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Record

Volume 13, Number 2

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

Fall 2003

Native American Court Cases Added to Online Archive A Mascoutan Indian man is tried for the murder of an Indian woman; a trader is charged with illegally selling whisky to members of the Missouria Indian nation; a slave sues for her freedom on the grounds that she is the freeborn child of a Blackfoot Indian mother. These are just some of the stories found in a newly digitized set of early nineteenth century court documents from the files of the St. Louis Circuit Court involving Native Americans. Twenty-seven cases dating from 1800-1848 will be the most recent group of digital records to be made available to researchers on the widely successful St. Louis Circuit Court Historical Records Project website. The project is a collaborative effort between the Missouri State Archives, the St. Louis Circuit Court Clerk’s Office, and the American Culture Studies Program in Arts & Sciences at Washington University. Initiated in 1999, the St. Louis Court Historical Records Project launched its website in July of 2002 with the release of eighty-two courts cases involving members of Lewis and Clark’s Corps of Discovery. Earlier this year, Secretary of State Matt Blunt announced the addition of the nation’s largest series of slavery freedom suits to the website. Ultimately, over four million pages of original court documents are expected to be made available to researchers

as a result of the project. In this most recent set of court documents related to American Indians, several files concern trade activity between European Americans and Indians on the Missouri River. The earliest among these are French documents related to legal disputes that took place from 1800 to 1802, before the Louisiana Purchase.

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Tribes mentioned in trade cases include many of those living along the lower Missouri River in the early nineteenth century; Pawnee, Kansas, Omaha, Otoe, Ponca. European Americans listed in these suits include such famous trade barons as Manual Lisa, John Jacob Astor, and Joseph Robidoux. Some files concern criminal cases such as murder and the unlawful sale of liquor to Indians, while others involve Indian interpreters suing for unpaid wages. One of these last cases was filed on behalf of the estate of Pierre Dorian, Sr. for his work with the Indian Department. Dorian also served as an interpreter with the Corps of Discovery.

The Omaha are just one of the Indian nations mentioned in a series of court cases to be made available on the St. Louis Circuit Court Historical Records Project website. Omaha Indians, by Karl Bodmer, 1833, from Reuben Gold Thwaites, Early Western Travels, 1903.

Though small in number, these cases are significant in that they help to fill gaps in our understanding of Indian relations at a time when the United States was just beginning to expand into the Trans-Mississippi West.

To access these records, and others from the St. Louis Circuit Court, visit the project website at: http://aslearning.wustl.edu/CourtRecords-Dev/index.cfm


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Volume 13, Number 2

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

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From the State Archivist Friends of the Missouri State Archives The Record is published by the Friends of the Missouri State Archives and is distributed as a benefit to its members. The Friends is a not-forprofit corporation, tax exempt under Section 501 (c) of the Internal Revenue Code, and is supported by memberships and gifts. Please address correspondence to Friends of the Missouri State Archives, P.O. Box 242, Jefferson City, Missouri 65102-0242. Visit the Friends on the web http://www.friendsofmsa.org/home.htm The purpose of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives is to render support and assistance to the Missouri State Archives, which was created in 1965 as a division of the Office of the Secretary of State and is the officially designated repository for all state records of permanent value. Its mission is to foster an appreciation of Missouri history and illuminate contemporary public issues by preserving and making available the State’s permanent records to its citizens and their government. Access to collections is provided through the research room which is open to the public: Monday through Wednesday and Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.; Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Written research requests are answered by the reference staff within eight weeks. Visit the Archives on the Internet at http://www.sos.state.mo.us/archives/ The Missouri State Archives is closed Sundays, New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Fourth of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Even a casual reader of this issue of The Record—apparently not you since you found these words—will see that we have adopted an Internet strategy as a principal means of providing Missouri citizens with historical information. Many of our online projects, such as the provost marshal and Supreme Court records indexing, have new material being added all of the time. Our St. Louis probate project is now complete, as we have met our goal of putting images of all actual documents to the year 1900 online. The search engines we have developed for these sites make finding documents even faster than if you were examining the actual records in our reading room. I am happy to say still more projects are in “the works,” including information about Civil War soldiers, nineteenth century immigrants to Missouri, and Native Americans. For those without Internet service we, of course, continue to respond by mail, telephone, and in person. Speaking of “in the works,” on April 22-23, 2004 the Missouri State Archives will host the annual Missouri Conference on History. The Archives hosted the conference eight years ago, and we hope to improve on what was the largest gathering of the MCH up to that date. Details about this event may be found in another part of The Record and additional information will be made available in the months to come. Kenneth H. Winn State Archivist

Board of Directors Bob Priddy, President Wade Nash, Vice-President Sandra Walls, Secretary Thomas Holloway, Treasurer Hon. Steve Ehlmann William Foley, Ph.D Louis Gerteis, Ph.D. Gary Kremer, Ph.D. Hon. Stephen Limbaugh Elizabeth Pool Sally Sprague

Ann Carter Fleming Lynn Wolf Gentzler Sherman Hayes Charles Kruse Kas Mahfood Robert Sandfort Hon. Carl Vogel

Ex-officio: Matt Blunt, Secretary of State Kenneth H. Winn, Ph.D., State Archivist Laura Wilson, Archives Staff Liaison e-mail: wilsol@sosmail.state.mo.us Phone: (573)-526-5326 FAX: (573)-526-7333 Greg Olson, Editor and Designer, The Record e-mail: olsong@sosmail.state.mo.us Phone: (573)-522-2705 FAX: (573)-526-7333

Upcoming Events at the

Missouri State Archives November 6, 2003, 7:00 p.m. One Man’s Dream: A Docudrama of the Lewis & Clark Expedition November 20, 2003. 7:00 p.m. The Civil War Life and Violent Times of William Monks Authors, John F. Bradbury and Lou Wehmer December 4, 2003, 7:00 p.m. From Clogging to Tap: the Sights and Sounds of American Percussive Dance Leela and Ellie Grace


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Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

Missouri State Archives’ Website Honored on List of “101 Best”

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Survey map, La Saline Salt Works, 1806, Missouri State Archives

Missouri State Archives to Open New Missouri Map Exhibit in April 2004 The Missouri State Archives will unveil its newest exhibit next spring. Mapping Missouri: Maps From the Collection of the Missouri State Archives will open at the State Information in Jefferson City on April 22, 2004. This new exhibit will feature more than 100 maps from the Archives’ collection, some of which have never been shown before. Drawing from such diverse examples as the land survey maps made by Antoine Soulard in St. Louis from 17961806 to the computer generated Lewis and Clark maps created by Jim Harlan and the University of Missouri’s Geographic Resources Center in 2002, this exhibit will explore the history of cartographic images in Missouri and the role they play in our everyday world.

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Albert Lea illustrates how varying interpretations of the boundary line between Missouri and the Iowa Territory nearly lead to war in 1839. Other maps in the exhibit examine how geography helps us form a sense of our own identity. Our sense of pride in being from Missouri is made visible by the fact that the outline of the state has appeared on everything from office buildings to whiskey bottles.

Also featured in Mapping Missouri are maps that inventory natural resources. The state’s development remains dependant on a clear understanding of the quantity and location of resources such as lumber, wildlife, tillable soil, mineral deposits, and workers. Even before Missouri hired its first State Geologist in Surveying land and making maps were key the 1850s, maps were central to the understanding of our natural riches and in the settlement of present-day Missouri related productivity. by European Americans. From negotiating treaties with American Indians to settling boundary line disputes between Of course no exhibit of maps would be suburban neighbors, accurately measuring complete without road maps. Mapping Missouri will feature state road survey and recording land plats is central to our maps from the first half of the nineteenth concept of land ownership. century and an early 1918 state highway map. The exhibit includes maps from the files of the Missouri Supreme Court showing After being displayed at the State numerous examples of land disputes Information Center, Mapping Missouri between neighbors. A map made by will begin traveling the state in 2005.

The Missouri State Archives has earned a place on Family Tree Magazine’s annual list of “101 Best Web Sites for Tracing Your Roots.” The list, which appeared in the August 2003 issue of the magazine, strives to lead “family historians to the latest and greatest resources on the ever-expanding internet.” Listed as one of the nation’s outstanding “regional and state sources,” the Missouri State Archives is one of only eight state archives to be selected this year. In its entry for the Missouri State Archives, Family Tree Magazine praises the listing of county records. Also noted are the Missouri Birth and Death Records database, which includes 185,000 pre-1909 records from 87 counties, and the searchable databases of World War I military service cards. The same issue of the magazine also includes a feature entitled “State Secrets,” which is a guide to 86 state libraries, archives, and historical societies. The feature is a comprehensive listing of reference services, interlibrary loans available from each institution. You can see Family Tree Magazine’s entire 2003 list of 101 Best Websites for Tracing Your Roots at http://www.familytreemagazine.com/in dex.asp To explore the menu of online resources available from the Missouri State Archives, log on to http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resourc es/resources.asp


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Volume 13, Number 2

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

FRIENDS OF THE MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES 2003 Annual Meeting June 14, 2003 The annual meeting of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives was held on June 14, 2003, at Huber's Ferry Barn located on the Osage River in Jefferson City, Missouri. President Bob Priddy called the meeting to order and greeted the members and guests. The motion was made by Steve Ehlmann to approve the 2002 Annual Meeting minutes by Secretary Sandra Walls and printed in the Fall 2002 issue of The Record. Sherman Hayes seconded the motion. The membership approved the 2002 Annual Meeting minutes. Treasurer Tom Holloway presented the financial report. A motion was made that the Treasurer's report be approved. The motion was seconded and approved by the members. Gary Kremer gave a history of Huber's Ferry. Nominations to the Board of Directors were open for discussion. Sally Sprague nominated Elizabeth Pool a Jefferson City Community Volunteer. Robert Sandfort a retired CEO of MEMC, O'Fallon, Missouri, was nominated by Steve Ehlmann. There were no other nominations made from the floor. A motion was made by Sandra Walls to approve the nominees to the Board of Directors. The motion was seconded and approved. Re-elections to the Board of Directors are Lynn Wolf Gentzler, Wade L. Nash, and Bob Priddy. The motion was made to approve the re-election, seconded and approved by the membership. The nominees for Officers of the Board of Director are President, Bob Priddy; Vice President, Wade Nash; Secretary, Sandra Walls; and Treasurer, Tom Holloway. The motion was made to approve the nominees as officers of the Board of Directors, seconded an approved by the members. State Archivist Kenneth Winn reported that the Archives have come through the state budget cuts better than most thanks. in part, to Secretary of State Matt Blunt. The Archives' Lewis and Clark commemoration, with the partnership of Washington University, is placing eighty-one legal cases involving Lewis, Clark, or Corp of

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Discovery members online. These cases were previously unknown to history. The Archives' has the early land records that help put together the Lewis and Clark Landscape Map Project with the University of Missouri-Columbia. This website is about 150,000 hits per month. The traveling exhibit version will be available until the year 2006. School curriculum is available on the Internet through MORNET. The Friends of the Archives Lewis and Clark Educational Activities Grant has about 30,000 schoolchildren participating in this program. The placement of 300 Slave Freedom suits online, again with Washington University, has brought the Archives national media attention. AmerinUE is funding an African-American internship. The Missouri Historical Records Grant Program awarded grants to 74 community history organizations. The Archives has online the Quest for a Cure: Care and Treatment of Missouri's First State Mental Hospital exhibit and the Civil War Provost Marshall records. The State Supreme Courts records will be put online this month. The Archives will continue its regular programs sponsored by the Friends of the Missouri State Archives. The Archives will be providing documents and photographs to the Second Capitol Commission and the Friends of the Archives will be the financial agents for this project. President Priddy informed the members that the Friends of the Archives would have its own website in a few weeks. Sally Sprague stated that the Lewis and Clark maquette was on display of the monument being presented by the Jefferson City Lewis and Clark Task Force to be located at Lohman's Landing. The motion was made to adjourn the meeting. The motion was seconded and approved. The meeting adjourned at 6:10 p.m. Submitted by Sandra L. Walls Secretary A dinner followed the business meeting. Mr. T.J. Stiles, author of Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War, was the guest speaker.


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Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

Above; African American History Intern Waheedah Bilal. Above Right; Supreme Court Interns Jessica Ham (left) and Alana Murray. Right; Missouri State Archives summer hires (left to right) Lesley Angle, Maggie Mayhan, Garret B. Kremer-Wright, Stephen Reading, and Hiromi Kubo.

Missouri State Archives Will Host the th 46 Missouri Conference on History The forty-sixth annual Missouri Conference on History, sponsored by the Missouri State Archives, will be held in Jefferson City on April 22-23, 2004. The conference will feature sessions relating to all facets and eras of Missouri and world history. Persons interested in organizing sessions and presenting papers at the conference are invited to submit an abstract and a brief curriculum vita to Laura Wilson, Program Coordinator, Missouri State Archives, P.O. Box 1747, Jefferson City, MO 65102; or via e-mail at wilsol@sosmail.state.mo.us. The deadline for submission is January 13, 2004.

Fall 2003

Students Spend Summer at the Missouri State Archives


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Volume 13, Number 2

Lewis and Clark Atlas Set for Publication Just in time for the bicentennial of the Corps of Discovery’s travels on the Missouri River, the University of Missouri Press will publish the Atlas of Lewis and Clark in Missouri. James D. Harlan created the maps and James M. Denny wrote the accompanying text. Secretary of State Matt Blunt contributed a forward to the atlas. The atlas is the product of the Lewis & Clark Historic Landscape Project, a four-year colaboration between the Missouri State Archives, the University of Missouri Department of Geography, the University of Missouri Geographic Resources Center, and the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Commission. The Atlas of Lewis and Clark in Missouri is a splendid re-creation of the natural landscape in the days when a vast western frontier was about to be explored. The Corps of Discovery’s expedition began in territorial Missouri, and this book of computer-generated maps opens an extraordinary window onto the rivers, land, and settlement patterns of the period. This book is an intensive examination of the Missouri portion of the expedition through a series of twenty-seven maps developed by combining early-nineteenth-century U.S. General Land Office (GLO) survey documents with narratives of the trip derived from expedition journals. In addition to supporting the project financially, the Missouri State Archives th provided the early 19 century land records upon which the project was built. In the summer of 2001 Secretary Blunt unveiled early versions of the maps in a series of press conferences around the state. In February 2003 the Archives opened Lewis and Clark Across Missouri, a traveling exhibit featuring many of the maps found in the atlas. To date, nearly 25,000 people have experienced the exhibit in eighteen different venues across Missouri.

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

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“New” Civil War History In The Archives: Union Provost Marshal Documents John F. Bradbury, Jr. Provost marshals are military policemen. Widely employed by both sides during the Civil War, provosts served with commands in the field as well as in garrisoned or occupied towns and in military districts. Technically, provost marshals derived their authority as assistants to the Provost Marshal General in Washington, D.C., or in Richmond, Virginia, the Confederate Capitol. Provosts received orders from higher headquarters, but also served local commanders, to whom they were always junior in rank. Charged with the maintenance of order within the armies, provost marshals enforced military order and camp discipline, regulated passes and permits, arrested deserters and stragglers, processed prisoners, investigated disorderly conduct by troops and depredations upon private property, administered punishments, and processed claims against the government. During the war, provost marshals became figures of order and oppression. Especially in Missouri, where most civil governments ceased operating and the state succumbed to martial law in the summer of 1861, the provosts increasingly dealt with civilian cases, directing a constabulary force and bureau of investigation in addition to a traditional military police force. Their duties included enforcement of militia enrollments, investigations of disloyalty and spying, regulation of the movements of civilians through military lines, administration of oaths and paroles, enforcement of orders and regulations concerning commerce and contraband, and investigations of theft and other criminal complaints. Secessionists, prisoners of war, aggrieved citizens, slaves seeking freedom, refugees, and common criminals passed through provost marshals’ offices. These officers wielded enormous power, with powers of search and seizure and the authority to confiscate

the private property of suspected rebels, including their slaves. As the practice became common later in the war, provosts also enforced the banishments of sympathizers and their families. Depending upon a person’s sympathies and complaints, provost marshals could be persecutors or protectors. Students of the Civil War are fortunate that the military bureaucracy generated a tremendous number of documents that shed light on this extraordinary period. Much of it still exists in the records of the Provost Marshal General in the National Archives at Washington, D.C. From this large record group, two portions have been microfilmed as “Union Provost Marshal Files Relating to Individual Citizens” (National Archives microfilm publication M345) and “Union Provost Marshal Files Relating to Two or More Civilians” (National Archives microfilm publication M416). Scholars have long known of these records, but few made good use of them due to the lack of a comprehensive index to the nearly four hundred rolls of microfilm comprising the series. However, the Missouri State Archives in Jefferson City has recently added the microfilmed provost collection to its holdings. Through the efforts of staff members and volunteers, the Missouri files in the extensive provost marshal collection are being indexed by name, location, and subject. About a third of the collection has been completed thus far, and the work is making available some remarkable documents concerning the war as it was experienced by noncombatant civilians. Anyone interested in learning more about the Provost Marshal collection may search the database by visiting the Missouri Secretary of State’s web page: http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/provost/


Volume 13, Number 2

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

The next time you take your chicken potpie out of the oven you might give some thought to the changes that have occurred in the poultry business over the last century. The growing demand for frozen chicken dinners, chicken nuggets, and the ready to eat rotisserie chicken at the grocery store, has forced poultry producers and processors to dramatically change how they do business. Many of these changes began in the years after World War II, and the Division of Commerce and Industrial Development, the precursor to Missouri’s Tourism Division, captured many of these new production methods on film. Within the photograph collection of this state agency, one can see what the poultry industry was like throughout the 1950s and 1960s, and how thousands of Missourians were once employed. By the late 1960s, the typical farm flock and hen house had been replaced by integrated systems, or the contract method, and the independent poultry farmer was virtually gone. According to a 1968 Poultry Industry of Missouri Report, hatcheries declined in Missouri by 80% since 1934. The started pullet (20-22 week old chicks) replaced the demand for day old chicks and automated machinery was slowly replacing

Fall 2003

human labor. Birds once free to roam were housed in cages in layers in order to simulate factory conditions and increase production. The broiler chicken, which became popular in the 1950s, was an example of how integration methods could work. By 1965 more than 95% of all commercial broilers were grown under a contract arrangement. By 1968, the 49 hatcheries left in Missouri were either producing broiler chicks or chicks for egg production. Changes in poultry processing occurred more slowly than the hatchery business. These photographs show that people were still very much needed in the processing factories. While machinery was available to help with these tasks, someone on the line was responsible for cutting the chicken’s throat, removing the head, the feathers, internal organs, wrapping giblets and tagging the broilers. Today, large-scale operations, sometimes referred to as “factory farms,” are almost fully automated, while smaller operations (those processing 500 chickens per hour) still require manual labor. The above images documented an era during which the poultry industry was in the process of becoming the highly commercialized and efficient business it is today.


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Volume 13, Number 2

DONATIONS TO THE FRIENDS OF THE MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES March 2003 through August 2003 GIFTS Claudia Baker, Linn Clara Bryant, Jefferson City Lon Cooksey, Moberly Robert Doerr, Rolla Anna E. Fever, Loose Creek Hon. Joe Kenton, Kansas City Dr. & Mrs. Gerald Lee, Kansas City Charles Morris, Jefferson City Irma J. Plaster, California Edwin F. Schwartz, St. Louis Mary W. Thomas, Columbia MEMBERS Thomas Hart Benton Memberships$100 Harold G. Butzer, Jefferson City Jonathan Kemper, Kansas City Margot McMillen & Howard Marshall, Fulton Patricia, A. Sanchez, Oxnard, CA Supporting Memberships-$75 Thomas & Barbara Diehl, St. Louis Nancy Grant & Mike Rodemeyer, Hartsburg Contributing Memberships-$50 William F. Berry, Columbia Ron Budnik, Chamois George W. Giles, Troy Dorothy R. Kenney, Jefferson City Jim & Mary Russell, Jefferson City Ona Scott, Maryland Heights Basic Memberships-$25 Claudia Backer, Linn Marci Bennett, St. Joseph Evelyn Borgmeyer, Jefferson City Lee Bowman, Jefferson City Suzanne Boyle, Florissant Willard M. Brann, Jefferson City Virginia M. Brinkmann, Jefferson City Cass County Genealogical Society, Inc., Harrisonville Doris M. Peyton Childs, Albion, MI Bill T. Crawford, Columbia Nancy Dietrich, Columbia

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

Charles A. Ecklund, Jefferson City Kevin Edwards, Jefferson City Calvin A. Erhardt, Jefferson City L. Azelene Evans, Jefferson City Kathleen Farrai, St. Louis John J. Forti, St. Louis Cathy Garcia, San Gabriel, CA Shirley M. Gassei, Lake Sherwood Dorothy Glassner, Jefferson City George S. Grazier, Jefferson City Rayma Grohs, Jefferson City Lloyd Grotjan, Jefferson City Ken & Joanne Hartke, Jefferson City Marvin A. Huggins, St. Louis Christine Human Hughes, St. Louis Janice Hull, Lowell, AK Joan Koechig, St. Charles Carlene King, Thousand Oaks, CA Tammy Krewson, Winchester Barbara Larson, St. Louis Bobette Laury, St. Louis Joyce Loving, Maryland Heights Arline Lueckenotto, Jefferson City Lorraine A. Magee, Imperial Fr. William L. Mugan, St. Louis J. Connelly Netherton, Ballwin Marsha Newman, Fenton Alice Robinson, Jefferson City Harvel & Barbara Sanders, Jefferson City Larry Sanders, Boonville Mary Ryan, St. Ann David Scherr, Jefferson City Patricia Schlechte, Jefferson City Gail Thoele, St. Louis Jenny & Tony Smith, Jefferson City Rayford O. Thompson, Jefferson City J. Joseph Trower, Jefferson City Francis Turner, Savannah John Viessman, Vienna Joseph Wilkinson, Morrison Jeanette A. Zinkgraf, St. Louis DONATIONS TO THE MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES January 2003 through June 2003 IMMIGRATION, FAMILY HISTORY AND COUNTY RECORDS Camden County Historical Society: Camden County Historian: Post Offices and Postmasters of Camden County Through 1931, edited by Fern Moreland, Thelma Perrish and Neta Pope.

Fall 2003

Cass County Historical Society: • Vol. I: Mt. Pleasant Township. • Vol. II: Peculiar, West Peculiar, Big Creek and Raymore Townships. • Vol. III: Pleasant Township. • Vol. IV: Camp Branch and Polk Townships. • Vol. V: Union, Dolan, and West Dolan Townships. • Vol. VI: Orient and Oakland Cemeteries in Grand River Township. • Vol. VII: Austin, Coldwater, Everett and Rural Grand River Townships. • Vol. VIII: Dayton, Index and Sherman Townships. • Vol. IX: Unknown Burials, Cremations, Stillborns, and Donations to Science. • Vol. X: A Index A-K. • Vol. XI: B Index L-Z. Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph: Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph Directory 2003. Gentges, Margaret H.: • Annotated 1880 Federal Census for Benton Township, Osage County, Missouri. • Pioneer Settlers of Osage County, rd Missouri, 3 edition. both by Margaret H. Gentges Greene County Archives: • Buyers and Sellers of Property in Green county, Missouri: 18331877. • A Chronological Listing and Index to Divorce Records 1837-1899 in the Greene County Circuit Court • A Chronological Listing and Index to Divorce: Records 1921-1928 in the Greene County Circuit Court • A Chronological Listing and Index to Divorce Records: 1900-1920 and 1920 to 1935. • Marriage Records from Green County, Missouri Justice of the Peace Books: 1840s-1920s. • 1852 Missouri State Census for Greene County (continued on page 9)


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Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

DONATIONS TO THE MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES, IMMIGRATION, FAMILY HISTORY AND COUNTY RECORDS (continued from Page 8) Mengwasser, Ken & June: Hart Hill Cemetery, Callaway County, 2002 Edition, by Ken & June Mengwasser. Pope, Neta: Early African-American Families of Camden and Laclede Counties, Missouri, by Neta Pope. Reiffe, Fred J.: Reiffe to Riffe Family in America: Ancestors and Descendants of Mennonite Reiff Brothers Hans, John, Jacob, & Abraham. Vol. II, by Fred J. Reiffe. Schlup, Peter D.: • Moniteau County, Missouri Federal Census 1920. • Moniteau County, Missouri Marriages, Vols. 3 & 4, 18751887. both by Peter D. Schlup. Ziegelbein, Denise: Marriage Index, Missouri: 1851-1900, CD-ROM. MISSOURI / UNITED STATES HISTORY Boutros, David: Cher Oncle, Cher Papa: The Letters of Francois and Berenice Chouteau, by Dorothy Brandt Marra, Marie-Laure Dionne Pal, and David Boutros. Cape Girardeau County Archive Center: The History of Jackson, Missouri and surrounding Communities. Office of State Courts Administration: A Very Special Place: The History of Juvenile Justice in Missouri, by Douglas E. Abrams.

McGhee, James: Campaigning with Marmaduke: Narratives and Roster of the th 8 Missouri Calvary Regiment C.S.A., by James E. McGhee. Missouri Military Academy: Missouri Military Academy Eagle 2002-2003, bound volume of newsletters, August 1, 2002 through June 19, 2003. NEW BOOK ACCESSIONS IMMIGRATION, FAMILY HISTORY AND COUNTY RECORDS A to Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists & Historians, by Barbara Jean Evans. The American Census Handbook, by Thomas Jay Kemp. The Source: A Guidebook of American Genealogy, edited by Loretta Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking. Adair County Collector Inventory, prepared by Mary Vogt McIntosh, Local Records Archivist. Audrain County Recorder Inventory of Vault A, prepared by Carolyn Collings, Local Records Archivist. Greene County Archives Inventory Project Report, prepared by Mariona Henshaw, Local Records Archivist. Harrison County Circuit Clerk and ExOfficio Recorder, prepared by Becky Carlson CA, Local Records Archivist. MISSOURI / UNITED STATES HISTORY

Schroeder, Walter A.: Atlas of Missouri Ecoregions, by Timothy A. Nigh and Walter A. Schroeder.

Confederate States Paper Money, by Arlie R. Slabaugh.

MILITARY HISTORY

Jane Froman: Missouri’s First Lady of Song, by Ilene Stone.

Civil War Round Table of Western Missouri: Civil War Monuments and Memorials in the Greater Kansas City Area, by the Civil War Round Table of Western Missouri. Knaebel, Anna: Military Memories: St. Francis Xavier Parish and Community, by Cindy Joannes and Anna Knaebel.

From Fugitive Slave to Free Man: The Biography of William Wells Brown, edited by William L. Andrews. Giving Voters a Choice: The Origins of the Initiative and Referendum in America, by Steven L. Piott.

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NEW BOOK ACCESSIONS, MISSOURI / UNITED STATES HISTORY Meriwether Lewis, by Richard Dillon with a foward by Stephen E Ambrose. Lewis & Clark: Historic Places Associated with Their Transcontinental Exploration (1804-1806), Roy E. Appleman. The Lewis & Clark Cookbook, by Teri Evenson, Lauren Lesmeister, and Jeff Evenson. Long Goodbye: The Deaths of Nancy Cruzan, by William H. Colby. The Louisiana Purchase: Emergence of an American Nation, edited by Peter J. Kastor. Mississippi: An Illustrated History, by Edward N. Akin and Charles C. Bolton. The Mysteries of Time Lines, by Fran Carter. Windy Pogue’s Letters from a College Freshman 1937-1938, by Dwight W. Pogue. The Promise of Cultural Institutions, by David Carr. Rumors of Indiscretion: The University of Missouri “Sex Questionnaire” Scandal in the Jazz Age, by Lawrence J. Nelson. The Sacagawea Cookbook, by Teri Evenson, Lauren Lesmeister, and Jeff Evenson. St. Louis in the Century of Henry Shaw: A View Beyond the Garden Wall, edited by Eric Sandweiss. The Shame of the Cities, by Lincoln Steffens. A Song of Faith and Hope: The Life of Frankie Muse Freeman, by Frankie Muse Freeman with Candice O’Connor. Francois Valle and His World: Upper Louisiana Before Lewis and Clark, by Carl J. Ekberg. (continued on page 10)


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(continued from page 9) MILITARY HISTORY Forgotten Valor: The First Missouri Cavalry Regiment C.S.A., by James W. Farley. I Acted From Principle: The Civil War Diary of Dr. William M. McPheeters, Confederate Surgeon in the TansMississippi, edited by Cynthia Dehave Pitcock and Bill J. Gurley. Locating Union & Confederate Records, by Nancy Justus Morebeck. Quantrill’s Thieves, by Joseph K. Houts, Jr. RECENT ACCESSIONS January 2003 - June 2003 This accessions listing is provided to the research community to advise it of recent Archives accessions of state and local government records. More detailed listings of the Missouri State Archives holdings are available at the Archives facility. Highlights from the accessioned materials from the first six months of 2003 include records of Governor John D. Ashcroft 1985-1986; Governor Mel Carnahan Photograph Collection 1992-2000; and the legislative papers of State Representatives Bill Boucher 1992-2003, Joan Bray 1993-2003, Martin (Bubs) Hohulin 1991-2003, Michael J. Reid 1991-1993 and 1999-2003, and State Senator Sidney Johnson 1991-2003. LEGISLATIVE, EXECUTIVE, AND JUDICIAL BRANCH RECORDS Adjutant General. st Records of Co. M, 1 Infantry Regiment, Missouri National Guard. 1908-1918, 1 cubic ft.

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

Appeals Court, Eastern District. Case Files #72863-79004 and #6944077543, 263 cubic ft. Appeals Court, Southern District. Case Files #22595-24990 and Daily Minutes (1973-2002), 99 cubic ft. Department of Public Safety. Law Enforcement Academy Training Films. 1970-1990, 146 films. General Assembly. st st House Committee Books, 91 G.A., 1 Regular Session. 2001, 5 cubic ft. House Research Records. 1981-1996, 1 cubic ft. st nd Records of House, 91 G.A., 2 Regular Session. 2002, 19 cubic ft. Senate Courtesy Resolutions. 2002, 0.3 cubic ft. Governors. Chief of Staff Papers. 1993-2001, 15 cubic ft. Governor Mel Carnahan Photograph Collection. 1992-2000, 2 cubic ft. Letter of Governor Joseph McClurg. 1868-1917, 0.5 cubic ft. Records of Governor John D. Ashcroft. 1985-1986, 8 cubic ft. Legislative Papers. Papers of Rep. Bill Boucher. 19922003, 2 cubic ft. Papers of Rep. Joan Bray. 1993-2003, 1 cubic ft. Papers of Rep. Martin (Bubs) Hohulin. 1991-2002, 0.4 cubic ft. Papers of Rep. Michael J. Reid. 19911993 and 1999-2003, 3 cubic ft. Papers of Sen. Sidney Johnson. 19912003, 2 cubic ft. Office of the Secretary of State. Administrative Rules. Take Out Pages of CSR. April 20, 2001-October 31, 2002, 2 cubic ft. Office of the Secretary of State. Elections. Election Returns. 2002 , 2 cubic ft. Office of the Secretary of State. State Library. Missouri Depository Documents, 5.5 cubic ft. Supreme Court of Missouri. Case files. September 2001, 26 cubic ft. COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL RECORDS

Benton County. Probate Court. Case files. 1951-1971, 9 reels.

Fall

Bollinger County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1885-1980, 18 reels. Probate Court. Case files. 1884-1966, 8 reels. Boone County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1918-1974, 88 reels. Clay County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1820-1841, 29 reels. County Clerk. County Court Records. 1858-1864. Probate Court. Case files and index. 1824-1988. Probate Court. Records. 1878-1927. Probate Court. Settlements. 18541927. Probate Court. Wills. 1927-1933. Recorder. Biography and Service Records. 1918-1944. Recorder. Index to Marriage Licenses. 1822-1915. Recorder. Marriage License Applications. 1931-1936. Recorder. Military Discharges. Clinton County. Clerk. Coroner’s Inquests (indexed). 1859-1957, 7 reels. Clerk. Miscellaneous records. 18371870. Cooper County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1844-1845, 9 reels. Circuit Court. Index to Files. 18181845. Dade County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1857-1899, 42 reels. Index to Case Files. 1818-1845. Dekalb County. Probate Court. Case files. 1859-1984, 32 reels. Gasconade County. Probate Court. Case files. 1821-1882, 5 reels. Probate Court. Case files. 1831-1895, 4 reels. Jackson County. Probate Court-Independence. Case files and index. 1828-1900, 34 reels. Jackson County. City of Kansas City. Circuit Court. Case files. 1956, 29 reels. Mississippi County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1881-1920 and 1931-1944, 15 reels. (continued on page 11)


Volume 13, Number 2

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

(Continued from page 10) COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL RECORDS Mississippi County. Circuit Court. Bank Liquidators. 1924-1939. Perry County. Circuit Court. Case files. 1851-1867, 5 reels. Randolph County. Probate Court. Case files. 1979-1989, 15 reels. Reynolds County. Recorder. Deeds. 1872-1993, 91 reels. Recorder. Index to Deeds. 1872-1966. Recorder. Military Discharge. 19191957. Recorder. Military Discharge Index. 1919-2002. St. Louis County. Circuit Court. Criminal case files. 1940-1859, 40 reels. Probate Court. Guardianship files. 1867-1872, 57 reels.

Scotland County. Probate Court. Case files. 1843-1978, 44 reels. Stoddard County. Collector. Tax records. 1913-1995, 47 reels. Webster County. Recorder. Deed books A-C, E-Z, AADD, 67-73, 29 reels. City of St. Louis. Probate Court. Record of wills. 18971900, 2 reels.

Staff Profile: Michael Everman

MANUSCRIPTS Calumet Presbyterian Church. Parish Records. 1961-1999, 1 reel. Liahona Research. Marriage index. 1851-1900, 1 CD. St. Boniface Catholic Church. Records. 1861-2002, 2 reels. St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church. Parish registers. 1861-2002, 1 reel. Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church. Records. 1895-1988, 2 reels. Whitey Owens Photograph Collection. 1960-1990, 7 cubic ft.

Become a Friend of the Missouri State Archives! Yes, I want to support the preservation and access of Missouri's heritage by assisting to the Friends of the Missouri State Archives $25 Basic Membership $50 Contributing Membership $75 Supporting Membership $100 Thomas Hart Benton Membership

Fall 2003

$500 Jefferson Membership $1000 Lewis and Clark Membership $2000 Truman Membership Contribution Only

Name: ___________________________________________________ Address: ___________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ City State Zip Telephone Number: (_____)_______________ Email________________________ Make check payable to: Friends of the Missouri State Archives Mail to: Friends of the Missouri State Archives, P. O. Box 242, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0242 The Friends of the Missouri State Archives is a not-for-profit organization

When the St. Louis Circuit Court Historical Records Project began in 1999, it became clear that the new collaborative initiative would need both an experienced archivist and a seasoned program supervisor to oversee the project's day-to-day operations. The person called upon to fill both of those needs was Michael Everman. Michael is not new to Missouri. In the early 1980s he was on the staff of the Missouri Cultural Heritage Center at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Michael also worked as an archivist with the Oklahoma Department of Libraries, the Oklahoma State Historical Society, and The American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) in Virginia. He had also served as the Director of Membership Services at AAHPERD and as Deputy Director of the Texas Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. As Archivist and Program Supervisor with the Circuit Court project, Michael directs records processing and plans the preservation and public accessibility of the court’s records. He also trains and supervises archivists, volunteers and interns involved in the project. “Returning to Missouri to work with the Local Records Program enables me to apply the whole spectrum of knowledge and skills from a 25-year career in archives.” says Michael. “This project is bringing the early residents of St. Louis back to life. History is about life, and life happens locally.” “Our goal is to share the information and the excitement with researchers.”


12 Volume 10, 13, Number 2 1 12Volume Number

Newsletter of the Friends of the Missouri State Archives

Fall

Friend’s Profile:

Kas Mahfood Kathleen (Kas) Mahfood was raised in Jefferson City. She began making jewelry in her home over twenty-five years ago. Kas always loved the old German South Side of town, and in 1984, renovated a cottage on Dunklin Street, just off Broadway, in which her jewelry business flourished. In 2001 she historically renovated the third of her contiguous buildings - a large Victorian - which currently houses her full service fine jewelry shop. Kas’ original designs are featured, as well as a large selection of all types of jewelry. In addition to designing jewelry, Kas is a Graduate Gemologist. Kas’ interest in the South Side led her to found the Old Munichburg Association in 2000. Members and friends of the Association have already accomplished a great deal and have plans for continued preservation and promotion of the unique area - which has been described as a city within a city. Several houses and a contiguous district, including two of Kas’ buildings, are now on the National Register of Historic Places. Kas is very interested in working for and with the Friends of the Missouri State Archives, noting: “The records and pictures preserved by the Archives prove invaluable to an organization such as the Old Munichburg Association that is trying to bring back an historic neighborhood. I think the Archives is a great resource for anyone researching regional history or doing genealogical research. The staff is user friendly and offers assistance when needed. My experience has been such a positive one that I recommend to anyone wanting to preserve old photographs to give them to the Archives. So many important photographs are lost in families either through neglect or a failure to identify them. The Archives can preserve images for generations and make them accessible to the public.”

Friends of the Missouri State Archives P.O. Box 242 Jefferson City, MO 65102-0242

Visit the Friends’ new website at http://www.friendsofmsa.org/home.htm

NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE PAID JEFFERSON CITY, MO 65101 PERMIT # 152


The Record - Fall 2003