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MINNESOTA SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIATION

November-December 2012

Volume 65, No. 3

Top Performing Boards Know the Importance of Trust Times of Turnover: How do you deal with a rebooted board? Want achievement? Get active!

92nd Annual Leadership Conference BUILDING EXTRAORDINARY LEADERS,

BUILDING TRUST January 17–18, 2013


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CONTENTS NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 VOLUME 65, NUMBER 3

Calendar N OV E M B E R 2 0 1 2

Divisions 4 5 6 32 35

QUOTES OF NOTE MSBA Staff

STRAIGHT TALK Bob Meeks, MSBA Executive Director PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Kent Thiesse, MSBA President VENDOR DIRECTORY Pierre Productions & Promotions, Inc. ASK MSBA Kirk Schneidawind

Articles 8 12 16 20 24

TOP PERFORMING BOARDS KNOW THE IMPORTANCE OF TRUST Greg Abbott TIMES OF TURNOVER Bruce Lombard WANT ACHIEVEMENT? GET ACTIVE! Greg Abbott A DIFFERENT VIEW Deron Stender 2013 MSBA LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE MSBA Staff

The MSBA Journal thanks the students of Ogilvie Public Schools for sharing their art in this issue.

1–2 .........MASBO Fall Conference 4 .............Daylight Saving Time Ends 6 .............Election Day (no meetings or activities 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.) 8 .............MSBA Board of Directors’ Meeting 11 ...........Veterans Day (no meetings) 11–17 .....American Education Week 12 ...........Veterans Day Observed (no meetings) 13 ...........BoardBook Webinar 14 ...........Minnesota School District Liquid Asset Fund Plus Annual Meeting 14–15 .....MSBA Pre-Delegate Assembly Meetings 17 ...........MSBA Pre-Delegate Assembly Meetings 22 ...........Thanksgiving Day (no meetings) 23 ...........Optional Holiday

DECEMBER 2012 4 .............MSBA New Board Member Orientation Phase I (Marshall & Staples) 5 .............MSBA New Board Member Orientation Phase I (Thief River Falls) 6 .............MSBA New Board Member Orientation Phase I (Rochester & Virginia) 7 .............MSBA Board of Directors’ Meeting 7 .............MSBA Insurance Trust Meeting 7–8 .........MSBA Delegate Assembly 11 ...........BoardBook Webinar 11 ...........MSBA New Board Member Orientation Phase I (St. Peter) 14 ...........MSBA New Board Member Orientation Phase I (St. Cloud) 15 ...........MSBA Phase II Orientation (St. Cloud) 25 ...........Christmas Day (no meetings)

J A N U A RY 2 0 1 3 1 .............New Year’s Day (no meetings) 7 .............Terms Begin for Newly Elected Board Members 8 .............BoardBook Webinar 15 ...........MSBA New Board Member Orientation Phase I (Minneapolis) 16 ...........Charter School Training (Minneapolis) 16 ...........MSBA Phase II Orientation (Minneapolis) 16 ...........MSBA Board of Directors’ Meeting 16 ...........Early Bird Workshops 17–18 .....MSBA Leadership Conference 18 ...........MSBA Board of Directors’ Meeting 21 ...........Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday Observed (no meetings)

COVER ART:

Jordana Yotter

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OFFICERS President: Kent Thiesse, Lake Crystal Wellcome Memorial President-Elect: Walter Hautala, Mesabi East DISTRICT DIRECTORS District 1: Kathy Green, Austin District 2: Jodi Sapp, Mankato Area District 3: Linden Olson, Worthington District 4: Betsy Anderson, Hopkins District 5: Marilynn Forsberg, Spring Lake Park District 6: Kevin Donovan, Mahtomedi District 7: Roz Peterson, Lakeville Area District 8: Elona Street-Stewart, St. Paul District 9: Karen Kirschner, Mora District 10: Dana Laine, Frazee-Vergas District 11: Tim Riordan, Virginia District 12: Ann Long Voelkner, Bemidji Area District 13: Deb Pauly, Jordan STAFF Bob Meeks: Executive Director Barbara Lynn: Executive Assistant/Director of Board Operations Kirk Schneidawind: Deputy Executive Director John Sylvester: Deputy Executive Director Tiffany Rodning: Deputy Executive Director Greg Abbott: Director of Communications Denise Drill: Director of Financial/MSBAIT Services Amy Fullenkamp-Taylor: Associate Director of Management Services Sandy Gundlach: Director of School Board Services Donn Jenson: Computer and Information Systems Manager Bill Kautt: Associate Director of Management Services Grace Keliher: Director of Governmental Relations Katie Klanderud: Director of Board Development Gary Lee: Associate Director of Management Services Bruce Lombard: Associate Director of Communications Bob Lowe: Director of Management Services Kelly Martell: Director of Technology Cathy Miller: Director of Legal and Policy Services Erica Nelson: MSBA Advertising The MSBA Journal (USPS 352-220) is published bimonthly by the Minnesota School Boards Association, 1900 West Jefferson Avenue, St. Peter, Minnesota 56082. Telephone 507-934-2450. Call MSBA office for subscription rates. (Opinions expressed in the Journal are those of the writers and do not necessarily represent MSBA policy.)

Quotes of Note captures some of the more interesting statements MSBA staff have read in local, state and national publications.

Tough budget cuts

On rigor

“There’s no right way to do a wrong thing. All of these cuts are wrong for quality education, but they are necessary given the finances.”

“Rigor is not how hard the course is, but how hard a student is willing to work to learn.”

Tom Casper, Faribault School Board Member

Mandated testing

Validating volunteers “I just want to say thank you to (our) volunteers. We have some volunteers coming back for 10, 15, 20 years, and the retirees especially in our community who want to give back, and it helps close the divide between the school children and the older generation in our community. We greatly appreciate all the hard work of them.” Steve Razidlo, Brainerd Superintendent

New administrator for school trust lands “As the trustee for school trust lands, it’s the (Department of Natural Resources’) fiduciary duty to find best uses for the lands to benefit the Permanent School Trust Fund. Aaron Vande Linde’s job will be to bring best business practices, central oversight and better coordination of DNR’s management of these lands.” Tom Landwehr, DNR Commissioner

Kim Stokes, Virginia School Board Member

“Each year we are asked to do more and more testing, and it’s an unfunded mandate. Consequently, our computer labs are full all the time with mandated testing, so we spend all these millions of dollars, literally, on computers that can only be used at certain times for testing. . . . Testing (students) every single year multiple times is not a good use of our time. We only have a finite amount of time with these children and if we spend all of it, or an increasing percentage of it testing, that’s not a wise thing to do. Children don’t learn by being tested continually; they learn by being educated.” Robert Slotterback, Richfield Superintendent

Bullying policies “Policies for schools to stem bullying need to have stronger discipline options allowing schools to address bullying. Replacing existing weak statutes with stronger language related to discipline (should be put into place).” Nordy Nelson, International Falls Superintendent

“It’s a critical issue. There are so many areas now with cyberbullying and bullying inside and outside of school—we have to take that very seriously.” Jerry Struss, South Koochiching-Rainy River Superintendent

The concept of ‘zero tolerence’ is made very, very clear. As a school district, we pride ourselves on the ability to continue to provide a safe and secure learning environment for everyone.” Fred Seybert, Littlefork-Big Falls Superintendent

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STRAIGHT TALK

SURVEY EXAMINES BOARD MEMBERS AND LEADERSHIP

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Over the course of this year, MSBA and the Center for Engaged Leadership at Minnesota State University, Mankato, have been collaborating on a study concerning Minnesota school board members and leadership. The study’s primary purpose is to gain a better understanding of how school board members view their role, responsibilities and work as a board member.

Bob Meeks MSBA Executive Director

If MSBA can provide our membership with more effective training and support, you will be better equipped to handle your top priority— ensuring our students receive the best possible education.

MSBA and MSU conducted a focus group with 10 school board members in August during the 2012 MSBA Summer Seminar at the Marriott Minneapolis Northwest hotel in Brooklyn Park. During this one-hour meeting, board members shared their experiences serving on school boards, explaining how they defined their work and where they saw their work as school board members intersecting with student achievement. This focus group discussion later led to the creation of a 30-question survey that was sent to MSBA’s membership in October via SurveyMonkey.com. The results of this board member survey will be released at a workshop during the upcoming MSBA Leadership Conference. The Leadership Conference is scheduled for January 17–18, 2013, at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

MSBA officials were approached by MSU’s Center of Engaged Leadership for the board member study this past spring. MSU’s Center for Engaged Leadership works to develop effective educational leaders by bridging the gap between research and practice. The center utilizes on-site, customized programs to give administrators the opportunity to work collaboratively as they develop and enhance their leadership skills, which leads to improved teacher performance and a learning culture focused on student success. What good will this survey do for Minnesota’s public school board members? Hopefully the results will provide insight to how MSBA can better provide training and support to school board members. If MSBA can provide our membership with more effective training and support, you will be better equipped to handle your top priority—ensuring our students receive the best possible education. Thank you to all of the members who participated in this survey. Please visit the MSBA website at www.mnmsba.org and check future editions of the Boardcaster for information about the Leadership Conference in January. We encourage your entire board and superintendent to attend. The MSBA Board and staff look forward to seeing you there.

MSBA’s Director of Board Development Katie Klanderud, along with MSU staff, will also present the survey’s findings at the National School Boards Association Leadership Conference in April at the San Diego Convention Center. Last year, MSU worked with the Minnesota Association of School Administrators on a survey regarding superintendents and leadership.

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PRESIDENT’S COLUMN “PARTING SHOTS” AS MSBA PRESIDENT

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It’s hard to believe that nearly two years have passed since I assumed the role of MSBA president in January 2011, and that I am now preparing my final MSBA Journal President’s Column. My two years as MSBA president have been interesting, rewarding, enjoyable and, at times, challenging. My greatest enjoyment has been the many school board members, superintendents and other school leaders that I have had a chance to meet and interact with.

Kent Thiesse MSBA President

My two years as MSBA president have been interesting, rewarding, enjoyable and, at times, challenging. My greatest enjoyment has been the many school board members, superintendents and other school leaders that I have had a chance to meet and interact with. 6

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As I complete my two-year term as MSBA president, here are some highlights from the two years and some opportunities that I see for MSBA: Legislative advocacy efforts at both the state and federal level are extremely important to public school districts. MSBA continues to be a strong voice at the state Legislature on issues that are critical toward enhancing public education. Efforts to repeal the January 15 school district penalty for failed teacher contract negotiations, more flexibility in use of staff development dollars and future access to revenues from school state trust fund lands were all results of MSBA advocacy efforts. Lobbying efforts at the federal level related to the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), fully funding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and making improvements in No Child Left Behind (NCLB) regulations are all very critical to public school districts. Continued efforts to provide adequate funding resources from both state and federal sources remain extremely important toward reaching our goals of enhanced student achievement. The MSBA Delegate Assembly process is a unique effort to develop the policy positions that MSBA represents on behalf of school board members and public school districts. These policy positions originate through a “grassroots” process that culminates with a statewide Delegate Assembly gathering of school board members from throughout the state on an annual basis to finalize MSBA’s policy positions on the “Pink Sheets.” This document guides MSBA’s Governmental Relations staff in their lobbying efforts at

the state Legislature and with state administration. Continuing to strengthen MSBA’s grassroots efforts will likely give MSBA an even stronger voice on educational issues in the future. MSBA is an “educational voice” for public school districts across the state. Sometimes this role involves participation in legal actions affecting local school districts, working with the Minnesota Department of Education on effectively implementing or interpreting new legislation, or serving on special committees — such as the teacher or principal evaluation statewide task forces. MSBA has also been a leader in collaboration efforts with other local units of governments, and has participated in regular meetings with the Association of Minnesota Counties, the League of Minnesota Cities, and more recently, the Minnesota Association of Townships. MSBA offers school board members training and education programs that are second to none. It starts with the Phase I, II, III, and IV training sessions, continues with specialized training for board development and negotiations, and includes numerous educational opportunities at the annual Leadership Conference and Summer Seminar. Effective school board members utilize these offerings to enhance their work as educational leaders in their school district and community. The MSBA Board has made several important decisions in recent years to hire high-quality staff to allow for a “seamless” transition as long-term MSBA staff members retire, in order to maintain highquality programs and continue timely educational information for school board members and school districts. MSBA is fortunate to have a 15-member Board of Directors that is highly committed to strengthening MSBA as an organization, and toward enhancing efforts to support school board members and school districts across the state. In closing, thanks to the MSBA Board and staff, and to all MSBA members, for your support and cooperation during the past two years to enhance public education in Minnesota and to give our kids greater opportunities! Please support Walt Hautala of the Mesabi East School District, as he assumes the role of MSBA president in January 2013.


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Top Performing Boards Know the Importance of Trust

Alexandra Edstrom

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For David Horsager, most issues come down to a matter of trust.

And in the business of education—or any business—a lack of trust can cost you time, stress and money.

Greg Abbott

“If you don’t think trust affects your bottom line, just ask Tiger Woods,” said Horsager. “A breach of trust cost him millions of dollars in just a matter of weeks. Penn State will lose a billion because of a breach of trust by one man.” Horsager, a Verndale native, will be the featured speaker at MSBA’s Leadership Conference January 17–18 in Minneapolis. He said that school boards, though focused on student achievement, also have to be bottom-line oriented because the budget can become a big issue.

“But if you bring your trust level up, efficiency improves and costs go down. A lack of trust could be a school district’s biggest expense,” he said.

David Horsager

It took a lot of research for Horsager to find the conclusion. During his graduate research, he focused on qualities of some of the top business CEOs. The more he read about these highly regarded people, the more the pattern started to develop. That’s when he found there were eight pillars of trust that these leaders all had—clarity, compassion, character, competency, commitment, connection, contribution and consistency. “There was much written about what destroys trust,” Horsager said. “But there wasn’t much written about how you build trust.”

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And what he found was that a good leader—and a good board—needed every single one of those eight pillars to build trust. Trust starts, he said, with each individual. Each person on a school board has to develop those skills, mainly by taking advantage of training offered by their associations.

“They’re now stronger than they were before. BP is still a viable brand because they communicated, showed compassion and followed through on their commitments. And if it can happen there, it can happen with any school board.”

“I hear some poorly performing boards talking about how they can save money by cutting their training budget or not going to conferences,” Horsager said. “What I tell them is that board members have to commit to going to conferences, learning from others, finding ways to make themselves better. The value of that training comes back 10 times. You know why? Because boards who lack training are boards with poor leadership. And poor leadership can severely damage your budget.”

What a board doesn’t want to do is what happens most of the time at the federal government level—with politicians blaming others for problems instead of offering solutions or owning up to the problem.

A successful board starts with personal improvement and a commitment to build trust among all stakeholders, he said. But what if your board has lost that trust? What if you are on a board where the community no longer trusts your decisions and 3-3 votes or 4-3 votes are becoming the norm? “I have a lot of hope in people, and I have seen people rebuild trust. It’s not easy, but it can be done,” he Tavia Holland said. “Start with an apology and bring some solutions that everyone on the board can commit to doing.” On a macro scale, Horsager points to British Petroleum and the biggest man-made disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. The company apologized, fixed the leak, held people responsible who played a role in the disaster and made commitment after commitment that the company has kept to make up for the spill.

“You can’t blame others and gain trust. It doesn’t work that way,” Horsager said. His example is when his father, a farmer in the Verndale area, bought a new John Deere tractor, and it had a problem. The implement dealer could easily have blamed the corporate headquarters. “But the implement dealer fixed it,” he said. “Didn’t matter whose fault it was. They sold a product to my father. They took responsibility for the problem and fixed it. That attitude builds trust.” Horsager will talk in detail about the Eight Pillars of Trust at the MSBA Leadership Conference—in depth on four pillars during the Thursday opening keynote and the remaining four pillars during the closing session on Friday. Look for a second article on Horsager’s Eight Pillars in the January-February Journal magazine that will double as the Leadership Conference program. Greg Abbott is the Communications Director for the Minnesota School Boards Association. To comment on the article, e-mail gabbott@mnmsba.org.

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TIMES OF TURNOVER How do you deal with a rebooted board? Rena Usai

Board Member Terms The chart below shows how many terms current Minnesota school board members have served.

Two terms: 25 percent One term: 49.2 percent

Three terms: 13 percent

More than four terms: 6 percent

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Four terms: 5.7 percent

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What happens when an election turns over your school board by more than half? How do you integrate the newly elected—and sometimes very green—school board members to keep your district running smoothly?

Bruce Lombard

Recent research compiled by MSBA Director of Communications Greg Abbott has shown that turnover is abundant among Minnesota school boards, with most members being either first- or second-termers.

Abbott found that nearly half (49 percent) of all Minnesota public school board members are firstterm board members. Seventy-five percent of current members are either in their first or second term. The longtime, multiple-term board member appears to be a rarity nowadays. Only 13 percent of board members are in their third term, 5.7 percent in their fourth term and 6 percent are serving more than four terms. Abbott said that some have moved on because of jobs, but there are also a share of members who ran for the board to help students, only to find their main job was to slash thousands of dollars from the budget.


on his 21st year and board chair Rachel Grieger is on year 20. Jill Carlson is the “junior member” of the board with two years under her belt. Cameron took the helm at New York Mills 10 years ago and said he’s enjoyed having a consistent school board. “Continuity is important to the board members and the community,” he said. “We’ve had excellent board members here.” While New York Mills is guaranteed four new board members, the Hutchinson School Board could possibly have that many if the voting results fare well for the nonincumbent candidates. Hutchinson has five seats up for election for its six-member school board. Though anything can happen in an election at any level of government (e.g., Reform Party candidate Jesse Ventura “shocking the world” with his Minnesota gubernatorial election victory in 1998), Hutchinson is probably unlikely to have any radical changes due to having four incumbents in the race. Two incumbents, chair Keith Kamrath and Jim Waldron, are running against three newcomers for three open seats in the general election.

“Being a board member is an important job, and it’s very complex,” Abbott said. “It takes time, a lot of effort and a mindset to get the training that will help make the person a better board member. It’s a huge responsibility.” Board turnover is something the New York Mills School District and its seven-member school board will face following the November 2012 election. Four current New York Mills School Board members opted to not file for re-election, leaving the door open for four newcomers. “You hate to see that many people leave the board at one time,” said New York Mills Superintendent Todd Cameron. “We have a very veteran school board. If you look at the number of years that people have served on the board, it’s way off the charts compared to the average board. They have probably served double the average tenure in Minnesota.” Cameron is not exaggerating. The four outgoing board members have a combined 50 years of experience among them. Tim Kupfer and Dan Welter both served for 16 years. John Peeters and Josie Hendrickx gave 12 years and six years of their time, respectively. However, the district is still in good hands. The remaining three members—who are not up for election this year— have compiled nearly 50 years of service. Chuck Jacobson is

Waldron said helping students fueled him to re-file. “Our district has a terrific superintendent and a very fine administrative staff,” he said. “As a result, we are very engaged in wanting the students to not only excel in the classroom, but also become outstanding citizens. Our entire staff puts students first and that is what makes me want to continue for another term.” The other two incumbents, Byron Bettenhausen and Don Martinez, are running against one newcomer for two seats in a special election. This special election will fill vacancies for terms that will end January 1, 2015. Bettenhausen and Martinez were appointed, in April 2011 and February 2012, respectively, to fill the spots that were originally held by Tim Kerkvliet and Mike McGraw, who both left the board before their terms were up due to personal reasons. Josh Gehlen began his first term in January 2011 and is the only Hutchinson Board member not up for election this cycle. Gehlen said his time on the board thus far has been a very rewarding learning experience. Why is he staying on? He said he has more to learn and more to accomplish. “I've enjoyed learning about the various aspects of the educational system, from finance to curriculum to employee contracts and numerous other elements,” he said. “I know I still have a lot to learn, but feel like I’m at least starting to get the hang of it. The most rewarding aspect is doing our part to help shape the educational system for our current and future generations of students. . . . I appreciate the opportunity to serve and look forward to continuing to

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work with our administrators, teachers and staff to do everything we can to provide the best education we can to the students of our school district.”

Times of Turnover

Working with a new-look board Cameron said working with four new board members in New York Mills will be a challenge. However, having two members each with 20-plus years on board allows him to have a positive outlook on this situation. “We’ve got some great mentors,” Cameron said. “I think anytime you can mix experience with new, and people come in open-minded and willing to learn from the veterans, and the veterans learn from the newbies, it can be a good mixture and a healthy atmosphere.” Along with having his remaining veteran members serve as mentors, Cameron is also counting on MSBA training for help. Cameron recommends MSBA training for not only his board, but all new board members elected in November. “I have always attended MSBA’s Phase I, Phase II and Phase III training with my board members,” he said. “I felt that has always been important.” Cameron also cites communication as a key aspect to building a new team. “You find ways of communicating and see what works best with them,” he said. “You think about it, as a superintendent, with new board members coming in, you just want to make sure that you’re asking them about their needs and yet at the same time you’re continuing to provide them with the trainings and the updates of what’s happening and what’s going on in education.” Cameron is optimistic about the quality of the five new board candidates that filed for the four open seats. “I think that when you are in a positive community that has supported education like the city of New York Mills has, I suspect we’re going to have positive people that come in and apply,” he said. Cameron said his four outgoing members made their “we’re not running again” announcements earlier than normal so any interested community members wouldn’t be discouraged from running against a seasoned veteran. “People may not want to run against someone that’s been on the board for 10 years or more,” he said. Hutchinson Superintendent Daron VanderHeiden was asked how he and the district would handle

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having potentially four new board members if the newcomers fare well enough in the November election. VanderHeiden said any massive turnover would probably slow down the district’s momentum. “It would certainly add some difficulty, especially due to the stability that we’ve had on the board and the relationship that we’ve had, and the way the current board operates,” VanderHeiden said. “Things have gone very well with them, even our two new members. Keith Kamrath is on his 12th year of the school board and has been the chair for a number of years. To lose him and his leadership would be very difficult.” Gehlen seconded those concerns, yet held some optimism as well. “It would definitely be a challenge to replace all of the institutional knowledge and experience of the current board members, some of whom have served multiple terms,” he said. “That being said, we are very fortunate in Hutchinson that we have numerous individuals that have the intelligence, passion and capacity to step in and get right up to speed on the workings of the school board. In addition, our great team of administrators, teachers and staff would be there to also lend a hand in getting new members acquainted with the various elements of our school system.” Like his counterpart at New York Mills, Superintendent VanderHeiden said he would lean on MSBA to help with training—along with providing his own orientation to get his new board member up to speed. “I would end up spending a great deal of time in education and data, and making sure they were on board with each area of operation—similar to what I do now with new members,” VanderHeiden said. “We go through facilities, budget and finance, special education and curriculum and instruction. For each one of those areas, I would have to dedicate a great deal of time with each one of them or as a group.” Six years into his tenure at Hutchinson, VanderHeiden said he and his district have benefitted from the luxury of having good and stable school boards. VanderHeiden has dealt with breaking in new board members in the past when he worked with his first school board, because they were new to him. “One of the things I did initially (with his first school board) was that I spent a good deal of time with them as a group as much as I could, especially in workshop settings,” he said. “I also spent a lot of time in committee work with them, just building relationships and getting to know them. I would have to do a lot more of that with each one of (the new board members at Hutchinson).”


Why are board members leaving? Burnout has likely shortened the longevity of many board members. The Minneapolis School Board is just one example. MinnPost.com reported that Minneapolis School Board member Carla Bates is now the senior member on her board—and she had only been elected in 2008. Three of Bates’ former board-mates—Pam Costain, Tom Madden and Chris Stewart—all resigned from the board in 2010. According to a Minnesota Public Radio story, Madden said he was “burned out” and felt the financial compensation for board work was too low. Costain said she was exhausted by the “culture of negativity” swirling around the district and public education. Internet search-engine queries can lead to many stories of board members nationwide resigning early or not rerunning for several reasons. According to Cameron, there is nothing complicated behind the mini exodus from the New York Mills School Board. Cameron says simply: “They’ve served their time.” “They said the time is right,” he said. “The school board has been extremely solid and there are no big issues going on in the district.” The New York Mills Board helped pass referenda in 2010 and 2011 and worked together to accomplish other goals. Cameron is undoubtedly hoping for similar results from his upcoming freshman board members. “They need to come in with an open mind and not come in with a one-and-done agenda,” Cameron said, in reference to the “one-issue candidates” that sometimes plague school boards across the country. Cameron said a board member with an open mind is extremely important for public education. “That old corny statement about ‘kids first’ does work. That’s our business.” Julie Ashbaugh is the only Hutchinson incumbent opting not to run. The decision to not run was not an easy one for Ashbaugh. “Hutchinson has an excellent, well-functioning board that I have been happy to be a part of,” she said. “I am recently divorced and have four children and a full-time job. I have found committee and board meetings difficult to attend. I do not feel like I can give enough to the position, although my colleagues have been very understanding.”

Cody Bixby

VanderHeiden said the two former Hutchinson Board members who resigned (necessitating the BettenhausenMartinez board appointments and the November 2012 special election) did so, like Ashbaugh, with some reluctance. VanderHeiden said one board member—who was very engaged in his board work—retired because of his job. The other member had family issues. VanderHeiden said neither resignation was due to board burnout. Cameron said his board and district are going to be fine when the smoke clears.

She said the school district will be in good hands and that she might make another run at the board someday.

“I think we’ve really built a solid foundation here. I don’t see (the board turnover) being a major issue,” he said.

“The district has seven people running for five available seats, and I am confident it will continue to be strong and vibrant under the leadership the voters will select,” she said. “I will miss being on the board, and have not ruled out running again someday.”

Bruce Lombard is the Associate Director of Communications at the Minnesota School Boards Association. You can reach him at blombard@mnmsba.org.

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WANT ACHIEVEMENT?

GET ACTIVE! Michael Kuczala will present his message at MSBA Leadership Conference session Randi LaBeau

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Michael Kuczala has seen way too many classrooms with the stereotypical “all kids must sit still” while the teacher lectures.

Michael Kuczala

The blood settles. The yawns begin. Students begin looking for distractions. Doodling. Wondering how many people “liked” the new profile photo put on the Facebook page.

Greg Abbott

And when test scores come out, there’s the administrative headscratching about why students aren’t learning.

Kuczala has one message he’s trying to get to school boards: Activity increases learning, and it’s up to board members to advocate for physical fitness and the incorporation of movement in class.

Kuczala is the director of instruction for the Regional Training Center, an educational consulting firm in Randolph, N.J. He is also co-author of The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning Through Movement.

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His philosophy has two parts: physical fitness and having some sort of movement in the classroom. “Kids who are fit do better academically. That case is pretty much closed,” said Kuczala, who is leading the MSBA Early Bird session Wednesday, January 16, for the 2013 MSBA Leadership Conference. “The research on a million kids in Texas showed the same conclusion. Another study of a million kids in California showed the same thing.” An interesting study by Charles Hillman at the University of Illinois went a step further to look at a student’s brain in the few hours after aerobic activity ends. “Hillman found that the brain was geared better toward learning,” he said. And this is where board members and superintendents come in because some districts have set up schedules so the most difficult classes follow physical education. Want kids to do better in English and math? Put them in a phy ed class right before.

movement in the classroom. He also wants to show how important physical education classes are in the school day— especially when many boards are facing budget cuts and have made phy ed one of the first cuts. So if people register for his Wednesday workshop, they should come prepared for a little activity. “We’re going to model the activity in a classroom. And show how the adjustments to be made are low-cost,” he said. “Just a couple minutes of activity in each class can go a long way in helping with retention, review and learning.” Greg Abbott is the director of communications for the Minnesota School Boards Association. To comment on the article, e-mail gabbott@mnmsba.org.

“Aerobic activity does things to the brain—mainly neurogenesis, or developing new brain cells and increasing cell regeneration. It also raises pools of protein that enhances learning.” The second part of activity happens in the classroom. Kuczala will go over a six-part framework that helps students prepare to learn using brain breaks, exercise, class cohesion, reviewing content and teaching content. Using movement thoughtfully enhances attention, retention and motivation. “We talk to teachers about supporting exercise and fitness with exercises that take 1 to 5 minutes. They can use exercise activities for brain breaks and to role model for life,” he said. “It’s not about taking over your classroom with movement—it’s just being aware of it.” For board members, he wants to make them aware of the research so they can be advocates to having

Tyler DeForrest

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

17


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A DIFFERENT VIEW Perceptions of the four-day school week on district budgets and student achievement

Adrianna Ripka

Deron Stender

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A

Across the nation, school districts are embattled with implementing a school calendar that improves student achievement. The famous statement made by Oliver Hazard Perry during the War of 1812 eloquently describes the issue of time that school districts face in developing a school calendar that positively impacts student achievement. Oliver said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have met the enemy, and they are [h]ours.â&#x20AC;? With a struggling economy, school officials are seeking alternatives that can result in reducing expenditures that do not put student achievement at risk (Griffith, 2011). A growing number of school districts across the nation and state are looking at the four-day school week as a budget-balancing option to safeguard classrooms and


student achievement (Sagness & Salzman, 1993). There are currently 11 public schools in Minnesota taking advantage of the alternative calendar and operating with a four-day week (Minnesota Department of Education, February 2012). The four-day school week is an option that allows school districts to complete seat-based hours of instruction in fewer calendar days, while reducing expenditures. The debate surrounding the four-day school week centers on the impact this cost saving measure has on student achievement. It was noted, in a report conducted by the Colorado Department of Education, “Any attempt to provide a definitive response faces the difficulty in statistically controlling all the variables involved. If student performance is judged by satisfaction, then the results are very favorable.” Perceptually, the four-day school week has a positive impact on student achievement, but beyond perceptions, data and research are limited in measuring and proving it (Sagness & Salzman, 1993). I conducted a mini-study on the perceived impact of the four-day school week on districts’ budgets, student achievement, instruction, discipline, attendance, and parental involvement. A survey was administered to randomly selected licensed staff districtwide at a rural Minnesota school district. The results of the survey are similar to the results indicated in research. The results for the Minnesota school district are as follows: •

61.6 percent of licensed staff agreed that the fourday week has had a positive impact on student achievement—15.4 percent were undecided.

69.3 percent of licensed staff agreed that the fourday week has improved instruction—15.4 percent were undecided.

46.2 percent of licensed staff agreed that the fourday week has improved classroom discipline—38.5 percent were undecided.

76.9 percent of licensed staff agreed that the fourday week has increased student attendance—15.4 percent were undecided.

30.8 percent of licensed staff agreed that the fourday week has had a positive impact on parental involvement—46.2 percent were undecided.

76.9 percent of licensed staff would recommend the four-day week to other districts.

The findings of a study (Sagness & Salzman, 1993) conducted at the Shelley School District—a suburban school system in southeastern Idaho—are consistent with other studies and demonstrated student achievement remains the same or greater than that of other school calendars, including the traditional agrarian calendar. It noted that the

classroom observations indicated high levels of student ontask behaviors. The study revealed fewer disruptions in instructional time and greater student engagement. Absenteeism of students, teachers, and staff decreased during the four-day week. In this particular study, the district experienced an estimated decrease of 1.6 percent in expenditures. As school districts continue to look at school calendars to improve student achievement and reduce expenditures, it is important to understand the contributions of research. This research and data can be used in professional discussions and evaluations of the four-day school week. Sometimes perception is reality. Deron Stender is the superintendent at Virginia Public Schools. Sources Griffith, M. “What Savings are Produced by Moving to a FourDay School Week?” (2011) Sagness, R. L., & Salzman, S. A. “Evaluation of the Four-Day School Week in Idaho Suburban Schools.” (1993)

Kristina Josul

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

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Successful students are tied to successful leaders in their schools. We offer school board leaders an opportunity to learn together and to strengthen skills as a board team, working with your superintendent to boost achievement.

Building Extraordinary Leaders,

BUILDING TRUST

MSBA’s 92nd Annual Leadership Conference is full of information and inspiration to help school leaders focus on how to provide the best education your board can offer to students. Whether it is learning through workshops, gathering inspiration from the keynote speakers or finding new ideas from connecting with other board members around the state, you will come away with the knowledge and motivation to show that your district can earn the trust of your community to make their children succeed.

Keynote Speaker David Horsager, Horsager Leadership Thursday, Jan. 17-18

The Trust Edge: 8 Pillars to Build an Extraordinary Leader Trust is defined by David Horsager as a confident belief in someone or something to do what is right, deliver what is promised, and to be the same every time in spite of circumstances. It is more than a convenient luxury; it is a clear competitive advantage in today’s brutal marketplace and can be the difference between success and failure for a school board.

Biography

92nd Annual Leadership Conference January 17–18, 2013 Minneapolis Convention Center 24

MSBA JOURNAL

David Horsager is an author, business strategist and keynote speaker. Through his book and programs, he shares the secrets of using trust to impact your bottom line. Combining humor, illustrations and memorable stories with research and insight, David sheds light on the confusion and misconceptions surrounding the cornerstone of personal and professional success. David learned first-hand how the world’s most successful people gain and keep the trust of their customers and colleagues. He takes the knowledge and breaks it into tangible steps that anyone can incorporate in their daily lives. David continues to consult and research through Horsager Leadership. He also serves as an adjunct professor of organizational leadership with Bethel University. He lives in St. Paul with his wife Lisa and their four children.


Pre-conference Training Sessions Phase I: New Board Member Orientation 6:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15 Hilton Hotel Minneapolis Help new board members hit the ground running with this session. Phase I covers the role of the school board, the role of the superintendent, and common scenarios facing new board members.

Phase II: Mandatory Training 8:45 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16 Hilton Hotel Minneapolis Presented by MSBA staff and state experts. Phase II includes the financial training school boards are required to have by state law. The session covers core topics such as the budget, school financing, local levies, policies, significant laws affecting school boards, collective bargaining and personnel issues.

The Kinesthetic Classroom and Academic Achievement: Preparing the Brain to Learn 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16 Minneapolis Convention Center Presenter: Michael Kuczala, author & director of instruction, New Jersey Regional Training Center Mike Kuczala will reveal a six-level framework for using movement with a purpose, including preparing the brain, providing brain breaks, supporting exercise and fitness, developing class cohesion, reviewing content and teaching content. The session will explore the connections between physical movement and academic success, classroom management and why activity enhances the learning process. As part of the framework, the school board member’s role as policy maker and advocate will be highlighted.

Evening Early Birds Bargaining Basics 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16 Minneapolis Convention Center Presenters: Amy Fullenkamp-Taylor, associate director of management services, Bill Kautt, associate director of management services, and Gary Lee, associate director of management services, Minnesota School Boards Association Negotiating employee contracts is one of a board’s most important responsibilities—it’s also among the board’s most complex, technical and political duties. This session will provide strategies, as well as an understanding of PELRA and other applicable laws. This is essential training for new negotiators and a great refresher for veteran negotiators.

Amy Fullenkamp- Bill Kautt Taylor

Gary Lee

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

25


Our Distinguished Group of 2013 Conference Exhibitors 4.0 School Services Transportation and grounds maintenance A. T. Group, LLC Employee benefits Ameresco Energy services American Lung Association ALAMN’s Clean Air Choice program promotes the use of cleaner burning transportation fuels like biodiesel, which reduce emissions that can harm the environment and human health. Learn more about the benefits of using biodiesel blends in school buses and find out about our biodiesel scholarship contest for high school seniors and poster contest for middle school students. American Student Transportation Contracted bus services

ATS&R Planners/Architects/Engineers Specialize in K–12 school planning, architecture, engineering, technology, interior design, and site development Avera PACE Group purchasing services offering competitive pricing on food, office supplies, and many other areas A’viands Food & Services Management Food service management Baseman Floors, Inc. Wood athletic flooring, synthetic flooring, refinishing wood flooring BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota Health insurance

Clark Engineering Corporation Engineering Contegrity Group Incorporated Construction management services Cosney Corporation Casework, seating, bleachers, lab casework CTS Group Energy-saving facility retrofits/performance contracting Dashir Management Services, Inc. Building and grounds management DLR Group Architecture, engineering, planning, interiors, commissioning and facility asset management evaluations

Bossardt Corporation Construction management services

Donlar Construction Construction management, general contracting and design/build services

Bray Associates Architects, Inc. Architecture, engineering and interior design services

DSGW Architects Architecture

Architects Rego + Youngquist, inc. Architectural planning, design and management of educational facilities

Center for Efficient School Operations, The Consulting services to school districts in the areas of facilities, health and safety, and transportation

Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center Eagle Bluff offers 3-day/2-night experiences centered around environmental education and life skills adventures

Arvig Security, business phone systems

Central States Terrazzo Association Poured-in-place Terrazzo flooring

ASVAB Career Exploration Program ASVAB Career Exploration

Champions Before- and after-school programs

Athletic Performance Solutions Athletic flooring

Chartwells School Dining Services Food service management

Anderson-Johnson Associates, Inc. Landscape architecture, civil engineering, site planning API Supply Lifts Aerial work platforms

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EAPC Architects Engineers Full-service architecture and engineering Education Minnesota ESI Financial Services Financial services and tax-qualified administration and compliance services


Educators Benefit Consultants Third-party administrator for 403(b) plan compliance, HRA and flex plan administration

FBG Services Corporation FBG is a 53-year-old complete facility maintenance services company for the education industry

General Energy Brokerage & Consulting, Inc. Energy project brokerage and consulting services

Ehlers Independent public financial advisory services

Fisher Tracks, Inc. All-weather track surfaces

Gordon Bernard Company School calendars, handbooks, registration books, spiral-bound planners

Empirehouse, Inc. Energy-efficient windows, heavy-duty entrance doors, glass and metal railing systems, decorative glass, and egress consultation services

Flagship Recreation Playground equipment Four Seasons Energy Efficient Roofing, Inc. Roofing/solar

Haldeman-Homme, Inc. Casework, bleachers, lockers, wood floors, science and tech. equip., computer and library furniture, athletic equip., auditorium chairs and seating, PLTW, 3-D printers, and laser engravers

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27


Our Distinguished Group of 2013 Conference Exhibitors Hallberg Engineering, Inc. Mechanical/electrical engineering, Schools for Energy Efficiency program Hank’s Specialties Flooring products – Azrock, Johnsonite and Protect All HealthPartners Medical and dental insurance Herc-U-Lift, Inc. Personnel lifts, scissor lifts, material handling equipment, forklifts Hiller Commercial Floors Commercial floor covering Hoglund Bus Co., Inc. International school buses, parts, and service Hufcor MN Marlite wall systems, Hufcor operable partitions, Cornell fire doors, complete service and repair department, and Borgo classroom furniture I & S Group Facilities planning, feasibility studies, master planning, energy analysis, facility needs assessments, indoor air quality improvements, facility analysis ICS Consulting, Inc. Planning and construction consulting services IEA, Inc. Health and safety consultants ISS Facility Services, Inc. SaniGLAZE tile restoration service, janitorial services

28

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Continued from page 27

Innovative Modular Solutions Modular buildings

LHB Architecture and engineering

Innovative Office Solutions School supplies, equipment and furniture, janitorial supplies

LifeSpan of Minnesota, Inc. Children’s mental health services

INSPEC, Inc. Architectural/engineering services Intereum Furnishings, architectural products and installation services Johnson & Condon, P.A. Attorneys – education law Johnson Controls, Inc. Indoor air quality – environmental Karges-Faulconbridge, Inc. Mechanical and electrical engineering, commissioning Kennedy & Graven, Chartered Legal services Kiefer Specialty Flooring, Inc. Athletic/commercial flooring Kodet Architectural Group, Ltd. Full architectural services, including predesign, programming, cost estimating, ADA evaluations, interiors, and feasibility studies Kraus-Anderson Construction Company Professional construction management services, referendum assistance, and facilities planning and management services Lance Service, Inc. Casework

LifeTrack Services Graduate survey programs, athletic surveys Lightspeed Technologies, Inc. Classroom audio technology Lunchtime Solutions, Inc. Food service management Marsden Services, LLC Janitorial and building maintenance services, window washing, HVAC and security MASMS-MN Educational Facilities Management Professionals Facilities management organization Metz Construction Management & Consulting, Inc. Construction management, facility planning, project consulting, owner's representation, facility assessments and project facilitation Midwest Tennis & Track Co. Athletic track and tennis court surfacing Minnesota Association of School Business Officials Providing education, training and services to staff that serve in school business management Minnesota Central School Bus Contract student transportation services


Minnesota Department of Education Division of School Finance Minnesota Department of Health Immunization Program Immunization information for school administrators

Minnesota School Nutrition Association Marketing materials

MLA Architects, Inc. Architectural/educational planning

Minnesota Service Cooperatives Minnesota Service Cooperatives

MN Ag Education Leadership Council/MN Ag in the Classroom Education materials and grant information

Minnesota National Guard State/government program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; free resources for people who work with military families

Minnesota State High School League MSHSL/MSBA Olympics

Musco Sports Lighting Sports field lighting

Minnesota State Industries ADA interior signage and exterior signage

Minnesota School Bus Operators Association School bus contracting

Minnesota State Patrol Information on school bus safety and pupil transportation

Musser Environmental Consulting, Inc. Health and safety consulting National Insurance Services Group insurance benefits â&#x20AC;&#x201C; MSBAIT Life/LTD plans


Our Distinguished Group of 2013 Conference Exhibitors

Continued from page 29

National School Boards Association Association

PMA Financial Network Inc. Financial investment and advisory services

North Central Bus & Equipment School buses

PreferredOne Health benefits administration

Skyward, Inc. Skyward student, budgetary and human resources administrative software exclusively for K–12 school districts, public and private

North Central Insulation Providing the Sprayed Foam Roofing System for over 33 years, benefitting owners with lower maintenance and energy costs

Public Financial Management, Inc. Financial advisory services

Snap Sports MN Athletic surfaces

R. A. Morton and Associates Construction management and prereferendum services

Sports Technology Sports field lighting

Northland Securities, Inc. Northland Securities is a diversified financial securities firm recognized as a financial advisor and underwriter of tax-exempt and taxable debt issues

Renaissance Learning Educational software and hardware

Springsted, Inc. Provides independent financial advisory and consulting services to school districts

Riverport Insurance Company Insurance

Staples Advantage Scholastic furniture, supplies and facilities

NPCG, LLC Playground equipment and surfacing

Roof Spec, Inc. Building envelope engineers/consultants

Student Assurance Services, Inc. Student accident insurance

Otter Tail Power Co. Utility

Schmitty and Sons School Bus, Inc. Charter/school bus services

Student Transportation of America School bus transportation

Palmer Bus Service Student transportation

Scholastic Equipment Company, LLC School furniture, equipment and flooring

Sturdisteel Grandstands, bleachers, aluminum seating

Paulsen Architects Architecture, engineering, interiors, planning and landscape architecture, and sustainable design

School Specialty School supplies, furniture and equipment

Taher, Inc. Food service management

Seating & Athletic Facility Enterprises, LLC Indoor and outdoor seating (new and renovations); e.g., telescopic bleachers, grandstands, portable bleachers

Teachers On Call Customized, streamlined substitute staffing service for Pre-K–12 public & private schools, featuring TOC 24/7, featuring Aesop technology

SGN/Wendel Architects Architectural school planning and design

Tectum, Inc. Acoustical wall and ceiling panels and structural/acoustical roof decks

Peoples Electric Company Electrical installation service and maintenance, Tel-com and HVAC building automation control PFM Asset Management LLC – MSDLAF+ MSDLAF+/Cash and investment services Piper Jaffray & Co. School district cash flow program

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MSBA JOURNAL

Siemens Security, fire, automation, mass notification, energy management

Telin Transportation Group Bus sales


TIES Personalized Learning

Webber Recreational Design Inc. Park and playground equipment

TSP Architects and Engineers Educational planning, architectural and engineering services

Widseth Smith Nolting Architecture, engineering, land surveying, and environmental services, with seven offices serving school districts throughout Minnesota

Virco, Inc. School furniture and equipment VS - America, Inc. Classroom furniture/dynamic, flexible solutions W. L. Hall Company Windows, skylights, lockers, fire doors, bleachers and auditorium seating

Winkelman Building Corporation Construction management services Wold Architects and Engineers Architectural and engineering services Kendra Kunz

Go paperless at your next meeting with BoardBook® Visit www.mnmsba.org to sign up for a FREE webinar: ➢ Tuesday, November 13: Noon to 1 p.m. ➢ Tuesday, December 11: 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. ➢ Tuesday, January 8, 2013: Noon to 1 p.m.

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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

31


MSBA’s VENDOR DIRECTORY MSBA’s Vendor Directory helps connect school districts with the products and services they need. The directory is always at your fingertips. You’ll find it printed in the back of every Journal magazine as well as on the MSBA Website at www.mnmsba.org. Most listings in the Web version of this directory include a link so you can head instantly to a Website or e-mail address. The directory includes everything you need to know to contact a company quickly—phone numbers, fax numbers and addresses—in an easy-to-read format. If you have a service or product you would like included in this directory, please contact Sue Munsterman at 507-934-2450 or smunsterman@mnmsba.org. Architects/Engineers/Facility Planners Architects Rego + Youngquist inc. (Paul Youngquist) 7601 Wayzata Blvd., Suite 200 St. Louis Park, MN 55426 952-544-8941, Fax 952-544-0585 www.aryarch.com pyoungquist@aryarch.com ATS&R Planners/Architects/Engineers (Paul W. Erickson) 8501 Golden Valley Rd., Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55427 763-545-3731 Fax 763-525-3289 www.atsr.com perickson@atsr.com Cuningham Group Architecture, Inc. (Judith Hoskens) 201 Main Street SE, Suite 325 Minneapolis, MN 55414 612-379-3400, Fax 612-379-4400 www.cuningham.com jhoskens@cuningham.com DLR Group (Jennifer Anderson-Tuttle) 520 Nicollet Mall, Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-977-3500, Fax 612-977-3600 www.dlrgroup.com jtuttle@dlrgroup.com GLTArchitects (Evan Larson) 808 Courthouse Square St. Cloud, MN 56303 320-252-3740, Fax 320-255-0683 www.gltarchitects.com elarson@gltarchitects.com Hallberg Engineering, Inc. (Rick Lucio) 1750 Commerce Court White Bear Lake, MN 55110 651-748-4386, Fax 651-748-9370 www.hallbergengineering.com rlucio@hallbergengineering.com ICS Consulting, Inc. (Pat Overom) 5354 Edgewood Drive Mounds View, MN 55112 763-354-2670, Fax 763-780-2866 www.ics-consult.com pato@ics-consult.com 32

MSBA JOURNAL

INSPEC, INC. (Fred King) 5801 Duluth St. Minneapolis, MN 55422 763-546-3434, Fax 763-546-8669 www.inspec.com fking@inspec.com Kodet Architectural Group, Ltd. (Edward J. Kodet, Jr.) 15 Groveland Terrace Minneapolis, MN 55403 612-377-2737, Fax 612-377-1331 www.kodet.com arch@kodet.com Larson Engineering, Inc. (Michael Murphy) 3524 Labore Road White Bear Lake, MN 55110 651-481-9120, Fax 651-481-9201 www.larsonengr.com mmurphy@larsonengr.com MSBA Playground Compliance Program (in partnership with National Playground Compliance Group, LLC) (Tim Mahoney) PO Box 506 Carlisle, IA 50047 866-345-6774, Fax 515-989-0344 www.nssi-usa.com tim@playgroundcompliance.com

Widseth Smith Nolting (Kevin Donnay) 7804 Industrial Park Road Baxter, MN 56425 218-829-5117, Fax 218-829-2517 www.widsethsmithnolting.com kevin.donnay@wsn.us.com Wold Architects and Engineers (Vaughn Dierks) 305 St. Peter Street St. Paul, MN 55102 651-227-7773, Fax 651-223-5646 www.woldae.com promo@woldae.com Athletic Sports Floors/Surfacing MSBA Playground Compliance Program (in partnership with National Playground Compliance Group, LLC) (Tim Mahoney) PO Box 506 Carlisle, IA 50047 866-345-6774, Fax 515-989-0344 www.nssi-usa.com tim@playgroundcompliance.com Attorneys Kennedy & Graven Chartered 200 South Sixth Street, Suite 470 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-337-9300, Fax 612-337-9310 www.kennedy-graven.com contactus@kennedy-graven.com

Paulsen Architects (Bryan Paulsen) 209 South 2nd Street, Suite 201 Mankato, MN 56001 507-388-9811, Fax 507-388-1751 www.paulsenarchitects.com bryan@paulsenarchitects.com

Knutson, Flynn & Deans, P.A. (Thomas S. Deans) 1155 Centre Pointe Dr., Suite 10 Mendota Heights, MN 55120 651-222-2811, Fax 651-225-0600 www.kfdmn.com tdeans@kfdmn.com

Perkins + Will (Steven Miller) 84 10th Street S., Suite 200 Minneapolis, MN 55403 612-851-5000, Fax 612-851-5001 www.perkinswill.com steve.miller@perkinswill.com

Pemberton Law Firm (Kristi Hastings) 110 N. Mill Street Fergus Falls, MN 56537 218-736-5493, Fax 218-736-3950 www.pemlaw.com k.hastings@pemlaw.com

TSP Architects & Engineers (Troy Miller) 18707 Old Excelsior Blvd. Minneapolis, MN 55345 952-474-3291, Fax 952-474-3928 www.teamtsp.com millertw@teamtsp.com

Ratwik, Roszak & Maloney, P.A. (Kevin J. Rupp) 730 2nd Ave. S., Suite 300 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-339-0060, Fax 612-339-0038 www.ratwiklaw.com postmaster@ratwiklaw.com

Construction Mgmt & Consulting ICS Consulting, Inc. (Pat Overom) 5354 Edgewood Drive Mounds View, MN 55112 763-354-2670, Fax 763-780-2866 www.ics-consult.com pato@ics-consult.com Kraus-Anderson Construction Co. (John Huenink) PO Box 158 Circle Pines, MN 55014 763-792-3616, Fax 763-786-2650 www.krausanderson.com john.huenink@krausanderson.com Metz Construction Management & Consulting Services (Deb Metz) 20759 Eastway Road Richmond, MN 56368 612-236-8665 www.metzmanagement.com deb@metzmanagement.com MSBA Playground Compliance Program (in partnership with National Playground Compliance Group, LLC) (Tim Mahoney) PO Box 506 Carlisle, IA 50047 866-345-6774, Fax 515-989-0344 www.nssi-usa.com tim@playgroundcompliance.com Educational Programs/Services Minnesota State Academies for the Deaf and Blind (Linda Mitchell) 615 Olof Hanson Dr. Faribault, MN 55021 507-384-6602, Fax 507-332-5528 www.msa.state.mn.us linda.mitchell@msa.state.mn.us Renaissance Learning PO Box 8036 Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54495 800-338-4204, Fax 877-280-7642 www.renlearn.com answers@renlearn.com The Minnesota Service Cooperatives (Jeremy Kovash) 1001 East Mouth Faith Avenue Fergus Falls, MN 56537 218-739-3273, Fax 218-739-2459 www.lcsc.org jkovash@lcsc.org


Energy Solutions Johnson Controls, Inc. (Larry Schmidt) 2605 Fernbrook Lane N. Plymouth, MN 55447 763-585-5148, Fax 763-566-2208 www.johnsoncontrols.com larry.j.schmidt@jci.com

MSBA-Sponsored SchoolFinances.com SchoolFinances.com (Jim Sheehan, Ann Thomas) Sheehan: 952-435-0990 Thomas: 952-435-0955 www.schoolfinances.com jim@schoolfinances.com ann@schoolfinances.com

Facilities Maintenance & Supplies Marsden Bldg Maintenance, LLC (Diane Lewis) 1717 University Ave. W. St. Paul, MN 55104 651-523-6756, Fax 651-523-6678 www.marsden.com dlewis@marsden.com

PaySchools (Debra Maggard) 6000 Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA 50312 866-729-5353, Fax: 218-545-1927 www.payschools.com debra@payschools.com

Financial Management Ehlers (Joel Sutter) 3060 Centre Pointe Drive Roseville, MN 55113 651-697-8514, Fax 651-697-8555 www.ehlers-inc.com jsutter@ehlers-inc.com MSBA-Sponsored Administration and Compliance Service (A&C Service) Administration and Compliance Service (Paige McNeal, Educators Benefit Consultants, LLC) 888-507-6053/763-552-6053 Fax 763-552-6055 www.ebcsolutions.com paige@ebcsolutions.com MSBA-Sponsored MNTAAB (MN Tax and Aid Anticipation Borrowing Program) MNTAAB (Patty Heminover, Springsted, Inc.) 800-236-3033/651-223-3058 Fax 651-268-5058 www.springsted.com pheminover@springsted.com MSBA-Sponsored P-Card (Procurement Card) Program P-Card Program 800-891-7910/314-878-5000 Fax 314-878-5333 www.powercardpfm.com

PFM Asset Management, LLC MSDLAF+ (Donn Hanson) 45 South 7th Street, Suite 2800 Minneapolis, MN 55402 612-371-3720, Fax 612-338-7264 www.msdlaf.org hansond@pfm.com Fitness Equipment 2nd Wind Exercise Equipment (Mike Adrian) 7585 Equitable Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55344 952-224-1210, Fax 952-544-5053 www.2ndwindexercise.com madrian@2ndwindexercise.com Floor Coverings Hiller Commercial Floors (Dave Bahr) 2909 S. Broadway Rochester, MN 55904 507-254-6858 or 888-724-1766, Fax 507-288-8877 www.hillercarpet.com dbahr@hillercarpet.com Food Service Products & Services Lunchtime Solutions, Inc. (Deni Ferlick) 717 N. Derby Lane North Sioux City, SD 57049 605-235-0939, Fax 605-235-0942 www.lunchtimesolutions.com deni@lunchtimesolutions.com

Insurance Minnesota School Boards Association Insurance Trust (MSBAIT) (Denise Drill, Gary Lee, John Sylvester, Amy Fullenkamp-Taylor) 1900 West Jefferson Avenue St. Peter, MN 56082-3015 800-324-4459, Fax 507-931-1515 www.mnmsba.org www.msbait.org ddrill@mnmsba.org glee@mnmsba.org jsylvester@mnmsba.org ataylor@mnmsba.org Janitorial Contract Services Marsden Bldg Maintenance, LLC (Diane Lewis) 1717 University Ave. W. St. Paul, MN 55104 651-523-6756, Fax 651-523-6678 www.marsden.com dlewis@marsden.com Playgrounds MSBA Playground Compliance Program (in partnership with National Playground Compliance Group, LLC) (Tim Mahoney) PO Box 506 Carlisle, IA 50047 866-345-6774, Fax 515-989-0344 www.nssi-usa.com tim@playgroundcompliance.com Roofing Four Seasons Energy Efficient Roofing, Inc. (Darrell Schaapveld) 1410 Quant Ave. N. Marine on St. Croix, MN 55047 651-433-2443, Fax 651-433-2834 www.fseer.com info@fseer.com Software Systems PaySchools (Patrick Ricci) 6000 Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA 50312 281-545-1957, Fax 515-243-4992 www.payschools.com pricci@payschools.com

Technology PaySchools (Debra Maggard) 6000 Grand Ave. Des Moines, IA 50312 866-729-5353, Fax: 218-545-1927 www.payschools.com debra@payschools.com Transportation American Bus Sales, LLC (Eric Edwards) 12802 N. 103rd East Avenue Collinsville, OK 74021 866-574-9970, Fax 918-205-5009 www.AmericanBusSales.net eedwards@americanbussales.net Hoglund Bus Co., Inc. (Jason Anderson) 116 East Oakwood Drive PO Box 249 Monticello, MN 55362 800-866-3105, Fax 763-295-4992 www.hoglundbus.com salesmanager@hoglundbus.com Minnesota School Bus Operators Association (Shelly Jonas) 10606 Hemlock Street NW Annandale, MN 55302 320-274-8313, Fax 320-274-8027 www.msboa.com shellyj@msboa.com North Central Bus & Equipment (Sandy Kiehm) 2629 Clearwater Road St. Cloud, MN 56301 320-257-1209, Fax 320-252-3561 www.northcentralinc.com sandyk@northcentralinc.com Telin Transportation Group (Jamie Romfo) 14990 Industry Avenue Becker, MN 55308 866-287-7278, 763-262-3328 Fax 763-262-3332 www.telingroup.com jromfo@telingroup.com

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

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MSBA JOURNAL


ASK MSBA

P

HOW CAN SCHOOL BOARDS GET INVOLVED IN ADVOCACY?

H

How does the Minnesota School Boards Association establish their positions for which they advocate?

Kirk Schneidawind, Deputy Executive Director

MSBA’s legislative positions are adopted through what is recognized as one of the most grassroots approaches of any of the interests represented at the state Capitol. School board members from throughout the state are elected for a two-year delegate term by their peers through a mail ballot election in the fall. These representatives come together in a Delegate Assembly in December to discuss and vote on various legislative resolutions submitted by school boards and individual school board members. Becoming a delegate is a tremendous experience. We will be seeking new delegates for two-year terms in July 2013.

The first step is to stay informed on the current issues relating to K-12 education. One way to do this is to follow the daily events at the state capitol.

Resolutions that receive a majority vote, as well as positions adopted during previous years, become the basis for MSBA staff lobbying efforts on behalf of all public school board members in the state. Lobbying on behalf of Minnesota’s public school board members is, and must be, a fulltime effort if we are to assure that our public school students receive the best possible education in a cost-effective manner.

Minnesota Association of Townships. This “Lobby Day,” or Day at the Capitol, provides our members an opportunity to learn about relevant issues that may impact their district, and to speak with one voice on important and relevant K–12 issues. It is also important to become acquainted with your house representative and state senator. What is the best way for our district to advocate for our students at the state and federal government level? The best way to advocate for your students is to tell your story. When the legislative members see me or my colleague Grace Keliher speak at committee hearings, they only see us as lobbyists doing our job. As impassioned and persuasive as Grace and I can be, nothing is more effective at connecting with lawmakers than hearing stories from school superintendents, board members and even students—especially if they are from their own legislative district. What government-related resources are available on the MSBA website? There are a number of government-related resources available on our website at www.mnmsba.org.

By clicking directly on the “Governmental Relations” tab, you get access to information on local government redesign, truth-in-taxation, The first step is to stay informed on the current and the Financing Education in Minnesota issues relating to K–12 education. One way to guide. do this is to follow the daily events at the state Placing your cursor over “Governmental capitol. The Governmental Relations staff Relations” will give you a drop-down menu provides a daily update of committee and floor containing an archive of our Capitol Compass activity at the state capitol through Lobby newsletter, election information, federal Line. By dialing 800-864-MSBA on a daily basis, education news, links to a legislative bill tracker our members can stay on top of the committee and a legislator finder, archives for Lobby Line and floor events at the state Capitol. The daily and legislative loggers, and more. reports are also archived on MSBA’s website. MSBA’s staff also uses Twitter You can also find a drop-down item that (www.twitter.com/mnmsba) during the session contains a list of MSBA’s legislative policies to provide you with immediate committee and (aka “The Pink Sheets”). These legislative floor updates. policies—adopted at MSBA’s Delegate Assembly—become part of the collective Also, MSBA will be co-hosting a Joint legislative policies and provide direction to the Legislative Conference March 21, 2013, with Governmental Relations staff on specific issues the League of Minnesota Cities, Association of for advocacy. Minnesota Counties and Townships, and the How can we keep up with education developments at the state Capitol?

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

35


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MSBA Journal: November-December 2012  

The 2012 November-December MSBA Journal magazine

MSBA Journal: November-December 2012  

The 2012 November-December MSBA Journal magazine

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