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Summer learning:

FFA learns through community service, Page 2

Farm, Venue, Table, Retreat Relaxing getaway in Navarro County, Page 5

Service Power Equipment Tyler company fills outdoor niche, Page 6

Anderson County fig tree may be world’s largest, Page 12


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July-August 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

FFA learns through community service By Lisa Tang

Palestine Herald-Press

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embers of the FFA at East Texas schools are learning to help others through community service projects -- even during summer break. Officers of the Oakwood chapter at Oakwood High School volunteered at the Rolling Hills Tree Farm in Fort Worth, during FFA’s 91st annual convention, July 15-19. Once a prison, the tree farm now donates many trees to the city of Fort Worth — one of Texas’ most beautiful cities. Students learned about the forestry industry by moving trees from the nursery to the open field, uprooting baby trees for planting elsewhere, and talking to city workers about caring for trees and clearing power lines. Westwood agriculture teacher Taylor Brown was surprised at how well the students worked together, expressing pride in their willingness to serve the community. “These girls truly have a better understanding of plant science,” Brown said. “They represented Oakwood ISD and FFA very well.” Oakwood FFA has 78 students in the club, grades 8-12. FFA stands for Future Farmers of America, but the organization has grown to encompass a variety of agriculturerelated careers. It is the premier youth organization preparing members for leadership and careers in the science, business, and technology of agriculture. During the school year, the group does a canned food drive, participates in parades in Palestine, and donates items to the animal shelter. Brown also wants to extend his group’s service to elderly farmers and ranchers who need help caring for property and animals. He said teens can do yard work, feed animals, trim trees, and repair fences. Westwood FFA students also work during the summer, but on projects closer to home. Agriculture teacher Bethany Lynch said students earned community service hours while building a barn and cleaning the agriculture shop, saving the district thousands of dollars in maintenance and

construction costs. Their influence, however, extends beyond the school walls. The students perform service projects that complement community events: Parades, holidays, the county fair, and even the beginning of school. The Anderson County Youth Livestock Show is one of the year’s highlights. Students showcase and sell animals, construction, and welding projects. Sales benefit the school’s agriculture program and raises money for college scholarships. They also lead tours of the complex and teach elementary students about animal science.

Contributed photos

Above and below left, Oakwood FFA officers learned about forestry and agriculture during a community service project at Rolling Hills Tree Farm in Fort Worth, Texas, during the FFA 91st annual convention July 15-19.

The fair is open to everyone in the county, but as participants and volunteers, the 100 or so Westwood FFA students make a visible impact. “We all get together as a county to see the students succeed,” Lynch said. During the holidays, Westwood FFA raises money by filling food orders for a food distributor. Students unload and open boxes and distribute fresh fruits and meats to local residents. They also

earn service hours while collecting and delivering canned food to local food banks or working with the animal shelter. At the start of the school year, the group pursues more service projects. FFA officers in uniform open doors in the car line at the primary school, greeting children, parents, and new teachers. Cooking and serving breakfast to teachers and staff at the beginning of the school year is another Westwood FFA tradition.

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July-August 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

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What A Sorry State Of Affairs!

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an natural gas for electricity and heating— bring on the “Green Revolution”, at taxpayer expense. The inmates are running the show in many locales—and residents are afraid to speak out. An increasing number of U.S. cities are being dominated by wild-eyed liberals that offer their unique views on use of our abundant natural gas supplies. The elected leaders in Berkeley, California have decided to ban any use of natural gas for new buildings, including homes, commercial buildings and other structures. The politicians call their decision one that will lead to “fossil free” energy use in that bastion of idiocy. No matter that natural gas is far cheaper than other sources of energy for heating and cooling. Costs will be passed on to the builders of

new homes and other structures. This means working Californians who are barely making ends meet will be paying more in the future to satisfy the demands of local politicians. Even here in mostly conservative Texas, the city of Austin is passing new laws to restrict the use of natural gas and coal inside their pristine boundaries. “Fake meat” is being sold as an alternative to hamburgers derived from our beef cattle. Making the product from plants, with color from beet juice added to simulate blood, is being merchandised as an alternative to the real stuff. But some of our restaurant operators are not going along with the artificial products. Arby’s and Taco Bell have issued a resounding “NO” to the sale of the plant-based meats to their menus. Taco Bell says their

restaurants will continue to offer vegetarian foods to their lineup— but none of the make-believe beef substitutes. East Texans with timber for sale are just not happy with prices for a product that takes decades to grow from planting to harvest. Unless prices improve considerably in the near future, the prospects of maintaining present asking prices of timberland is going to decline. Land owners are paying taxes, keeping roads maintained, and often making payments on their timberland loans. Making a return on the timber investment is becoming more difficult and causing prospective buyers to rethink their offers. The only saving grace in our area is the folks from the city who want a place strictly for recreation and have no interest in making a profit

from their investment. If this market starts drying up it will be a sad day for timberland owners. Lots of lawyer jokes are recycled and become Aggie jokes. One I heard recently involves a doctor, a lawyer, a priest and a little boy. The four were flying on a small plane that developed engine trouble. The pilot put on a parachute and yelled to passengers to do the same, and he bailed out. There were only three parachutes remaining for the four passengers. The doctor grabbed one and said “I am a doctor, I save lives, and I must live” and he jumped. The lawyer said, “I am a lawyer and we are the smartest people in the world—and I deserve to live”. Then he jumped out. The old priest looked at the little boy and said, “My son, I have lived a long and full life. You have your whole life ahead

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of you. Take the last parachute and live in peace”. The youngster told the priest not to worry. “We still have two parachutes. One of the smartest men in the world just went skydiving with my back pack”. That’s –30–

Corn grows wild in Athens garden

By Rich Flowers

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Athens Daily Review

his year, the rainy spring and summer caused a few headaches for gardeners and hay growers, but contributed to some pretty tall corn stalks at Delbert Stutts’ farm in Athens. “I plant some about every year for us to eat. I’ve never grown it as tall as this,” Stutts said.

He bought the seed from a vendor, but isn’t sure exactly what type it is. The tallest talks were up to about 13 feet high. “I haven’t had anyone really tell me what kind it is,” Stutts said. Stutts home is located on County Road 3715, not far outside Loop 7, north of town. He has about 115 acres. Stutts has been on the property since 1958, Some popcorn stalks were also growing in the garden. Rainfall in April, May and June was

about 10 inches above normal this year. The rain wasn’t as kind to some of his other crops. Many people planted too early and saw their efforts drowned. “I planted my watermelon seed and it rotted. I planted potatoes and they rotted,” Stutts said. On his wall, Stutts has a reminder of a year his watermelons turned out much better. A certificate, signed by then Henderson County Extension Agent Rick Hirsh said the melon, picked on August

26, 1998, weighed a county record 85.5 pounds. In the frame, Stutts has a picture of the huge striped melon. Through the years, Stutts has also grown sugar cane on some other property he owns in the area. He boils that down into sweet ribbon cane syrup. “Then you’ve got to cut it and strip it.” After that the cane is run through a squeezer. “You squeeze this juice out, then put it in this vat and cook it,” Stutts said.


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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

July-August 2019

Some like it HOT!

Kim Benton

Cherokee County Horticulturist

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uring this summer heat, most of us do our gardening in the air-conditioning, knowing that our tomatoes are spent and that the thick mulch we put down on the flower beds is doing its job. The heat can be downright dangerous, so we stay inside and dream of our fall and winter gardens, watching the butterflies and hummingbirds work the flower beds over. If you don’t have flowers that will bloom in this heat, let me give you some suggestions. There are so many flowers that will pack a punch despite the temperature. Want more wings in your garden? If that is the case, there are some plants that are irresistible to our winged friends and tough as nails in the summer as well. Good plants for all of these situations: rudbeckia, zinnia, orange cosmos, and blanket flower are all easily grown by scattering seeds, while Salvia greggii, firebush, lantana, and flame acanthus are just a few of the great perennial options. Let’s focus on a few of my favorite summer heat-seekers. Firebush (Hamelia patens) is a tender perennial for us here in zone 8 (it is happier in zones 9and 10), but it’s worth the effort of mulching the roots in winter. The slender red flowers on this showy bush are a delicious draw for hummingbirds and butterflies, and this fellow loves our summer heat. It blooms most heavily from July through September, and its height (4-5 ft.) makes it a good background plant for the flowerbed. I have found lantana to be an absolute workhorse in the garden, especially in the summertime, when so many plants are taking a break. Not these guys. They are getting into their showiest blooms when it is almost too

hot to breathe outside. There are both bush (L. camara, and L. horrida) and trailing species (L. montevidensis) to love and enjoy. They will be strong perennials for you and make a few additions to your garden as well. The bush types will grow seedlings for you (don’t eat those berries, they are poisonous), and the trailing lantanas tend to root in most of the places where their stems touch the ground Flame Acanthus (Anisacanthus quadrifidus) is another tough Texas native. I find this woody shrub to be very under-utilized. The slender red blooms are perfectly designed for the feeding habits of butterflies and hummingbirds, and the drought hardy nature of this guy makes it perfect for our summer heat. It loves to show out in August in September, and will be happily covered in a mass of red blooms. Zinnias (Zinnia elegans) are gems! They are wonderful butterfly magnets and love to bloom in the heat, plus they are easily grown by seed. And on top of that, they make lovely, long-lasting cut flowers and look stunning in a mass planting. It sounds too good to be true, so of course there is a slight draw back. Zinnias can be prone to a couple of foliar diseases, but planting them with enough space for air circulation, as well as watering at ground level and not on the leaves, can really help cut those instances down. Also there are resistant varieties of zinnias out there, and almost every color of the rainbow to choose from. I know, I know! I probably missed your favorite. Smile at it for me, and enjoy your summer blooms.

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July-August 2019

5

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Talkin’ Dirty I

n this column I have often mentioned scours, abscesses, big tits, bad bags, cancer eyes, foot rot, slurry pits, afterbirth, retained placenta, castration, heat cycles, sheep pellets and snotty noses. Over the years I have received the occasional letter castigating me for talkin’ dirty. It is never my intention to offend the sensibilities of my readers. My poems and stories are always written with the idea that people who read them regularly are livestock people. In real life I’m not comfortable

cussing or telling blue stories in mixed company and I’m no different writin’ this column. So, if I’m talkin’ to a cattlewoman I assume she knows what bull semen is. That she has had scourin’ calves in her house and knows what it means when someone says it’s rainin’ like a cow peein’ on a flat rock. Those subjects are part of her lifestyle. I feel no need to ask her to leave if I’m doing a rectal exam on a cow. Farm kids are the best example. They are what we have taught them and what they have experienced. Fifteen years old

who are learning to artificially inseminate learn the proper words for the anatomy involved. Uterus had never been a dirty word to them. Children on a dairy farm learn to spot cows that are in heat. Washing the bag or tit dip does send them into fits of teenage giggling. Helping a newborn get his first meal is not a titillating experience. Mucking out the horse barn is hard work but it’s not ‘ooky’! All of us who spend our lives tending livestock are aware that

our daily working vocabulary is not always proper amongst people from outside the real world (gentiles, I call them). When the new preacher, who hails from Chicago, is introduced to us, we don’t immediately

invite him to the oyster fry next Tuesday. I would guess the people who are most conscious of this “cowboy vocabulary” are new spouses marrying into a livestock raising family. I’ll bet they could write a book! So, to those of you sensitive folks who read my column with some reservations, or have neighbors who sit at your dinner table and talk about how to get cow manure stains out of a good shirt, I beg your indulgence. It’s not dirty to us…it’s just grass and water.

Farm, venue, table, retreat Purdon Groves offers relaxing getaway or venue destination By Michael Kormos

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Corsican Daily Sun

efore founders, Houston and Sherry Clark, purchased the Navarro County property that is now Purdon Groves, the previous owner, Freddie Eads, put a lot of hard work and love into hand-clearing the acreage and thoughtfully creating manicured groves and open pastures. The Clarks wanted to continue pouring that kind of care into Purdon Groves, specifically by handcrafting experiences for their guests — experiences where they are inspired to connect, retreat, celebrate and create. They do this in a variety of ways: • The Retreat Experience — Stay overnight in a spacious Bell Tent • The Chef ’s Table Experience — Join the PG Chef for an interactive dining event • The Garden Experience — Work alongside Head Gardener, Emilie, in the dirt and/or hydroponic garden • The Bee Experience — Learn about honeybees and taste PG honey with Beekeeper Houston (seasonal) • The Purdon Groves’ Vision Experience — Walk the property with Co-Founder Houston and hear plans for the property • You Create Your Own Experience — Host your wedding or reunion on 22 beautiful acres “We moved to Dallas from Atlanta almost eight years ago, to start an office for Houston’s company,” Sherry said. “We fell in love with Texas and decided to buy

some land within an hour or so of our downtown loft. After looking at properties south and east of Dallas, our realtor told us about a listing in unincorporated Purdon. We came out to look at the acreage on Easter, 2017, and fell in love with the property.” Twenty-three years ago, Houston started a company, Clark, with his brother. Their company designs and installs audio, video and theatrical lighting for large auditoriums, on an international level. Sherry continues to work part time as a freelance writer and copy editor. They have four adult kids, including Emilie, who works full time as Farm Manager at Purdon Groves. After working professionally with creatives over the past couple of decades, Houston felt called to invest in the arts community in a way that would provide opportunities to rest, refresh and be inspired. “We believe Purdon Groves is our palette and that time unplugged and in nature, eating and sharing community around the table is important for body and soul,” Sherry said. “Purdon Groves is a work in progress. While we’re still completing some of the infrastructure to host weddings and other large scale events, we’ve been able to host outdoor dinners and overnight guests in our glamping tent. This is just the beginning!” During their more than 30 years of marriage, Houston fell in love with the creative community and developed a passion for sharing the artists’ gifts with

Courtesy photo

A spacious bell tent welcomes you to retreat into tranquility at Purdon Groves in Navarro County.

Purdon Groves founders Houston and Sherry Clark. others. At the same time, Sherry found her calling in hosting and fostering community around the table. The result is a joint desire to provide experiences that nourish the creativity of artists and enrich the lives of all who enter the gates at Purdon Groves. Sherry said they’ve had overwhelming support and great feedback from those who’ve taken part in the Farm, Venue, Table and Retreat experiences so far. “Even though our tent is air conditioned, we anticipate increased bookings in the Retreat this fall. And we’ll be announcing our fall Chef ’s Table Experience schedule later this week. People can follow our progress on Instagram and Facebook. They may book the Retreat and Table on our website — purdongroves.com.” Sherry said they’ve had guests from far and wide, including an intern from

Courtesy photo

California. She thinks the best part of being at Purdon Groves is feeling so immersed in nature, but being only 15 minutes from Corsicana! “We’re moving full time to Corsicana at the beginning of August,” she said.”We’re excited to develop relationships and become a part of the community in Navarro County!” Purdon Groves values wholesome, locally sourced food. After seven years in the restaurant industry, Head Gardener Emilie was ready to take on a new challenge. She moved to Texas and soon rediscovered her love of nature and adventure, something she’s happy to share at Purdon Groves. In her role as Head Gardener, Emilie said she enjoys getting her hands dirty,

Continued on page 9...


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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

July-August 2019

Service Power Equipment Company Tyler company fills niche for outdoor equipment sales, services By Jo Anne Embleton Jacksonville Daily Progress

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local equipment company that caters to the needs of homeowners and businesses alike has filled a niche in specialized sales and services of outdoor equipment. Service Power Equipment Company, located at 125 FM 346 East, south of Tyler, originally was part of a small chain rental and equipment business founded in Sulphur Springs, but became an independent company earlier this year that is owned and operated by Tommy Richards, said manager Stephen Leach. “Now, we are focused on sales, service and parts,” he said. “We’ve been here for a little over three years, but we split off, started a new business in February,” said Stephen Leach, manager. The mother company – founded more than a dozen years ago – focused on equipment rental, but “with the rental business, you have to have a service department, and we already had the service side. But a lot of contractors would look back over their rental expenses for the year and (realize they) could have bought one for the cost of rental,” he said. “And when they started asking if we could get equipment for them, we started moving into that area, because the better option for them, often, is to buy.” Clientele from across northeast Texas purchase mowers from SPE, stretching from Dallas to Texarkana and Shreveport, to Lufkin; from Athens to Greenville to the Mount Pleasant/Mount Vernon area south to Smith County and the surrounding areas, he said. “Because we service and sell units at four locations, we did not expect to retain a large percentage of that,” Leach said. “Several other small dealers have gone out of business, and because of that, we’ve inherited their customers. People knew

Photo by Jo Anne Embleton

In addition to keeping a supply of items for certain name brand equipment, Tyler-based Service Power Equipment Company also focuses on sales and service of those brands, according to store manager Stephen Leach. come to us because we carried the parts they need, and we can do the service and warranties they can use from companies they purchase from. We are not the only game in town, but for the lines we carry (we are). SPE can service any and all types of zero turn mowers, but specialize in Grasshopper, Ferris, Snapper and Simplicity, and can handle the majority of small engines, not just mowers or zero turns. They also are an authorized ASV dealer, which is a line for track loaders and skid loaders. Other brands carried by the Tyler business are RedMax, Yanmar, DR, Troybilt, RedMax, Jonsered; they service Brigg-Stratton, Kawasaki and Kohler engines as well. The company has two sets of clientele: About 60 percent is comprised of homeowners with more than one acre, while the remaining 40 percent –

commercial landscapers/lawn care services and farmers – represent the highest volume of sales. “Our biggest sales is on the ASV forestry machines, and then commercial, you see a lot of zero-turn mowers,” Leach said. But the company is primarily targeting those homeowners wishing to make a serious investment in equipment that will provide years of service, he pointed out. “We want to help them find the right fit for what they’re going to do, and we have a knowledgeable enough staff to be able to do that – we listen first, and then make recommendations, because we always want them to be happy with their final decision. We want a repeat client base, not just a sale,” he said. The goal of SPE is to be the best in customer service, he said, adding that one of the seven-member staff is a master service technician. “We might not be the fastest or the cheapest” – the company’s goal is too stay under a two-week turnaround – “but our goal is to be the best,” he pointed out. SPE’s location at the intersection of U.S. Highway 69 and FM 36, just south of the Toll Road 49, is in a prime location, ideally

able to catch the eye of commuters. However, Leach said the biggest challenge they face “is getting people to know what we do here. “We’ve done (a variety of advertising), and somebody will still walk in the door and say, ‘I’ve lived here two years, and I never knew quite what you are!’ So, people have thought we were a tractor repair shop; they have thought we were mower sellers only, that we were used equipment dealers … our electronic sign outside gives the message, but people usually pass by so quickly that they can’t read it all,” he said. The other great challenge is handling growth. “We are a small business just going through the growing pains of getting the right people on staff,” he said. Service Power Equipment Company is located in southern Smith County, 125 FM 346 East at U.S. Highway 69). Summer hours are from 7:30 to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. The business is closed Sundays. To learn more, contact them at 903630-6147 or visit the Facebook page, “Service Power Equipment Company.”

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Service Power Equipment Company manager Stephen Leach looks over items stocked at the 125 FM 346 East store, located south of Tyler. The company originally was part of a small chain rental and equipment business but recently launched as an independent company to serve the needs of regional property owners and businesses.

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July-August 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

7

The Other Bass

Largemouths are king, but ’spots, smallies and ‘Lupes are still worth a cast By Matt Williams

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Outdoors Writer

assmaster Magazine recently ranked 10 Texas fisheries among the best in America. Two Texas lakes — Sam Rayburn and Lake Fork — landed spots in the Top 5. The national recognition from one of the world’s most respected bass fishing organizations comes as no surprise. Texas is a well-known sweet spot for bass anglers around the globe looking for numbers quality, alike. Dozens of reservoirs have produced fish upwards of 13 pounds. On most lakes, word of a 10 pounder doesn’t even raise eyebrows anymore. Adding to the appeal of Texas fishing is the diversity of “other bass” finning around out there waiting to be caught. While the largemouth is king in these parts, some Texas water bodies support abundant populations of smallmouth bass, northern spotted bass, Guadalupe bass and Alabama bass. Pay a visit to the right lake and you might even catch a “meanmouth” or two. The meanmouth is not designated as a species of black bass. Meanmouth is a slang term used to describe the genetic cross that results when a smallmouth bass and northern spotted bass share the same spawning bed during springtime. Fisheries biologists say hybridization is fairly common among bass and sunfish. It is usually an indication that one species or the Photo by Matt Williams other is low in abundance or struggling. Texas is a haven for bass anglers, where 8-10 pounders don’t garner much attention anymore. Spotted bass are native to Texas waters and abundant in many. Smallmouth aren’t as Colorado River between Austin and Bastrop. TPWD Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi. They were considered widely distributed. fisheries biologist Marcos De Jesus says Guadalupe’s can as members of the spotted bass family until 2011. That’s Meanmouth bass have been documented in only be found in waters all around Central Texas. However, he when the American Fisheries Society designated them a two Texas lakes — Lake Ray Roberts and Texoma. Ray thinks the 25-mile stretch of Colorado where Townsend separate species, mainly because of their genetic potential Roberts has produced several big ones in recent times, caught the record is the best for numbers of quality fish to grow extremely large. A big northern spotted bass is including a trifecta of state records since 2016. because good habitat is abundant and water flows are a three pounder. Alabama bass have been documented The current record was caught on a stormy day in Oct. steady. beyond 11 pounds. 2018 by Cody Morrison of Pilot Point. It weighed 5.96 Several state agencies have stocked the fish in public pounds, topping the former record of 4.9 pounds reeled waters. In 1996, TPWD stocked 150 adult Alabama bass in seven months earlier by Adam Pels, also of Pilot Point. in Lake Alan Henry as an experiment. Apparently, the What’s interesting is smallmouths have never been fish have fared pretty well. The lake produced a 5.62 stocked in Ray Roberts. Scientists believe the bronzebacks pounder in 2011 and a 5.98 pounder in 2016. Genetics were illegally introduced to the lake several years ago, testing showed both fish were pure Alabama bass. In possibly by anglers who transported them from nearby 2017, TPWD created state record category for Alabama Lake Texoma. bass. Texoma, a Texas/Oklahoma border lake, has abundant Alan Henry is the only Texas lake were Alabama bass populations of smallmouth, largemouth and spotted bass. The recent outbreak of big meanmouths at Ray Roberts have been stocked. TPWD says it has no plans to stock is believed to be the result of one spawning event several the fish in others lakes. years ago. Spotted Bass As earlier mentioned, there are several other species of “Spot” is the abbreviated term frequently used for black bass other than largemouth finning around in Texas northern spotted bass. Also known as Kentucky spotted lakes and rivers. Here’s a little background history on each bass, the sport fish are widely distributed throughout one, followed by some of the top spots to find them in the Ohio River basin as well as the central and lower number: Mississippi River basin. Spots also are found in several Guadalupe Bass coastal states, including Texas, where they are native to The ‘Lupe is special. So special, in fact, it was declared several river systems from the Guadalupe to the Red the official state fish of Texas in 1989 by the 71st Texas River, exclusive of the Edwards Plateau region. Legislature. As earlier mentioned, spotted bass rarely grow beyond Native only to the rivers and streams of Central Texas, three pounds. Anything larger is highly suspect of TPWD Photo the Guadalupe thrives in swift running water riddled carrying hybrid genes. Texas Parks and Wildlife lists a Bryan Townsend with his 3.71 pound state rewith rocks, boulders and still water pools. They also can 5.56 pounder as the state record for that species. The bass be found in catchable numbers in deep, clear, riverine cord Guadalupe bass caught in 2014 from the was caught at Lake O’ the Pines in 1966. Genetics testing reservoirs across the Edwards Plateau. Colorado River between Austin and Bastrop. was not performed on the fish. Just don’t expect a limit of Guadalupe bass to take you The Guadalupe bass was declared the Texas Spotted bass can be found in a number of lakes, but very high in the standings of a bass tournament. Any fish they are most abundant in East Texas reservoirs like state fish in 1989. over two pounds is a big one. Anything over three pounds Cypress Springs, Palestine, Jacksonville, Bob Sandlin, is a giant. The current state record is a 3.71 pounder Alabama Bass Toledo Bend and Sam Rayburn. The fish are especially caught in 2014 by Bryan Townsend. plentiful on lakes Jacksonville and Cypress Springs, Alabama bass are native to the Mobile River basin of Townsend caught the fish while fly fishing on the where they account for a high percentage of the bass caught. At Jacksonville, anglers host Thursday night open tournaments and sometimes award a “Kentucky Derby” side pot for the five heaviest spotted bass brought to the scales. The statewide daily limit spotted bass is five fish, but there is no minimum length limit.

Smallmouth Bass

Photo courtesy of Jim Tutt

Lake Texoma in North Texas ranks among the state’s top smallmouth fisheries. Longview angler Jim Tutt boated this six pounder there a few years back.

The smallmouth isn’t the big player in Texas that it is in northern states, but there are a few fisheries across the state that have gained reputations for producing numbers and quality, alike. Among the best are lakes Belton and Texoma. Belton is a 12,385-acre reservoir built on the Leon River in Bell and Coryell counties near Temple. It’s looks like smallmouth central with plenty of steep banks, long, rocky points and lots of deep water. There are quite a few tournaments held on the lake, many of them won with mixed bags of smallmouth and largemouth. The lake record of 6.43 pounds has stood since 1999, but biologists believe bigger ones have been caught and released without being reported. TPWD has stocked Belton off and on since 1978 with hatchery raised smallmouth fingerlings. Texoma is a 74,700-acre reservoir along the Red River that TPWD co-manages with the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. It’s got plenty of deep water and rocky habitat where the smallies grow fat and sassy. The Texas lake record is listed at 7.06 pounds; the Oklahoma side record is 7.8 pounds. The best smallmouth fishing usually takes place around the lower 1/3 of the lake in relation to steep bluffs around Eisenhower State Park, the Denison dam and up the Washita River to an area known as Willow Springs. Areas with big boulders, rocky points and gravel bottoms have the best potential. The fish can be caught on a wide range of baits including Carolina rig plastics, grubs, topwaters, spinnerbaits, shaky heads and Alabama rigs. Three other smallmouth fisheries to check out include the scenic Devil’s River that feeds Lake Amistad, Lake Grapevine (6,700 acres) and Stillhouse Hollow (6,400) acres. Matt Williams is a freelance writer based in Nacogdoches. He can be reached by e-mail, mattwillwrite4u@yahoo.com.


8

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

July-August 2019

A&M Asst. Rodeo Coach earns coveted buckle

J

ordan Jo Fabrizio is the assistant rodeo coach at West Texas A&M and she’s been wearing a trophy belt buckle that was earned by seven-time National Finals Rodeo qualifier Raymond Hollabaugh. Hollabaugh, who is the head rodeo coach at West Texas A&M, earned the buckle as the result of clinching the tie-down roping title at the 1983 Cheyenne Frontier Days Rodeo in Wyoming. Hollabaugh was Fabrizio’s coach when she competed for West Texas A&M and she has worn his Cheyenne buckle for inspiration. But Fabrizio, 28, a Canyon resident, now has a coveted Cheyenne Frontier Days championship buckle of her own. When the break-away roping title was at stake at the famous Wyoming rodeo on Sunday, July 28, Fabrizio clinched it with a time of 4.18 seconds. She also earned $17,515 throughout the rodeo and a trophy saddle. “It was one of the toughest short rounds that I’ve roped in,” Fabrizio said of competing in the final round in Cheyenne. “You had to back in there and bring your A game.” Hollabaugh, who was in Cheyenne on July 28 to watch Fabrizio compete, was filled with emotion when she lassoed the prestigious title. “I was so proud of her,” Hollabaugh said. “I know how hard she’s worked. It was about an hour before

I could talk to her. I could hardly look at her without tearing up.” The Cheyenne rodeo, which is the rodeo equivalent of a Wimbledon stage, featured break-away roping for the first time and drew 242 entries. “It’s an awesome opportunity for break-away ropers,” Fabrizio said.

Wright riding tough

Rookie Stetson Wright of Milford, Utah, clinched the all-around title at the 123rd Cheyenne rodeo. Wright earned $16,007 in bull riding and saddle bronc riding. He also snared bull riding title in Cheyenne after turning in a remarkable score of 93 in Sunday’s final round. Wright, 20, is ranked No. 1 in the PRCA’s 2019 world all-around title race with $160,781 in regular season

earnings (in the world standings released on Wednesday, July 31). Caleb Smidt is ranked No. 2 with $126,196. Tuf Cooper, the 2017 world all-around champion, is ranked No. 4 with $92,923. For the first time, the Cheyenne rodeo featured a tournament format to determine single event champions. Three-time NFR qualifier Clayton Biglow clinched the bareback riding title with a 91 in the final round. Three-time world champion Will Lowe of Canyon tied for third with an 87.5. Brody Cress, a two-time NFR qualifier, clinched the saddle bronc riding title in Cheyenne for the third consecutive year. Former Women’s Professional Rodeo Association world champion Nellie Miller clinched her second

consecutive Cheyenne barrel racing title. The other champions at the 2019 Cheyenne rodeo were steer wrestler Eli Lord, team ropers Dustin Bird and Trey Yates, tiedown roper Seth Hall and steer roper Trey Sheets (who is from Cheyenne).

PBR update

The Professional Bull Riders conducted a major show on its Unleash The Beast, the association’s top tier tour, on July 22-23 at the Cheyenne Frontier Days. Chase Outlaw, an Arkansas cowboy, clinched the title at a show called Last Cowboy Standing and earned $156,856 after turning in remarkable scores of 93.5 and 90.5. Outlaw earned 875 PBR world points for his win in Cheyenne and is ranked No. 1 in the PBR’s 2019 world title race with 4,142.5 points (in standings

released on Monday, July 29). Jose Vitor Leme, a Brazilian who lives in Decatur, finished fourth at the Cheyenne’s show and is ranked No. 2 in the world standings with 3,711.66. Winning the prestigious PBR show in Cheyenne was a moral victory for Outlaw. Last year, he was pulled down on a bull in Cheyenne and broke 30 bones in his face, according to pbr.com. Brett Hoffman, a Texas Cowboy Hall of

WCRA update

The World Champions Rodeo Alliance organization conducted a major rodeo in Salt Lake City, Utah, called the Days of ’47 Cowboy Games. The champion in each event received $50,000 and a gold medal. One of the $50,000 winners was Matt Reeves who is a resident of Cross Plains near Abilene. Reeves clinched the steer wrestling

Fame member, has reported on rodeos for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for more than three decades. Email him at bchoffman777@earthlink.net.

title during the July 24 final round with a 3.92. Kaycee Feild and Caleb Bennett shared the bareback riding title and each earned a $50,000 check and a gold medal. The other champions of the 123rd Cheyenne rodeo were barrel racer Hailey Kinsel, team ropers Ty Blasingame and Kyle Lockett, break-away roper Jordi Edens, saddle bronc rider Zeke Thurston, tiedown roper Ty Harris and bull rider Trevor Kastner.

Death of a legend

Dr. J. Pat Evans, one of the founders of the Justin Sportsmedicine Program, who was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in 2004, passed away July 22. He was 88. A celebration of the life and legacy of Evans will take place Aug. 11 at 2 p.m. (CT) at the River Ranch Stockyards at 500 NE 23rd Street, in Fort Worth.


July-August 2019

9

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Continued from page 5... planting and harvesting, whether it’s in our dirt or hydroponic garden. She’s excited to be able to share what she’s grown with local chefs and all who value fresh, local, chemical free produce. They also believe community is created around the table. Executive Chef Tanner Purdum’s passion is bringing people together to experience the best food that local and sustainable farming has to offer. His previous work as a cook in a fine dining, James Beard award winning establishment, executive chef of a farm-to-table restaurant and most recently as a private chef have helped him develop his craft. Tanner is committed to providing the highest quality ingredients and dishes, while supporting local family farms (Purdon Groves and others) that enrich community health and value. His experience working day-to-day with diverse seasonal menus and dietary needs has helped shape his identity as an innovative and creative chef. Tanner said he is excited about showcasing the foods grown at Purdon Groves, educating

Courtesy photo

Above, Purdon Groves Executive Chef Tanner Purdum welcomes you to experience a true farm-to-table experience at Purdon Groves in Navarro County. guests in preparing those foods, and hopefully, inspiring them to support local farmers and

Purdon Groves Farm Manager Emilie Clark.

artisans. His passion is bringing people together over great food, whether the environment is

of being in nature, away from distractions of everyday life, stirs a person’s senses and inspirers creativity,” Sherry said. “We are excited to provide those kinds of opportunities for the artists and others seeking to retreat. So whether your purpose is to create, connect or to just disengage and have time for quiet, the retreat at Purdon Groves is for you.” Families and friends retreating together, will have uninterrupted time to connect with those they love. For individuals wanting to spend time alone, Purdon Groves will allow them the time and space to do that. “While you’re at Purdon Groves, we hope you’ll relax in a hammock, sit by the campfire, walk through the pecan groves or just hang out in your peaceful lodging,” Sherry sadi. “Take a few minutes to fish in the pond, swing under the oaks or play lawn games. The important thing is that you retreat from the busyness of your everyday life and enjoy a sense of renewal and refreshment.”

a relaxed picnic or a candlelit dinner. “We believe the simple act

Courtesy photo

East tExas stock PricEs

ANDERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK

EAST TEXAS LIVESTOCK INC.

Updated: 7/17/2019 Head Count: 250 Buyers: 32 Sellers: 49

Updated: 7/30/2019 Feeder Calf Buyers: 19 Sellers: 163 Feeder Calf Companies: 35

STEERS

STEERS

200lb - 300lb

1.30

2.00

300-DOWN

1.61

2.06

300lb - 400lb

1.20

1.87

305lb - 400lb

1.44

1.98

400lb - 500lb

1.05

1.70

405lb - 500lb

1.31

1.80

500lb - 600lb

1.05

1.42

505lb - 600lb

1.16

1.49

600lb - 700lb

0.95

1.35

605lb - 800lb

1.12

1.43

700lb - 800lb

0.80

1.30

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

200lb - 300lb

1.25

1.55

300-DOWN

1.25

1.80

300lb - 400lb

1.10

1.48

305lb - 400lb

1.18

1.68

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.43

405lb - 500lb

1.10

1.60

500lb - 600lb

0.90

1.35

505lb - 600lb

1.03

1.40

600lb - 700lb

0.80

1.30

605lb - 800lb

1.00

1.35

700lb - 800lb

0.75

1.20

Cows

0.30

0.66

Cows

0.50

0.70

Bulls

0.55

0.90

Bulls

0.81

0.90

PAIRS

$600

$1400

PAIRS

SLAUGHTER

STOCKER COWS GOATS

SLAUGHTER

$500hd

$950hd

$50hd

$125hd

TRI-COUNTY LIVESTOCK MARKET Updated: 7/27/2019 Head Count: 767

STEERS UNDER 300lb

1.35

1.98

300lb - 400lb

1.25

1.95

400lb - 500lb

1.20

1.65

500lb - 600lb

1.15

1.48

600lb - 700lb

1.10

1.38

700lb - 800lb

1.00

UNDER 300lb 300lb - 400lb 400lb - 500lb

BRED COWS

NACOGDOCHES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

STEERS

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.99

300-DOWN

1.00

2.15

300lb - 400lb

1.25

2.00

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.95

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.80

400lb - 500lb

1.05

1.72

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.60

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.55

500lb - UP

0.95

1.54

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.47

500lb - UP

0.85

1.45

1.28

600lb - 700lb

N/A

N/A

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.47

HEIFERS

700lb - 899lb

1.00

1.39

300-DOWN

1.00

1.90

1.20

1.53

UNDER 300lb

1.25

1.98

HEIFERS

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.60

1.15

1.50

300lb - 400lb

1.10

1.60

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.91

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.45

1.10

1.39

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.44

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.47

500lb - UP

0.80

1.35

0.75

1.42

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.45

SLAUGHTER

N/A

N/A

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.40

Cows

0.25

0.69

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.30

Heavy Bulls

0.65

0.87

1.00

1.15

PAIRS

HEIFERS

1.05

1.34

600lb - 700lb

1.00

1.26

600lb - 700lb

700lb - 800lb

0.85

1.15

SLAUGHTER

SLAUGHTER

BABY CALVES STOCKER COWS LOW-MIDDLE

STEERS

2.07

500lb - 600lb

PAIRS

Updated: 7/26/2019 Head Count: 1611 Sellers: 242

1.35

500lb - UP

Heavy Bulls

$1150/hd

ATHENS COMMISSION COMPANY

Updated: 7/29/2019 Head Count: 984

STEERS

$1450hd

$650/hd

UNDER 300lb

HEIFERS

Cows

HUNTS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

Updated: 7/25/2019 Head Count: 630 Buyers: 47 Sellers: 106

$800hd

Cows

0.40

0.70

700lb - 899lb

0.25

0.67

Bulls

0.70

0.90

SLAUGHTER

0.80

0.88

PAIRS

$850

$1450

Cows

0.30

0.69

Low-Middle

$1275

STOCKER COWS

Bulls

0.79

0.90

PAIRS

$600

$1710

STOCKER COWS GOATS

$1430hd

BABY CALVES

$15hd

$275hd

NA

HORSES

$50hd

$500hd

$1150 $95 $575/hd NA

$500hd

$1250hd

GOATS

$25hd

$150hd

$1250/hd

BABY CALVES

$50hd

$150hdt

STOCKER COWS

NA

HORSES

N/A

BABY CALVES

$190

N/A

Top

$125hd NA

$1000

$1350

$500

$1000

0.50lb

0.95lb

$20hd

$150hd


10

July-August 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Navarro County teen claims three All-American titles By Guy Chapman

S

Corsicana Daily Sun

eventeen-year-old Madison Peterson isn’t a stranger to her talents showcasing Brahman heifers becoming a featured story. At 5 years old, Peterson made the August 2007 cover of The Brahman Journal, an accomplishment the December 2007 issue of Explore Corsicana compared as “the equivalent to being on the cover of Time Magazine”. The Blooming Grove High School student has shown no signs of slowing down in 2019, having recently become a three-time “All American” winner from the All-American Junior National Brahman Show that took place from June 30 to July 1 at the Four States Fairgrounds in Texarkana, Arkansas. The titles she claimed during this exhibition were: Grand Champion Showman, Grand Champion Gray Female, Grand Champion F1 Female, and Reserve Grand Champion Red Female. Winning the All-American title in one of these shows takes a lot of hard work and dedication, having to compete with

over three-hundred and fifty other young exhibitionists, including one of her longtime friends that has always previously won. Peterson explained the work it takes to make one of these prized Brahman calves look its best, including how to properly walk them, adopting a good stance for the calf look to thicker for the judges, and how to make a calf stand out from the rest of the herd. “You don’t want to be the one the judges see,” Peterson explained. “You want them to see the cow.” Peterson’s family are all long-time animal lovers and have created a display wall for her exhibition achievements in their family home. The display is impressive as she pointed out this year’s All-American accomplishments. “People work their whole life to get just one,” Peterson said, pointing out this month’s recent additions to her collection. A long-time competitor, 2019 marked her first year to claim the All-American title. She has worked with Val Walters and Rodney Finch, who helped her meet her goal of champion showman. Peterson recalled that during 2018’s show in Perry, Georgia, Finch had said to her: “We’re

going to get you a title.” “If you have one of those, you’re doing good,” she added. Her words are more than pride. They are a reflection of a lifetime of commitment to her craft. Peterson has already spent the first half of this year “doing good.” In addition to her All-American titles, she was awarded Reserve Grand Champion Bred and Owned Bull, Reserve Grand Champion Bred and Owned Heifer, Reserve Grand Champion Gray female, Grand Champion Red Bull at June’s Texas Junior Brahman Association State Show in Bryan. Peterson also serves as the current TJBA president for the 2019-2020 term, having previous served as vice-president. Peterson’s start began with her first heifer that her parents bought from her at the Tic Tac Toe Ranch, owned by Max and Shirley Watts. It was here where Peterson found her love with Brahman cows. Her time working in the barn with her mother, Ronda, taught her a lot about the care and understanding of these gentle creatures. As part of the interview, Peterson

showed off two other highlights: A young white bull named “Diablo” that, despite its namesake, was quite friendly and paused for nose pettings. Peterson also showed off another full wall collection that hung over her bed. This one, however, was not awards and banners, but photos of a lifetime of posing with her most beloved Brahmans from her long career, mixed with group shots of friends that she shared her many show experiences with. Outside of her very active career raising and showing Brahmans, Peterson also keeps busy with volleyball, softball and track, is an active member of National Honor Society, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Future Farmers of America, 4H, yearbook, student council, a reporter for FCCLA, and is ranked second in her class. When she graduates from high school, Peterson, plans to go to Sam Houston to pursue a degree in agricultural business, and will already have 45 hours of college credit upon graduation.

Game Warden Field Notes

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Fear That Rumbling Sound At about 11:30 p.m. on June 21, a Government Canyon State Park police officer received a missing persons call from the San Antonio Police Department. It seems the missing person called 911 from somewhere in the park reporting that an animal had been following and growling at her, so she had taken refuge by climbing a tree. The park police officer searched her last reported location to no avail, but was able to make contact on her cell phone to reassure her help was on the way. She urged him to please hurry because an animal she believed to be a wild pig was nearby and growling. He informed her he would turn on his truck siren and asked her to listen. She was unable to hear his siren, so the officer told her to use her iPhone to send him her location by text message, which she did. The officer then hiked to that location and found her and a male subject in a tree. She warned the officer that the pig was still close by and

she heard it just a few minutes before he arrived. Shortly after that, the officer heard a car drive over the rumble strips nearby on Galm Road and watched as the woman’s body language immediately changed. The officer asked if they believed the noise they just heard was a pig and both nodded. He explained it was only cars crossing rumble strips on the road nearby. Embarrassed by the misperceived threat, the lost hikers were reassured by the officer that the unknown can be scary and their reaction surprisingly common.

Jet Ski Roundup On June 3, a marine theft unit game warden responding to information about a possibly stolen jet ski for sale on social media went to the location to investigate and ended up seizing a pair of stolen jet skis. There were approximately 20 more jet skis at the location, some of which had identifying numbers removed. The warden called for reinforcements and subsequently seized several more jet skis (3 stolen and 2 with no identifying numbers). The investigation ended with eight seized vessels, including one stolen out of Florida back in 1996. Property

hearings to determine ownership are pending.

Stuck in the Middle On June 9, several game wardens were patrolling the Rio Grande River near the Roma Port of Entry when they observed a group of 23 individuals stranded on an island on the U.S. side of the river. Wardens approached the group and learned they were not U.S. citizens, had been stranded on the island overnight and required immediate assistance. Wardens radioed Border Patrol vessels in the area and worked with them to transport the group to safety.

Crossing the Line Nearly a year-and-a-half after game wardens received a complaint from a landowner in Falls County about a helicopter flying over his property shooting feral hogs, and just one week before the case was set to go to trial in June, the helicopter pilot and the gunner both pled guilty to Class A misdemeanors for hunting non-game animals without landowner consent. Game wardens made the cases after an extensive investigation documenting 34 dead feral hogs

on the complainant’s property, along with evidence collected using drones, metal detectors and a K9 game warden search dog. The investigation ultimately led to four arrest warrants and multiple Class C citations being issued in addition to the Class A guilty pleas.

Can’t Run from the Law In late May, a Hill County game warden received a call from a complainant who stated he had observed someone shooting from the roadway near Hubbard. The warden responded to the area and soon after received a call from man admitting that he had shot a feral hog from the public roadway. He then stated that he went on to the private property to retrieve the hog, but after seeing a vehicle he fled the area. The subject stated that he knew his actions were wrong, and he called to confess because he believed a game warden would come knocking on his door since he’d seen the TV show Lone Star Law. The landowner of the property was contacted, and he elected not to file hunting without landowner consent charges. The subject was issued citations for hunting from a public roadway.

Guess He Told Them Montgomery County game wardens were patrolling for fishing violations at a local camp ground in the Sam Houston National Forest when they came upon an unoccupied vehicle with an open door. As the wardens peered into the vehicle, a young male approached and shouted they were not allowed to search his vehicle. One warden attempted to inform the subject that the vehicle was not being searched, but the individual continued to be belligerent. The wardens noticed the subject was displaying alcohol in a wildlife management area, a Class C misdemeanor violation, and appeared to be intoxicated, also a Class C citation. So, the wardens initiated an investigation. The subject refused to provide the wardens with his name and date of birth, yet another Class C violation. While inventorying the subject’s pockets, a vape pen with a brown waxy substance was found that tested positive for THC. The subject was additionally charged with possession of a controlled substance, a state jail felony, and subsequently arrested.


July-August 2019

11

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Plenty of produce

Steve’s Produce, located on the corner of Cherokee Street and U.S. 69 North in Jacksonville, has a wide array of farm favorites available now. According to Karen Ray, who was working the stand in early July, tomatoes and Grapeland watermelons are the local favorites. The produce market is owned by Steve Killion.

photos by Jay Neal

TOUGH. RUGGED. VALUE. Fuel Efficiency & Productivity

Reliability & Versatility

772 E. State Hwy 31 Kerens, Tx 75144 903-270-0877 www.prequipmentsales.com


12

July-August 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Monster fig tree may be world-record By William Patrick Palestine Herald-Press

A

n old Greek proverb says: “Sharing the figs can leave you with nothing at all.” That’s not a worry for John Marks, who has what he believes to be the world’s largest fig tree. “The tree is almost 17 feet high, and nearly 100 feet around,” Marks told the Herald-Press. “The biggest ones I’ve seen online are, maybe, 15 feet tall and 70 inches in circumference.” Marks moved to Anderson County 20 years ago with his wife, Katherine, and their three children. Back then, the tree was just a sapling. The secret to its growth, Marks said, is something he has in abundance: chicken manure. “We have about 800 chickens,” he said. “Whenever we clean out the chicken houses, we shovel the manure on to the tree’s roots; we’ve been doing it since we moved in.” The results of Marks’ all-natural methods are indisputable. The 20-year-old tree, an adolescent in fig tree years, bears thousands of figs a year, feeding friends, family – and, oddly enough, the chickens. “During the summer months, the chickens fly up in the tree for shade,” Marks said. “They sit up there and eat the figs right off the branches. I guess the tree feeds the chickens, and the chickens end up feeding the tree.” Although the chickens eat hundreds of figs each year, Marks said he still has enough to supply his wife’s preservemaking, and still have bushels left over. Friends have tried to convince Marks to call the Guinness Book of World Records

to have his tree examined and officially awarded the title “world’s largest fig tree.” A private man, Marks isn’t sure he wants all that attention on his property or his family. “We have the tree behind a fence,” he said. “I don’t know if I want my home to become a tourist destination.” He might not have a choice. The Marks’ fig tree is not done growing. With a lifespan of 100 to 300 years, the fruitbearing behemoth might grow too big to ignore, as long as Marks keeps shoveling. Meantime, he will continue to enjoy his wife’s strawberry-fig preserves. Katherine Marks’ strawberry-fig preserves: 6c figs 4c sugar 2 lg packages strawberry Jell-O

Photo courtesy of the Marks family

John Marks stands at the base of his fig tree. The tree, Marks said, might be the largest of its type in the world.

• Rinse figs, drain, cut off stems, and mash. • Place figs and sugar in a large pot, stir and let set for 15 minutes to draw out juice. • Cook on med. Heat until it comes to a boil. Slow boil, stirring frequently for 15-20 minutes. • Add Jell-O and cook for 15 more minutes. • While still slowly simmering, fill sterile jars up to 1/2-inch from the top. Make sure to wipe clean the top of the jar before sealing with hot lids and ring bands. • Place jars on a dishtowel to cool, and wait for lid to seal. When you hear a “pop” sound, you will know it is sealed. (Wait until completely cool before cleaning residual stickiness from jars.) • Store in cool, dry place.

Photo courtesy of the Marks family

John Marks, 16, stands atop the family barn to reach the top of his family’s giant fig tree.

Power to the Pasture… Power to the Food Plot… Power to the Garden… Power to the Yard…

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GBH Farms gbhfarmstx@gmail.com 903-723-4123

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Farm and Ranch Living July 2019  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

Farm and Ranch Living July 2019  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

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