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ASSOCIATION

NEW RENOVATIONS: PROPERTY UPGRADES TO BOOST YOUR NEXT MEETING EXPERIENCE

MSAE.ORG | ISSUE #1 | 2018

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THE THE

TOP 12 TRENDS THAT WILL AFFECT HOW ASSOCIATIONS OPERATE AND THRIVE IN THE NEAR FUTURE

MICHIGAN SOCIETY OF ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVES

MSAE 1350 Haslett Road East Lansing, MI 48823


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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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P R E S I D E N T ' S M E S S AG E

HELP ME EXPLORE THE TOP 12 4

Cheryl Ronk, CAE, CMP, FASAE calls on MSAE members to lend their expertise in exploring the top 12 trends for 2018.

P E R S O N A L AWA R E N E S S

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BETTER TOGETHER PROFILES Olga DuBois, Andrea Bretz, and Nicki Polan answer MSAE’s Better Together Questionnaire.

I N D U S T R Y U N D E R STA N D I N G 6

MSAE HONORS SUPPLIERS AT 2017 ASSOCIATION CHOICE AWARDS Check out the list of providers that served associations best in 2017.

GAMIFICATION AND ASSOCIATIONS 14

This isn’t your father’s Donkey Kong. Games have grown up, and your association can use them to enhance the member experience.

A S S O C I AT I O N KNOWLEDGE 16

ASSOCIATIONS CAN PRODUCE SURVEY RESULTS IN REAL-TIME Cost-effective market research is accessible to associations.

ADDING AUDIO AND VISUAL TO YOUR MEMBER COMMUNICATIONS 19

The attention span of your members is stretched across a very broad spectrum of communication outlets. Here’s how to put the latest technologies to work for you.

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COVER STORY: THE TOP 12 Photo by Tony Demin

Pictured on the cover (l to r): Snowmobiling in Traverse City Courtesy of Traverse City Tourism Edward Klim, president, International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association; Christine A. Jourdain, executive director, American Council of Snowmobile Associations; and William D. Manson, Jr., executive director, Michigan Snowmobile Association


P R E S I D E N T ’ S M E S S AG E

Cheryl Ronk, CAE, CMP

(cheryl@msae.org) is the president of MSAE. President's Message is a regular feature in Association IMPACT magazine. If you’d like to stay up to date between issues, follow her blog posts on LinkedIn at http://bit.ly/2nrYCGX.

Special Thanks

Thank you to Traverse City Tourism for hosting us during this gorgeous snowmobiling adventure in Traverse City, Michigan!

Share Your Insights

Read the cover story and view Cheryl’s Top 12 Trends starting on page 8. If you are intrigued by one of the trends? Contact Shawnna Henderson at henderson@msae.org to share your insights in Association IMPACT magazine as part of our 2018 cover story series. Photo Caption (l to r): Snowmobiling in Traverse City Courtesy of Traverse City Tourism Edward Klim, president, International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association; Cheryl Ronk, CAE, CMP, FASAE, president/CEO, Michigan Society of Association Executives; Christine A. Jourdain, executive director, American Council of Snowmobile Associations; and William D. Manson, Jr., executive director, Michigan Snowmobile Association Photo by Tony Demin

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Help Me Explore the Top 12 A

s I look back over my MSAE career, there’s no doubt that this journey has been one of discovery and learning. All of us at MSAE have considered it our first responsibility to curate and analyze trends and upcoming changes impacting Michigan associations and the organizations that serve them. MSAE has always shared trends and best practices with you through this publication, and 2018 will be no different. In recent years, we have used a book or a subject-matter expert at the heart of our cover stories. This year, as I plan to retire in the fall, I will be passing along some of the educated intuition that comes with decades of experience. After 29 years as MSAE’s president, I’ve learned a thing or two — from you and with you. When you read this issue’s cover story, you’ll see these trends that I believe every association staff person needs to be thinking about. Of course, I don’t plan on doing it alone. I am looking for 10 MSAE members who are willing to be interviewed to help shed light on these trends. Read the list on page 9, and let me know what you are doing in that area. Speaking of member thought leadership, did you take a good look at the cover? I have wanted to feature these three association executives for years. I am proud that Michigan is home to three snowmobile associations, and no other state can make this claim. Years ago, I received a call from the chairman of the board of the Snowmobile Manufacturers Association

saying that he wanted to move the national association from Washington, DC to a snow state. He said that final selection would depend on where he could find talent. Michigan won in the end because, as you and I well know, Michigan has talent! I remember suggesting that the association take a look at Ed Klim — who is one of the three executives featured in this issue’s cover story — and he was soon interviewed and hired for the job. Then the American Council of Snowmobile Associations was looking for an executive director to work with Ed in Michigan. This organization represents the snowmobile users not only in the U.S. but all around the world. By then, MSAE was actively helping associations with their executive searches. We put in a proposal and helped this organization find Chris Jourdain, also featured in the cover story. Bill Manson, our third cover-story leader, was already in Michigan. Little did I know how much he helped behind the scenes. The snowmobile executives featured in this issue’s cover story share an enthusiasm for winter, snowmobiling and Michigan. I’m confident that you will enjoy the perspectives of these three Michigan association leaders as they help us explore the first two trends: ++ Engagement models contain thoughtful strategy regarding experiences. ++ Associations are more proactive and educational with legislators and regulatory officials.


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I N D U S T R Y U N D E R STA N D I N G

MSAE Honors Suppliers at 2017 Association Choice Awards M

SAE honored the association’s supplier partners during the 2nd Annual Association Choice Awards Celebration on November 17 at the East Lansing Marriott. MSAE’s Association Choice Awards celebrate supplier partners that make a difference in the association community. Over 300 association professionals voted online in two rounds to determine the winners in 23 categories. The Amway Grand Plaza Hotel was awarded the first ever EMBRACE Award. This recognition is for the supplier partner with the most overall votes in the final round. During the celebration, MSAE also held a charity raffle that raised nearly $900 benefitting the Nottingham Nature Nook Winter Wildlife Food Drive 2017. The 2018 Association Choice Awards will be in November. Keep track of the suppliers who impact your organization and vote for them when the polls open. Congratulations to this year’s finalists and winners:

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ACCOUNTING/ FINANCIAL SERVICES

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LEGAL SERVICES

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TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

Fifth Third Bank Maner Costerisan � Plante & Moran, PLLC The Centennial Group

Fraser Trebilcock Davis & Dunlap, P.C. Honigman, Miller, Schwartz and Cohn, LLP � Willingham & Coté, P.C.

CONSULTANT SERVICES

LEGISLATIVE SERVICES

HOTELS: DETROIT AREA

Event Garde, LLC Leading Edge Mentoring

Karoub Associates � Muchmore Harrington Smalley & Associates The Sterling Corporation

Suburban Collection Showplace The Henry, An Autograph Collection Hotel � The Inn at St. John’s

� Destination Michigan

EXPO/DÉCOR/ AV SERVICES

MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS SERVICES

� Art Craft Display, Inc. MessageMakers Motown Digital

Martin Waymire MessageMakers � Truscott Rossman

INSURANCE SERVICES

� Blue Cross Blue

Shield of Michigan Member Insurance Solutions, Michigan Dental Association The Centennial Group

IT AND TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

of Michigan Indian Trails Metro Cars

HOTELS: ANN ARBOR AREA

� Ann Arbor Marriott

PRINTING/MAILING/ DESIGN SERVICES Allegra Marketing of Okemos Bradford Printing � BRD Printing, Inc.

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES

� Bull Enterprises

Dewpoint � Maner Costerisan Pace Consulting, L.L.C.

� Dean Trailways

(Janitorial Services) Hotel Investment Services (Real Estate) ITC Holdings Corp. (Utilities)

Ypsilanti at Eagle Crest Resort Holiday Inn Near the University of Michigan Weber’s Inn & Restaurant

HOTELS: CENTRAL MICHIGAN Bavarian Inn Lodge & Conference Center � DoubleTree By Hilton Bay City-Riverfront Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort

KEY � = CATEGORY WINNER

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I N D U S T R Y U N D E R S TA N D I N G

Photo Captions

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HOTELS: LANSING AREA

RESORTS

CVB: LARGE

Crowne Plaza Lansing West � Kellogg Center-Spartan Hospitality Group Radisson Hotel Lansing at the Capitol

Crystal Mountain � Grand Hotel Mission Point Resort

Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau Experience Grand Rapids � Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau

HOTELS: SOUTHWEST MICHIGAN

� Amway Grand Plaza Hotel Holiday Inn Grand Rapids Downtown Radisson Plaza Hotel and Suites

CASINOS Firekeepers Casino Hotel MotorCity Casino Hotel � Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort

CVB: MEDIUM

EVENT VENUES Lansing Center � SMG - DeVos Place The Henry Center at MSU

HOTELS: NORTHERN MICHIGAN Cambria Suites Traverse City Hotel Indigo � Park Place Hotel

2017 EMBRACE AWARD WINNER Amway Grand Plaza Hotel

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Discover Kalamazoo Great Lakes Bay Regional Convention & Visitors Bureau � Traverse City Tourism

CVB: SMALL Blue Water Area Convention & Visitors Bureau � Frankenmuth Chamber of Commerce and Convention & Visitors Bureau Mount Pleasant Area Convention & Visitors Bureau

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1: Barry Freed, Art Craft Display Inc.; Cheryl Ronk, CAE, CMP, FASAE, Michigan Society of Association Executives 2: Michael W. Stephenson and Scott Breen, Willingham & Coté, P.C. 3: Cheryl Ronk; Dave Campbell, BRD Printing Inc. 4: Cheryl Ronk; Alex Maxwell, MBA, The Inn at St. John’s 5: Jamie Vecchioni , Ann Arbor Marriott Ypsilanti at Eagle Crest ; Cheryl Ronk; Sandra Steward, Ann Arbor Marriott Ypsilanti at Eagle Crest 6: Cheryl Ronk; Sonja Wood, CMP, CTA, GMS, Great Lakes Bay Regional Convention & Visitors Bureau 7: Hannah Kroll, CTA, Spartan Hospitality Group; Cheryl Ronk; Kristina Reitler, CMP, CTA, Spartan Hospitality Group 8: Cheryl Ronk; Chris Schroeder, CMP, CTA, AHC+Hospitality 9: Lisa Monache, Park Place Hotel; Cheryl Ronk 10: Annie Farrell, Grand Hotel; Jennifer J. Moeckel, CTA, Grand Hotel; Cheryl Ronk; Michael Concannon, Grand Hotel 11: Cheryl Ronk; Julie Oatman, CMP, Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort 12: Cheryl Ronk; Laura D’Artanay, CTA, SMG - DeVos Place 13: Kristy Doak, CMP, CTA, Lansing Center, Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau; Brenda Haight, CMP, CTA, Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau; Amanda Toy, CMP, CGMP, GMS, CTA, Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau; Cheryl Ronk, CAE, CMP, FASAE; Mary Chris Hotchkiss, CMP, CTA, Greater Lansing Convention & Visitors Bureau 14: Terese McInnis, CMP, GMS, Traverse City Tourism; Cheryl Ronk

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ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < ISSUE 1> 2018 7


THE TOP 12: TREND #1 By Carla Kalogeridis

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ot too many people can say that they have been president of an organization for 29 years — but MSAE’s Cheryl Ronk can. As Ronk prepares for a well-deserved retirement later this year, she is taking time to not only reflect on things she’s learned, but also to use that experience and insight to leave her members and colleagues with a parting gift: the identification of 12 trends that Michigan associations must navigate to remain relevant and thrive (see sidebar). This year in Association IMPACT, we will dive into two trends each issue. Ronk’s role was to call attention to the trends, but we will rely on key MSAE members to flesh them out and lead the discussion. First up on the trends list are strategic

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Snowmobiling in Traverse City Courtesy of Traverse City Tourism member engagement models and proactive approach to legislative and regulatory officials. To help with these, Association IMPACT calls on Bill Manson, executive director, Michigan Snowmobile Association; Christine Jourdain, executive director, American Council of Snowmobile Associations; and Ed Klim, International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association.

TREND #1: Engagement models contain thoughtful strategy regarding experiences. Although association conventions and meetings are on an upswing in attendance and sponsorships, Bill Manson took the bold move of canceling his annual meeting for the foreseeable future. “We decided to end our annual convention and membership meeting starting this year,” says Manson. “Instead, we are going to engage with members by hosting one-day seminars on specific topics and issues of interest to them.” Although it’s too soon to evaluate the impact, Manson points out that the move is really his association responding to the needs of its members. “Our annual convention was when we gave out some awards and held general elections for officers,” he says.

“But our members — who are just your normal, every day snowmobilers — had to pay their own way. They were paying premium rates for rooms and meals, and it was costing them about $300 to $500.” Manson says while the association’s membership is growing back toward prerecession numbers, the number of people who wanted to spend that kind of money to meet was declining. “They didn’t see the value — and quite frankly — would rather spend that money on snowmobiling,” he says. “This change is more about getting rid of something they didn’t want rather than it is about trying something new.” This willingness to be responsive and flexible points to a growing trend of associations being more strategic and thoughtful in how they engage with members, even if that means bucking the traditional annual convention model.

This change is more about getting rid of something they didn’t want rather than it is about trying something new. — Bill Manson


THE TOP 12 TRENDS Manson’s new annual meeting format this year will be only one day, and it will be held closer to the heart of Michigan snowmobile country near the Mackinac Bridge. “We will focus on hearing committee reports and holding the general elections,” says Manson. “It will still be a drive for most members, but they can do it in one day or with just one night’s hotel if they want to.” He adds that the association’s program is running so well that there is really no reason to “rally the troops” for a big, multi-day meeting. Manson also sees the change as the side effect of another trend: the digital world. “There’s no void for the association to fill now that there’s the internet,” he says. “During the snowmobile season, we publish a monthly magazine for members as well as e-newsletters. To be honest, they can get all their questions answered online in five minutes. They post a question about the condition of a trail or the need for advice, for example, and they have 200 responses within the hour. And they aren’t going through our social pages to get those responses either.” As Manson progresses in the development of his modern-day membership engagement model, he will do so with an eye on the Millennials. “As an association, we never used to toot our own horn,” he says. “Now, we make sure they know what we’re doing. The message is about what the Michigan Snowmobile Association has done for you and what it has done for snowmobiling. It’s been a slow education process.” The association’s work in support of the sport includes acquiring permanent easements on corporate land and maintaining permissions with private property owners, which comprise about 50 percent of the trails. These easements cost snowmobile program about $2 million a year. “When we think about the Millennials and attracting new people to the sport, we are focusing on trying to put together additional fun events like scavenger hunts and weekend reunions,” Manson says. “I think we’re on the right track because we can have 200 people or more show up at these events. But the fact is that before the recession in 2009, we had about 300,000 registered snowmobile users and now we are at about 189,000. Lots of people lost

1. Engagement models contain thoughtful strategy regarding experiences.

It’s an interesting dynamic because it is basically four competitors joining together to take on projects for the good of the industry. — Ed Klim

their jobs and had to sell their snowmobiles. So, our engagement strategy includes attracting people to the sport who are just now finding themselves able to afford it.” Ed Klim is also focusing on member engagement models, but his challenges are the opposite of Manson’s. Why? Because Manson has 10,000 members and Klim has four. “Our members are the four main snowmobile manufacturers,” Klim says. “We do work for them all over the world.” Klim, who has headed the organization since 1995, is responsible for introducing people to snowmobiling and educating them on how important snowmobiling is to rural economies. However, the work he does with the four member companies is targeted elsewhere. “The board gives me specific tasks, and they don’t want me to step outside the boundaries,” he says. “It’s an interesting dynamic because it is basically four competitors joining together to take on projects for the good of the industry. We engage in a lot of different ways and through a variety of committees, but we never talk about things specific to products or new technology.” The committees cover focuses like communications, statistics and market research, engineering, and certifications. Like Manson, Klim’s four members have the Millennials in their sights as well. “Our engagement strategy is focused on the very successful Millennials,” Klim says. “As they get a bit older and are making more money, that’s when they are entering our marketplace. With the new growing economy, we’re seeing things begin to change. It’s been a tough eight years.”

2. Associations are more proactive and educational with legislators and regulatory officials. 3. Associations treat members as owners rather than customers. 4. Volunteers want valuable experiences. 5. New dues models evaluate what the customer wants. 6. Communication and marketing are a bigger part of the experience. 7. Millennials are expecting career path training. 8. Professional development models are adding badging. 9. Knowledge management is utilizing artificial intelligence. 10. Conferences and trade shows are here to stay. 11. Risk assessment and counsel is collectively generated by associations. 12. Increased partnerships and integration to reduce duplication and blaming.

Photo at left: Snowmobiling in Traverse City Courtesy of Traverse City Tourism Edward Klim, president, International Snowmobile Manufacturers Association; Christine A. Jourdain, executive director, American Council of Snowmobile Associations; William D. Manson, Jr., executive director, Michigan Snowmobile Association Photo by Tony Demin

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Photo by Tony Demin Pictured: Christine A. Jourdain Snowmobiling in Traverse City Courtesy of Traverse City Tourism

Get like-minded people together so that you are not going it alone. Joining forces makes you stronger. There is power in numbers. — Christine A. Jourdain

THE TOP 12: TREND #2 By Carla Kalogeridis

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ith the beautiful Michigan rural landscape as their office, when the snowmobile associations want to engage with legislators and regulatory officials, it’s kind of hard to turn them down. “We do enlightenment rides where we take legislators and other decision makers out snowmobiling,” says Christine Jourdain. “In most cases, they have no sense of what their public lands look like in the winter. We take the time to explain

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TREND #2: Associations are more proactive and educational with legislators and regulatory officials. our economic impact, and how the snowmobilers help fill up hotels, restaurants, and gas stations in rural America.” Manson and Klim also conduct legislative rides, often collaborating on a single event. “We try to plan an event every year so that legislators can come see what snowmobiling is all about,” Manson says, adding that the association provides coats, bibs, hats, and helmets for the two-day excursion. A favorite run is riding out of Indian River, up to Harbor Springs, over to Mackinac, and back down again. On average, 25-50 legislators will participate. “Most legislators have no idea how much we contribute to the local economies they serve or how we take care of the trails,” he adds. “Our whole sport is based on snowmobile law, so the legislature has to know who we are and what we do.” “Often, they don’t understand the product that they are legislating,” says Klim, “unless they spend some time with us enjoying and using the trails — only then do they understand snowmobiles.”

While the snowmobile outings are important and quite effective, says Jourdain, so is meeting the legislators on their own turf. “We’ve been active with an annual legislative fly-in for about 18 years,” she says. “We have about 75 members who fly in to DC for one day of meetings with agency leaders, partners and staffers and one day on the Hill, when they meet with their own legislators. As a group, we’ll average about 200 meetings a day.” Admittedly, she says the first few years, the legislators asked, “What are you doing here?” Now, they recognize people in the hallways and are asked, “Hey, are you coming to my office, too?” “They understand now how to use the snowmobile associations as a resource,” Jourdain says. For example, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management are stewards of the public lands. Because the associations have been effective and proactive, now these groups understand that the snowmobile associations help them care for these


COVERSTORY

lands, she says, including trail management, forest fire clean-up, and putting up snow fencing around areas that need protecting. Proactively engaging with the legislators and regulatory officials is particularly important when a challenge comes up. “Even though we care for the lands we use and we add a lot to the local economies, sometimes a group will want to block access because we are a motorized activity,” Jourdain explains. “When we have an issue with public land access, we let the legislators know and they want to help because they know that it is good for their constituents’ economies.” Another reason that being proactive is important is because many legislators have limited engagement with the snowmobile industry. “When we’re on the Hill, we remind them how snowmobiling impacts them,” she says, “and that’s easy when they are from areas that have snow and trails. But we have to engage with everyone because even if snowmobiling issues do not impact your district or state, you are still voting on the issue. Our job of educating the legislators is critical.” Both Jourdain and Klim have noticed the impact of the new presidential administration, and so far, it’s been a positive one for snowmobiling. “We are seeing changes in their receptivity, but often their hands are tied because the administration is still trying to get Congressional approval for people in key positions,” Jourdain says. “Until they are approved, they have no staff, and it’s hard to get anything done with limited clearance and no staff. But they have been very open and interested in talking to us about what we need and how they can help.” “The difference between the new administration’s Department of the Interior and the previous one is like night and day,” Klim agrees. “This administration’s leadership likes recreation, hunting, and fishing, while the previous administration did not. They have a whole different approach to public land and how that land should be enjoyed.” Klim makes monthly trips to Washington, DC, serving on recreation industry roundtables and talking about the macroeconomic decisions made in DC that impact his industry. His association has a full-time lobbyist, and when Klim flies in, they meet with 10-15 congressional leaders per visit. “We talk to them about land management

he says. “Basically, it’s about educating people on the economy of rural areas.” Recreation is an $890-billion global industry, and snowmobiling delivers about $40 billion of that, Klim notes. For associations looking to start or improve their legislative engagement, Jourdain recommends starting small. “Start with one event, perhaps jointly with a coalition,” she suggests. “Get likeminded people together so that you are not going it alone. Joining forces makes you stronger. There is power in numbers.” As for what kind of event, Jourdain admits that you will never know if you’re doing the right thing to engage people until you try it. “Be fluid, and remember that the issues and the people change. But if you don’t at least try to get their attention, someone else is going to get it,” she says.

and how to manage the land correctly,” he says. “Our biggest challenge are radical environmentalists. These groups have a lot of money, and they want human beings to stay out of the forests. We have to be proactive and work hard to educate legislators about our industry.” His work also keeps him busy close to home. For example, his association is instrumental in working with the U.S. EPA in developing and creating national emissions standards for snowmobile engines, and most of that work is going on in Michigan. “It took about five years to finish the latest standard, and nearly all that work happened with us getting our member manufacturers engaging with the engineers that work for the EPA in Ann Arbor,” he says. The association repeated the standard-developing process in Canada and has recently finished the European standard in Brussels, a regulation that he says took years to complete. “To engage in global regulations, you have to learn politics and bureaucracy,”

From

Carla Kalogeridis (carlak@arion-media. com) is editor of Association IMPACT.

to

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800-878-0710 artcraftdisplay.com ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® <ISSUE 1> 2018 11


F E A T U R E STO R Y

Crystal Mountain

NEW RENOVATIONS Several of Michigan’s leading hotel and meeting properties have announced renovations and additions to improve the quality of the association event experience.

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ssociations book about 60 percent of available meeting space in the state of Michigan. In fact, they offer more adult education than any other sector. Why? Because once you are in a profession, you stay current by interacting with others, most often through your association. Since it is challenging for meeting professionals to visit all properties to experience their latest renovations, each year MSAE features this synopsis of the significant changes to save you time on discovering what’s new in Michigan meeting space.

Auburn Hills Marriott Unveils MultiMillion Dollar Modern Renovation The project modernized and enhanced every aspect of the facility including guestrooms, pre-function, meeting space, lobby, restaurant, and all common areas. Michigan’s first M Club Lounge also opened, an exclusive concierge space with premiere services. The renovation included every aspect of the 290 oversized guestrooms and suites at the hotel through contemporary modifications, including new furniture, bathroom fixtures, flooring, increased electrical outlets and USB placement, and luxurious showers. Every guestroom now

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Crystal Mountain Crystal Mountain

includes mini fridges and safes, and all doubles now have double queen beds.

Comfort Inn & Suites Hotel & Conference Center Announces Newly Renovated Meeting Space Being centrally located in the state of Michigan, Mt. Pleasant is the perfect destination for corporate and social gatherings. With over 10,000 square feet of newly renovated flexible meeting space, including seven breakout rooms and an executive boardroom, the Comfort Inn & Suites Hotel & Conference Center offers everything needed, whether you are hosting 50 or 550. The 138-room hotel is ranked in the top 7 percent of U.S. Comfort Inn’s as a Gold Award Recipient. The rooms feature pillowtop mattresses, complimentary hot breakfast, and high-speed internet. There is an indoor pool and fitness room on site, as well as a Bennigan’s. The hotel is conveniently adjacent to Central Michigan University.

Crystal Mountain Completes New Additions to Enhance Guest Experience Crystal Mountain has completed yet another addition to enhance guest experiences for business or pleasure. Located in the

heart of the Crystal Village, the Inn at the Mountain adds an all-new vibe to the resort’s core area with the addition of 25 suites, the Mountain Market, Bru Bar, a rooftop terrace, and outdoor meeting spaces. The new Inn Residence suites feature contemporary design and high-end finishes. With floor to ceiling windows, these modern suites offer amazing slopeside and village views. Inn at the Mountain guests are allowed exclusive access to the rooftop terrace. This new space also serves as an outdoor event venue with a full bar, mingling space for 100 people, and stunning panoramic views. The new lobby Bru Bar is a great place for meeting up and grabbing a cup of coffee by day or a cocktail by night. The Mountain Market is a specialty grocery store featuring local culinary treasures, grab-and-go delights, and necessities guests may have forgotten. Crystal Mountain offers meeting and conference attendees the Crystal Center, a designated meeting and conference building featuring flexible seating for up to 350 people, lots of breakout spaces and outdoor meeting options, plus over 260 lodging rooms.


F E AT U R E STO RY

Auburn Hills Marriott Breslin Student Events Center Renovates and Increases Meeting Space At the heart of Michigan State University’s campus is the Breslin Student Events Center with easy access to the Capital City Airport, major highways and Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center. Our recently renovated facilities provide an additional 30 feet of perimeter space on the concourse, with new concessions and restrooms to accommodate events from small to large. The arena space is extremely flexible and our professional, experienced team members can adapt one setup to another quickly and efficiently. Our unique meeting rooms with Spartan flare have various setup capacities and range in size to accommodate small informal meetings to press conference style events. The Breslin Student Events Center is more than just an athletic facility; it is an event complex for corporate and association functions, employment fairs, commencements, memorial services and more.

Suburban Collection Showplace

Breslin Student Events Center

Breslin Student Events Center

Suburban Collection Showplace Breaks Ground on Event Space Expansion

Treetops Resort Completes $4.5 Million Renovation

The Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi has broken ground to add approximately 175,000 square feet of event center expansion space to its facility. Scheduled for completion by mid-2018, the expansion offers 90,000 square feet of exposition space including 70,000 square feet of clear-span, columnfree event center space with a 40-foot, clear ceiling height contiguous within the existing 210,000 square feet of exposition space. There will be 14 additional meeting/ banquet rooms including a 24,000-squarefoot, second-story ballroom overlooking the new event center and 16,000 square feet of upper and lower level pre-function space. The Suburban Collection Showplace will now offer over 300,000 total square feet of event center exposition space and four large ballrooms ranging from 5,700 square feet to 20,000 square feet with 38 total meeting/ breakout rooms. The expansion will enable the facility to host larger consumer shows, entertainment events, athletic events, trade shows, social events, and association conventions for up to 8,000 people.

Treetops is welcoming guests to a whole new lodging experience this year. Having just completed a $4.5 million renovation, both the Treetops Lodge and the Treetops Inn have undergone major overhauls. Guests will arrive to a fresh new look outside, including exterior paint, trim, balconies, and doors. Both lobbies are completely new, including a gift shop and the all-new Bar 81 in the lodge lobby, featuring food service, cocktails, and an ice cream parlor. The guest rooms have new furniture and fixtures; new bathrooms; and new wallpaper, paint, and carpet. The hallways and public spaces also feature new carpet, trim, paint, and wallpapers. Other updates include the indoor pool at the Treetops Inn, spa upgrades, a game room, and a new front desk. Treetops Resort offers a variety of unique meeting and conventions spaces. 

Treetops Resort

Treetops Resort

ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < ISSUE 1> 2018 13


I N D U S T R Y U N D E R STA N D I N G

Gamification and Associations

This isn’t your father’s Donkey Kong. Games have grown up, and your association can use them to retain members and enhance the member experience. By John Forsberg

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grew up in the dawn of video games. First it was Pong, then Space Invaders, Pac Man, and Defender. Countless quarters were dumped into saving the universe, princess, spy, or frog. I loved them all. Fast forward to today with the innumerable choices of games for our mobile devices. True, you can blast a zombie or fling an angry bird, but now mobile devices and game development are rapidly being integrated into how we do business.

something more complex such as when Samsung used online gaming for its loyalty program with features leaderboards and mission-based games to guide users through multiple activities for product training. Gamification is proving highly successful. A survey conducted by TalentLMS showed that 79 percent of participants said that they would be more productive and motivated if their learning environment was more like a game.

The Rise of Gamification

I Was Wrong

Gamification is the process of implementing game mechanics into a non-game context to drive user engagement. For example, it can be something as simple as accumulating points with each Starbucks purchase, or

Here’s a short example from my own experience. Lastmobil year, my application developer firm took over a mobile app company. One of their most popular apps is an event and conference mobile app for

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Search for these resources in the digital library on www.thirdthought.msae.org

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“Engagement Strategies for Enhancing Events” “Managing Capital Expenditure for Technology Investments”

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“How Technology is Changing the Organization”


I N D U S T R Y U N D E R S TA N D I N G

associations, allowing event visitors to view their agenda, get information about exhibitors, view a facilities map, and so on. One of the available add-on options for that app is a game called Exhibitor Bingo. It allows event attendees to gather points as they interact with exhibitors at the show. They can view their own score as well as see and compete with others at the event. At the end, the association gives out prizes to the highest scores. Initially, when we took over the company, I recommended eliminating that game feature. Despite all those statistics I just described earlier, I assumed Exhibitor Bingo was a frivolous add-on that few would be interested in. Then we talked to the clients and reviewed the app traffic reports. Oh, how I was wrong. It turns out that Exhibitor Bingo is used by nearly every association using the app, and reports have shown it to be a

proven hook to encourage attendees to use the app during the event. Simply put, people like to accomplish, compete, and win — even at association conferences. Gamification will only continue to grow and associations are well positioned to make the most of it. What can you do to add gamification into your conference, website, social media sites, and online learning to retain members and enhance their member experience? For us, this lesson was a wake-up call as to how gamification — even something very basic — can have a profound impact on member engagement. Now, if we can somehow work zombies into it… well, that would be awesome. 

By The Numbers The survey conducted by TalentLMS also found the following. These statistics are being heard as the gamification market is expected to grow by a rate of more than 48 percent by 2019.

89

of those surveyed stated

% that a point system would boost their engagement.

82

in favor of multiple difficulty % are levels and explorable content.

62%

John Forsberg (jforsberg@i2integration. com) is CEO of I2Integration.

stated that they would be motivated to learn if leaderboards were involved, and they had the opportunity to compete with other colleagues.

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A S S O C I AT I O N KNOWLEDGE

Associations Can Produce Survey Results in Real-Time

With exciting new online capabilities, it is more cost effective for an association to conduct market research, providing realtime data that has less bias and response variations.

By Josh Shapiro

A

mong the most wide-ranging and valuable of association activities, conducting research and gathering and analyzing statistical information provides members with marketing data, helps identify new trends, and enables businesses and professions to function more efficiently. According to ASAE, nearly 65 percent of associations gather statistics and facilitate or conduct research. It was further noted that over 25 percent of associations conduct compensation surveys. Traditionally, a survey is administered annually or bi-annually, or at the very least, data is collected at a specific time and the report released at a specific time. Now

Complete the New Operating Ratio Survey MSAE has switched to a real-time analysis for the new Operating Ratio Survey. Contact Taylor Benavente at benavente@msae.org or 517-332-6723 with questions. 16 ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < VOLUME 35 > 2018

that automated surveys are administered online, results can be processed essentially in real-time. Because of this, organizations can prepare white papers on the results more frequently than previously possible and identify any changes or trends, without incurring additional analysis costs. If sufficient data is in the system, members can submit data when convenient for them and get results from peers at the same time. How does this work? Once the population has submitted sufficient data across the various data segments or peer groups, data is available for reporting. After the organization has entered its data, it can see the other data for its peer group.

STEP 1 Visit http://bit.ly/2CbevN8 to take the survey. Make sure to have a calculator, staffing/payroll information, general ledger, budget, revenue by category, and detailed financial statement by category.

To get the results, data is uploaded from the survey to a pre-populated spreadsheet by simply clicking “refresh” in Excel. After this, tables or graphs can be inserted into a Word file, and the report is exported as a PDF. Since this can be done at any time, documents and survey results can be updated repeatedly throughout the year, with very little additional effort. This creates a constant and smooth connection with the associations, which leads to a higherlevel of customer service to members. Real-time survey results allow for the production of actualized dashboards that include key process indicators. This produces survey insights that aren’t misled

STEP 2 Complete the online survey by the second submission deadline of March 30. Progress cannot be saved so please make sure you can complete the survey in one sitting.

STEP 3 Review data. Results will become live once 50 participants have completed the survey. All members will receive 25% off the member prices, and nonmembers will receive 17% off the nonmember price.


A S S O C I AT I O N K N OW L E D G E

by outdated information and can account for any recent market changes that have occurred. With web surveys, you can avoid variations on responses that are affected by seasonal events. For example, the survey can be refreshed after an event to see the responses during that season or can exclude a specific season entirely. Also, the lack of variation will provide comprehensive, actualized, and purified data, which will lead to better decisions and results. This is great news for both the association and the member. Not only are online surveys easier to administer, but also they are less time consuming, faster, low-cost, more accurate, and easier to analyze than ever before. With these exciting advantages, it is more cost effective for an association to conduct its own market research through surveys, resulting in real-time data that has less bias and response variations. What types of surveys are associations conducting? In addition to member

satisfaction and member engagement surveys, associations offer research that is valuable to the members. Compensation and benefit surveys are common, as are benchmarking surveys, information about clients’ needs, and preferences to help market the members’ services. Statistics enable businesses and members to compare their output, productivity, and costs. Marketing studies allow members to share research costs collectively. New trends research allows the profession or industry to stay current on new developments in their industry or profession. Is your association providing its members with valuable research, and have you considered the advantages of moving the process online?  Josh Shapiro is founder of Business Science Associates. He can be reached at (404) 3340984 or js@business-sci.com. He is creating real-time data surveys with MSAE on member engagement and the Operating Ratio Report.

Keep Learning in Third Thought®

Search for these resources in the digital library on www.thirdthought.msae.org

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“The Effective Use of Research in Advocacy”

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“Research in Associations” “Research Projects – Examples from a Skilled Workforce”

CON NECTION

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ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < ISSUE 1> 2018 17


Better Together Profiles P E R S O N A L AWA R E N E S S

The Better Together Profiles is a regular series showcasing association professional pride.

Olga DuBois

Andrea Bretz

Nicki Polan

Michigan Manufacturers Association #mimfg

Michigan Realtors | @MichREALTORS

Michigan Boating Industries Association @boatmichigan

10 years

6 years

30 years

Describe your job in one sentence

Responsible for providing leadership and direction in finance, accounting, human resources, and information technology operations.

Provide internal, collaborative solutions in accounting, finance, grant innovation, and member education.

My job is to advance, promote and protect boating in Michigan.

Most proud of as an association professional

Today, just like a 100 years ago when most associations were formed, we provide a unified voice that promotes development, growth, and prosperity of our members.

I am proud to see the organizations I have worked for create effective changes in legislation that have had positive impacts on real lives in Michigan. It is exciting to be part of initiatives that lead to making Michigan a better place to live and work.

Currently, our association is the most financially sound it has ever been in its 60-year history, meaning if we have another downturn, we will be strong enough to continue to help our members as we move through it.

Best career advice received

There is only one thing that makes a dream impossible to achieve: The fear of failure.

Every situation has the potential to be an open door to a new opportunity. Do not disregard anyone you meet as inconsequential on your journey through life. And, most of all, be kind.

Remember the 24 hour rule. When faced with a difficult situation or a challenging goal, I always wait 24 hours before answering, reacting, or implementing. This gives me time to think, cool down, ask for outside opinions, see all sides, and ultimately make better decisions.

If I had magical powers in the association sector, I would...

I would replicate resources, so associations can implement more great ideas and accomplish more great projects.

The ability to predict broad economic fluctuations to proactively prepare for increases and decreases in membership.

Make membership renewal the most fabulous experience of everyone’s life, so they would be waiting with great excitement for the day their dues renewal notice arrived.

Telepathy, so we can improve communication.

The Midas Touch, which would create an endless stream of financial resources to offer infinite member resources, services, and advocacy.

Subliminal communication so I can get time in every member prospect’s head to help them understand all the reasons they should be MBIA members.

Years in association management

First-choice superhero power for accomplishing goals

Association theme song

VP OF FINANCE, HR, AND IT

“Let Everyone Shine” the 2018 Olympics song

18 ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < VOLUME 35 > 2018

OPERATIONS PROJECT MANAGER

“Don’t Stop Believing” by Journey

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

“What a Wonderful World” by Louis Armstrong


A S S O C I AT I O N K N OW L E D G E

Adding Audio and Visual to Your Member Communications

The attention span of your members is stretched across a very broad spectrum of communication outlets. Here’s how to put the latest technologies to work for you. By Michael Rogers

C

ommunicating with members is a key challenge facing association leaders. When I started in the association world 40 years ago, reaching our members was pretty simple. This was when there was no Internet, no email, no social media. Our choices were fairly basic: send them a letter or phone them. You also hoped they read your printed magazine or newsletter or heard/saw a mention of you in earned media (local newspapers, radio, and television.) That was it. Today, the challenge is that your members receive an overwhelming amount of messages from a constantly shifting blizzard of sources: podcasts, YouTube, live and streaming video content from sources like Netflix and Facebook, email, social media, etc. — not to mention the old standbys like print, direct mail, and even the shrinking universe of earned media. The attention span of your members is smeared across a very broad spectrum of communications outlets. This means that you have to be using all those outlets as well. You must have a presence in all the media they consume.

This article will focus on how you can harness a very valuable but underutilized set of communications tools: audio and visual content presented through tools like podcasts, live/recorded videos, and webinars.

Communications vs Marketing

Communications is often conflated with marketing. But while all marketing is communications, not all communications is marketing. It can be a subtle distinction. Marketing messages trend along the lines of “join or renew now!” and “use our association products and services.” This is vital to association financial survival, but not always sufficient to motivate member involvement, loyalty, and activism. That’s where member communication steps forward, manifested through a wide range of tools and techniques. Member communication contain at least an indirect marketing message because it reinforces the value of the association. But its main focus should be informing, energizing, and involving your members, and developing your leadership.

Common association communications tools include print, email newsletters, website posts, white papers, and social media. But there is also tremendous value in audio visual content — audio podcasts, Facebook Live shows, YouTube productions, webinars — as cutting-edge products to complement and enhance your current communications efforts. Audio-visual content is not difficult or expensive to produce. Many years ago, when I worked as a local radio reporter, my news-gathering gear consisted of a cassette tape recorder the size of a briefcase. I had to edit my news reports on a reelto-reel deck the size of a suitcase. Scripts were typed on manual typewriters. And the finished product could only reach an audience through AM and FM radio. When I started in association communications, organizations still had to use film cameras to record reports for their members. Electronic video cameras were just coming onto the market, but at an inflation-adjusted price of many tens of thousands of dollars — not to mention the additional multi-thousand dollar investment

ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < ISSUE 1> 2018 19


A S S O C I AT I O N KNOWLEDGE

in editing equipment and skilled staff. Today, smartphones, software, and the Internet have reduced equipment costs to a relative pittance — although investment is still needed in human expertise to gather and produce the audio visual content.

Why It’s Important

Your members are increasingly living in a post-print media, online (mostly mobile) world. We may not like it, but the trend lines clearly point to people reading less and listening/watching more. According to Edison Research:

++ 112 million Americans have listened to an audio podcast. That’s up 11 percent from 2016. Overall, 40 percent of Americans age 12 or older have listened to a podcast at some point. ++ 67 million Americans listen to podcasts monthly. That’s up 14 percent in one year. ++ 42 million Americans listen to

++

++

++

++ ++

podcasts weekly, representing 15 percent of the total U.S. population. Only three percent of Americans go to the movies weekly. Year-over-year growth rates for podcast listening have been remarkably consistent, with 1020 percent increases each year. There is a steady increase in carbased audio and in-home audio (Amazon Alexa and Google Home), a potential new way for consumers to listen to podcasts. Podcast consumption has been substantially more common among Americans under the age of 25 since the advent of the medium. But the first time, the percentage of 25 to 54 yearolds listening to podcasts monthly was greater than any other age group. 27 percent of American men and 21 percent of women have listened to a podcast in the past month. The average number of shows

Why Video Is Important

80% 3x 2nd 5G 75%

Cisco predicts live Internet video will grow 15-fold by 2021. About 80 percent of global Internet consumption will be video content. Social media company Buffer reports that video posts on Facebook gets almost three times the engagement as other kinds of posts. YouTube is the second largest search engine after Google. Edelman Digital reports that the spread of 5G will lead to more video consumption on mobile devices. Gen Z (today’s teens) consume almost 75 percent of their entertainment from streaming video services like YouTube and Netflix, according to the Wall Street Journal. These teens may not be your target customer market today, but they will be tomorrow, and their media consumption habits are the trends of the future.

20 ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < VOLUME 35 > 2018

listened to per week is five (same as 2016). Twenty-one percent of weekly podcast listeners (approximately nine million Americans) listen to six or more shows every week. ++ Like blogs five years ago, podcast listening is still driven largely by subscriptions (new shows automatically download to your phone, tablet, or computer). The average podcast consumer subscribes to six shows. ++ Two-thirds of podcasts are played on a phone or tablet. Fifty-two percent of podcasts are listened to at home, 18 percent in the car. ++ Eighty-five percent of listeners hear all (or most of) a podcast.

What Are the Tools of Audio/Video? There are a variety of ways to express your communications messages with audio/visual tools: Audio podcasts. Long-form (15-60


A S S O C I AT I O N K N OW L E D G E

minutes) distributed through iTunes or other podcast distribution services so members can subscribe and listen on a regular basis; shortform shows (60 seconds to several minutes) produced through a service like Soundcloud that permits you to post the shows/reports on social media and your website (can also be distributed through iTunes.) Videos/Facebook Live. Ten-to-30 minute-long shows that permit audience interaction (through online comments) and the authenticity and vitality of live video. Replays can later be boosted on Facebook for further audience distribution, or posted on your website and YouTube. Another option is a live video broadcasting service like BeLive. YouTube. Pre-produced videos to which members can subscribe. You can establish a branded channel for your association and repost the videos on your website and social media. YouTube is not the only video distribution outlet (Vimeo, for

example) but is certainly the best known. Webinars. Live, web-based informational seminars with various interactive tools to permit audience participation. Particularly well suited for Power Point-style presentations designed to communicate data, product info, and other educational material. These can include a mix of audio/ visual material and audience participation.

What About Production?

What’s the cost in time, budget and resources? It depends on your objectives and the tools you already have in-house. Audio podcasts. Equipment is a modest expense. You can create good quality audio shows with a smartphone as your audio-gathering device, or, alternatively, a computer. A sign of podcast professionalism is a microphone that’s a step above the one that is built into your phone/laptop. Invest in multiple mics (and stands) and some

kind of audio interface device/mixer if your show includes more than the host and a single guest. There are dozens of options available from Amazon or professional suppliers like B&H.com. This does not have to be intimidating or expensive when your start out. In a pinch, just try using your smartphone and then go from there. Editing your audio can be done with inexpensive (or even free) audio editing software. I use Sound Forge Audio Studio but Audacity, Ocenaudio, Free Audio Editor, mp3DirectCut, and Acoustica Basic Edition are good free choices. Choosing software depends on your preferences and how much of a learning curve you can tolerate. Podcast hosting services (like Soundcloud and LibSyn) are also modestly priced. However, a key requirement to successful podcasting is having someone on staff, in your membership, or a vendor who is experienced in skillfully interviewing

ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < ISSUE 1> 2018 21


A S S O C I AT I O N KNOWLEDGE

guests and presenting a smooth, interesting program. Broadcasting experience is helpful but not a strict necessity. What’s more important is having a show host who is personable, easy to listen to, knows the subject being discussed, and can create a comfortable communications environment for the guests and listeners. Facebook Live videos. Again, entry-level involvement does not necessitate a great deal of equipment expense. You can accomplish a lot with just a modern smartphone and lavalier microphones. Facebook (at least for now) does not charge for Live shows. But, for maximum impact, the Live programs need to be promoted/boosted through Facebook’s paid promotional system that aims programs at audiences you can select from the Facebook universe of users. YouTube. If you’ve already done a Facebook Live show, congratulations! It’s two-for-one — download your recorded video, maybe make some simple edits with your video editing software, then upload it to YouTube (or another video-hosting service of your choice, like Vimeo.) But, if you want to solely do YouTube videos, you can use the same basic gear that you utilize for Facebook Live. If you want to do video editing and production that is beyond the capabilities of your computer’s built-in editing software, secure the services of a professional video firm.

How These Audio/Visual Tools Are Used by Associations

Member communications. Tell and show your members information about new product and service offerings, and remind them of current products. Reinforce loyalty and enhance membership renewals. Public policy advocacy. Inform membership of current legislative news and priorities. Motivate action (legislative contacts, letter writing, emails, etc.) Educate and persuade public policy leaders. Feature public policy allies on podcasts/ videos to reward their support and provide visibility for your legislative friends. Leadership development. Audio podcast and video productions are an opportunity to showcase your association leaders. Let them hone their communications skills by talking to members and the public to share

22 ASSOCIATION IMPACT ® < VOLUME 35 > 2018

their expertise and their belief in the value of their association involvement. Hearing from and/or seeing association leaders testify about their association is much more powerful than just hearing from staff.

Complimenting Your Other Communications Efforts

The top YouTube video stars have tens of millions of subscribers. “S-Town”, an audio podcast by the creators of “This American Life,” got nearly two million subscribers just a week after it was launched. Will your association video or audio production get those kinds of numbers? Unlikely. This underlines the hazard of basing your success on the raw number of viewers, downloads of subscribers. It doesn’t matter if you have a thousand people in the audience if they are the wrong kind of audience — people who are not part of your target demographic, are unlikely to become members or are not going to buy your association products and services. On the other hand, what if you only have dozens of people in your audience? You’re still golden if those people are committed association customers who are receptive to your audio/ visual message and take action on it. How do you measure the true value of audio/visual communications? How do you measure the impact that communications has on member loyalty and perceived membership value? Tried-and-true surveys can surface valuable insights. So can polling member renewals: Why did you rejoin? What influenced you? A communications audit can provide great information about which specific communications tools are

Keep Learning in Third Thought® Search for these resources in the digital library on www.thirdthought. msae.org

Read

“A Communications Plan: Key to Achieving Greater Recognition”

most utilized by your members. However, a survey or audit should supplement, not replace, the experience and intuition of staff and leaders. Rank-and-file members sometimes will tell you what they want — but often, they don’t know what they want and won’t until they see it.

Hiring to the New World of Audio/ Visual Communications

To take advantage of where the world is going (more listening and watching, less reading), you need to be prepared with the staff talent that can leverage these tools. That means hiring good communicators, regardless of their staff function. Your people need to organize their ideas and verbally communicate them in a persuasive way. You don’t need to hire a former TV news anchor, but you do need to hire people with public-speaking expertise who are not shy about standing in front of an audience, a microphone, or a camera. Those who say they prefer to stay behind the scenes are going to be left behind. Today, your members are consuming media in every kind of segment — and you have to be represented in all those segments as well. Moving forward, audio visual communications is going to be paramount. Are you ready?  Michael Rogers (mike@orioncommunications pr.com) is president of Orion Communications and Public Relations in Holt. He recently retired after 21 years at the Small Business Association of Michigan as vice president communications.

Review

“Communications Plan” (sample document)

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“Communicating Issues With Members”


BOARD OF DIRECTORS MSAE STAFF Barry Cargill, CAE, Chairman Executive Director Michigan HomeCare & Hospice Association

Cheryl O. Ronk, CAE, CMP, FASAE President/CEO

Denise E. Amburgey Chief Financial Officer of Denise McGinn, CAE MSAE & General Manager of Chairman-Elect MSAE Service Corporation

President Association Guidance Maryanne F. Greketis, CMP

Career Enrichment Manager

Lorraine Goodrich, CPA Treasurer Shawnna Henderson CFO Strategic Marketing Manager Automotive Industry Action Group Angela DeVries Cynthia H. Maher, CAE Secretary Executive Director Michigan Plumbing & Mechanical Contractors Association

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Association Community Manager

Kelly Chase, CMP Member Service Coordinator Kristy Carlson, CMP

Mike Wenkel, CAE, Certification Manager Past-Chairman Executive Director Taylor Benavente Michigan Potato Industry Commission Association Industry Advocate Jared Burkhart, CAE Peter Terry Executive Director Sales Representative Michigan Council of Charter School Authorizers ASSOCIATION IMPACT® Steve Carey, CAE Carla Kalogeridis Executive Director Editor National Truck Equipment Association

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Michael Moss, CAE Association IMPACT® is published President bimonthly by the Michigan Society Society for College & University Planning of Association Executives, 1350 Andi Osters Haslett Road, East Lansing, Assistant Director MI 48823, (517) 332-6723. Michigan High School Athletic Subscribers should direct all Association inquiries, address changes, and subscription orders to that Kimberly R Pontius, CAE address. Articles written by Executive Vice President outside authors do not necessarily Traverse Area Association of reflect the view or position of the REALTORS® Michigan Society of Association Jack Schripsema, CTA Executives (MSAE). MSAE’s position on key issues will be President & CEO clearly stated. Manuscripts are Greater Lansing Convention accepted at the approval of MSAE, & Visitors Bureau which reserves the right to reject Richard P. Seely, CAE or edit. Appearance in Association ® Account Executive /Medicare Advisor IMPACT does not constitute endorsement of the advertiser, Member Insurance Solutions, Michigan Dental Association its products or services, nor does Association IMPACT® make Bob Thomas, IOM, CAE, CMP any claims or guarantees as to Vice President of Operations the accuracy or validity of the and Executive Director, Michigan advertiser’s offer and reserves Chamber Foundation the right to reject any advertising deemed unsuitable. Advertising Ara Topouzian rates available at www.msae.org. President/CEO Troy Chamber of Commerce © MSAE 2018


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Association IMPACT: The Top 12  

Three snowmobile association executives discuss two of the Top 12 Trends that will affect how associations operate and thrive in the near f...

Association IMPACT: The Top 12  

Three snowmobile association executives discuss two of the Top 12 Trends that will affect how associations operate and thrive in the near f...

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