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October-November 2019

Why pumpkins represent fall By Guy Chapman Corsicana Daily Sun

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ith the Texas fall now settled in, the weather brings cooler temperatures, a crispness to the air, and familiar images to represent the season. One of the most iconic fall symbols is the pumpkin. While trendy society thinks of spiced lattes when the pumpkin is mentioned, the orange fruit is as common as the changing colors of the leaves, and has a story just as long. Pumpkins have a history that dates back to ancient Mexico and southern United States, where the fruit is thought to have its origins from these areas. Pumpkins are said to date as far back as 7,000 and 5,500 BC, where evidence of pumpkin fragments were found in Mexico. An extremely versatile fruit, pumpkins are found throughout the world, with the exception of Antarctica, the only one of the seven continents that is unable to produce pumpkins. Pumpkins are actually a type of squash known as “winter squash.” Pumpkins are of importance to

the Native American culture, as it is one of the “three sisters” - beans, maize, and squash. Putting these three types of plants together is beneficial as they have a tendency to nourish each other. Because of this, Native Americans cultivated and ate the “three sisters” together. When the first American settlers came to what would eventually become the United States, Native Americans introduced this unique food to the Pilgrims, where it became a regular agricultural staple of their diet. They even learned to craft beer out of it. Due to its early introduction to English American culture, the pumpkin became synonymous with fall, and introduced into celebrations such as the Jacko-Lanterns of Halloween. The American pumpkin is commonly known as the “Connecticut Field” variety. Pumpkins are a symbol of fall harvest, and are a fixture of our American heritage. It’s little wonder that we become nostalgic for them as a part of our autumn stories. See you at the pumpkin patch.

The First Line of Defense Tips to prevent cattle theft and aid recovery

By Joel Harlow

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Special to the Athens Review

attle rustling and theft have been a part of farm and ranch life for almost two centuries. On the front line of prevention is the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association. Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association traces its beginnings to 1877 in Graham. It was formed under an oak tree by 40 cattleman to fight cattle theft in their area under the name “Stock Raisers’ Association of North-West Texas.” Today, TSCRA has more than 17,500 members composed of large and small farming and ranching operations and agricultural businesses throughout the United States. They rely on 30 TSCRA Special Rangers to combat rustling and theft. The Rangers are commissioned by the Texas Department of Public Safety and have enforcement authority throughout Texas. Some Rangers have dual enforcement authority in Texas and Oklahoma. The Rangers work with all branches of law enforcement at the local and state level as well as federal agencies such as the FBI and the Secret Service, and law enforcement in Canada should the need arise. In addition to the Special Rangers, TSCRA has Market Inspectors at every livestock auction in Texas who are the first line of defense in combating cattle theft. Larry Hand is a Special Ranger whose primary area

of operation are 12 East Texas counties, though his profession takes him all over north and east Texas as well as occasionally into adjoining states. Hand was raised on a family farm and graduated with a Master’s Degree in Agriculture Economics from Texas A&M University. He was a Game Warden for 25 years, retiring at the rank of Captain, and immediately began his career with TSCRA upon his retirement as a Game Warden. Hand offered the following tips to farmers and ranchers in preventing theft and increasing chances of recovery should a theft occur: Cattle branding is one of the most important theft prevention practices a rancher can implement. All cattle that go through a livestock auction pass under the watchful eyes of a TSCRA Market Inspector and if a theft has been reported, the brand is key in recovery. All ranchers should have a brand registered with their local County Clerk. TSCRA keeps a database of these registered brands. TSCRA has found that cattle rustlers prefer unbranded cattle, as they are harder to track. Locked gates and the location of loading facilities on a ranch are important as well. All loading facilities and corrals should be located off the road and out of sight if possible. Most professional cattle rustlers look for an operation with no homes nearby and with visible loading facilities on the ranch. All equipment, tack, and machinery should have the owner’s driver’s license number including the “TX” prefix welded or stamped in an inconspicuous place. Also, having a mechanic install an inconspicuous electrical or fuel cutoff on tractors and machinery makes theft difficult. Preparing and maintaining a video of all equipment, livestock, and horses helps in identifying stolen property should theft occur. Varying feeding times to avoid a “routine” that a potential rustler can identify is a practice that is a powerful deterrent, as well as keeping an accurate cattle count. And those well-recognized blue TSCRA signs that are prevalent on TSCRA members’ entryways? These serve as a powerful deterrent. TSCRA has interviewed professional cattle rustlers who state they will pass by a farm with a TSCRA sign, as they know they will have Special Rangers “working the case,” something most wish to avoid at all costs.

USDA Issues Safety-Net and Conservation Payments to Texas Farmers

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he U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) in Texas is processing more than $205.7 million in Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) payments for the 2018 crop year. Additionally, Texas FSA will distribute more than $89.1 million in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) rental payments to landowners to support voluntary conservation efforts on private lands. “Our safety net programs help provide certainty and stability to Texas farm families affected by fluctuating market prices,” Gary Six, State Executive Director in Texas said. “When reviewing payments, it’s important to remember that ARC and PLC payments by county can vary because average county yields will differ.” FSA began processing payments for 2018 ARCCounty (ARC-CO) or PLC on covered commodities that triggered payments on enrolled farms in the 2018 crop year. FSA anticipates issuing more payments in November once USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service publishes additional commodity prices for the 2018 crop, which will include seed cotton. In Texas, 218 counties have experienced a drop in price or revenues below the benchmark price established by the ARC or PLC programs and will receive payments. Producers who had 2018 covered commodities enrolled in ARC-CO can visit www.fsa.usda.gov/arc-plc for payment rates applicable to their county and each covered commodity. For farms and covered commodities enrolled in 2018 PLC, the following crops met payment triggers: wheat, barley, peanuts, corn, grain sorghum, dry peas, lentils and canola. Oats and soybeans did not meet 2018 PLC payment triggers. Also, this week, USDA began issuing 2019 CRP payments to support voluntary conservation efforts on private lands. In Texas, more than 24,300 CRP participants will receive compensation for their efforts to improve water quality, reduce soil erosion and improve wildlife habitat on more than 2.4 million acres enrolled in CRP throughout the state. “Annual rental payments through the Conservation Reserve Program help farmers and landowners who want to take sensitive land out of production in order to improve water quality, prevent soil erosion or create wildlife habitat,” Six said. For more information about USDA programs or to locate your FSA county office, visit www.farmers.gov.


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October-November 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

The Butterfly Barn:

Beautifying the environment inside and out By Jo Anne Embleton

Jacksonville Daily Progress

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estled among homes and businesses along Jacksonville’s North Bolton Street is what appears to be a small pocket garden filled with delights for indoors and out, a tribute to owner Pamela Starr-Duke’s love of flora, fauna and finer things. Outside, The Butterfly Barn – located at 664 N. Bolton St. – is dotted with a variety of plants, “both annuals and perennials such as roses, shrubs both flowering and evergreen, seasonal flowers and succulents,” while indoors, “I have unique decor items for the garden and home, antiques, refinished furniture and Tyler Candles,” said owner Pamela Starr-Duke. Open since April 1, she purchases her plants locally, from farms in Jacksonville, New Summerfield, Bullard, Mount Selman and Tyler. “Everyone, whether they are a regular customer or visiting for the first time, always compliments how pretty and healthy my plants are,” she said. “That makes me happy to hear because I love plants and enjoy tending to them, even in the heat of summer.” Initially, the business was set out to be a mobile plant sales called “The Butterfly

Bus,” but after an offer from an uncle to set up shop at the North Bolton Street property, Starr-Duke opted to open up The Butterfly Barn at the site. “One of the buildings resembles a barn, so rather than call the permanent location ‘The Butterfly Bus,’ I chose ‘The Butterfly Barn.’ The reasoning behind the butterfly part of my name was simply that I wanted to specialize in container gardens and plants that attract pollinating creatures such as butterflies, bees and birds,” she said. While she said she missed out on spring planting sales because she opened later than she hoped, it worked in her favor when “so many of the big box stores got rid of all of their plants in June, so I was about the only place to find plants unless you went to the plant farms,” she said. Today, Starr-Duke said she has established a solid clientele, who are interested in the wide variety of offerings at The Butterfly Barn. “I do sell some plants as gifts, and as I grow and increase my inventory, I will be able to accommodate a wider range of customer’s needs,” she said, adding that business also offers living potted arrangements as well as customized arrangements for funerals, weddings and other special occasions. “I try to stock plants that are low maintenance and that thrive in our

Photos by Jo Anne Embleton

The Butterfly Barn owner Pamela Starr-Duke with an outdoor display at her 664 N. Bolton St. shop in Jacksonville. The business carries a variety of items to beautify both home and garden. zone. I also try to educate my customers with care instructions, yet I am not afraid to lose a sell if the plant is not right for the person or location that they intended to plant – I want people to enjoy their investment for many years to come, and not fret over trying to keep it alive and disease-free,” she said. “Right now I do not stock garden soil, fertilizers and mulches. However it is my plan to do so next year in order to be ready

for spring. We do carry some pottery, mostly used at this time. I am working on a joint effort to carry much more pottery by next planting season.” Growers recognize autumn as prime roseplanting season, and not only does Starr-Duke have available stock, but an abundance of knowledge to share with customers so they get favorable results. “The best advice I can give people is to make sure they plant their roses in

fertile, well-draining soil in a sunny location. Roses will live in the shade, but they will not bloom,” she advised. “ And I try to let people know that roses are not really difficult to care for if you buy healthy, heat-tolerant varieties, if you feed them regularly – they love Epson salts – and to not get discouraged if they stop blooming in the heat of the summer. Very few flowering plants have the energy to bloom in 90-plus degree weather.

I suggest planting in the fall so that you can have a well-established plant in the spring.” The Butterfly Barn, located at 664 N. Bolton St. in Jacksonville, is open Monday and Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and is closed Sunday and Tuesday. To learn more, visit “The Butterfly Barn” on Facebook, or contact owner Pamela Starr-Duke at 903-539-7335.

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October-November 2019

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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

What Are We Eating?

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hen it comes to food on the table, there’s plenty of room for concern about many of the offerings. Yep, there are those who believe “government” is protecting us from meats, fruits and vegetables that may be hazardous to our health. The real truth is that this is not always honesty in action. Many shoppers believe that buying “organic” foods makes for a healthy environment –and shell out megabucks for those food products. One grocery store advertised “organic” coconuts recently. How can anyone with a lick of common sense believe that line? As for protecting consumers

from imported food hazards, our inspection programs are an absolute mess. Less than 2% of all imported food is even looked at—and less than a tenth of 1% is tested for harmful drugs or chemicals or even inspected for freshness. Imported meat and seafood is a constant threat. Federal food inspectors rarely open a box of frozen beef or seafood. And when testing is done, illegal drugs are often found in the products. Southeast Asia, where cleanliness is not an issue for many who raise seafood destined for our dinner tables, is a constant offender. We have a few laws on the

books that are often bypassed. For example, the seafood mandatory labeling law enacted by the U.S. Congress several years ago. The legislation requires seafood sold at a grocery store be labeled as to country of origin. But the law does not extend to restaurants—thanks to lobbyists who are paid by the restaurant associations. A few states, thank you, have mandatory laws that demand restaurants put on their menus the origin of their seafood. Arkansas, Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama and Tennessee require restaurants to show country of origin on seafood offerings. Several Louisiana restaurants

were recently fined $450 to $900 for listing catfish on their menu when it was actually Swai and Basa--both poor relatives of the catfish. Texas had the chance to enact a similar bill several years ago, but the proposal never got to the floor for a vote. Maybe some of our legislators will work up their courage and show backbone by introducing a bill in the next session to get our state on the side of consumers. Thought for today: “Ranchers and farmers are the most mistreated of all mortals. They sell at wholesale, buy at retail and pay the freight both ways”.

That’s –30—horace@valornet.com

Quite a catch; Fishery hooks a new director

By Shelli Parker

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Athens Daily Review

exas Freshwater Fishery Center in Athens landed quite a catch with new director Tom Lang. He started in August and said the job is his the final destination in his long-term career path. “I have dedicated my life to the future of fisheries, conservation and fishing,” Lang said. “It is just who I am, it is my passion. It is everything I have ever wanted to do and I have worked a long time to prepare myself to be able to serve. This is a tremendous opportunity to serve our state, our anglers and our resources for the rest of my career. That’s why I’m here. This place is somewhere I have been in awe of my whole career.” Growing up with a passion for wildlife, Lang said the inspiration to pursue biology was started by something as simple as a box of fish. “I’m lucky to be a fish biologist,” he said. “I’m lucky because I ran across a box that said farm-raised catfish, I loved fishing and it opened my eyes to see their must be such a thing as a catfish farm and fish science.” The idea he could make a living doing something Lang already enjoyed so much, was incredible to him. So he went to college at Purdue University, where he met his wife, and finished his studies at Arkansas Pine Bluffs where he received his Masters in Fishery Science. He did extensive work in Wichita Falls and Kansas before this opportunity opened. “I saw the work going on here and wanted to be here,” he said. “This place is great because of our team. What attracted me here is their work. They have made this place great. I’m proud to come here to and learn along side of them.” The fishery was started 23 years ago, in a competitive bid for the flagship facility. The Economic Development Corporation and City of Athens gathered up their pennies and actually beat out other areas hoping to be selected. The Texas Freshwater Fishery has been producing benefits for the community and Texas wildlife ever since. TFFC has plant nurseries, hatcheries, dive shows and tours. Texas is home to four out of seven different gar species. It is a world-renowned alligator gar fishery. “Long-lived prehistoric creatures, they haven’t evolved since the dinosaurs, that is pretty neat to have swimming around,” Lang said. “Buying a fishing license is an act of conservation, because those funds go right back into places like this. Through growing fish, habitat improvements, and management efforts, fishing is at the heart of it, but we talk about all kinds of species,” he said. People can come watch speakers, divers and a feeding display. The tram tour has had almost a quarter million people learn about fishery science through that project over the years. “If you love the outdoors and love nature for what it can and does do for our world, you can spend your career doing that. To have a place like this in our own backyard is a real asset,” Lang said. We have some of the best bass fishing in our own back yard. We have two million anglers in the state of Texas with a $1.3 billion dollar annual impact to our state. Since 1986 they have had the ShareLunker program, which partners them with anglers catching big bass. If someone catches a 13 pound or larger bass, they can use the ShareLunker App. “At certain times of year, anytime you catch a 13 plus

pound bass, we would actually come pick it up, bring it back, spawn it and take it back to help make those genetics more prevalent. We have had nearly 600 of those bass turned in, including from Lake Athens,” he said. “Our anglers are actually better at getting to these fish and give us better information than even our electro fishing,” he added. “We average about 500 of those verified online every year which gives us great information.” Lang enjoys fishing with his own family and spoke about the many advantages of putting the cell phones away, turning the t.v. off and reconnecting with nature and each other. Fishing is an opportunity to reconnect with nature, yourself, and each other while helping the economy. He spoke of a young boy who was taken on his first fishing trip by the founder of Bass Pro Shop, a note hangs on the wall of his office thanking him for the trip. That little boy grew up to be professional angler Alton Jones. You never know when that child grows up who you are influencing and encouraging, just by taking a little time with them. Get them out in nature. People have lost the understanding of the importance of water, nature and spending time in it. So what are the future plans for this amazing treasure? First, TFFC needs volunteers. If you would like the opportunity to spend your free time around fish enjoying nature, please reach out to them. Secondly, the facility needs some updates as it nears it’s 24th year. Lang

plans on having fund-raising activities that will be fun for the whole family to assist this process. Finally, they want to emphasize more education. Money from fishing licenses goes directly to conservation efforts like the hatcheries. “Every day that the facility has been open for 23 years someone has experienced the excitement of catching their first fish. The staff loves getting to be part of this momentous occasion. They want to expand this and educate more skills to the new angler including all the different ways you can go out and enjoy fishing, even how to fry it up after. “What we are doing fishery wise, this is our flagship and I think the city of Athens has something to be very proud of,” If you would like to visit this amazing resource to our community, please visit Halloween at the Hatchery. According to the TPWD website: “Area families will have a chance to celebrate Halloween at the Texas Freshwater Fisheries Center in Athens with trick-or-treating and games. The annual Halloween at the Hatchery event will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on October 24, with local organizations giving away candy. The event will raise money for the East Texas Crisis Center, Henderson County Rainbow Room and the Athens High School bass fishing team, according to a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department news release. The Hatchery is located on Fm2495, Just off State Highway 31, Athens, TX. Please call (903) 676-2277 for more information.


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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

October-November 2019

Mulch is mulch is mulch, Right? M

ulch is one of my favorite fall topics. A workhorse in the garden, and needed far more than most people ever take the opportunity to use it. Are all mulches created equal? No, no they aren’t. What is mulch anyway? Frequently it is confused with compost, but they have opposite purposes. Compost is intended to be incorporated into the soil as a soil amendment. Mulch is intended as a protective layer that lies on top of the soil saving water, preventing weeds, moderating the soil temperature, preventing erosion, and in the case of some mulches, improving the soil as it breaks down. Mulches can be classified as organic or inorganic. The organic mulches are most popular and include bark, pine needles, straw and similar materials. Inorganic mulches include rocks, rubber, synthetic fabrics, and other nonplant materials. The biggest advantage to using mulch is the

water holding ability. The water savings during our summer drought season can be significant! The soil moisture loss is greatly reduced because there is no wind contact directly with soil (which also helps with erosion.) To help with our harsh hot summers, mulch can also create a temperature barrier so that the roots of the plant stay cooler. This helps reduce stress on the plants, which can cut down on disease and insect problems. A happy plant is a healthier plant!

For some, the biggest advantage of using mulch is weed reduction. A 3-4 inch layer of mulch will significantly reduce the presence of undesirable plant growth by keeping the sunlight from hitting the soil. A mix of coarse and fine mulch is the best for reducing weed germination. In general the very best mulch for use in flower beds and around trees is a native hardwood mulch, which can be purchased in bags at local feed stores and box stores, or in bulk

by the yard. This will be a mulch mix that contains both course and fine pieces, that together will be resistant to floating away in rain situations, and will also break down to provide a nutrient source for the perennials it protects. Chipper debris can make a great native mulch mix. Native mulch is best used by reapplying every spring and fall. Your plants will thank you for it. Frequently, pine straw is also used as mulch. It is plentiful here in East Texas, and makes good mulch for acid-loving plants like azaleas, camellias, and blueberries. It is very slow to break down, and should usually not be used near wooden fences or structures because of its flammability. Leaves are another readily available material that make great, inexpensive mulch. Leaves work best as mulch when shredded because large leaves can form a mat that actually repels water. Bark mulch is generally the most prevalent mulch

and is widely available. Bark is relatively easy to apply, but some types can have a tendency to float away in heavy rains. Pine is the most common bark mulch used, but cypress and redwood are also popular. Cypress will resist floating. Many people have asked me about using rocks or gravel for mulch. Although they are readily available, our summer heat makes rocks and gravel undesirable as mulch. Rocks retain heat, releasing it at night, which keeps the roots of the plants too warm. Instead of reducing the stress on the plant, as mulches are intended to, rock and gravel mulches actually increase the stress. Since organic mulches decompose over time, they will need to be replenished or replaced periodically. It’s a good idea to check the garden every spring and renew areas where the mulch has gotten thin. Maintaining a healthy 3-4 inch layer of mulch is essential to the success of

Kim Benton

Cherokee County Horticulturist weed prevention and soil temperature moderation. There is no need to remove the old and replace with new mulch, since soil organisms will work the decomposing organic matter into the soil, increasing the health of the soil. You can just lay new mulch down where the previous season has decomposed. Mulch is an easy step that will cut down on your garden maintenance over time. It is an essential part of an Earth-Kind, low maintenance yard and garden.

Community garden launches in Jacksonville By Jay Neal

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Jacksonville Daily Progress

embers of the Jacksonville community gathered Wednesday at Nellie Crim Park to break ground on a community garden project sponsored by YOU! EMPOWER, a local initiative dedicated to providing disadvantaged women and families with tools and resources to help them achieve a selfsustainable lifestyle. Approximately 40 people attended the event, as city officials addressed the crowd, while YOU! EMPOWER advisory board chairman Dr. Mary Alice Bone Adamson

presented a brief history of Nellie Crim. The garden – located at Myrtle Drive at Cherokee Trail, behind the Texas Basket Factory in East Jacksonville – allows residents an opportunity “explore options for supplementing their household food purchases, increase their overall buying power, income stability and promote healthy eating habits,” according to a release. Several components will comprise the garden: Fresh produce, herbs and edible flowers, as well as flowering plants, and it will feature a variety of gardening techniques. “YOU! EMPOWER will collaborate with the community at large, businesses, educational institutions, youth groups, public health, AgriLife, Master Gardeners, churches, diverse agencies and nonprofit organizations,” according to

a release, which described the wide variety of produce that will be grown. “Planting will include greens, lettuces, cabbages, root vegetables, other staple vegetables, edible flowers, herbs, fruit and vines,” it stated. “The garden (also) will have roses, sunflowers and other aesthetic features. Our vision is for the garden to be one of a kind in our local community. Residents who visit the garden will experience the natural beauty of the park, learn to grow, provide maintenance and harvest food,” it stated. To learn about YOU! EMPOWER’s programs, contact Sandra E. Fry, Founder and Executive Director at 903339-8605 or visit the Facebook page, “You Empower of Cherokee County.”

Progress photos by Jay Neal

A number of officials were on hand Wednesday for a groundbreaking ceremony of the Nellie Crim Park Community Garden. The project is sponsored by YOU! EMPOWER, a local initiative dedicated to providing disadvantaged women and families with tools and resources to help them achieve a self-sustainable lifestyle.

Jacksonville: Local resident makes difference to protect wildlife

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he National Wildlife Federation (NWF), America’s largest wildlife conservation and education organization, is pleased that Dennis Kenney in Jacksonville has successfully created a Certified Wildlife Habitat® through its Gardens and Farm for Wildlife™ program. In addition, Kenney’s “Apis Gardens” habitat has been co-certified with the Texas Conservation Alliance NWF celebrates this effort to create a habitat that supports birds, butterflies, bees, frogs and other local wildlife. Every Certified Wildlife Habitat garden provides natural sources of food, water, cover and places to raise young and is maintained in a sustainable way that incorporates native plants, conserves water and doesn’t rely on pesticides. Celebrating more than 45 years, the Garden for Wildlife movement has recognized over 227,000 Certified Wildlife Habitat gardens across the United States to date, encompassing more than 2.5 million acres that support wildlife locally. Backyards, urban gardens, school grounds, businesses, places of worship, campuses, parks, farms, zoos and community landscapes can all be recognized as wildlife habitats through the program. “Anyone, anywhere can restore wildlife habitat right in their own yards and communities,” said NWF naturalist David Mizejewski. “Whether you garden in a suburban yard, an urban area or a rural plot of land, you can make a difference for local wildlife. Creating a Certified Wildlife Habitat garden is fun, easy and makes a real difference for neighborhood wildlife. It’s the perfect grassroots way to

think globally and act locally and help birds, butterflies, bees and other wildlife,” he added. “My small six acre farm is still under development with plans to build a high tunnel green house and create a pond for water foul. In the past six years I have established a fruit tree orchard, a honey bee apiary a small vineyard and a chicken coop and run for my flock of various hens. Being retired I have had the time to establish the Jacksonville Area Beekeepers and give beekeeping presentations to the local schools and community organizations. I enjoy watching wildlife and wanted to do my part to help. Redesigning my property to make it more inviting to wildlife not only gives me great wildlife watching opportunities, it also helps me to be greener – reducing lawn to mow, cutting down on watering and saving time in the long run to enjoy time outside,” said Kenney. Many of NWF’s state affiliate organizations are partners in the Certified Wildlife Habitat program. Habitats in partnering states have national and state certification, including Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming. Every Certified Wildlife Habitat garden is now also part of the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge, a national effort to create a million gardens that provide habitat for declining pollinator insects such butterflies and bees. Participants who have their wildlife habitat garden certified receive a personalized certificate with a unique habitat number, a one-year membership to NWF with a subscription to National Wildlife magazine, a subscription to the Garden for Wildlife e-newsletter, a 10 percent discount to National Wildlife catalog, and the exclusive right to post a Certified Wildlife Habitat yard sign. For more information on NWF’s Garden for Wildlife movement and how to qualify to have a garden space recognized as a Certified Wildlife Habitat, visit https://www.nwf.org/ garden or call 1-800-822-9919.


October-November 2019

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

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A Hundred Years From Now L

ife has always been a balancing act between the haves and have-nots. Less populated industrial countries use the major portion of fossil fuel while third world countries still farm by hand and recreate. The world population is expected to increase by a billion every upcoming decade. If we could snap our fingers and by magic, make some change that might save the earth from its inhabitants, what would we do? “Birth control,” said Steve. “You mean anything?” asked J.D. “Yup . . .” I said. “I’d transport

everybody into the future 100 years to see how the earth would have been taken care of under their generations.” A great idea. . . though hard to predict. But we could compare it to someone in the past lookin’ forward to today. My grandpa was born in 1866 in Bonham, Texas. Twenty years later he had moved to Oklahoma, staked a claim in the land run of ‘89, married and started a family. He was a farmer, horseman and fiddle player. If he was suddenly transported at age 53 to today, how would his world have changed?

First, I think he’d notice there’s a lot more people . . . and a lot less farmers. Yet these farmers are producing enough to feed their neighbors. The absence of draft horses and mules would be a shock. He’d see smoking diesel tractors draggin’ discs, combines, cotton pickers and corn pickers through the fields. The number of bushels yielded per acre might leave him speechless as would dairy cows that milk 70 lbs a day, a 100,000 head feedlots, hog and chicken confinement barns and the loss of self-sufficiency on the family farm. However, the air would

Anderson County 4H Banquet honors youth achievement

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he 2019 4H banquet honored youth members and their work in a range of projects. Memories from the September banquet were captured in these photos.

be less breathable, the water less palatable, the work ethic less valued, family time less taken, sunsets less viewed and neighbors less trusting. The environment would have been compromised by farming in order to feed the 3 times increase

in population. As less good farm ground was available due to urban encroachment more technological innovations would have been required to keep up. So, what is our world gonna be like in 100 years? It’s hard to predict, but there is one guarantee that should keep farmers busy improving our methods . . . there’s gonna be a lot more people to feed. Thank God for modern farming methods, science and technology, and most of all for the cowboy and the farmer who always get up every day to feed the world. That won’t change.

Photo by Lisa Tang

Gunner Link (left), a third-grade student, was a big winner at the Anderson County 4-H Banquet. Preston Sturdivant (right) of Texas A&M AgriLife, presents the Rookie of the Year Award. Gunner also won the 4-H Bronze Star Award, which recognizes a junior 4-H member.

Photo by Lisa Tang

Photo by Lisa Tang

Anderson County Master Gardeners, receive the Friend of 4-H Award, are recognized as supporters of 4-H programs. From left: Truman Lamb, Barbara Kolstad, Pat Jolly, and Rob Bass.

Photo by Lisa Tang

McKenna Bowman (center, right) wins the 2019 Gold Star Award for Anderson County 4-H, the highest county award in 4-H Club work. McKenna is the daughter of Dr. Danny (far left) and Candace (center, left) Bowman. Presenting the award is Judge Robert Johnston (far right).

Photo by Lisa Tang

Preston Sturdivant (far left) leads initiation of the 4H Ambassadors, who are all continuing as ambassadors in the 2019-2020 school year. From left: McKenna Bowman, Scott Black, Addison Bowman, Kayty Allen, Bayli Honeycutt, and Justin McGuire light candles and recite the 4H Pledge during the ceremony.

Winners of the 2019 Oustanding Club Member Award are Amanda Howell, Katie Howell, Cameron Allen, Grayson Walker, Meredith Legard, Scott Black, Cayvin Birdwell, Bailee Birdwell, Hallie Woolverton, and Storri Simmons. Only six of the winners are pictured here (from left): Kamryn Allen, Scott Black, Hallie Woolverton, Storri Simmons, Bailee Birdwell, and Cayvin Birdwell.


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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

October-November 2019

Taking it to the Bank

Houston County Lake kicks out biggest bass in nearly 30 years; O.H. Ivie on the rebound By Matt Williams

I

Outdoors Writer

t was just beginning to turn dusky dark on the afternoon of Oct. 20 and Jim Crockett of Brock was in his happy place doing what he loves. Standing on the shores of Houston County Lake, the 63-year-old angler lofted a 1 ounce perch color Rat-L-Trap into the 1,300-acre reservoir. “I’ve been here for about 2-3 months, working on a pipeline,” said Crockett. “I like to take my lawn chair down by the water in the afternoon and fish after work. It’s a good way to get away from things. It’s what we do to relax.” Crockett said he and a co-worker, Jesse Mathis, also from Brock, had been fishing from the bank on a small point for about two hours without catching much. Crockett’s luck changed in a big way moments after he made a cast into about 15 feet of water and began a slow, methodical retrieve. “There’s a creek channel out there that winds right up next to an old boat dock,” he said. “The shad show up there just about every afternoon. You’ll see an occasional swirl when the bass start to feed. Sometimes they jump clear out of the water. It’s a pretty good spot.” Crockett said his lure was about 10 yards from the bank when he got the bite he was waiting for. “I knew right away it was big,” he said. “The fish was really strong. I was using 20 pound test line, but I wasn’t sure if it was going to hold or not. It pulled a lot of drag.” As every good fishing partner should, Mathis had Crockett’s back. Once the big bass was worn down, Mathis waded into the water and helped wrestle it to shore. What the two men discovered was a largemouth bass bigger than most fishermen have ever seen. “I caught a 13.2 pounder out of a stock tank near Weatherford several years ago,” Crockett recalled. “I could tell by looking

this one was bigger,” Crockett said. The lakeside marina had already closed for the day, so there was no place to weigh the fish on scales that had been verified for accuracy. Crockett said he didn’t want to risk killing the fish by holding it overnight, so he weighed it on a digital scale, took a picture and released the bass back into the lake. The angler said the hand-held scale read 14.1 pounds. “It was a beautiful fish, really thick and healthy,” he said. “I made a point not to keep her out of the water very long. She took off once I released her. Hopefully somebody else will catch her again one day.” The big bass is more than just a new personal best for the casual angler. If the scale used to weigh the bass is remotely accurate, Crockett’s fish may be biggest bass caught from Houston County in nearly 30 years. According to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department water body records, the lake record largemouth for Houston County Lake is a 15.20 pounder caught in February 1988 by Terry Walling of Tennessee Colony. Only two other Houston County bass topping 13 pounds have been reported since, a 14 pounder and a 13.25 pounder. Both fish were caught during the spring of 1990 and turned over to TPWD’s Toyota ShareLunker program.

Lake With a History Although Houston County has been off the ShareLunker radar in recent years, it is no stranger to Texas’ big bass circles. There was a time when the lake 10 miles northwest of Crockett was regarded as one of the “best little big bass lakes” in Texas. Throughout the 1980s, Houston County cranked out 6-9 pound bass almost like a gum ball machine. Much of the lake’s early success can be attributed to Florida bass, a strain known for growing faster and significantly larger than native northern largemouths. Houston County was among

Photo courtesy of Elm Creek Marina

Curtis Duncan’s 13.32 pounder caught Oct. 5 from Lake O.H. Ivie is the biggest bass reported from the 19,000-acre West Texas reservoir since 2012.

Photo courtesy of TPWD

Robert Scruggs’ 12.81 pounder caught from Lake Athens last May is one of several double-digit bass reported around the state since last spring. the first reservoirs in the state to be stocked with Floridas in the early-to-mid 1970s. Sadly, however, the lake’s heyday occurred before catch and release was widely accepted. Many of the big fish that were caught from the lake during its prime were either filleted or killed for mounting by the anglers who reeled them in. John Hope of Brackettville guided on Houston County for about eight years from the mid-1980s through the early 1990s. He says he lost count of the number of fish over 7 pounds that he put in the boat. His personal best was a 12.8 pounder, but he guided clients to bigger ones. Hope was widely known for conducting a tracking study on big bass using electronic transmitters to follow monitor movements of the fish. The study originated on Houston County before he expanded it to other lakes. “The number of big fish that were caught out of that lake back in the 1980s was unreal,” Hope said. “It was almost like somebody was stocking 9-10 pounders in there. Trucks and trailers used to line up and down the road and people came there from all over the world. Some of the big bass were released but a bunch of them weren’t. The fishing pressure eventually took its toll. It’s only 1,300 acres. A lake that size can only take so much.” Catherine Markham’s family has owned a lakeside marina on Houston County for 38 years. Markham says she was pleased to hear about Crockett’s 14 pounder, but says it didn’t come as a total surprise. “I think there’s a 20 pounder out there somewhere,” she said. “We still hear about for see quite a few 8-10 pounders, but there are a bunch we don’t hear about, either. A lot of anglers around here are pretty tight lipped about the big fish they catch these days.”

A Fall Surprise Another factor that makes Crockett’s 14 pounder unique is the timing of the

catch. Reeling in such a big fish during the fall isn’t unheard of, but it is somewhat of an anomaly. Most Texas teeners, which are invariably females, are caught from late winter through spring, when the fish are heavy with eggs. It’s also a period when the fish are prone to move shallow for spawning, which naturally makes them more vulnerable to being caught. Interestingly, Crockett isn’t the only Texas angler in recent times to crack a double-digit bass outside the traditional lunker window. A pair of 13 pounders have been reported from Lake O.H. Ivie near San Angelo since late September. The heaviest of the two fish, a 13.23 pounder, was caught on Oct. 5 by Curtis Duncan of Brownwood. Duncan’s fish was weighed on a certified scale at Elm Creek Marina. It was subsequently accepted into the Toyota ShareLunker program as a Legend Class entry. The second fish, an uncertified 13.0 pounder, was caught on Sept. 26 by Ron Luitsi of Midland, according to Elm Creek’s Rhonda Wilson. That’s great news from the 19,000-acre reservoir near San Angelo, which hasn’t recorded a 13 pounder since 2012. The lake appears to be making a rebound after years of low water resulting from prolonged drought. ‘Ivie is currently 70 percent full, up 33 percent (nearly 15 feet)) from a year ago. Toyota ShareLunker program leader Kyle Brookshear says several more fish upwards of 10 pounds have been reported from Texas lakes since last spring. Among them are 13.12 pounder caught in August from Lake Holbrook, a 12.82 pounder caught in August from Lake Tyler and a 12.81 pounder from Lake Athens in May. Brookshear added that close to 300 ShareLunker entries have been accepted in 2019, the majority outside the Jan. 1 March 31 spawning window for Legacy Lunkers 13 pounds and larger. The program is now open year-round online entries in three additional categories. To learn more, texassharelunker.com.

Photo courtesy of Jesse Mathis

Jim Crockett was fishing from the shores of Houston County Lake near Crockett on the afternoon of Oct. 20 when he caught and released what may be the biggest bass reported from the 1,300-acre reservoir since 1990. Crockett, 63, said the fish weighed 14.1 pounds on an uncertified digital scale. The bass hit a 1 ounce Rat-L-Trap in about 15 feet of water.


7

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

October-November 2019

Kasel clinches title with 8-second ride

M

ore than once this season, Dalton Kasel has been very close to clinching a prestigious event title on the Professional Bull Riders tour. He’s missed out on earning bigger paychecks recently because he’s been bucked off on multiple occasions during the final rounds on the Unleash The Beast, the PBR’s top tier tour. At a major UTB tour stop in August in Nashville, Kasel was bucked off in the final round in 7.7 seconds as he attempted to stay on for the required eight seconds. At Anaheim, Calif., in early September, Kasel was bucked off in 7.7 seconds during the finals. At Fairfax, Va., in late September, he was bucked off of his final bull in 7.73 seconds. In Minneapolis earlier this month, he departed from his short round bull at the 6.5 seconds mark, according to pbr.com. But when the title was at stake in the finals (short) round last weekend at the PBR’s Unleash The Beast tour stop in Nampa, Idaho, Kasel, 20, a PBR rookie who has residences in the West Texas towns of Muleshoe and McCamey, stayed on for the eight second count. He turned in an attention grabbing score of 92 and clinched the title. He earned $37,600 throughout the Oct 18-19 show in the Boise area. “It shows to myself that I get paid when I stay on them,” Kasel said of making enough qualified rides to clinch a title. “It was nice to get one knocked down in the short round.” Brazilian Jose Vitor Leme, a Decatur resident who is ranked No. 1 in the PBR’s 2019 world standings, finished second in Nampa and pocketed $17,680. Kasel and Leme were the only riders who stayed on all three bulls throughout the two-day show. Kasel, turned in scores of 86.75, 87.75 and 92. The 92 in the final round was aboard a bovine named Fearless (owned by D&H Cattle/ Buck Cattle/ Tommy Julian). Leme turned in scores of 88.75, 84 and 88.25. His final round 88.25 was atop Whiskey Bent (Wentz

Bucking Bulls/New West Rodeos). Jess Lockwood, the 2017 PBR world champion, finished third and pocketed $13,550. He was bucked off in the first round in 6.61 seconds, but turned in an 84 in the second round and a remarkable 94 during the final round. The 94 was aboard Heartbreak Kid (D&H Cattle/ Buck Cattle/ Erwin Cattle). It’s the year’s highest marked ride on the PBR circuit, according to pbr.com. Leme is ranked No. 1 in the world standings (released on Oct. 19) with 6,601.66 points. Lockwood is ranked No. 2 with 6,185. Chase Outlaw, who finished fifth at the Nampa tour stop, is No. 3 with 5,185.83. Veteran Joao Ricardo Vieira, a Brazilian

from Decatur, is ranked No. 4 with 4,483. Cooper Davis of Jasper, the 2016 world champion, is ranked No. 5 with 3,738. Kasel is ranked No. 7 with 2,218 points. He also is ranked No. 1 in the PBR’s 2019 Rookie Of The Year title race. Kasel has earned $178,887 from PBR shows this season. The Nampa show was the last regular season Unleash The Beast tour stop in 2019. The PBR’s 2019 World Finals is scheduled for Nov. 6-10 at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas. The 2019 PBR world champion will receive a $1 million bonus.

College rodeo update On the National

Intercollegiate Rodeo Association Southern Region circuit, Sam Houston State finished fourth in the women’s team title race as the result of earning 145 points throughout the Oct. 19-20 Northeast Texas Community College Rodeo in Mount Pleasant. McNeese State clinched the title with 378 points. After the first three rodeos of the 2019-2020 regular season, Sam Houston State is ranked No. 3 in the women’s team title race with 380.83 points. Texas A&MCommerce is ranked No. 1 with 1,237.29. McNeese State is ranked No. 2 with 1,159. Trinity Valley Community College is ranked No. 8 with 95. In the men’s team title

race at the NTCC Rodeo, Sam Houston State finished sixth with 255.5. McNeese State and Hill College tied for first, each finishing the rodeo with 450.5 points. TVCC finished eighth with 138. Sam Houston State’s men’s team received notable help from Kaden Isaac Kornegay who clinched the bareback riding title. Kornegay is ranked No. 3 in the Southern Region’s 20192020 bareback riding title race with 271 points. Timothy Ray Murphy of Hill College is ranked No. 1 with 441. TVCC’s men’s team received help at the NTCC Rodeo from Cutter Cash Carpenter who finished fifth in the tie-down roping title race (in terms of points

Brett Hoffman, a Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame member, has reported on rodeos for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram for more than three decades. Email him at bchoffman777@earthlink.net.

earned during the rodeo). Carpenter is ranked No. 2 in the Southern Region 2019-2020 tie-down roping standings with down roping standings with 176 points. Texas A&MCommerce’s Ty Harris is ranked No. 1 with 290. In the 2019-2020 Southern Region men’s team standings, Sam Houston State is ranked No. 4 with 1,068.5 points. McNeese is ranked No. 1 with 1,674.5. Hill College is ranked No. 2 with 1,495. Texas A&M-Commerce is ranked No. 3 with 1,442. TVCC is ranked No. 8 with 403. The NTCC Rodeo was the third of 10 Southern Region shows scheduled for the 2019-2020 regular season. The next Southern Region show is the Nov. 1-2 McNeese State Rodeo in Lake Charles, La.

Top PRCA stock Each year, the PRCA recognizes its top bucking horses and bulls. This year, the association recognized Beutler& Son Rodeo Co.’s Killer Bee for Bareback Horse of the Year, according to prorodeo. com. The bronc is owned by Bennie and Rhett Beutler of Elk City, Okla. The Beutlers provide the stock for numerous PRCA shows such as RodeoAustin in Austin. The PRCA also recognized Northcott Macza’s Get Smart for Saddle Bronc of the Year and Harper& Morgan Rodeo’s Hot& Ready for Bull of the Year.


October-November 2019

8

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

Lone Star tick causes meat allergy By PennyLynn Webb

L

Palestine Herald-Press

one Star ticks are causing many hunters and outdoorsmen to develop allergies to red meat. Amblyomma americanum, also known as the Lone Star tick, the northeastern water tick, or the turkey tick, is indigenous to Mexico and Southeastern United States, including Texas. Its bite is painless and commonly goes unnoticed. Its nickname, Lone Star tick, is derived from the star-shaped spot on the female tick’s back. Wild turkeys are a common host for immature ticks. Male Lone Star ticks have several inverted horseshoeshaped white spots on their backs. Like all ticks, they can carry a host of diseases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 16 tick-borne diseases in the United States. Lyme disease, transmuted through deer ticks, is the most prevalent. The Lone Star tick is increasing tickborne meat allergies, causing people to

react to beef, lamb, pork, and even dairy products. Lone Star ticks carry a sugar called alpha-gal, found in red meat, but not in humans. When a Lone Star tick bites a person, it transfers alpha-gal into the bloodstream. The person’s body then produces antibodies to fight the sugar. This causes a response to the alpha-gal from the immune system the next time red meat is eaten. The allergic reaction can include itching, burning, hives, rash, wheezing, vomiting, dizziness, loss of consciousness, a drop in blood pressure, and even throat swelling or constriction of airways. Mild reactions can be treated with antihistamines, but severe reactions of anaphylactic shock require epinephrine. While most reactions to food occur immediately, reactions to red meat can take up to eight hours after the person has eaten. Standard skin scratch meat test for meat allergies are unreliable when testing for alpha-gal allergies, but skin tests for raw

as you would any other tick. With a finetipped tweezers, grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible, pulling upward with steady, even pressure. Avoid twisting or jerking. Make sure you remove all of it and that none of the mouthparts break off and remain in the skin. Once the tick is removed, throughly clean the bite area with soap and water. Place the tick body in alcohol to ensure it’s dead then flush it down the toilet or wrap it tightly in tissue and put it in the trash. Watch for signs of rash, headaches, pains, fever, itching, burning, hives, wheezing, vomiting, dizziness, loss of consciousness, a drop in blood pressure, and even throat swelling or constriction of airways. Call a doctor or seek medical help immediately if you develop any of these symptoms. The Lone Star tick cannot survive indoors. If found inside, it was most likely carried in by a host and dropped off when fully engorged. If you suspect a Lone Star tick problem on your property, contact a licensed pest control professional.

meat are more sensitive. Specific tests determining allergies to alpha-gal are available. It is not known if the read meat allergy is permanent. Some people have recovered from it; others have not. Ticks are typically found crawling on the tips of low-growing vegetation, waiting for a host to pass by and brush it. Unable to survive in long amounts of exposure to the sun, they stick to shaded areas. To avoid Lone Star tick bites, wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, socks, boots, and tick repellent. Avoid sitting on stumps, logs, or the ground in busy areas. Inspect clothing, body, and hair for ticks when you get home. Should you find one on you, remove it

East tExas stock PricEs

ANDERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK

EAST TEXAS LIVESTOCK INC.

Updated: 10/23/2019 Head Count: 214 Buyers: 22 Sellers: 37

Updated: 10/22/2019 Feeder Calf Buyers: 17 Total Sellers: 273 Feeder Calf Companies: 31

STEERS

STEERS

200lb - 300lb

1.05

1.65

300-DOWN

1.38

1.78

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.57

305lb - 400lb

1.35

1.72

400lb - 500lb

0.95

1.19

405lb - 500lb

1.25

1.54

500lb - 600lb

0.90

1.29

505lb - 600lb

1.19

1.40

600lb - 700lb

0.80

1.10

605lb - 800lb

1.14

1.36

700lb - 800lb

0.70

1.00

200lb - 300lb

0.95

1.50

300-DOWN

1.27

1.70

300lb - 400lb

0.90

1.45

305lb - 400lb

1.23

1.62

400lb - 500lb

0.85

1.38

405lb - 500lb

1.16

1.48

500lb - 600lb

0.80

1.10

505lb - 600lb

1.12

1.33

600lb - 700lb

0.70

0.95

605lb - 800lb

1.07

1.25

700lb - 800lb

0.60

0.80

Cows

0.20

0.48

Cows

0.34

0.56

Bulls

0.50

0.75

Bulls

0.70

0.80

PAIRS

$600

$1250

PAIRS

NA

NA

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

SLAUGHTER

STOCKER COWS GOATS

SLAUGHTER

$450hd

$1000hd

$25hd

$100hd

TRI-COUNTY LIVESTOCK MARKET Updated: 10/26/2019 Head Count: 592

STEERS UNDER 300lb

0.85

1.50

300lb - 400lb

0.80

1.53

400lb - 500lb

0.80

1.45

500lb - 600lb

0.80

1.39

600lb - 700lb

0.80

1.25

700lb - 800lb

0.80

BRED COWS

NACOGDOCHES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

HUNTS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

Updated: 10/24/2019 Head Count: 1538 Buyers: 72 Sellers: 168

STEERS

$975/hd

ATHENS COMMISSION COMPANY

Updated: 10/14/2019 Head Count: 1902

STEERS

$600/hd

Updated: 10/25/2019 Head Count: 1298 Sellers: 180

STEERS

UNDER 300lb

1.23

1.60

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.75

300-DOWN

0.80

2.00

300lb - 400lb

1.10

1.56

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.65

300lb - 400lb

0.80

1.65

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.50

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.65

400lb - 500lb

0.75

1.45

500lb - UP

0.80

1.32

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.40

500lb - UP

0.70

1.30

1.16

600lb - 700lb

N/A

N/A

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.32

HEIFERS

700lb - 899lb

NA

NA

300-DOWN

0.80

1.65

UNDER 300lb

1.15

1.50

HEIFERS

300lb - 400lb

0.75

1.50

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.45

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.40

400lb - 500lb

0.70

1.30

0.95

1.38

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.40

500lb - UP

0.65

1.20

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

UNDER 300lb

0.75

1.50

300lb - 400lb

0.75

1.20

400lb - 500lb

0.75

1.20

400lb - 500lb

500lb - 600lb

0.75

1.18

500lb - UP

0.65

1.18

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.35

SLAUGHTER

1.15

600lb - 700lb

N/A

N/A

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.38

Cows

0.15

0.50

0.75

1.00

SLAUGHTER

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.29

Heavy Bulls

0.50

0.75

Cows

0.20

0.42

700lb - 899lb

1.00

1.17

PAIRS

Cows

0.10

0.50

Bulls

0.50

0.75

SLAUGHTER

Top

$950

$1200

Heavy Bulls

0.65

0.77

PAIRS

$750

$1250

Cows

0.25

0.59

Low-Middle

$500

$950

STOCKER COWS

Bulls

0.55

0.71

PAIRS

$640

$1430

STOCKER COWS

0.45lb

0.95lb

600lb - 700lb 700lb - 800lb

0.75

SLAUGHTER

PAIRS

$900

$1125

BABY CALVES

$100

$175

STOCKER COWS LOW-MIDDLE

$500/hd NA

$450hd

$1100hd

GOATS

$25hd

$200hd

$1025/hd

BABY CALVES

$25hd

$125hd

STOCKER COWS

NA

HORSES

0.40

BABY CALVES

0.30

$300hd NA

GOATS

$30hd

$250hd

$1280hd

BABY CALVES

$10hd

$250hd

NA

HORSES

$35hd

$450hd


9

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

October-November 2019

Kids get hands-on experience at ‘Ag Day’ By William Patrick

M

Palestine Herald-Press

ore than 500 Anderson County third-graders crowded the Anderson County Livestock Pavilion Tuesday during their annual “Ag Day” field trip. Sponsored by the Anderson County Farm Bureau, Ag Day provides area kids with hands-on experience, while learning about farming issues, such as water conservation, animal care, raising animals, and growing crops. Palestine Independent School District spokesperson Larissa Loveless told the Herald-Press Thursday that Ag Day increases in size and scope every year. “The main focus is to encourage young people to become involved in agriculture,” Loveless said. “It’s another way we try to broaden the children’s experiences, and give them another tool in their learning belt.” Stations set up throughout the pavilion, manned by the Farm Bureau, Anderson County Master Gardeners, and Future Farmers of America taught the children about agricultural life, while allowing them to experience the touch, sights, sounds, and smells of farm life. In addition to learning, the kids were treated to games, crafts, food, and fun. The hit of the day was a giant cotton-tilling vehicle roaring to life. The third-graders were split into groups and moved from station to station – careful of where they stepped, due to the livestock roaming the grounds. During a milking demonstration, an FFA student remarked Ag Day probably gave the children their first glimpse of where their food comes from.

Photo courtesy of Anne Patrick

Students check out a giant cotton-tilling vehicle during Anderson County’s annual ‘Ag Day.’

Game Warden Field Notes

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Riding Shotgun An Abilene district game warden was patrolling in Throckmorton County when he observed a utility vehicle (UTV) driving through the center of a failed wheat field. Upon entering the field, the warden saw two individuals on the UTV. One of the individuals was sitting on a cooler on the front of the UTV holding a shotgun. The warden observed the two hunters driving through the field and shooting at birds that were flushed up by the UTV. The warden made contact with the UTV and citations were issued for Hunting from a Motor Vehicle.

Pepper Your Neighbor, Get Peppered With Citations On opening day of dove season during the evening hunt, a Williamson County game warden received a complaint in the Jarrell area. The complainant said a hunter was shooting across the property line and peppering their house. When the game warden arrived on scene, he was received with pellets from the hunter they were complaining about. Two game wardens jumped the fence and found the hunter, along with 30 other hunters, some found to be missing a plug, have no hunter education, no hunting license, shooting across property line and hunting over a baited field. Game wardens spoke to the landowner who was hunting and after a short interview, he admitted he placed bait to attract the birds. Citations were issued to the hunters and landowner.

The Old Bait-andDitch While patrolling Duval County during the South Zone season opener, game wardens contacted a landowner who said his hunters had shot 110 doves over the course of two days. The landowner became very nervous when asked to identify the location where the hunt took place. The landowner identified a caliche pit as the location of the hunt and said the hunters were already on their way back to Houston. After searching the caliche pit, large amounts of milo, scratch, and corn were located about 20 yards away. A feeder full of scratch and milo was also located in the same area. The landowner admitted this feeder had been running until two days prior to opening day. A game warden in Harris County was contacted and interviewed two of the hunters resulting in the seizure of 63 birds. The remaining 47 birds were returned to the game warden by the

landowner. Civil restitution and multiple citations for Hunting Migratory Game Birds over Bait and Placing Bait to Attract Migratory Birds are pending.

Blamed The BB Gun Totin’ Kids Maverick County game wardens observed a group of dove hunters taking pictures of their doves at a roadside park. They stopped to check the doves and found the group to be 60 doves over their limit for the weekend. The group’s explained that the two young boys with the group also shot a limit each day. After a brief conversation, the group finally admitted the boys only had a BB gun and didn’t shoot 60 birds. Cases pending.

Not Registered to Boat A Comal County game warden was following up on a boating accident which occurred on Canyon Lake involving a private boat owner and the operator of a rental boat. While inspecting the rental boat for possible damage, the game warden found it did not have a TX # assigned to it. It was then discovered that the rental company had acquired the boat some time ago and had been renting it throughout the summer under a temporary dealer tag. The game warden then inquired about numerous other rental boats which were displaying dealer tags. As it turned out a total of 13 additional rental boats were not titled or registered properly. Appropriate enforcement action was taken. The resulting boat registration transactions exceeded $25,000 in sales tax paid and $3,300 paid in late fees and interest.

Epic Quail Fail An Atascosa County game warden responded to a call about hunters that were pelleting a house on an adjacent piece of property. While walking up to the hunters, the game warden noticed a pile of bird feathers. Upon further examination, he noticed five quail carcasses and numerous dead mourning doves. There were about twenty hunters, and of those twenty, no one would admit to having killed the quail. The game warden inspected a cooler in the bed of a truck and found the quail breasts. The owner of the truck acknowledged possessing the quail and was cited for possessing freshly killed bob white quail during closed season.

A Wardens Work is Never Done During the opening weekend of general dove season, Willacy County game wardens patrolled the county enforcing Texas hunting regulations. Game wardens made multiple contacts throughout the weekend

and several violations were discovered which included: over the daily bag limit of dove, unplugged shotgun, no hunting license, no hunter safety certification, no migratory endorsement and the possession of a threatened nongame species. One jack rabbit, one Texas indigo snake and over 80 doves were seized during the weekend. Restitution and cases pending.

Turtle-y Awesome Tip While patrolling Willacy County, game wardens received a tip about a fisherman in Port Mansfield possibly in possession of a live sea turtle. After a brief search of the area, wardens found the vehicle in question and began to inspect the vehicle where they found a live sea turtle in an ice chest filled with water. The sea turtle was immediately seized, and information was gathered for a federal NOAA case referral. Afterwards, the wardens decided to meet the tipster and discovered the concerned caller was a 13-yearold girl. After hearing that the violator was caught, the young girl was immediately ecstatic. The wardens expressed extreme appreciation to the girl for her quick action and congratulated her for a job well done! Federal case pending.

This Buck’s For You Three game wardens from Sabine County, San Augustine County and Shelby County set up a deer decoy in an area of Sabine County prone to illegal night hunting. At about 1 a.m., a truck passed the decoy and a voice shouted, “That’s the buck!” The truck turned around and slowly rolled towards the decoy and the driver from the vehicle with their rifle, hitting the decoy in the neck. Once they realized it was a decoy, the truck took off and began throwing beer cans out of the window. The wardens stopped the vehicle and detained three people. When they searched the vehicle, the wardens found a rifle and a spent shell casing on the floorboard. The driver was arrested and charged with Hunting from a Vehicle, Hunting at Night and Hunting with an Artificial Light. The passengers received multiple citations. Cases pending.

asked the owner of the marina if they had a boat the wardens could use, and a local resident volunteered his bass boat. The wardens made their way across the river and walked within 50 yards of the hunters. When the hunters decided to pick up their decoys, the wardens made contact with the group. They said they haven’t seen teal all morning. When asked about all the shooting, the hunters admitted to shooting various shorebirds. One hunter did not have a hunting license and lead shot was also discovered. Eleven citations and warnings were issued. When the wardens returned to the marina, they were met by the boat owner who was excited to be a part of catching scofflaws.

wardens advised the hunter that it would probably be best if he just called it a day. The man was initially confused, but after a little education on the law he agreed to call it a day. The wardens also checked other hunters on the ranch at a nearby tank when they noticed a large deer feeder in the field directly behind the tank where they were hunting. After inspecting the feeder, the wardens noticed a large amount of corn on the ground as well as dove feathers and shotgun wads that were scattered around. All five hunters were cited for hunting over bait and about 30 doves were seized. Civil restitution is pending.

Non-Exclusive Access

A Coleman County game warden and a McCulloch County game warden were on patrol when they received a call about three poachers in a dove field belonging to a local outfitter. When they arrived, the outfitter said two of the poachers hopped the fence and took off running back home, and a third man stayed behind. After talking to the man, one of the wardens went over the fence where he found the house and the two poachers who admitted to hunting on the neighboring property without landowner consent. Three shotguns and eight mourning doves were seized out of the field and all three people were arrested and transported to the Coleman County Jail. Cases pending.

Two Freestone County game wardens were contacted by a man leasing property for exclusive hunting and grazing rights when he found out the landowner had leased it out to two other people as well. Upon further investigation, three additional people contacted the warden saying they had been given exclusive access to the same property. Overall, the landowner had “exclusively” leased the property to five individuals making about $18,000 in profits. An arrest warrant was issued and executed charging the landowner with deceptive business practices.

Caught Red Handed Two game wardens were inspecting commercial shrimping boats in Galveston County when, during one of their inspections, they located a shrimp sack containing fresh caught red snapper onboard the vessel. Upon inspection of the bag, wardens found 12 undersized red snappers with the largest snapper measuring at about 11 inches in length. The daily bag limit for red snapper during the season is four fish with a 15-inch minimum length. The wardens issued the captain of the commercial shrimping boat two citations for exceeding the daily bag limit for red snapper and undersized red snapper. The illegally possessed red snapper were seized and donated to a local family in need. Civil restitution is pending.

BYOB- Bring Your Own Boat

The Limit Does Not Exist

A Trinity County game warden and a game warden K9 handler were patrolling near a boat ramp when they noticed several groups of hunters across the Trinity River shooting every few minutes. As each group returned to the boat ramp, they told the wardens they had not seen very many teal flying. The wardens decided to check the remaining group on the other side of the river but needed a boat. They

Two game wardens were patrolling for dove hunters in La Salle County when they heard multiple shots from a nearby ranch. They began working their way through the ranch when they were greeted by a hunter about to head out for an afternoon hunt. When the wardens asked him how his morning hunt went, he replied that he had done well and reached his limit of 15 doves. Upon hearing his response, the

Don’t You Be My Neighbor

To The Hunter, The Spoils Two Liberty County game wardens received information about three local men who had allegedly harvested three whitetail deer in closed season. Since the three subjects were in different locations, a Hardin County game warden assisted with one of the interviews. The wardens split up and contacted all three men simultaneously so they couldn’t compare stories. They all admitted to taking the three deer and forgetting to put fresh ice in two of the deer, causing them to quickly spoil in the heat. Charges and restitution were filed for taking whitetail deer in closed season and by illegal means, as well as waste of game for failing to keep them all in edible condition.

Dazed and Confused Two Montgomery County game wardens approached a man parked by a local boat ramp when they noticed the odor of marijuana coming from his vehicle. He admitted to possessing the marijuana and was arrested while protesting, “I thought this was Harris County!” After being told he was in Montgomery County, he was transported to the Montgomery County Jail. Case pending.


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October-November 2019

View from above

LiDAR technology used map to archeological features Special to the Athens Daily Review

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local surveying company owner has brought new technology, to his Athens-based business. After years working in the industry Boog Ferrell, owner and operator of Ferrell Survey Group found a solution to meet his needs and those of his customers through a method called LiDAR. Ferrell is using the method through his new company, Active Aerial. “LiDAR technology will be able to improve both the quality of terrain information and save valuable time for

our local engineers, surveyors, and land developers. This is the first time Athens, Texas, can offer a service like this, and I’m excited to show how it can help others with their terrain projects,” said Ferrell. LiDAR, stands for Light Detection and Ranging. The LiDAR instrument fires rapid pulses of laser light at a surface, some at up to 150,000 pulses per second. A sensor on the instrument measures the amount of time it takes for each pulse to bounce back Recorded by an airborne system, it generates precise three-dimensional data about the shape of the Earth and its surface features. This information can be used

in a wide range of management and planning efforts including finding ancient, lost cities. LiDAR was even in the spotlight on the pages of a book recently on the New York Times bestseller list, “The Lost City of the Monday Gods.” In the book scientists and archaeologists used LiDAR technology to find previously unknown archeological features that helped them determine where to explore. “I thought, Oh, my God, I’ve just got back 10 or 12 years of my life. It would have taken me that long to survey those nine square kilometers.” - said Chris Fisher, Professor of Anthropology on page 109 of the work.

U.S. House passes bill FALL FOR A NEW KUBOTA making animal cruelty a federal crime 99 AS LOW AS

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By Megan Hempel

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Corsicana Daily Sun

he United States House of Representatives passed a bill Tuesday that would make animal cruelty a federal felony. The Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act, known as the PACT Act, will ban abusive acts, as well as the filming of abuse and its distribution. Specifically, the Act will amend the federal criminal code to prohibit the intentional acts of crushing, burning, drowning, suffocating, impaling or otherwise inflicting bodily harm on animals. The bill states that violators will be fined, and imprisoned for up to seven years. To further combat the disturbing trend of “animal crush videos,” in which people brutally kill and torture animals and share the videos online, Florida congressmen, Vern Buchanan (R-FL) and Ted Deutch (D-FL) introduced the bill in January to ban these acts of torture and make it easier to prosecute those who abuse and violently kill animals. “This is common sense, bipartisan

legislation to bring some compassion to our animal laws,” Deutch stated in January. Congress passed the Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act in 2010, declaring the creation, sale and distribution of animal crushing videos illegal. However, the acts of cruelty remain legal. Now, legislators are working to close this loophole and outlaw animal abuse as the PACT Act progresses to the U.S. Senate on its way to becoming law. “Now, of all the divisive issues here in Washington, the PACT Act is one on which we can all agree, we must make animal abuse a Federal crime. This bill has received so much bipartisan support, because Americans care about animal welfare,” Deutch said as he addressed members of the House Tuesday. “We form deep relationships with our companion animals and are rightfully outraged by cases of animal abuse. Animal rights activities stand up for living things that do not have a voice. That is what the PACT Act does.” On the net: https://www.congress.gov/ congressional-record/2019/10/22/housesection/article/H8355-1

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1604 S. LOOP 304 • CROCKETT, TX 936-544-4596 • houstoncountyeq.com 1. © Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2019. Excludes taxes and fees. 0% A.P.R., 20% down, financing for 84 months on purchases of new Kubota BX1880 plus 54” standard mower-deck from participating dealers inventory is available to qualified purchasers through Kubota Credit Corporation U.S.A.; subject to credit approval. Example amount based on sales price of $10,395. Each dealer sets own price. Prices and payments may vary. Example: 84 monthly payments of $13.66 per $1,000 financed. Offer expires 12/31/19. For complete warranty, safety and product information see dealer or KubotaUSA.com. 2. © Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2019. Excludes taxes and fees. 0% A.P.R, 20% down, financing for 84 months on purchases of new Kubota L2501HST w/R4 tires from participating dealers in-stock inventory is available to qualified purchasers through Kubota Credit Corporation USA; subject to credit approval. Example: 84 monthly payments of $11.90 per $1,000 financed. Example amount based on sales price of $15,645. Each dealer sets own price. Prices and payments may vary. Offer expires 12/31/19. For complete warranty, safety and product information see dealer or KubotaUSA.com. 3. Excludes taxes and fees. © Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2019. 2.99% A.P.R., 0% down, financing for 72 months on purchases of a new Sidekick model from participating dealers’ in-stock inventory is available to qualified purchasers through Kubota Credit Corporation USA; subject to credit approval. Example: 72 monthly payments of $15.19 per $1,000 financed. Example amount based on sales price of $12,849. Each dealer sets own price. Prices and payments may vary. Offer expires 12/31/19. For complete warranty, safety and product information see dealer or KubotaUSA.com. K1064-01-142904-4


October-November 2019

Texas Crop & Weather Report Sorghum, corn production varied based on regional moisture levels

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exas sorghum and corn producers experienced mixed levels of success in 2019 mostly due to moisture levels on a field-by-field basis, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Moisture is always a major factor for any crop in Texas, but sorghum and corn yields around the state showcased how timing and too much or too little rain can impact plant performance, said Ronnie Schnell, Ph.D., AgriLife Extension agronomist, College Station.

Sorghum Schnell said sorghum yields in some parts of the Coastal Bend and Upper Gulf Coast were very good. The crop success was attributed to favorable growing conditions and excellent management by producers. “Sorghum acres were down, but yields were good for the most part,” he said. “A lot of it came down to when and how much rain was received.” Sorghum yields are typically around 5,600 pounds per acre in those regions, but many producers reported 6,500-8,000 pounds per acre. Schnell said sorghum success in the Panhandle was mixed depending on where spotty rains fell. “The Panhandle was variable, especially on dryland fields,” he said. Schnell said irrigated sorghum fields in the Panhandle can produce 10,000-plus pounds per acre in a good year. In previous years, sugarcane aphids were a concern. While they still encounter sugarcane aphids, producers are better equipped to manage the pest. Sugarcane aphid-tolerant sorghum varieties, good scouting and effective spray treatments kept the pest in check for the most part, Schnell said.

Corn Yields were also very good for corn growers in South to Central Texas, despite a very late start. Soil moisture levels and rainfall patterns delayed field activities and there were concerns about late plantings exposing plants to heat or drought conditions. However, these concerns did not come to fruition. “Sometimes a late start pushes us to a point where heat can be very detrimental to the crop’s progress,” he said. “But it stayed cool enough, and the soil moisture was good enough that the delay didn’t really hurt yields.” Schnell said some producers were unable to perform tillage due to wet conditions and planted in established beds. There were also some issues of lost acres due to too much rain or poorly timed rains in other areas. “Despite a few issues in South to Central Texas, I would say yields were above average,” he said. Typical yields in those regions are 100-150 bushels per acre, but Schnell said a good number of producers reported 150-180 bushel per acre yields. Yields were variable in the

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Panhandle and were impacted by heat and drought, he said, though some acres benefited from spotty rains. “A lot of the Panhandle is irrigated, but even those acres depend on some rain when temperatures are that high and moisture levels are so low,” he said. “If you don’t have rainfall it’s hard to keep up.” Irrigated fields in the Panhandle average 250-300 bushels per acre, but heat and drought knocked yield results below 250 bushels per acre for some producers. In good years, yields can exceed 300 bushels per acre. “We had corn trials in the region, and yields averaged 258 bushels per acre at one location and 298 per acre at another location,” he said. “They received close to the same amount of irrigation and rainfall. However, the higher-yielding field received a larger portion of the rainfall later in the year.” AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries: CENTRAL: Temperatures were extremely warm, and some rain was received. One area reported 0.4 of an inch of rain. Warm-season grasses greened up in areas that received rain, but growth was slowing. Many fields of small grains had not come up, and those that had emerged needed additional moisture to keep from dying. Pecan harvest was in full swing. Livestock were in good to fair condition and were receiving supplemental feed. Stock tanks were becoming a concern as many people will run out of water for livestock due to no large rainfall events. A few cotton fields were yet to be harvested. Burn bans were lifted due to recent rains. EAST: Up to 4 inches of rain fell across the district. Pastures greened up, but cooler temperatures slowed production. Sabine County reported a few producers got a fourth cutting of hay rolled while others were still hopeful to make a last cutting. Pasture and rangeland conditions were fair to good. Subsoil and topsoil were adequate. Winter pastures and fall vegetables were being planted. Winter weed control was underway. Cattle markets were up from the previous week. Livestock were in fair to good condition. Producers in some areas began feeding hay. Anderson County producers were supplementing livestock with protein and energy. Wild pigs remained a problem. Armyworm infestation reports were spotty. SOUTH PLAINS: Conditions continued to be dry and windy with unseasonably warm temperatures in some areas. No rainfall was reported. Temperatures were cold in areas, and an early freeze damaged some cotton. Many farmers were defoliating for the second time because of regrowth after rains. Farmers who defoliated early were starting to strip cotton. Cotton harvest was ramping up in some areas. Some dryland cotton was destroyed. Winter wheat was in good condition. The pumpkin harvest was complete. Some producers were finishing up corn harvest, and many were busy getting sorghum out of

the fields once they had dried. Cattle were in good condition. Producers were harvesting peanuts. Pasture and rangeland were still in fair condition. Cattle were in good condition. A lack of rain was slowing pasture progress. Wheat looked good. NORTH: Soil moisture was adequate to short across the district. Most counties reported temperatures dropping into the 40s during the night. Only a small amount of rain fell in a few counties. Pond levels were a major concern for some counties due to the lack of measurable precipitation. Winter wheat planting began, but a good rain was needed to promote growth. Cotton and soybeans were being harvested. Warm-season perennial pastures were going dormant, and winter pastures were being planted. A few armyworms were spotted but infestations were not as bad as in the previous years. Spring-born calves looked good and were being weaned. Summer stocker calves looked good as well. Wild pigs were moving as temperatures cooled. SOUTHEAST: Soil temperatures remained fairly warm through mid-October, which allowed some producers to cut hay again on a few pastures. Livestock were in fair condition. Parts of Lee and Walker counties received some rain but was still extremely dry. Rangeland and pasture ratings varied from excellent to very poor with good being most common. Soil moisture levels ranged from adequate to very short with adequate being most common. SOUTH: Weather was mild with short to adequate soil moisture levels. Temperatures cooled due to a cool front in some areas. Some areas received rain. Maverick County reported up to half an inch of rain, and LaSalle County reported up to 1 inch. Topsoil was moist in areas that received good rains. Other areas remained critically dry. Cotulla reported only 9 inches of rainfall so far for the year. Pasture and rangeland conditions were poor but were improving in areas that received rain. Hay producers were making final cuttings with minimal yields reported. Livestock were in fair to good condition as supplemental feeding continued. Some producers were culling herds deeper than usual. Cattle markets were seasonally weak and not expected to rebound until early next year. Producers were working to get small grains and winter forages planted. Armyworms were reported. Peanut harvest should pick up soon. Producers reported peanut fields were impacted by wild pigs and other wildlife. Most warm-season vegetable crops were harvested, and Coastal Bermuda pastures were in the final stage of production. Cabbage and spinach made good progress due to cooler temperatures. Pecan orchards were doing well with no pest reports. Cotton gins were active.

TPWD Reminds Hunters About Proper Deer Carcass Disposal

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ith general deer hunting season opening this weekend, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is reminding hunters throughout the state to properly dispose of carcasses from harvested deer to help prevent the spread of infectious diseases in deer. This is particularly important for those taken inside the Trans-Pecos, South Central and Panhandle Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Containment and Surveillance Zones. “Because many hunters process their own deer, they are key players in preventing environmental contamination or minimizing the spread of diseases such as CWD,” said Alan Cain, TPWD White-tailed Deer Program Leader. “One possible way that disease can spread is by the transportation and improper disposal of infected carcass parts.” Deer can become infected with CWD if they come into contact with other infected deer or an environment contaminated with CWD prions. While CWD prions are found ubiquitously throughout the body of an infected deer, they are known to accumulate in the brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, and lymph nodes. Additionally, hunters cannot take whole deer carcasses, or carcass parts that contain brain, spinal cord, eyes, spleen, or lymph nodes, out of the CWD Containment and Surveillance Zones or from another state or country known to have CWD. “We recommend hunters in the CWD Containment and Surveillance Zones quarter deer in the field and leave all inedible parts at the site of harvest, or preferably dispose of in a landfill, or bury at site of harvest if possible,” Cain said. “Proper disposal of carcass parts is good practice anywhere in the state, but especially critical in CWD zones.” Cain also noted that hunters wishing to take an intact skinned or unskinned deer head to a taxidermist outside a CWD zone or from another CWD positive state or country may do so, but must obtain the Deer Head Waiver at any TPWD CWD check station or at the TPWD CWD website. The waiver should be completed and kept with the hunter or with the deer head until it reaches the taxidermist. Hunters are urged to follow these safe handling recommendations:

Proper Carcass Disposal

Avoid cutting through bones, spine, or brain when processing deer carcasses. If processing harvested deer in camp or at home, place carcass parts in trash bags and properly dispose of them through a trash service or landfill.

Safe Parts to Transport Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spine or head attached. Hides or capes from which all excess tissue has been removed. Antlers, including antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue. Finished taxidermy products. Carcass movement restrictions do not apply if the carcass will not be moved outside of a CWD zone. However, it is recommended to always properly dispose of unused carcass parts. Hunters who harvest deer and other CWD-susceptible species should check the Outdoor Annual online or through the mobile app to find check station requirements, dates and hours of operation. “Texas Game Wardens will be doing compliance checks to make sure hunters are meeting the requirements in the CWD restricted zones and when bringing big game from CWD positive states, which includes Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming,” said Region I Texas Game Warden Major Jason Huebner. For the latest updates, call (800) 792-1112, or visit the CWD information page. A hunter who harvests a CWD-susceptible species outside a CWD zone and wishes to have the animal tested for CWD should contact a wildlife biologist in that area.

Outdoor Briefs Fall duck, goose seasons coming up, quail season underway By Matt Williams Outdoors Writer

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exas’ 2019-20 duck and goose hunting seasons are set to get underway in early November in most of the state. The only exception is the High Plains Mallard Management Unit in the Texas Panhandle, which opens for two days Oct. 2627 before reopening Nov. 1 - Jan. 26, 2020. The first split of the South Zone duck season runs Nov. 2 - Dec. 1 and resumes Dec. 14 - Jan 26, 2020. In the North Zone, the first split runs Nov. 9 - Dec. 1 and resumes Dec. 7-Jan. 26, 2020. There is a two-day Youth Only season in the North Zone on Nov. 2-3.

The daily bag limit on ducks is six per day, no more than 5 mallards, of which only 2 may be hens, 3 wood ducks, 3 scaup, 2 redheads, 2 canvasback, 1 pintail, 1 “dusky duck” (mottled, black or Mexican-like) may only be taken after the first 5 days of the season in the respective zones. Mergansers: 5/day with no more than 2 hooded mergansers. Coots, 15 per day. Goose season in the East Zone runs Nov. 2 - Jan. 26 and Nov. 2 - Feb. 2 in the West Zone. The daily bag limit on geese is 5 dark geese, to include no more than 2 white-fronted geese, 20 light geese. Also, the statewide quail

season opened Oct. 26 and runs through Feb. 23, 2020. Daily bag limit is 15.

8.82 pounder tops at Fork Berkley event Illinois bass angler Richard Morganthaler topped a record field of 1,200 anglers to win the 14th annual Berkley Big Bass event held Oct. 19-20 on Lake Fork. Morganthaler won the tournament will an 8.82 pounder caught on Day 2 of the event. He took home a fully rigged Skeeter bass boat. Morganthaler’s winning fish was one of only two bass over Fork’s 16-24 inch slot limit brought to the scales. The second was a

5.25 pounder caught by Clifton Jackson of Alba. Stephen Crumpler of Bloomberg also won a Skeeter boat for reeling in the heaviest fish under the slot limit, a 2.98 pounder. The tournament paid 10 cash prizes each hour for two days. All but two of the hourly prizes were won by fish in the two-pound class.

Newberry wins Costa AOY Houston bass pro Dicky Newberry recently nailed down the Costa FLW Series Southwestern Division Angler of the Year title with a 24th-place finish in the season finale held in early October on Oklahoma’s Grand Lake. Newberry, 65, went into

the final event as the AOY points leader after finishing 13th in the season opener at Lake Amistad and 7th Sam Rayburn. The AOY title came with a $5,000 payday.

Light tackle awards for whoppers Who says you need magnum tackle to land big fish? The International Game Fish Association recently awarded two anglers, George Hogan, Jr., and Liz Hogan, with the Bob Herder Light Tackle Award for outstanding accomplishments using light tackle. George Hogan currently holds 26 IGFA World

records for big fish caught 8-pound test or smaller fishing line. Among them are a 202-pound Pacific blue marlin caught on an 8-pound line, a 141-pound Pacific blue marlin on 4-pound line, a 139-pound tarpon caught on 6-pound line, and a 132-pound striped marlin caught on 2-pound line. Liz Hogan holds 28 IGFA world records for 15 species, including a 445-pound black marlin on 16-pound line, a 141-pound, 9-ounce tarpon on 8-pound line, a 211-pound, 10-ounce blue marlin on 12-pound line, and a 111-pound, 5-ounce striped marlin on 2-pound line.


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October-November 2019

Let them fly

Butterfly release delights local children By Shelli Parker

Athens Daily Review

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wo little girls expressed joy and excitement as they released monarch butterflies in late September at the East Texas Arboretum with their families. The event took place in the Ruby Key Garden. Started in 2001, Key left $10,000 to the arboretum after she passed for the garden and maintenance. The fund has been depleted and the garden is

in need of an update. When her grandson Milton Key, a friend of assistant director Carolyn Goodman found out, he excitedly agreed to help restore it. This process will happen over the next six to 12 months. The updated garden will be a monarch way station. A way station is a place where monarchs can stop on their journey, reproduce, feed and develop from caterpillar to butterfly. It is a safe place for them to stop. Pandora Smith and

Aubree Young took part in the release made possible by Becky Patterson. Patterson started raising monarchs about a year ago after a successful milkweed garden attracted monarchs. She started seeing eggs and caterpillars, which she thought were cute and read up on how to raise and take care of the butterflies. She has released about 80 into the wild. What starts as a 1 millimeter egg, grows to around 3,000 times

its original size in two to three weeks. The butterflies are a passion for Patterson, who is intrigued by them and thankful she can be part of helping them. The monarch was almost on the endangered list due to pesticides. People like Patterson stepped in, planted way stations and butterflyfriendly flowers allowing them to try and catch back up. Right now they are not on the endangered list. The group released Monday was headed to Mexico, some of them were tagged. “It’s going to be a lot of fun,” Goodman said in reference to the butterfly garden. She said she intends to apply for a grant with the Monarch Alliance to help with funding and she expressed excitement about the project. “We would invite fellow butterfly fans to join us in our planning stages whether physical or monetary,” she said. “It is intriguing to me that God can make this teeny tiny little caterpillar that emerges as this beautiful butterfly,” Patterson said. “It makes it all worthwhile seeing His nature and that creation, I feel that it is kind of a small thing to some people, but they bring a lot of joy to people.” If you would like to donate money or volunteer your time to the Arboretum, please contact them at 903-6755630.

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Farm & Ranch Living October 2019  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

Farm & Ranch Living October 2019  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

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