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Published October 31, 2018

Kids on the farm...

Safety tips for parents of young farmers, Page 2


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October-November 2018

Safety tips for parents of young farmers

eople who live in cities, exurbs or suburbs may not come across farms very frequently. But millions of people, including children, still live on farms. In fact, in 2009 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that more than one million children under the age of 20 lived, worked or had a regular presence on farms in the United States. Protecting children from injury on farms, especially those who perform work on farms, is of paramount importance. The American Society of Safety Engineers offers the following safety tips to parents of children who will be spending time on farms. • Know and obey the laws. Various state and federal laws are in place to protect young children from farm-related accidents and injuries. Age requirements dictate which jobs children can perform on a farm, and parents should adhere to those requirements. Asking children to do more than they’re physically capable of can lead to accident, injury or even death. • Review equipment operation instructions. Before assigning children a task on the farm, parents should review the equipment operation instructions. Doing so can help parents reacquaint themselves with tools and equipment they may not have used in awhile, and that can make it easier for them to teach kids how to use such equipment. In addition, reviewing equipment instructions may provide insight to parents unsure if their children are old enough to use certain tools. • Inspect equipment. Before children perform any tasks on the farm, parents should inspect the equipment their children are likely to use to make sure each tool is safe. Make sure tools are in proper working order, as broken or poorly working equipment increases the risk of accident or injury. • Enroll children in farm safety camps. The ASSE recommends that parents contact their local Cooperative Extension and Farm Bureau offices to enroll children in farm safety camps. Such camps can teach kids safe farming techniques and the proper ways to use age-appropriate tools. • Set a positive example. Another way for parents to protect their children on the farm is to set a positive example. Parents can do so in various ways. Using equipment properly, removing tractor keys from ignitions when tractors are not in use and exercising caution when using hazardous materials shows kids the importance of caution when working on farms. Hundreds of thousands of children perform jobs on farms across the country. Parents who want to teach their kids to farm should always do so with safety in mind.

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Get This Political Season Behind Us – PLEASE!

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ovember 6th will be the day of reckoning for lots of would-be “public servants”. About half the aspirants to taxpayer funded jobs will have to return home and work for a living. The other half will be in their plush offices, with lots of perks, and then start working to be reelected two or four years down the road. Frankly, both political parties are to blame for the mess we are in. The Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, Elizabeth “Pocahontas” Warren faction is throwing everything they can think of at the Republicans.

It’s down and dirty politics— and the Republicans too often are responding at their level. Witness the President Trump statement of calling a notorious seeker-of-fame “horse face”. Stupid, ludicrous and uncalled for—take the phone away from our President and tell him name calling is over! The Ted Cruz and Beto O’Rourke race is getting testy. Cruz can often be an obnoxious pest—but at least he doesn’t want to open our borders to any and all comers. O’Rourke, like Cruz, got his college education at an Ivy League school on the east

coast. If you are going to live in Texas, support our colleges and universities—rather than pack up and head to Harvard, Yale or Columbia. Just enroll at Texas A & M, Rice, Texas Tech, or heaven forbid, the University of Texas. If you are proclaiming to be “hometown” just walk the walk. Members of the U.S. Congress must sit up nights coming up with new spending schemes to garner more votes in their home districts. One for the Environmental Protection Agency resulted in $800 pencil holders and $7,000 executive desks. Last year twelve members

of Congress who own farms collected $637,000 in farm subsidies. And what about developing a Smartphone app for parking your car? That one cost us $150,000. The list goes on and on! One that really stood out was “Sex Ed for Prostitutes in California—cost 1.4 Million Dollars! Reckon our hardpressed livestock farmers can get a government gift to buy hay and other feeds? Thought for the day: Politicians need to spend more time praying for others—not spending time preying on the populace. That’s –-30-- horace@valornet.com

Pioneer Village to host Harvest Festival Corsicana Daily Sun

The City of Corsicana Parks and Recreation Department presents Harvest Festival from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8 at Pioneer Village.

Everyone is encouraged to attend and bring lawn chairs to enjoy some old-time country music featuring Music on The Porch with John Byron Haynie. Guest appearance by Reba Billingsly, season eight contestant on FOX TV’s MasterChef.

There will be family fun for the entire family including pioneer reenactors, apple bobbing, hay rides and games. Beth Barrows of Navarro Fiber Friends will present a spinning demonstration. The Pioneer Village is located at 912 W. Park Ave. For more information contact Sharla Allen, Corsicana Parks & Rec Director or Deb Miller Pioneer Village Curator at 903-654-4846.

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October-November 2018

East Texas Beef & Forage Clinic Special to the Jacksonville Progress

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he Cherokee, Panola, Rusk & Smith County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Offices will be holding a joint program Friday, November 16, at the Henderson Civic Center located at 1500 Forest Parkway in Henderson. Current Texas Department of Agriculture Pesticide License holders are encouraged in to attend this event as 5 CEU hours (2 general, 1 IPM, 2 laws & regulations) will be available. Please remember to bring

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your TDA Pesticide License number with you. Cost to attend is $30 and includes lunch. Please RSVP to the Cherokee County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office at 903-683-5416 or the Rusk County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office at 903-657-0376 by November 13th to guarantee your lunch reservation. Registration/breakfast will be 8 a.m. with the program beginning at 8:30 a.m. Breakfast is sponsored by Heritage Land Bank. Topics for the program will include: Feral Hogs in East Texas – Jamie Sugg, Rusk County Extension Agent – Ag/NR

A Multi-tiered Approach to Brushy Weed Control - Vanessa Olson, Forage Specialist at Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Pesticide Updates – Darren Rozell, Rozell Sprayers Pesticide & Chemical Safety/Farm Safety – Nykole Vance, Southwest Center for Ag Health, Injury Prevention & Education Understanding the Pesticide Label – Lee Dudley, Panola County Extension Agent – Ag/NR Individuals with disabilities who require an auxiliary aid service or other

accommodation in order to participate in this meeting are encouraged to contact the Rusk County Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Office at 903-657-0376 for assistance before November 2, 2018. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension provides equal opportunities in its programs and employment to all persons, regardless of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, disability, age, genetic information, veteran status, sexual orientation, or gender identity. The Texas A&M University System, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the County Commissioners Courts of Texas Cooperating.

Tractor Safety on the Farm

arms rely on tractors to operate profitably and efficiently. As necessary as these machines are, extreme caution must be executed while using one. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2016, 417 farmers and farm workers died from a work-related injury. The leading cause of death: tractor overturns and other transportation incidents. The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension urges operators to inspect these important components of a tractor before entering the driver’s seat.

Roll-Over Protection Structure

Hydraulic Connections

A ROPS is a frame which provides a safe area for the tractor operator in the event of Your machine relies on a hydraulic system to operate attachments. Inspect connections a rollover. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1976 required all tractors over 20 at the fittings for leaks and check hoses for damage. Depending on the type of equipment horsepower to be equipped with these protective additions. Ensure it is in good condition the hydraulics control, a faulty system can be fatal. You should also ensure you have ample by inspecting the two- or four-post structure attached to the frame. If you notice more fluid to operate the system. than minor damage, the unit must be replaced.

Slow-Moving Vehicle Warnings

Seat Safety Switch

It’s important this switch functions properly as it stops equipment from being started accidentally. This safety device only allows the ignition to begin if it senses an operator sitting in the seat, which helps prevent runaway tractors and tractor run-overs. These incidents are the second most frequent cause of tractor-related deaths while farming.

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Ear Tag Identification G

ood ranch managers often use numbered ear tags to monitor their herd more closely. Clem thought Reg ought to give up and start all over again. They had moved the pairs that were mothered up to the east pasture down the road. Accidentally, calf number R31 had gone with that bunch. His mama had been left behind. In his I.D. number the R stood for red. His mama’s number was also R31 but her tag was yellow. In the record book she was listed as YR31. Her calf was listed as BYR31. There was also a cow in the herd with a red tag numbered 31 (R31 in the book).

Mama YR31 was bawlin’ and missin’ her calf. Reg asked Clem to haul her to the pasture and find her calf. On the way he asked him to

pick up a dry cow they’d left in a trap. When Clem reached the pasture he had two cows loaded in the 16-foot stock trailer. They were separated by the inside gate. Sure enough a calf came runnin’ toward the trailer. He was black brockle just like the cow. She went to bellerin’. Unfortunately she was in the front. Clem couldn’t coax her out the side escape hatch. So, somehow he smashed the dry cow between the inside gate and the side of the trailer with a piece of cotton rope. And using one foot and one hand managed to lift the wooden door panel out of the tail gate. Mama YR31 squeezed by and leaped out. She raced to the herd and never even looked at the calf! Clem closed the trailer up, leaving the dry cow in the rear section. Reg drove up. After finding out that Clem never actually saw the calf suck the cow, he thought they ought to

check her to be sure. Out across the pasture they drove to find the cows. Reg was drivin’ and lookin’ for a place to cross the creek. “Reg,” said Clem. “We don’t wanna cross here. I see cattails.” They stuck it when the front bumper hit the opposite bank! Clem escaped out the window and they walked the mile back to his pickup and trailer. Reg got the handy man jack and set it under the tongue. “Reg,” we’re not gonna need the jack. We’ve got a thousand pound cow in the back section. Reg jacked it up anyway. When Clem slid the sleeve back on the hitch it came off the ball like a monkey touchin’ a hot plate. The nose of the trailer shot four feet in the air, rolled forward and creased the pickup’s tailgate...permanently. It still won’t open. By the time they’d pulled Reg’s truck outta

the creek, the cows had circled the pasture, gone out the gate Reg had left open and were headed down the road. It took ‘em an hour to get the cows gathered back in the east pasture. As they were closing the gate they saw a calf with a blue tag that read R31 suckin’ a cow with a red tag 31. And next to her was a cow R31 with a yellow tag nursin’ a big Charloiscross calf. They never did get the calf ’s number but as Reg said, “That’s alright. We’ll catch’er in the fall!”

BEES: A honey-making marvel

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By Rich Flowers

Athens Daily Review

xecutive director of the East Texas Beekeepers Association Dick Counts told members of the Athens Kiwanis in October that bees are busy creatures and because of humans they stay busier. If people didn’t harvest the honey, their work would be a lot easier. “If we didn’t rob from the bees, they wouldn’t spend as much time as they do making other bees that will swarm out and take their place,” he said. “Because we demand so much of them, the queen is constantly laying and replacing those bees.” Counts has been raising bees for more than 40 years and is one of the few beekeepers in East Texas with the tools and experience to remove hives from homes. He said the amazing activity within the beehive is evidence of God’s role in creation. One queen, he said, is sufficient for a colony of 30,000 to 40,000 bees. The queen is fertilized once and can live for about six years, producing eggs throughout that time. Counts said the East Texas Arboretum and Botanical Society in Athens has one of the few observation bee

hives in the East Texas area. “Pollen is the protein the bees need, and nectar gives them energy. With some enzymes they add, they turn that nectar into honey.” The bees start getting active in February and March. “As things bloom, they’re storing that honey and processing it.” The best time to buy local honey begins in June, Counts said. His advice for anyone who wants to buy local honey is to know the beekeeper. “If you’re really serious about it, visit and see that he does have bees in the boxes. He could have boxes and no bees.” Counts said that in the Tyler area, three large sellers of honey do not own bees. “It’s a big business now,” Counts said. “They buy it in Houston, by the port.” The average cost of good honey from a local beekeeper should be $7 to $8 a pound, he said. “That’s a decent price. The honey in the grocery store is cheaper, but it’s not of the same quality as you’d get from some of the local growers.” One concern of the beekeepers is the decline of the bee population because of manmade chemicals. Counts asked for a

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show of hands from those who had not picked up a can of insecticide at some time and sprayed into the air. None were raised. “It’s all of us,” Counts said. He was asked if any insecticide can be

sprayed on a garden that’s safe for the bees. “Not to my knowledge,” Counts said. “There’s no good answer, because the people who make that stuff are stronger than all of the beekeepers together.”


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October-November 2018

Happy Fall Ya’ll

Progress photos by Alyssa Massingill

Left, above and below right, the fall plant sale held in J’ville recently. The Cherokee County Master Gardener Fall Plant Sale was held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 13, at the Ruth B. Nichols Arboretum in Jacksonville. Locally grown plants were for sale. Below left and bottom, Scarecrow Trail! The ninth annual Scarecrow Trail – sponsored by the Cherokee County Master Gardeners – was held Oct. 6-18 at the Ruth Bowling Nichols Arboretum in Jacksonville. Proceeds benefited the Manna Pantry at The H.O.P.E. Center.

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USDA approves commercialization of new strain of cotton By Laylan Copelin

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Texas A&M Communications

he U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday gave its blessing to Texas A&M AgriLife Research to move toward commercialization of a new strain of cotton that has the potential to help feed half a billion hungry people across the globe while also doubling the income of cotton farmers. It is only the fourth time ever that a university has successfully petitioned the USDA for deregulation – and the first time in Texas. The development was the result of a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist’s life’s work. After 23 years, Dr. Keerti Rathore figured out a way to remove a naturally occurring toxin from cotton seeds that made them inedible to people and most animals. The breakthrough by Rathore and his team at Texas A&M AgriLife Research will allow farmers now to grow cotton for both fiber and food. The new seeds can be eaten, ground into flour or made into a peanut butter-like spread. They also can provide an excellent source of protein for animals that were unable to consume cotton seeds before Rathore’s discovery. Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp, who oversees Texas A&M AgriLife Research along with 11 universities and seven state agencies, said Rathore’s work will have a dramatic effect across the world. “The work and dedication of Dr. Rathore has paid off,” Chancellor Sharp said. “He and his team exemplify the values of the Texas A&M System, and because of them, more than half a billion people across the world may have access to a new form of protein, and our farmers will be able to earn a much better living.” Through a project funded by Cotton Incorporated, Rathore and the Texas A&M team have developed a cotton plant without significant levels of toxin in the seeds. The plant, however, maintains normal levels of the natural toxin gossypol in the rest of the plant, which is important to protect it from pests. Rathore said he has been focused for nearly a quarter of a century on unlocking “the potential to make this new source of protein available to hundreds of millions of people.” Countries all over the world will see the advantages from Rathore’s development, but cotton-producing countries in areas that are struggling with famine and malnutrition could benefit the most from Rathore’s work. They will be able to use the seed-derived protein for human consumption and as a feed for poultry, swine or aquaculture species. “I also realized the value to cotton farmers everywhere of removing gossypol from the cottonseed because such a product is likely to improve their income without any extra effort on their part or additional input,” he said. “Such a product can also be important from the standpoint of sustainability because farmers will produce fiber, feed and food from the same crop.” The next step after move by the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, or APHIS, is approval from the Food and Drug Administration, which is expected in the coming months. Then, it is onto commercialization, which would require involvement from philanthropies, investors or corporations.

Volatile lumber market hit record highs HUNTSVILLE– Landowners may wonder what the record-high lumber prices in the first half of 2018 signal for timber prices. This historically high lumber price leads many to expect higher prices for standing timber, however, the association between lumber and timber prices is loose over short time spans. Lumber and timber prices should rise and fall closely together, in theory. However, after plotting price fluctuations between 1984 and 2018, Forest Economist Nana Tian and Forest Resource Analyst Aaron Stottlemyer found that differences between lumber and timber prices can be dramatic over shorter periods, such as a quarter or one or more years, though the prices follow a similar pattern over many years. Several factors contribute to the short-term disconnect. “The price of lumber is primarily affected by the U.S. housing market, which continues to improve since the 2008 recession,” Tian explained. The U.S. housing market, current lumber production capacity, and reductions in Canadian imports all factor into record-high lumber prices in early 2018. However, timber prices have stayed relatively flat over the last couple of years and the primary reason is the abundant supply of standing timber. Technological advancement in lumber production can also weaken the correlation between lumber and timber prices. Abundant timber supplies and improved technology result in lower timber prices, even during periods when lumber is in high demand. “In summary, the combination of housing markets, lumber demand and production capacity, sawmill technology, timber supplies, and local market conditions all contribute to short-term disconnections between lumber and timber prices,” Tian stated. There is an abundant supply of standing timber, with possible reasons being that some mills closed and many landowners pulled their timber off the market in the immediate aftermath of the 2008 recession. This caused the total volume of logs in the U.S. South to rise unimpeded the last few years. For example, the total inventory in the South increased 8.1% from 231.7 billion cubic feet (BCF) in 2008 to 250.4 BCF in 2014.

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October-November 2018

Bad Weather? No problem with indoor arena!

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hese days, a rodeo organizing committee’s decision to conduct their annual rodeo in an indoor arena is no big deal. During the past weekend, for example, the All-American Rodeo Finals, a larger Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association/Women’s Professional Rodeo Association annual show, was inside the Extraco Events Center in Waco. The Professional Bull Riders’ biggest show last weekend was inside the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, N.C. Indoor rodeos are very common these days and there are lots of venues that can be utilized for rodeo performances. But when the Fort Worth Stock Show’s Rodeo organizing committee opted to hold the world’s first indoor rodeo inside Cowtown Coliseum in the Fort Worth Stockyards 100 years ago, it was a big deal. At that time in 1918, organized rodeo had moved from being a brand spanking new sport, but was still in its infancy. For example, the West Texas

community of Pecos, which claims to have held the first organized rodeo, conducted its first edition in 1883. The Pecos rodeo was and still is featured in an outdoor venue. The potential problem that every outdoor rodeo committee

faces is potential adverse weather that would diminish the quality of the rodeo. Today, the Fort Worth, Texas, rodeo’s organizing committee conducts the Stock Show Rodeo in January and February inside Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum and weather is not a factor. When defending Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association world all-around champion Tuf Cooper backs into the roping box at the Fort Worth

rodeo, it doesn’t matter whether his stiffest competition saddles up to rope on a warm and sunny winter day but he’s up on a nasty, frigid day. Cooper, who has residences in Decatur and Weatherford, is the 2017 tie-down roping champion at the Fort Worth Stock Show’s traditional PRCA show, which runs 16 days and 29 performances. He said he takes comfort in knowing weather is never a factor. “When you have 29 performances, when it’s that long, mother nature can come in do a lot of different things, especially in North Texas,” Cooper said. “So, it’s very nice to be indoors and to know that I can show up at any one of the 29 performances and have the same chance on any day.” Unlike pro football that’s mostly outdoors, the entire field of rodeo competitors usually are not all scheduled to compete on the same day. With that in mind, indoor venues allow everyone who is entered in the rodeo to compete under the same conditions no

matter which performance they are scheduled. The Fort Worth Stock Show Rodeo was in Cowtown Coliseum from 1918 through 1943. In 1944, the Fort Worth Stock Show Rodeo moved to the Will Rogers Memorial Coliseum. This year, both the annual Fort Worth Stock Show Rodeo and the weekly rodeo at Cowtown Coliseum have celebrated a century of indoor rodeo. For example, the main theme of the rodeo program that has been distributed at weekend rodeo performances throughout 2018 at Cowtown Coliseum is “100 Years Of Indoor Rodeo.” Today, the Cowtown Coliseum is the home of the Stockyards Championship Rodeo that’s held on most weekends and is classified as an “open” show, meaning pros and amateurs can enter. Unlike other weekly rodeos in cities such as Steamboat Springs, Colo., that are outdoors and seasonal, Cowtown Coliseum’s rodeo activity is year round. Every weekend throughout the year, there’s some type of rodeo show at Cowtown Coliseum. “We wouldn’t be here today if we were outdoors,” said Cowtown Coliseum manager Hub Baker. “Thanks to the city of Fort Worth, we have heating and air conditioning. We’re proud of that. We’re the only rodeo in the world that’s every Friday and Saturday night year round.”

PBR update

At the 25th PBR: Unleash the Beast tour stop in Greensboro, Kaique Pacheco, a Brazilian who lives in Decatur, finished third during the Oct. 13-14 show and is ranked No. 1 in the world title race with 5,246.66 points. Claudio

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Brett Hoffman, a Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame member, has reported on rodeos for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for more than three decades. Email him at bchoffman777@earthlink.net.

Montanha Jr., another Brazilian who lives in Decatur, is ranked No. 2 with 3,313.33. Matt Triplett clinched the title in Greensboro and catapulted from No. 23 in the PBR world standings to No. 15. This weekend, the PBR’s top tier tour stops in Nampa, Idaho. The 25th annual World Finals is Nov. 7-11 at Las Vegas’ T-Mobile Arena.

PRCA update

At the Oct. 6-13 All American ProRodeo Finals in Waco, Tyson Durfey of Weatherford, the PRCA’s 2016 tie-down roping champion, clinched the tie-down roping title with a final round with a time of 8.6 seconds.Other winners were steer wrestler Scott Guenthner (4.1 seconds), team ropers Billy Bob Brown and Hunter Koch (4.8 seconds), saddle bronc rider Chase Brooks (89 points on Pickett Pro Rodeo’s Delta Dawn), barrel racer Ivy Conrado (15.99 seconds), bull rider Parker Breding (87 points on Andrews Rodeo’s Rank Hank) and bareback rider Jamie Howlett (86 points on Pickett Pro Rodeo’s Shady Night).


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From Scratch with Love Red Wine–Braised Beef with Apple Gremolata

Total time: 50 Minutes (plus 3 hours braising) makes 4-6 servings A fork-tender roast that’s spent the day bubbling away in the oven makes a perfect supper on a lazy Sunday. To start, brown a whole chuck roast, then deglaze the pot with red wine to pick up all the rich, beefy flavor left behind. Pop the roast in the oven and slow-cook it with herbs and aromatics until it falls apart. To cut through the richness of this dish, top it with a fall-inspired gremolata made with tart diced apples tossed with lemon zest and parsley. Serve with smashed red potatoes or a baked sweet potato to soak up the sauce.

Instructions

For the beef: 1. Heat the oven to 325°F and arrange a rack in the lower third. 2. Pat the roast dry with paper towels and trim any excess fat or sinew. Season generously with salt and pepper; set aside. 3. Heat the oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the roast and cook, turning occasionally, until it’s browned all over, about 15 to 20 minutes total. Transfer to a large plate and set aside. Meanwhile, peel and cut the carrots into large dice; set aside. Cut the celery and onions into large dice. 4. Add the carrots, celery, and onions to the pot and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables have softened and are just starting to brown, about 5 to 7 minutes. 5. Add the wine, scrape up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot, and bring to a boil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the wine is reduced by half, about 7 minutes. Meanwhile, peel any loose outer skins from the garlic head and cut off the top quarter to expose the cloves (reserve the top for another use). 6. Add the broth or stock, vinegar, garlic head, thyme, bay leaves, and rosemary, stir to combine, and bring to a boil. Return the roast and any accumulated juices on the plate to the pot. 7. Cover with a tightfitting lid and place in the oven. Cook, flipping the roast every hour, until the beef is fork tender, about 3 hours total. Meanwhile, make the gremolata. For the gremolata: 8. Peel, core, and cut the apples into small dice. Place the apples in a medium nonreactive bowl, add the parsley, olive oil, and zest, season with salt and pepper, and toss to combine. Taste and season with additional salt and pepper as needed, cover, and refrigerate. To serve: 9. Remove and discard the herbs and garlic from the pot. Break the beef into large chunks, top with the gremolata, and serve with the sauce.

Ingredients

For the beef: • 1 (4-pound) boneless chuck roast • Kosher salt • Freshly ground black pepper • 1/4 cup olive oil • 3 medium carrots • 3 medium celery stalks • 2 medium yellow onions • 2 cups dry red wine • 1 medium garlic head • 2 cups low-sodium beef broth or stock

• 1/4 cup red wine vinegar • 4 thyme sprigs • 2 bay leaves • 2 (3-inch) rosemary sprigs For the gremolata: • 2 medium tart apples, such as Granny Smith • 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh Italian parsley leaves • 3 tablespoons olive oil • Finely grated zest of 1 medium lemon • Kosher salt • Freshly ground black pepper

Recipe by Chefs Collaborative and Ellen Jackson via Chowhound

East tExas stock PricEs

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$190

500lb - 600lb

1.15

1.52

505lb - 600lb

$115

$168

600lb - 700lb

1.10

1.35

605lb - 800lb

$110

$142

700lb - 800lb

1.00

1.30

200lb - 300lb

1.25

1.75

300-DOWN

$125

$190

300lb - 400lb

1.20

1.70

305lb - 400lb

$118

$192

400lb - 500lb

1.15

1.67

405lb - 500lb

$110

$184

500lb - 600lb

1.05

1.38

505lb - 600lb

$103

$156

600lb - 700lb

1.06

1.30

605lb - 800lb

$100

$135

700lb - 800lb

0.85

1.28

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

SLAUGHTER

SLAUGHTER

Cows

0.35

0.56

Cows

$38

$54

Bulls

0.60

0.80

Bulls

$68

$76

PAIRS

$950

$1450

PAIRS

STOCKER COWS GOATS

$600hd

$1350hd

$25hd

$100hd

TRI-COUNTY LIVESTOCK MARKET Updated: 10/13/2018 Head Count: 1374

STEERS UNDER 300lb

1.25

1.85

300lb - 400lb

1.20

1.85

400lb - 500lb

1.15

1.65

500lb - 600lb

1.10

1.55

600lb - 700lb

1.05

1.45

700lb - 800lb

1.05

UNDER 300lb

$1000

BRED COWS

NACOGDOCHES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

HUNTS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

Updated: 10/23/2018 Head Count: 854 Buyers: 54 Sellers: 105

STEERS

$1300 $1200/hd

ATHENS COMMISSION COMPANY

Updated: 10/15/2018 Head Count: 1330

STEERS

$700/hd

Updated: 10/19/2018 Head Count: 878 Sellers: 136

STEERS

UNDER 300lb

1.30

2.00

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.91

300-DOWN

1.25

1.85

300lb - 400lb

1.22

1.92

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.93

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.70

400lb - 500lb

1.15

1.75

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.71

400lb - 500lb

0.80

1.70

500lb - UP

1.00

1.58

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.63

500lb - UP

0.80

1.60

1.37

600lb - 700lb

N/A

N/A

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.51

HEIFERS

700lb - 899lb

1.00

1.33

300-DOWN

1.00

1.75

1.20

1.63

UNDER 300lb

1.20

1.90

HEIFERS

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.65

300lb - 400lb

1.15

1.60

300lb - 400lb

1.15

1.80

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.87

400lb - 500lb

0.80

1.50

400lb - 500lb

1.10

1.45

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.62

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.71

500lb - UP

0.70

1.45

0.85

1.56

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.55

SLAUGHTER

N/A

N/A

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.42

Cows

0.25

0.57

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.34

Heavy Bulls

0.60

0.78

1.00

1.21

PAIRS NA

NA

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

500lb - 600lb

1.05

1.38

500lb - UP

600lb - 700lb

1.05

1.28

600lb - 700lb

700lb - 800lb

1.00

1.21

SLAUGHTER Cows

SLAUGHTER

0.35

0.56

700lb - 899lb

Cows

0.25

0.52

Bulls

0.55

0.77

SLAUGHTER

Heavy Bulls

0.68

0.78

PAIRS

$850

$1300

Cows

0.25

0.58

Low-Middle

PAIRS

NA

NA

Bulls

0.60

0.81

BABY CALVES

NA

NA

STOCKER COWS

PAIRS

$930

$1350

STOCKER COWS LOW-MIDDLE

$600hd NA

GOATS

$1100hd

BABY CALVES

NA

HORSES

$475hd

$1200hd

$35hd

$150hd

$25

$100

STOCKER COWS

N/A

N/A

BABY CALVES

Top

$200hd NA

$600

$1250

STOCKER COWS

0.50lb

1.00lb

GOATS

$35hd

$300hd

$20hd

$200hd

$150hd

$450hd

$1650hd

BABY CALVES

NA

HORSES


East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

10

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

October-November 2018

Bulls ‘bash’ into Jacksonville B

Progress staff reports, Photos by Jessica Payne

ull riders once again had a chance to prove their skills, all while raising money for East Texas’ youth, during Jacksonville’s annual Nicky Wheeler Memorial Bull Riding event, which is part of the Tuff Hedeman Breakout Series. The Jacskonville event was held Oct. 6, and it’s formerly known as the Bull Bash Revolution but was renamed this year in honor of long time stock contractor and bull riding champion Nicky Wheeler. Wheeler called Flint home but spent his career helping to raise money for youth across the state. He died in April at the age of 61. “The event is now renamed and will forever be called the Nicky Wheeler Memorial Bull Riding event,” event co-organizer Brian Beasley of Jacksonville said on Monday.  Wheeler spent his life working in the rodeo industry and after his competition days, served as a bull riding judge, stock contractor and owner of Fresh Country Fundraising - a fundraiser company benefiting 4H and FFA students across Texas. In addition to advancing, winners received prize money and a custom, engraved Hy O Silver Trophy Buckle.

ET archer brings down P&Y 11 pointer By Matt Williams

I

Outdoors Writer

t’s been a slow start to the 2018 Archery Only season in eastern Texas with limited activity filtering in across the region. The best buck reported thus far in Region 6 belongs to Joseph Loggins of Lufkin — and it’s a good one. Loggins, 23, arrowed a talltined 11 pointer from 32 yards on the afternoon of Oct. 6 while hunting from a tree stand on his lease in Trinity County. The buck has been green scored at 143 6/8. It’s a shoo-in to qualify for entry to the Pope and Young record book. Pope and Young is the official registry for white-tailed deer and other big game animals taken using approved archery gear. The minimum net score required on typical racks is 125; 155 on non-typical ones. Loggins’ handsome typical, a main frame 10 pointer, is certain to crack the minimum mark with plenty of room to spare after 60 days drying. “I’m pretty proud of him,” he said. “It’s a buck of a lifetime for me.” Loggins said he’d been patterning the buck using a game camera for more than a week. He had pictures of the deer for eight consecutive days. Not surprisingly, the buck did most of its moving around under the cover of darkness. “I only had one picture of him during daylight,” Loggins said. “All the rest were at night.” The hunter said the buck

Courtesy Photo

Joseph Loggins is shown with the handsome 11 pointer he arrowed Oct. 6 in Trinity County. Loggins’ buck has been green scored at 143-6/8. showed up in the company of a much younger buck at around 6:30 p.m. on a muggy Saturday afternoon. The two deer stepped into a shooting lane where he and

his wife had scattered corn two days earlier. The bigger deer was well within range, but forced Loggins into a nail-biting waiting game

before finally offering him a clear shot. “I must have watched him for close to 25 minutes before he finally turned broadside,” Loggins

said. “My heart felt like it as about to beat right out of chest.”

Matt Williams is a freelance writer based in Nacogdoches. He can be reached by e-mail, mattwillwrite4u@yahoo.com.


October-November 2018

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

11

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Pumpkin spice and everything nice

Five not-so-typical uses for pumpkins By Sierrah Sowell Corsicana Daily Sun

D

uring the season nothing says fall breezes like autumn pumpkins. Whether it is hearing the crisp leaves crackle beneath your feet or going to the local pumpkin patch to find a pumpkin for carving, it is the time for sweater weather and being together with the ones you love. Pumpkins have a big role during Halloween. Many people use pumpkin carving as a way to spend time together and express their creativity through designs. This also allows for the pumpkins to be used as decor during the season and for trick-or-treaters, to light their way in the night. Pumpkin pie and other desserts along with meal dishes, are classics at the Thanksgiving table for most families. While all of these are great uses for pumpkins, some other creative ideas can be inspiring as a way to still enjoy the season and try something new. Here are five not-so-typical uses for pumpkins:

Bird Feeder Bird feeders are a great way to use a pumpkin and give back to the environment at the same time. You’ll need: a small pumpkin (up to 10 pounds), small sticks, twine or rope and birdseed. The first step is to cut the pumpkin in half and hollow out the inside of the pumpkin completely, leaving a half inch thick shell wall. Then, insert two sticks across the pumpkin from one side to the other, creating a perch for the birds. Attach twine or rope to the bottom inside of the pumpkin with tack, knotting them through the center to create a hanging feeder. Fill the inside with birdseed and for another option, you can also use the leftover pumpkin seed for feed as well. Hang this anywhere in the backyard to have a festive hangout for birds to enjoy.

Pumpkin Vase Typical pumpkin decor can be changed up for a new style with multiple innovative uses. A pumpkin makes a beautiful vase for flowers. To begin, cut the pumpkins top off, removing it with the stem, leaving the

center exposed. Next, clean the guts out of the pumpkin and then you can paint the outside if you desire. Fill the pumpkin will multiple flowers, making an arrangement with several type of blooms. Another option is to paint the pumpkin instead of carving. Use Modge Podge on the pumpkin, then applying glitter and sealing the area with a second coat of Modge Podge to seal in the glitter. To create more art, use stencils on the pumpkin to paint on whatever graphics you would like is another easy option for a creative touch.

Pumpkin Martini To spice things up a notch, adding pumpkin to an alcoholic beverage can give a twist to a typical cocktail. For ingredients you will need 1/2 ounce cream liqueur, 2 ounces vanilla vodka, 1/2 ounce pumpkin liqueur or pumpkin spice syrup. For topping 1 teaspoon of whip cream and garnish with a cinnamon stick. To begin, pour the cream liqueur and vodka into a cocktail shaker filled with ice and shake well. Then add the pumpkin liqueur or pumpkin spice syrup and shake again. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and serve with a dollop of whip cream and a cinnamon stick.

Face Mask Pumpkins also make great face masks. The uses for pumpkins go far beyond food. Several vitamins are present in pumpkins and are good for promoting healthier and younger looking skin. To make your own pumpkin facemask at home, you will need 1/4 cup organic pumpkin puree, one egg, 2 teaspoons raw honey for dry or normal skin and 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar if you have oily skin. The mask is simple to make, with only two steps. First, mix the pumpkin puree and the egg until well blended. If you have dry or normal skin, then add honey. For oily skin, add apple cider vinegar. Wash your face and then apply the mask for 15-20 minutes and rinse it off. Not only will your skin be looking fresher but it will smell delicious.

you will need a pumpkin, a baking sheet or dehydrator, a knife, a vegetable peeler and your oven. Begin by cutting the pumpkin open and removing all of the seeds. You can cut the pumpkin however you like, either into quarters or chunks. Bake the pumpkin pieces in the oven for one hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. You can place the pumpkin pieces on a baking sheet or in a glass dish. Remove the pumpkin from the oven and use the vegetable peeler to cut off the outer skin of the pumpkin. Then, use the knife to slice the pumpkin chunks into the desired thickness and amount for your pet. Then, for the final step, place the Dog Chews If you are a dog lover, this pumpkin treat pumpkin pieces into the dehydrator or onto a baking rack to dry out. is sure to be a delight. To make the treats,

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Doing these activities during the fall season brings joy and gets everyone in the mood for the holidays. When doing one of the DIY’s or creating a new use for a pumpkin, all of these hacks allow for little to none of the pumpkin to go to waste. When beginning one activity, another can be started just as easily with left over pumpkin parts. The possibilities are endless and yet the concept is still the same: Spend time doing something you love with yourself or with the ones you care about most as we all prepare for the new season and the upcoming holidays.

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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

12

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

October-November 2018

Bullard angler wins 1st at Championship

B

Progress staff reports

randon Miles of Bullard and Steve Gonclaves of Midlothian won first place on Saturday at the 11th Annual Texas State Crappie Championship Tournament, which took place on Lake Fork. Miles and Gonclaves were competing in Division 2 and had a two-day total of 14 fish weighing in at 24.30 pounds. They edged out Bob McAffrey (Killeen) and Greg Young (Weatherford) who reeled in 13 fish that topped out at 24.02 pounds. According to tournament officials, the anglers were forced to battle changing fish patterns and torrential rains but were still able to bring impressive and record-breaking stringers to the scales. A total of 18 teams competed in Division 2. Miles and Gonclaves also won the Pro Angler Elite Rod Challenger Award (13.12 and 11.18 pounds) and the Bobby Garland Big Fish Award on Day 1 (2.29 pounds). To cap things off the team of Miles and Gonclaves was named as Anglers of the Year in Division 2 during a ceremony that was held at the Emory Civic Center on Friday. Crappie Anglers of Texas (CAT), a non-profit organization dedicated to the sport of crappie fishing, sponsored the tournament. CAT has more than 280 members nationwide. All CAT tournaments pay back at least 100-percent of the anglers’ entry fee. For more information, visit www.crappieanglersoftexas.com or contact Pat Martin 214-729-0139.

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October 2018 Farm & Ranch  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

October 2018 Farm & Ranch  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

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