programmatic layer, previously discrete municipal programs are laminated to create a robust, defensive pastoral infrastructure.

58


2050 . Recreation

2080 . Funeration

59


The End of the Line reveals the interconnectedness of water, waste, life, and death in the function of the metropolis. It proposes the possibility of a greater urbanism through the expansion of the concept of infrastructure that enables a contraction of its spatial requirements. A greater definition of urban infrastructure spans the overlooked gap between the provision of basic human needs and the social rituals supporting human loss. The project develops over time, reconditioning the public understanding of waste through an incremental exposure to its latent potential and its central connection to a global energy cycle, ultimately creating a positive relationship between life, waste, death, and shared public space.

2080

60


2020 . Purification

2050 . Recreation

61

2080 . Funeration


Greenpoint Neighborhood

Bridge to Long Island CIty

Park hosts, irrigates

stimulates, protects filters

Newtown Creek

Wastewater Treatment Plant provides waterfront access

Context / Concept / Strategy Contemporary Sites of Accumulation + Processing along Newtown Creek

15

65

70

TRASH 70

85

25

90

65

90

70

60 60

70

85

65

70

70

60

90

50

70

90

60

60

0

55

35

85

60

7

60

30

15

70 65 75 25

30

55 45 0 35

20

65

65

70

30 40

45

85

20

65

80

85

BODIES 40

75

65

20 10 15

70

15

60

85

55

65 60

65

10 5

25

20

70

25

70

20

WASTE

60

30

30

15

55 45 35

60

70

20 40 20

65

BODIES TRASH

15

80

70

20

15

65

65 60

5

WASTE

65 70 85 75

90

70

10

10

15

15

85

15

0

25 5

55

20

60

20

50

70

15

15

85

90

10 15

10 15

20

5

Context / Concept / Strategy Contemporary Sites of Accumulation + Processing along Newtown Creek

10

15

60 70

25 5

0

20 15

50

20

85

10 5

65

60 70

20

70 65 75

25

25 40

30

45

35

250

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

Feet 3,000

60

70

0

0

55 50

Context / Concept / Strategy Contemporary Sites of Accumulation & Processing Along Newtown Creek 0

250

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

Feet 3,000

62


Today the major threat is storm surges, compounded by the pollution of the water threatening to invade and contaminate the street. This requires an increase in height for the plant’s flood barriers, which we address as a need for traversable and non-traversable boundaries. The barriers calibrate the public access to the new public space with a controlled exposure to waste management processes. The goal of the project is to layer multiple urban infrastructures on one site, compounding the efficiency of the land area, and creating an accessible space for public engagement with the realities of urban infrastrcuture. Responding to the city’s dire lack of burial space, we propose to layer these infrastructures for mutual benefit. Through the process of alkaline hydrolosis the same water processed by the plant can be used to process the remains of the dead, which will then be inturned on site in a new memorial space for the city.

Hurricane X

Hurricane Sandy 15’ 14’

Hurricane Donna

13’ 12’ 11’ 10' 9' 8' 7' 6'

Anticipated Sea Level Rise (Max)

5' 4'

Anticipated Sea Level Rise (Min)

3' 2' 1' 1900

1940

Projected Sea Level Rise in New York

63

2010

2050

2080


Respond An operational sequence is executed at three scales to manage the large site at multiple levels.

LowResolution

Low resolution operations prepare a guide surface, strategically draped over controlled areas of the site. These organize both protected and exposed regions of the site, optimizing the multiple functions for environmental conditions and site circulation.

ClearanceMaker

DonDraper

DaylightMaker

GISmachine

Influencer

Sculpt LowResolution

MediumResolution

At the medium level of resolution this guide surface is further sculpted to respond to urban conditions, circulation patterns, and drainage strategies. ClearanceMaker

DonDraper

DaylightMaker

GISmachine

PathingNetworker

Topographizer

SmellSnouts

Memorial Space

High resolution operations entail populating the prepared and sculpted guide surface with the apparatuses developed for the urban infrastructure oriented site strategy. These include Smell Snouts, which have a dual role of controlling Plant odor and creating a mausoleum, Sense Straws that MediumResolution demarcate the grid overlayed on the seemingly pastoral landscape of the park and communicate exposure levels and toxic proximities to park goers. The most ubiquitous element across the site will be Filter Paver elements that manage storm water and provide a direct, visceral point of contact with the element of water, a constant at every scale of operation. Lasty, we employ scaffolding structure and various boundary types to support the new Topographizer GISmachine public surface ofPathingNetworker the park and define it edges with storm surge proof barriers.

Influencer

Populate HighResolution

out-site

SmellSnouts

E-Structure

FilterPaver

in-site

Barriers

Memorial Space

Managing an Evolving Site

64


input

Boundary Type (non-traversable)

output

12’ 8’ 4’

Solid Boundary Dry Edge Draining Inward

Open Boundary Dry Edge Drains Inward Modulating Height

Open Boundary Wet Edge Drains Inward Modulating Height 65

Flood Barrier

Flood Barrier Exposure

Flood Barrier Storm Water Retention Exposure

Solid Boundary Wet Edge Drains Outward

Open Boundary Dry Edge Drains Inward Modulating Height

Transparency Dry Edge Drains Outward

Flood Barrier Storm Water Retention Engagement

Flood Barrier Exposure Clearance

Flood Barrier Retention Exposure Engagement

Transparent Flood Barrier Boundary Retention Dry Edge Exposure Drains Outward to Engagement Drinking Fountain


Five critical areas of the 53 acre site were selected for high resolution development to communicate the over-all ste strategy.

2

3

5 4

1 Critical Test Sites

66


Populate HighResolution

solution

orker

out-site

Topographizer

SmellSnouts

E-Structure

FilterPaver

in-site

Barriers

Memorial Space

1 . Primary Pedestrian Entry

67

4. Sedimentation Beds : Smell Snouts : Memorial Space

2 . NW Corner : Current Outfall

5 . Decommisioned Cetrifuges : Exhibition Space

3 . Whale Creek : Future Outfall


Sensible Straws

Filter Pavers tm2525

Smell Snouts jps2171

Populating Apparatuses

68


PURIFICATION RECREATION FUNERATION

69


The End of the Line


72


73


NEW YORK CITY PRODUCES 1,300,000,000 GALLONS OF WASTE WATER EVERY DAY

C E N T R A L I Z E D W A S T E M G M T

V S

L I Q U I D

D I S T R I B U T E D W A S T E M G M T

S O L I D S

OR

→ → → → →

>6,000 MILES OF SEWER PIPES 135,000 SEWER CATCH BASINS >495 PERMITTED OUTFALLS FOR CSOs 96 WASTE WATER PUMPING STATIONS 14 TREATMENT PLANTS

I N

20% OF PLANT’S POWE

53 ACRES

T H R O U G H

→ → → → → → → → → →

DISINFECTION FACILITY 2 CONTROL BUILDINGS 3 SEDIMENTATION BATTERIES 3 AERATION BATTERIES SUPPORT BUILDINGS RESIDUALS FACILITIES CENTRIFUGE BUILDING SOLIDS HANDLING FACILITY MAIN BUILDING, VISITORS’ CENTER PUBLIC WATERFRONT

O U

S T

N E W T O W N C R E E K S E W E R S H E D 1 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 R E S I D E N T S 1 5 , 0 0 0 A C R E S

C

Miles 0

0.5

1

2

3

4

74


Sources: Center for Urban Pedagogy, Newtown Creek Alliance.org, NYC.gov, New York Times, Kate Ascher “The Works”, Humanurehandbook.com, NY DEP

L I Q U I D S

30-60 fl.oz./day

S O L I D S

E X T R A

S P A C E

E X T R A

T I M E

3-8 oz./day ( E X T R A

ORGANIC ADDITIVES

$ $ )

PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

W H E R E

D O

W E

P U T

I T ?

NT’S POWER NEEDS

SOCIAL EQUITY → M E T H A N E

O U T

→1,200 TONS OF SLUDGE

→ W A T E R

R

FLORIDA CITRUS GROVES VIRGINIA GRAZING AND CORN LAND COLORADO WHEAT NEW JERSEY ALKALINE TREATMENT PLANT ARKANSAS PELLETIZATION PLANT PENNSYLVANIA COMPOSTING NYC GARDENS

4 2 %

STORM EVENT= COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW

DRY WEATHER UP TO 310,000 GALLONS A DAY TO EPA STANDARDS

WET WEATHER UP TO 700,000 GALLONS A DAY PARTIAL TREATMENT

75

3 7 %

1 3 %

→ A L K I A L I N E

L A N D → D I R E C T

→ P E L L E T I Z E D

O N - S I T E S T O R M W A T E R R E T E N T I O N

→ C O M P O S T I N G

C O M B I N E D S T O R M A N D S E W E R

S T A B I L I Z A T I O N

A P P L I C A T I O N

→ → → → → → →

8 %


Project Team

Andrew Maier III, Michael Schissel

Housing Infrastructure


Core Studio III East Harlem, New York


lg

lg

sm

sm

sm

sm sm

sm

Stair Habitable Unit Elevator Urine Diversion Potable Water Grey Water Supply Grey Water Return Dry Toilet Core Storm Water Conveyance Air Supply

Wet Network

78


System Relationships: Infrastructural Networks If the history of housing can be examined as the history of plumbing, the history of plumbing can, in turn, be examined as a history of the interrelationships between privacy and publicity – of intimacy within the simultaneous negotiation of shared space. This project organizes housing around explicit systems of circulation: people, air, water, and waste, making visible the implicit organizations of the social space of human intimacy and public negotiation. This organizational agenda also introduces mechanical efficiencies and creates an easily and affordably adpatable mechanical model for high density residential construction. Our goal is to make transparent the opaque qualities of privacy through their public exhibition, while still maintaining the necessary anonymity of privacy. In this way the viewer is also viewed, yet is aware of this relationship. The project utilizes a fluid oscillation between co-dependencies: figure and ground, horizontal and vertical, intimate and exposed, solid and void. The architecture thus not only provides for the private requirements of the occupant, but also enables a knowing relationship between occupants. The explicit system implies its hidden counterpart; the architecture simultaneously precedes and frames the positionality of the inhabitant.

79


Constrained Site

Both Harlem River Drive and Metro North enclose, yet bypass, the site. Considerable traffic and noise pollution necessitate moving the residential zones upwards. The tightly bound site, accessable from only one side, is lifted, redirecting the traffic onto the highway beneath the building and creating an accessible connection to the north-east for pedestrian traffic.

Closed Loop Site Planning

Taking advantage of the fragmenting of the nyc grid that occurs as it meets arcing line of the Harlem River, the site reaches into the previously unusabe pocket of space and reclaims it for grey water processing and a new greenspace for the city. Waste Management vehicle acess and Harlem River Drive On-Ramp combine below grade. Collection Tanks, digestors, and composting chambers nestle at the feet of the primary concrete structure, centalized fluid collection and distribtuion nodes.

80


tr Me

On-ramp Is Replaced With Wetlands For Greywater Processing

h

Ideal Building Depth Site Grown Market + Bodega New Pedestrian Connection

31s

tS

Summer

t.

rk

Winter

Har

Av

e

E1

lem

Pa

ort

Harlem River

Traffic Re-routing Waste Mgmt Education Center Micro Farm Pedestrian Flows Waste Mgmt Access

Riv er D rive

81

oN


R8 District With Community Facility

6.5 Maximum Overall Far 6.02 Maximum Community Use Far 75% Lot Coverage (Corner) As Of Right Buildable Area: 393,088 Sf (6.5X60,475sf)

Community Facility+ Inclusionary

Request For Inclusionary Housing Bonus Of 33% Of Floor Area For Providing 20% Affordable Housing.

The Entire Site:

45,500Sf (6.5X7000sf) + 435,420 Sf (7.2X60,475sf)} X 1.33 = 639,625Sf With 127,925Sf Permanent Affordable Housing Required

639,625 ALLOWABLE SF


ridg e

E. 1 3

80’

Me tro -No rth R

er Drive Harlem Riv

ailw ay B

2nd

159

.33

140

.83 224

R8

80’

C2378

4o ver lay ’

04’ 314.

100

Park Ave .

.59

E. 1 3

1st

R8 Standard Sky Exposure Plane

R8 Sky Exposure Plane or Alternate option 6.02 Maximum FAR As of Right buildable area: 364,060 sf (6.02x60,475sf)

C2-4 Overlay, Commercial FAR within R6-R10 2.0 Maximum FAR with a 100’depth As of Right buildable area: 90,000 sf (2x45,000sf)

R8 Standard _ Option 1 29 Floors 672,000 Gross SF

R8 Standard _ Option 2 29 Floors 565,000 Gross SF

R8 Alternate _ Option 1 29 Floors 601,000 Gross SF

R8 Alternate _ Option 2 29 Floors 513,000 Gross SF

83

R8 Alternate Sky Exposure Plane


Residential 226,400 Circulation 66,500 16,500 Public Zones 50,000 Cat Walks Tower Commercial 5,000 Base Commercial 15,600 7000 Grocery 8,600 Theater Wast Mgmt Sub Level 30,000 Gross 343,500 Res+Circ 292,900 Commercial 20,600 Efficiency (Circ/Res) 0.29 0.66 (With Sublevel) Site 86,350 Far 3.98 Unit Count Approx Occupants Expected Occupant Load Micro(1B) 158 1 = 158 Loft (1B Tall) 26 2 = 52 1 Br (2B) 69 2 = 138 2Br (3B) 43 43= 172


Loft Micro

Twin Micro With Circulation Coupling

One Bed

Two Bed

86


87


Occupiable Patio And Passive heat/Cool Stack Floor to Floor Fixed Glazing

Double Skin Facade

Operable Wood Slat Louvers Operable Glazing

Off-Site Prefab Slab Insert HoleDeck Waffle Slab Lightweight, Flexible Maintenance

88


Systems Conveyance -Human Waste -Air -Water

Modular Bathroom Unit

Basic Hygienic Needs Bathroom

Mud Room with Coat Closet and Bench

Bedroom Closet

Kitchen Insert Starter Kitchen Insert Upgradeable

Concrete Shell

89


90


show me

91

hold me


92


93


Structural Shells

Double Skins

Unit Slabs

Plinth

Stair Core Circulation

Elevator Core Circulation

Enlarged, Shared Space Floor Plates

Meandering Circulation

Meandering Circulation

94


95


Grey Supply Potable Supply Solids Evacuation Liquids Evacuation Grey Return Stack Effect Exhaust

Closed Loop Waste Management

96


150’

Sub-Grade Level 0ft

97

25ft

75ft

150ft


98


orth 25’

50’

150’

Level 2 Main Lobby 0ft 99

25ft`

75ft

150ft


100


Level 13 0ft 101 50’

150’

25ft`

75ft

150ft


102


Level 30 0ft 103 50’

150’

25ft`

75ft

150ft


White steel, White concrete, Glass Project Team

Andrew Maier III, Zack Mauer Arkadiusz Piegdon, Michael Schissel

Fabulous Factory


Architectural Technology V


Structural Strategies. Ductal Fins (structural exoskeleton facade) WT structural steel (braced frame) Crossing the threshold moves the occupant through the layered depth of the facade, depositing them into a voluminous interior space. A large void carves up from the second floor from the entry, corresponding with the peeled-up lip vestibule of the facade. Our goal is to create an unpredictable experience and a dramatic interior/exterior dichotomy through the careful control of scale and the deployment of unexpected structural strategies and material contrasts. Bringing the structure outside of the envelope opens the full perimeter of the long building, creating an unbroken space articulated by the dramatic and constantly shifting play of light filtered through the skin.

108


109


1

1

A302

1

S104

A301

A.1 A

B

C

1.1

D.1

3

4

5

1

D

Transverse Section

2

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16.1 16

Roof 116' - 0"

Roof 116' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 5 60' - 0"

Level 5 60' - 0"

Level 4 46' - 0"

Level 4 46' - 0"

Level 3 32' - 0"

Level 3 32' - 0"

Level 2 18' - 0"

Level 2 18' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Longitudinal Section


At the largest scale, reading the building as an exterior envelope from a distance, it appears to be a monolithic block. It reads as a precise, solid volume, minimally articulated. Upon approaching the building, movement reveals a play of light through the surface of the block, the unity of the facade begins to dissolve in mirage-like moire pattern. The fineness of the screen is discerned and the faint suggestion of a contrasting interior space is just barely discernable. As the entry is reached, the scale and materiality of the structural skin is revealed, but its fineness and depth keep the interior space veiled, not fully legible except for glowing color and suggestions of solid and void glimpsed through the filtering screen.

Roof 116' - 0"

Level 7 88' - 0"

Level 6 74' - 0"

Level 5 60' - 0"

Level 4 46' - 0"

Level 3 32' - 0"

Level 2 18' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Perspective


D

C

B

A

D

C

B

1 A301

A

D.1

A.1

1

D.1

22' - 0"

22' - 0" A.1

22' - 0" 1.1

1.1

1

EQ

2

2

3

18' - 0"

3

4

18' - 0"

5

18' - 0"

PUBLIC LOBBY

5

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

4

6

18' - 0"

6

MECH ELEC

1 A302

7

18' - 0"

7

8

18' - 0"

8

9

36' - 0"

9

10

10

11

12

13

18' - 0"

14

18' - 0"

15

15

18' - 0"

1 S104

18' - 0"

PUBLIC LOBBY

13

FREIGHT ELEVATOR

12

14

18' - 0"

MECH ELEC

11

16

16.1

EQ

16

16.1

Plans: Architectural L1, Roof, & Structural L2

112


Steel Frame, Unitized Curtain Wall, & Concrete Exoskeleton

113


14’-0” 6’-0”

6’-0”

3’-2”

6’-0”

1’-0” 1’-0” 1’-0” 1’-0” 1’-0” 1’-0”

E3

Typical Bay Plan, Section, and Elevation

114


14’-0”

E2

E1 1” Steel Plate with 1/2” Splice Plates

3’-2”

Horizontal Mullion Aluminum Stick Mullion Steel Lap Joint Connection with 2 Stainless Steel Pins Ductal Exoskeleton Fin

Translucent Insulating Nanogel Panel 1” Steel Plate with 1/2” Splice Plates

Ductal Exoskeleton Fin Bracing

Triple Glazed IGU with Argon Gas Aluminum Mullion Cap Shop Milled and Adhered for Thermal Break

Delaminated Cladding System

115


Horizontal Mullion

B

Structural Silicone Sealant Spacer Triple Glazing With Argon Gas Setting Block Silicone Weatherseal

Slot At Windload Anchor Hole At Deadload Anchor

Backer Rod Vertical Mullion Extrusion Spacer Structural Silicone Sealant Double Glazing Bb

Aa B

Nanogel Translucent

Slab Anchor

Horizontal Mullion

E2

Ductal Bracing (Maximum Unbraced Length = 10’) Structural Ductal Exoskeleton Fin Member

Ductal Outrigger With 1” Embedded Steel Plate Fireproof Membrane 5” Topping Slab Pre-cast “Super Slab”

1/2” Steel Angle Wt 12x52 With Add’l Steel Welded To Web Steel Splice Plate To Ductal Connection Translucent Nanogel IGU Horizontal Mullion With Structural Glazing

E1

Ductal Stack Joint With 2-1/2” Stainless Steel Pins

Low E, Triple Pane IGU With Argon Gas

Typical Slab Edge / Ductal Connection

116


A

Anchor Bolt Kit Steel Angle A

12 X 52 Wt Beam With Thickened Web

Steel Splice Plate Gasket Sealer Aluminum Mullion Splice Plate Fabreeka Or Isokorb 1/4" Thermally Isolated Structural Pad Factory Installed, Thermally Broken, Sealed Coupling Sealant/insulation Triple Glazed With Argon Gas Silicone Weatherseal

1"x12" Steel Cast Into Ductal Concrete 3.5" X 16" Ductal Concrete Fins

1/2" Splicing Steel

E3 Curtain Wall Mullion Details

117


Ductal Fin Welded Ss Through-bolt Welded Ss Plate 1/4” Steel Splice Plate

Integrated Brace Plate 1/2” Threaded Rods, Cast In Brace Plate 1/2” Steel Unit To Unit Slotted Connection Plate, Welded To Primary 1” Steel , Primary Reinforcing Plate, C.I.P.

Ductal Fin Section

118


12 X 52 Wt Beam With Thickened Web 12 X 52 Wt Beam With Thickened Web

Triple Glazed With Argon Gas Splice Collar With Slotted Bolt Holes

3.5” X 16” Ductal Concrete Fins 1” Steel Reinforcing Plate

Steel Splice Plate 12 X 52 Wt Beam With Thickened Web Fabreeka Or Isokorb 1/4" Thermally Isolated Structural Pad

Sealant /insulation Steel Splice Plate With Slotted Expansion Bolt Holes Aluminum Mullion

Triple Glazed With Argon Gas

Exoskeletal Structural Connection

119


5” Topping Slab Precast Concrete 'Superslab' 5" Dia. Cavity

7"

Reinforcing Steel Mesh Modified Wt12x52 Styrofoam, C.I.P. Balast 1/8" Bolt Aluminum Plate Snap In Acrylic Diffuser T3 Light Bulb

T3 Fluorescent 1'

Pre-Cast ‘Super Slab’ Section Detail

7" X 4" Rectangular Duct Topping Slab

1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe

Precast 'Super Slab'

5" 7"

5"

Wt 12x54 I-beam

1'-0 T3 Lighting Connection Between Flex Duct And Rect. Duct

Flex Duct

Hot/cold Pipe For Active Chilled Beam

Active Chilled Beam

Hot/cold Pipe For Active Chilled Beam 1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe 15" X 6" Main Duct To Mechanical Rooms Hot/cold Pipe For Active Chilled Beam 1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe Fire Sprinkler

Single ‘Superslab’ Short Section

15" X 6 Duct To Mech R 1 3/4 Sprinkler Fee Hot/col For Active Chilled

1 3/ Sprinkler Fee Fire Sp 1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe Fire Sprinkler

7” X 4 Duct Flex Duct To 4” X 7” 8' Long Ac Chilled Be Cast In Pl Aluminum

Cast In Place Aluminum Box 1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe Fire Sprinkler

Wt 12x54 I Beam

Wt 12x54 I Beam

120


Wt 12x54 I Beam Concrete Precast Superslab Fire Sprinkler 1 3/4” Dia Sprinkler Feed Pipe Wt 12x54 I Beam

7” X 4” Rect. Duct

Exposed For Connections During Installation Between Superslabs Topping Slab To Be Poured 15" X 6" Main After Installation uct To Mechanical See Specifications Rooms 1 3/4" Dia. rinkler Feed Pipe Hot/cold Pipe tive Chilled Beam

1 3/4" Dia. prinkler Feed Pipe Fire Sprinkler a. pe er

7” X 4” Rect. Duct Flex Duct Connection To 4” X 7” Rect .duct 8' Long Active Chilled Beam Cast In Place Aluminum Box

8' Long Active Chilled Beam Cast In Place Aluminum Box Flex Duct Connection To 4” X 7” Rect .duct 6” Dia. Flex Duct Hot/cold Pipes For Active Chilled Beam Fire Sprinkler 1 3/4” Dia Sprinkler Feed Pipe

Flex Duct Connection To 4” X 7” Rect. Duct 6” Dia. Flex Duct 4' Long Active Chilled Beam Cast In Place Aluminum Box

15" X 6" Main Duct To Mechanical Rooms 1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe Hot/cold Pipe For Active Chilled Beam

Cast In Place Aluminum Box Hot/cold Pipe For Actvie Chilled Beam 1 3/4" Dia. Sprinkler Feed Pipe 15" X 6" Main Duct To Mechanical Rooms Exposed For Connections During Installation Between Superslabs Topping Slab To Be Poured After Installation See Specifications

‘SuperSlab’ Single Span Axonometric

121


Core Studio II Bank

New York City

INVESTMENTOPIA: SPECTACLE AND RISK


The spectacle is capital accumulated to the point that it becomes image. -Guy Debord


A Double Agency

Market speculation can be fun for everyone: good for your health and for the environment: a veritable panacea for the malaise of everyday life and a welcome distraction. Investmentopia! perverts the logic of capital to produce a regulatory device, turning the bank into an info-tainment for the people. Simultaneously, it is integrated into an image cult(ure) of beauty sells a punitive regulation strategy back to the bank as a perk. Get fit and stay rich.

125


View From The South


Looking Up The Steps, To The Atm


Power Transmission

Air Handler Heat + Moisture Harvesting Vehicle Suspension Cable Uptake

Retractable Deployment Hatch

Secondary Gearing

Retracting Supply + Return Air Rigid Insulated Panel, Mirrored Interior Finish

Rigid Insulated Panel, Mirrored Interior Finish

Derailleur And Tensioner Two-way Mirror Hinged Glass Access Panel

Transfer Primary Gearing Insulated Structural Panel

Section 0ft

3ft

6ft

18ft 128


This system employs the core processes of investment banking to produce a spectacle for the benefit, and amusement, of an interested public. It de-mystifies the bank’s investment strategies and simultaneously limits its risk. An open public plaza and viewing area oriented towards viewing the spectacle of capitalism above, a cafÊ serving snacks and refreshments, and public bathrooms (the only truly shared space of unequivocal neutrality) serve the production and consumption of the spectacle.

Futures Futures 129

Futures Futures


+80ft

+ High Liquidity

+ Highly Leveraged

+20ft

+0ft Great Jones Elevation

Laf


The show is comprised of an active spatial matrix that visualizes the actual investment strategies of the bank and its relative liquidity and leveraging. This is realized through the use of pedal powered investment vehicles and the coupling of risk with consequent gear ratios, fueling both the building and the event. Thus, the vertical position within the event space indicates their risk and success ratio, which is informed by the actual condition of the pedaling banker, viewed through the two-way mirrored surfaces of the crystalline vehicles by the crowd gathered below, or on their way to the ATM.

Foreign Exchange Raw Materials Real Estate Bonds Stocks Options Futures

Lafayette Elevation


Development Drawings

132


Profit Inversion and Energy Production Punitive Regulation

Low Risk, High Liquidity High Energy Output: Maintains Suspension Sufficient Electrical Power

High Risk, Highly Leveraged Low Energy Output: Loss Of Suspension Lowered Position Dimmed Lighting

133


Great Jones

Lafayette

Lafayette Up

Up

Up

Up

Cafe

Up

Information/ Security

+0ft

Investor’s Elevator

Up

Public Toilets/Lobby Up Up

Custodian Command Center

Ground Level

134


Great Jones

Lafayette Up

Up

Up

Up

Reclined Viewing Areas

Seating, Typ. Up

Up

Trading Floor, Typ.

To Restrooms Lobby

Atm

s r

Up

Elevator

To Restrooms Lobby

Stair Core Up Reclined Viewing Areas

n r

+20ft

Stair Level 0ft 135

6ft

18ft

36ft


Great Jones

Lafayette Overhead Vehicle Suspension Cabling

Translucent Floors

Vehicle Suspension Cable Uptake

Flywheels And Power Distribution

Overhead Transmission Moveable Shade Screen

Servers

Air Pump/filter

Investment Vehicle

+80ft

Elevator

Dn Investor’s Lounge

Showers

Vehicle Docking Level 0ft

6ft

18ft

36ft 136


ent ors

And tion

ers

ator

ers

137


The spectacle is not a collection of images; rather, it is a social relationship between people that is mediated by images.

-Guy Debord

138


139


Food Research Institute

Core Studio I

Columbia’s Manhattanville Expansion

New York City

Public Food


North Elevation


The Vaulting Problem “During the last two millennia, each period has created its own form of vaulting interior space…each specific form of vaulting has almost become the symbol of its age… The hyper-paraboloid space frame offers a new starting point for the spatial imagination… its balance is always contained within itself and its hovering impression derives from its inner constitution.” -Sigfried Giedion Space, Time, and Architecture

Food research is beholden to the public: This is the primary organizational principle of the institute: the indispensability of public discourse and an open, accessible space for public inhabitation. The language of vaulting, historically rooted in New York City’s public spaces, is employed as a means to this end. From the flowing vaults and stairwells of Guastavino to the industrial language of the Riverside Viaduct, the curved line is found everywhere in the city and announces the intersecting spaces of institutional power and public resistance.


144


The design brief calls for 79,000 sq. ft. of programmed space. Elements of this program that can be considered public make up 33,000 sq ft, or 42% of the overall program allocation, while the single largest block of programming is dedicated to the laboratory. It is the public program that drives the formation of the building and requires that consideration be given to the surrounding neighborhood and its access to the food, ideas, and resources housed within the institution. The laboratories will be outfitted to engage with a wide array of agricultural strategies to better understand their strengths, weaknesses, and synergetic potentials. These include hydroponics, geoponics, and aquaponics. These synthetic systems can be implemented practically anywhere, however of particular importance to there execution is the supply of nutrients and water and the infrastructural control of energy. The structure of the building provides a secondary matrix of interstitial space that provides for just such a requirement (this is the space outside and in-between the intersecting spheroids). This experimental program will necessitate varied growth environments and laboratory space, as well as unscripted space for future experimentation. Many of these lab regions will necessitate environmental isolation for controlled experimentation, some including light, but others (most) will seek maximum sun exposure in the attempt to reduce inputs and make use of readily available energy. All cells with a southern exposure (primarily growth cells) are equipped with operable louvers, increasing the differentiated environmental control of each cellular environment.

145


Morphology: Having severed the peak of the vault and turned the body onto its side, the constitutional structural capacity is negated and the vault becomes an ornamental remnant, a form embellishing the new primary structure that is the tensile members. And yet, these members require the framework of the severed vault to remain aloft; they are an incomplete structure without it. This interdependency of systems straddles an unclear boundary between structure and ornament. The structural vault is abstracted and re-presented, yet still plays a real structural role in the newly derived, interdependent system: the occupiable ornament.

146


147


Cafe

Public Toilets

Seed Vault Reception

Lecture Hall

Ground Level

148


Teaching Kitchen Dining Hall

Meeting Spaces

Vault Access

Meeting Space

Classrooms

Level 1 n 0ft 149

10ft

30ft

60ft


East Elevation

150


The Institute will appropriate the Riverside Viaduct as productive agricultural land. This will provide an on-site, traditional agricultural reference point and baseline comparative standard for future food production experimentation as well as a new civic green space and the buildings physical connection will create a public, pedestrian circulation point midway along the viaduct.

151


152


153


154


155


After Briget Riley

Advanced Curtain Wall Bridget Riley: Rough Stripe Study, 1981


The project is conceived as a deceptive, fluctuating object, based on Bridet Riley’s Rough Stripe Study of 1981. At first glance, one will discern a smooth, discrete object protruding from the continuous street fronts. This smooth glass box is constituted by a grid of structurally glazed, insulated glass units, broken only by a colorful array of aluminum fins that visually form a multicolored plane floating just off the surface of the box. The glazing will receive both a reflective coating and a gridded fritting that serve to visually unify the building scale and the secondary unit scale. The interior experience of the façade is different during the day. The colored fins slice the views out into multiple vertical shafts, each colored differently by the light reflecting off the fins and spilling into the space creating a variegated color wheel across interior surfaces. What is understood as an object from the exterior becomes an activated interior interplay of color and void. The simplicity of the plane and the box dissolves at night and the relationships reverse. Interior light spills colorfully through the fins and the floor separations, barely distinguishable during the day, break the box into three horizontal bands. The object is dissolved, while the interior experience becomes solidified, the disrupting fins having no visual effect on the space.

158


159


5

A1

EQ.

EQ.

EQ.

4 12'-4"

EQ.

EQ.

C EQ.

EQ.

2'-0 5/8"

A1

A2

2'-2 1/2"

EQ.

2'-3"

2'-2 1/4"

160


7

F

2'-0 5/8"

F 6"

5 3/4" 1"

5"

9" 8 9

11 3" 2 1/2" 12

2 7/8"

13

1 5/8" 6 1/8"

E 14

Annotations 1. Painted aluminum panel 2. Cantilevered 1/4� aluminum parapet glazing unit support 3. Access hole in concrete parapet, to be infilled post curtain wall installation 4. Painted, fixed aluminum louver 5. 1/8� Aluminum channel with rigid insulation 6. Lapped joint for louver support arm, bolted in field with flush mount aluminum 7. Typical horizontal mullion 8. Weather seal 9. Air seal 10. Splice plate 11. Factory installed, louver stabilizing tab 12. Factory installed louver support arm connection 13. Integrated heating coil 14. C.I.P. concrete slab with 1� topping slab 15. Frit pattern 161

10 1" 5 1/2" E

4 1/2"


1

1

2

3 4 5 6

Annotations 1. Painted aluminum panel 2. Cantilevered 1/4� aluminum parapet glazing unit support 3. Access hole in concrete parapet, to be infilled post curtain wall installation 4. Painted, fixed aluminum louver 5. 1/8� Aluminum channel with rigid insulation 6. Lapped joint for louver support arm, bolted in field with flush mount aluminum 7. Typical horizontal mullion 8. Weather seal 9. Air seal 10. Splice plate 11. Factory installed, louver stabilizing tab 12. Factory installed louver support arm connection 13. Integrated heating coil 14. C.I.P. concrete slab with 1� topping slab 15. Frit pattern 162


15

7" 1" 4 3/8"

3/4" 3/8" 1/8" 1/4"

2 5/8" 1 5/16"

4 6"

163

6"

5" 1" 5/16"

9"


164


The curtain wall is organized into 12’- 4” floor to floor unitized system, with each 2’3” wide unit then broken down into a grid of individual, structurally glazed secondary units. The anodized aluminum mullions of each sub unit within the primary floor-to-floor units are mitered at their corners to create a visual separation of units and to express the grid on the both the interior and exterior. The mitering is accomplished by simply cutting back the thermally broken portion of the mullion, which maintains the structural continuity of the unit. This technique allows the ease of construction offered by unitization to be taken advantage of while dissolving the visual distinction of the primary units. These units of units are evenly distributed across the façade, the grid disrupted only by a minimal 2 - 7/8” gap at the stack joint to receive the support arms of the external, painted aluminum fins. The edge units are modified to wrap around this gap and contain it within the region of the fins, maintaining the continuity of the grid as it wraps the corners of the building. The primary units incorporate a factory installed support arm that is then field connected to the corollary support tab on the aluminum fins using a lap joint and flush mount bolts. The fins incorporate an extended stabilizing tab that inserts into the bottom of the corresponding upper fin providing a near seamless visual continuity for the fins, which run vertically across two full floors, plus 4’ extensions at their base and at the parapet. Along with the structural supports for the exterior fins, the stack joint accommodates the floor to floor tolerances of the system with a three axis adjustable slab anchor. It also incorporates a heating coil that runs the length of the façade. Thus, the myriad demands placed upon the system are concentrated in a single unit joint, allowing the rest of the system more freedom to perform visually, keeping the final design as closely dedicated to re-presenting Bridget Riley’s painting as built form as possible. The end result is a gridded, glass box behind a floating field of colored stripes.

165


Core Studio 1

Water Research Facility

East River, New York City

A VESSEL FOR ONE

166


Keel

Tether

167

Hydro-Kinetic Turbine

Paravane Mobilized data collection instrument


The vessels glow with a color linked to water quality, publicizing the information

A vessel for a solitary researcher. This research may take many forms: observation, data collection, poetic interpretation, tourism, etc. The vessel is defned by an octahedron of occupiable surfaces inscribed within the sphere, each quadrant providing a necessary component for the provisions of research: observation, data interpretation, resting, cooking, defecating, and entering. The desired quadrant is reached by manually rotating the vessel into position. Techno-utopia wrapped into a multidimensional claustrophobia: the illusion of control.

observation/qualitative research quad

feeding quad

toilet quad

entry quad

Plans

168


Resting Quad

Transparent Quad

Transparent Quad

Computing Nook

0ft 169

1ft

2ft

4ft

8ft


Bed

Door

Entry Quadrant

170


Hand Grip

Door

0ft 171

1ft

3ft

6ft


Privacy Screen

Hand Grip

Urine Diverting, Extrudable Composting Toilet

Methane Capture

Toilet Quadrant

172


Solid Waste Anaerobic Digester Urine Tank

0ft 173

1ft

3ft

6ft


Fold-Out Hot Plate and Seating

Hand Grip Methane Capture Delivered for Heating and Cooking

Feeding Quadrant

174


Computing Nook

Quantitative Research 0ft 175

1ft

3ft


Vacuum Seals

Door

Felted Surfaces Throughout

Bed

A Thin Layer of Water Maintains Buoyancy and Minimal Friction

Resting Quadrant With keel

176


R-6ft

Transparency

Retractable Shades

Electromagnetic Stabilizers

Ballast

Ballast

Hydro-Kinetic Turbine

Ballast

Qualitative Research With Keel 0ft 177

1ft

3ft

6ft


Architectural Drawing and Representation II Michael Young, critic

PAPER SPACE


180


Series I

181


Tilt. Pan. Roll. We draw with computers and simulated cameras. Model Space becomes cinematic space. The medium is still the message. Tilt. Pan. Roll. Snap. Series I of the Paper Space drawings explores representational techniques in the process of shifting from a consciouness of the object drawn to a consciousness of the mechanizisms employed in drawing. Pushing the digital apparatus until it breaks, the drawings seek the moment when the simulated camera sees too much, the moment that its machine vision blurs, when its eyes roll back in its head and the floors wrap across impossible space to meet the ceiling.

182


Series I

183


184


Series II

185


186


Screens deceive. Screens depend. Flickers too fast to follow. The second series in the Paper Space drawings explore the embodied experience of the screen. TIlt your head, change your position and contrast, brightness, hue, and saturation all shift. Series II explores ways to translate these digital phenomena into ink, paper and acetate.

Series II

187


Produced in Conjunction with the NYC DDC Town & Gown 2012-2013

Private Infrastructure


Knowing Cities New York City


from T&G 2012-2013: Michael Schissel, a graduate student working with the Spatial Information Design Lab, mapped the city’s utility road cut permit data from 2008 to 2012 to illustrate the intensity of utility cuts across the city over time, providing another lens for practitioners to consider policy, practice and design options based on intensity of activity by location. The data is visualized in two ways. The larger maps show the aggregate density of road cut permits issued over the available time range. The Permit Density map shows overlaid data for all permit types and recipients.

190


191


The Private | Public map filters the data to compare the distribution of permits received by government contract and with those received by private utility companies. The smaller, inset maps isolate areas of high intensity discovered through the density mapping. These enlarged areas visualize the data quantitatively for both street and intersection permit locations, as intersections tend to have higher collateral costs due to traffic disruption. The city’s current recursive collective action roadway paradigm creates negative externalities that can be translated quantitatively into costs that cannot otherwise be avoided. Some of these unavoidable costs, such as repeated roadway repairs and roadway reconstruction projects that cannot approach their technical useful lives, are financed at the municipal level by taxpayers. Other unavoidable costs, such as repeated repairs to and expansion of private utility infrastructure (both of which require digging into and repairing the roadway) and protecting existing utility infrastructure during the City’s roadway reconstruction projects, are financed by many of the same people or entities, but this time as utility ratepayers. The following infographic map, along with the legal investigations, provides the take-off point for the next action research set.

192


193


N

E W

Y O

R

K

S

T

E

A

M

14,827 ROA D-CU T P ERM IT S IS S U ED 2 0 0 8 -2 0 1 2

NYC DRINKING WATER

T Y P ES

74th St Station

CON-ED

Ravenswood Station, Queens

ST EA M ( 2 , 6 3 5 P ER M I T S) H I G H V O LT A G E M A N H O LE GAS COMMUNICATIONS

59th St Station

1,600,000 GALLONS PER HOUR PEAK

GOV’T (3,216 STEAM OVERLAPS) PAVING SEW ER S T R A F F I C LI G H T S T EST P I T S A N D B O R ES T R A N SI T T U N N EL R EH A B

POWER CABLE WATER ABANDONED

B OI L E R

STEAM

1 2 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 Lb s /h o u r G AS

H EAT BYPROD UC T RE-CAPTURE

GAS

CO-GENERATION – THERMODYNAMIC EFFICIENCY

East River Station TRANSIT

E L E CT R ICIT Y SEWER

FURN A C E

Contract Steam: Brooklyn Navy Yard

Legend

Gov’t Utility Overlap

Steam Related Permit Locations

Total Permits Issued

Consolidated Edison Largest Consumer of NYC Drinking Water

Generation Plants

1878 Steam Mains

0 .125 .25

.5

.75

Miles 1

¨

1890

“ . . . To d e l i v e r s a f e , r e l i a b l e , e ffi c -ConEd, Steam Long Rang

194


A

M Scale and Efficiency Central

105 Miles of Steam Mains 5 Generation Plants High Maintenance Lo w Se a s o n a l A d a p t a b i l i t y Interconnected Network 7 0 % -7 4 % Ef f i c i e n c y Lo w e r Em i s s i o n s Accounts for 6% of C o n -Ed O p e r a t i n g R e v e n u e

Distributed

vs 1,800 + Hydronic Boilers

Lo w M a i n t e n a n c e Se a s o n a l A d a p t a b i l i t y N o t N e t w o r ke d , I n c r e m e n t a l C h a n g e H i g h e r Em i s s i o n s 8 2 % Ef f i c i e n c y

E nd t o e n d e fficie ncy is d e fin e d a s t h e t ot a l a mou n t of e n e rgy u se d ( e le ct rica l a n d t h e rma l) by a cu st ome r d ivid e d by t h e t ot a l fu e l inpu t . *Con-e d

WER BLE TER

NED

1 Unit Water in = 1 Unit Condensate Out

GAS

W . I . S. O . R .

W e l d i n g a n d In s p e c t i o n St e a m O p e r a t i o n s R o b o t .

H o n e yb e e C o r p o r a t i o n i s contracted to design and construct a steam main repair and maintenance robot.

NSIT

Centralized Distribution Decentralized Recovery

WER

17 EXPLOSIONS SINCE 1989

1890

1914

e l i a b l e , e ffi c i e n t , c o m p e t i t i v e l y p r i c e d , a n d Long Range Plan, 2010

1930

1932.

Promotional Publication F i f t y y e a r s o f N e w Yo r k S t e a m S e r v i c e : T h e Story of the Founding and Development of A Public Utility

1937

1999

2007 2008

c l e a n e n e r g y t o c u s t o m e r s w h i l e p r o v i d i n g a f a i r r e t u r n t o s h a r e h o l d e r s .” SO URCE S: Con -E d , Ne w York Time s, Got ha m Ga ze t t e , “The Works” by K a t e Asche r, “Fift y Ye a rs of Ne w York St e a m Se rvice , ASHR AE

195


Economies, Development, and Mega Games Workshop . Summer 2013


The Capital of Rio Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Pop The Bubble


Built of reinforced concrete in 1980, the heavy, mass positive station consists of battered, solid concrete walls on the north and south ramping up to cast-in-place concrete roof beams. It is surrounded by a thin scattering of typical urban furniture and park amenities. Barbed wire abounds. The building itself opens only on the east and west ends, bifurcating the site along this axis. The north and south sides of the station are edged by large, sharp, uninviting stones, filling most of the few shaded areas of the site, and battered concrete walls giving the structure the feel of a bunker. This bifurcated organization extends outward from the site. The north edge meets Cidade Nova, a new development with multiple large scale corporate campuses and little commercial activity. Most notably, there is a new modular building that houses the International Olympic Committee headquarters. The modular building anticipates the temporary reality of Olympic development, sitting lightly on its site with the expectation that it will be deconstructed and moved upon the closing of the games. The south edge is lined with multiple small commercial enterprises: food markets, furniture stores, hardware stores, and street vendors.

New Metro

Cidade Nova New Olympic HQ

ses

sines

ll Bu

Sma

Morro S達o Carlos

0

100

200

Site Analysis

feet meters

400 m

2000

800

N

198


“We will use the building according to the Committee’s growth demands and, in the end, it will be possible to dismantle the structure, to reuse it elsewhere.” President of the Local Organizing Committee (LOC) for the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Carlos Arthur Nuzman. The Rio Times March 12, 2013 The UN indicates that housing prices have increased 165 percent over the past three years in Rio de Janeiro. In addition the rate at which average Rio property prices have risen over the past five years is four times greater than that at which average wages have gone up. The explosion of Rio’s real estate market can be attributed to various factors. A boom in the petroleum industry, Brazil’s emerging middle class hungry to buy property, lower interest rates on loans, and the prospect of hosting the FIFA World Cup and the Olympics in 2016 have increased demand and stoked up prices. The Rio Times April 30, 2013 “Brazilian Protests Concern Olympic committee” What began in Sao Paulo as a protest against transit fare hikes has become a widespread outpouring of anger and disgust over high taxes and corrupt politicians who are spending an estimated $30 billion on next year’s soccer World Cup and the Olympics at the expense of housing, health, and education. Boston Globe, June 25, 2013

New Olympic HQ affic n Tr

stria

ede

tP Ligh

Rio Prefeitura Partially Shaded Seating

Football Basketball

Shaded Seating

Amphitheatre Shade

Skate Park

H

0

199

25

50

feet meters

100 m

trian

edes

P eavy

ic Traff

700 200

N

Indicators


The physical capital of Estacio is formally repellent and defensive. The structure anticipates violence. This defensive strategy squanders the attempts to accumulate social capital through the expenditure of physical capital in the form of park amenities. The presence of the fortified municipal facility further alienates potential occupants. The station seems to say, “get in, get out; do not linger. Or better yet, just use the Cidade Nova station to the north, it is safer there anyway.â€? Recent evidence in nearby favelas indicate that the gentrification of the favelas is immanent and the dislocation of the residents a near certainty. EstĂĄcio is a few steps behind, due to its lack of ocean views and the undesirability of nearby amenities. Economic Capital = Physical Capital + Social Capital Reorganizing the physical capital present on the site and expending the social capital of the surrounding community will generate the necessary environment to attract new economic capital.

Diagnosis

200


201


Question Can the station’s physical capital be consumed and reorganized to force a fast paced gentrification of the sight and the surrounding low income neighbourhood, associating the metro station more closely with the glittering IOC to the north and cultivating the appearance of gentrification? Can this hyper-inflation of real estate valuation set the stage for an economic coup d’état – a sudden reversal of capital flow?

Thesis This strategy hinges on the temporary intensification of Olympic development and the anticipated deconstruction of the modular IOC building. The sudden abandonment by this anchor tenant will create the conditions necessary to re-direct the flow of capital accumulation to the south moments before the Olympic bubble (predictably) bursts. These machinations also rely on the social capital of a tight knit community to maintain the appearance of the typical processes of gentrification. By generating a speculative real estate bubble and exploiting the Olympic fervour to force a fast paced gentrification of the site, the historically disempowered community is placed in the advantageous position, able to exit the market at its highest point. If the bubble is anticipated, the flow of economic capital can be re-directed moments before it bursts, placing a maximized economic capital gain in the hands of communities overlooked and/or marginalized by Olympic development.

202


+$R

Municipality, Olympic Committee, Speculators

Media Attention

Ioc Removal

Int’l Real Estate Speculation

General Abandonment Station/site Renovations

Risk Oblivious Artists

+$R

Cafes

Bicycle Enthusiasts

Local Sell Off

Local Buy Back

Residents Of Estácio And Morro São Carlos

New Olympic HQ

Partially Shaded Seating

Amphitheatre Shade

Skate Park

0

203

25

50

feet meters

100 m

700 200

N

Stages


+ (machinations)

+

Accumulation is unidirectional. This direction always coincides with the location of existing capital. This directionality of capital flow relies on the knowledge-power of risk assessment and market prediction. Recent events in the global market have revealed that risk is frequently minimized by rigging the market. If the market can be rigged on a global scale, and it can certainly be rigged at the scale of a neighbourhood. There are only two ways to redirect the accumulation of capital towards existing capital: we can regulate the market from above, or we can rig it from behind. The fundamental problem in today’s world is that of unrelenting capital accumulation and the extraordinary asymmetries of money and political power that are embedded in that process... – David Harvey

Argument

204


1

2

3

4

5

6

$R

POP! SELL

vendemos!

7

8

9

1. Removal of Prefeitura, sports fields, and perimeter fence 2. Bisect site with pedestrian/bicycle path connecting towards Cidade Nova footbridge 3. Remove battered walls from station and support with piloti 4. Remove barbed wire from roof edge, maintain partial batter for roof access for graffiti 5. Appropriate playground equipment for a new sculpture park 6. Street markets, art festivals, etc. 7. Social Capital of a tight-knit community 8. An organized a sell off in the winter of 2015-2016 9. Deconstruction of the modular IOC HQ.

Elements

205


ESTOURA A BOLHA

Estação Estácio

CAPITAL OF RIO DE JANIEIRO’S BUILT FORM

A GAME ON URBAN RE-DENSIFICATION

GSAPP LATIN LAB SUMMER WORKSHOP | AUGUST 2013 | NEW YORK | RIO DE JANEIRO | SAO PAULO

INSTRUCTORS: ALEJANDRO DE CASTRO, FRANCISCO DÍAZ STUDENTS: LINGJUN BU, YIWEN CHEN, PEIQIN GU, LEAH GUSZOWSKY, HANNAH MARCUS, CALLIE NEW, MAYA PORATH, NATALIE QUINN, MICHAEL SCHISSEL, ALEJANDRO STEIN, MICAH STROUP, ZHEWU ZHUANG.


Urban Horticulture Workshop, Spring 2013 Project Team

Sissily Harrell, Andrew Maier III, Vahe Markosian Diego Rodriguez, Michael Schissel


GSAPP Lab for Applied Building Science Kymenlaakson University Of Applied Sciences, Kouvola, Finland

Crop Line


210


After spending several months developing our concept and testing prototypes in the GSAPP LABS, we set out for Finland. In 5 days we fabricated a working proof-ofconcept, full scale model of our project. The driving idea behind the Crop Line was the desire to utilize the unused, or previously unusable, spaces in the urban fabric to grow food, while still creating a means to access the individual plants efficiently. The Crop Line distributes a crop throughout the space above the city streets. It can wrap around corners, jump between buildings, or go just about anywhere, but the plants will always come back to you, the urban farmer, on the circuitous path pulley system.

211


212


213


Urban Planning Studio Gut Renovation . Summer 2012 Project Team

Nathan Carter and Mark Taylor, directors Eileen Chen, Jacob Esocoff, Michelle Ku, Andrew Maier III, Zack Mauer, Michelle Mortenson, Arkadiusz Piegdon, Maya Porath, Michael Schissel


Lab for Applied Building Science GSAPP, New York City

Construction


216


217

m. schissel 2011-2014  

m. arch gsapp

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you