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Published August 30, 2018

More than just farming... 4-H members learn a new skill, Page 6


East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

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Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

August-September 2018

For retired vet, hives are his bees wax BY WILLIAM PATRICK reporter@palestineherald.com

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andor Marozsan describes himself as a “retired army-guy who does bees.” Despite his nonchalance about his avocation-turned-vocation, residents with bee problems or questions from Dallas, to Lufkin, to Texarkana know he’s The Man, the one to call when life delivers stings instead of honey. Marozsan runs East Texas Bee Removal Specialists, serving much of Texas and all of Anderson County. Born in Romania in 1969, Marozsan and his family moved to Israel when he was 5-years-old. From there, they spent roughly a year in a refugee camp in Greece,

before moving to the United States in 1977. “We arrived in Dallas, Texas, 7 July 1977 – 07-7-77,” Marozsan said. “So seven became my lucky number.” Marozsan discovered beekeeping at 12 through a school friend. His friend’s parents kept bees, and they taught him everything they knew. After joining the U.S. Army in 1986, Marozsan would return once a year on military leave to work for a month on his friend’s hives. Medically retired after serving more than 25 years, following an injury in Afghanistan, Marozsan and his wife, Yvonne, have run the bee business since 2009. His business consists mostly of bee removal. Marozsan said, however his

mission is to educate others on the importance of bees and other pollinators to the eco system. “I love to help people deal with their bee problem,” he said. “If they want, I can even relocate their bees from their eave or wall into a commercial hive. Then place them on their property, so they can raise the bees and harvest some of their honey.” When not at work, removing wasps, bees, hornets, yellow-jackets and other flying insects from homes, Marozsan spends his days tending his more than 50 hives. “I had 17 last year, and will hopefully have over 250 next year,” he said. “Eventually, I want to have over 1,000 hives.” Currently, Marozsan doesn’t charge for the honey his hives produce. If he meets his goal of more than 1,000 hives, however, he might have to change his policy.

When he has enough bees, Marozsan said he plans to put them all on a truck for a road trip to California. “They’re suffering ‘colony collapse syndrome’ out there,” he said. “There are no bees. I plan to be one of the many who bring their bees in to pollenate the almond groves.” Getting stung, Marozsan said, is a daily event. He added, however, the average person can easily avoid bee stings. “I get stung, on average, 30 to 50 times a week,” he said. “But, it’s always in defense. There are only two places in the world where bees attack: Hollywood, and the media.” Marozsan recommends listening to bees rather than swatting them. “Bees will defend their homes, just like humans,” he said. “The queen will send out a group to investigate when people come near. They will fly close, and, if you continue towards

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August-September 2018

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

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Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

A Donkey In Your Backyard?

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ome farmers are looking at new income opportunities. But look before you leap. Some “trendsetters” believed all the hype they read and heard about the fantastic profits by raising Shetland ponies, ostriches, emus, llamas, alpacas, potbellied pigs and even chinchillas. Most of those schemes ended with a crash. But now there’s a new offering—one that may end well. It’s pasturing and caring for donkeys that have been “rescued”. They were captured off ranges in western states. And, yep, the taxpayer is on the hook for corralling the rascals and providing the money to feed and

care for them till they age out. One rescue group is offering $15 a month to landowners who have good fences, plenty of water and grass. “Peaceful Valley Donkey Rescue” handles all other expenses. The sponsor figures it takes two donkeys to equal one cow on pasture—so a farm that can run 100 cows should be able to house 200 donkeys, at $15 a month, each. The ranchers would receive $3,000 a month for their efforts. Only jennets and geldings will be provided. If you have an interest in this new “crop” call Zac Williams at 325-276-1676. WWW.grazinglease.org. is the website. A minimum of 40 head of donkeys is required.

Moving from the country to the big city often means several hours a week lost to commuting to work. However, some larger Texas cities offer lots less time spent in travel. Lubbock has the shortest average travel time in Texas—16.3 minutes. Waco and Corpus Christi have 18 minutes travel time. So, if you have to move to the big city, these towns need consideration! Another new “crop” has potential for East Texas. It’s Kiwifruit—a New Zealand import that has a booming market at grocery stores and restaurants. Dr. David Creech, who heads up the SFA Gardens in Nacogdoches, says we have

the right soils and climate for the fruit. Along with Creech, several Kiwi experts will be headlining a Kiwifruit field day in Nacogdoches Friday September 21st. Tim Hartman, Texas A & M horticulturist, says the golden Kiwi is an alternative fruit crop for East Texas. He says yields are good and consumers are ready to buy. The all-day program will be held at the Piney Woods Native Plant Center at 2900 Raguet St. in Nacogdoches. Cost, including lunch, is $25 a person or $40 for couples. For registration or more information send an e-mail to: dawnstover@sfasu.edu That’s –30—for this week. Horace@ valornet.com

the hive, they will try to bump into you in an attempt to deter you from coming closer. They only sting if you keep moving towards the hive.” He added that, in the act of stinging, a bee gives its life in the defense of the hive. “A bee can only sting once,” Marozsan said. “It dies shortly thereafter.” Marozsan recommends that, if stung, a person should scrape the stinger out with a hard flat object, such as a credit card, rather than pulling it out. “You have to keep your wits about you,” he said. “If you pull on a stinger, you will inject all of the bee venom into the wound. You get much better results if you scrape it out.” East Texas Bee Removal Specialists are available for bee and pest removal or helping with the acquisition of a bee hive. Advice is always free. “Remember, you get what you pay for,” Marozsan joked. For questions, call: (903) 489-0947, or visit https://texasbeespecialist.com

For More Information: It is illegal to kill Honeybees! call: (903) 489-0947, or visit https://texasbeespecialist.com

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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

August-September 2018

H.O.P.E. garden efforts continue to grow BY Jo Anne Embleton

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Jacksonville Daily Progress

ultivated with love, gardens grown by local master gardeners keep The H.O.P.E. Center kitchen stocked in fresh produce year-round. “It’s just a project we started years ago - - it’s one of our main projects and it helps people in the community,” explained Robert Selman, the Cherokee County Master Gardener who oversees work done on the garden at H.O.P.E. as well as one that is part of the group’s demo garden at the Ruth Nichols Arboretum, on South Loop 456 in Jacksonville. “We get feedback from H.O.P.E., who really appreciate it, especially the new director (Sandra Fry). They appreciate the effort and work and the vegetables we give them,” he said. “If we had more members and bigger space, we’d give a lot more, but we’re limited.” Fry spoke highly of the gardeners who help make work at the 595 S. Ragsdale St. center easier in so many ways. “We appreciate it so much, because they have (fresh produce), which comes in really handy for ingredients to cook with. We have an abundance with our first harvest, which we can use in salads so they can have a fresh green salad, as well,” she said. The garden project initiated about a decade ago, Selman said, under the tutelage of inaugural H.O.P.E. executive director Fran Daniel. “I think when it was originally started, the lady that was over H.O.P.E. was a Master Gardener,” he said. Today, the gardeners do fall and spring gardens, growing things like tomatoes, cucumbers, bell peppers, jalapeños, banana peppers, squash, collards, green cabbage - - this year, even eggplant - - “things they can use in the kitchen,” Selman said. “What we do is check with them and see what they want, what they can really use in the kitchen.” Plants are from Bonnie’s Plant Farm in Ponta, and cultivated in raised beds at both sites. “We don’t have a whole lot of actual space to grow, so this is a good way to produce a good bit of food in a small area,” he said, adding that with raised beds, “there’s not as much weeding and it’s easier to take care of.” The gardens have been grown in raised beds since the program began, but because of time and wear, Master Gardeners have rebuilt them recently.

“They were cedar slabs, but we went back to using cedar lumber, with the beds 16 inches deep,” he said, noting that compost is donated by Neches Compost of Jacksonville, who provided about 10 yards of the material this year for use in the beds. “With the raised beds and the compost we’re using, our tomato plants are about five foot tall. It’s a good learning process on how to do different things with the beds,” Selman said. Additionally, this year the beds in the demonstration garden are part of a tomato trial for Texas A&M AgriLife Research & Extension Center in Overton, with varieties including Creole and Big Boy. Selman said they also grow herbs there, at the request of H.O.P.E. kitchen chef Linda Cryer. “She asked us to put herbs in, because they do use them at the kitchen,” he said. Fry, who took over H.O.P.E.’s reins earlier this year, said the yield from the gardens makes a huge impact on the program in an additional way: “It definitely minimizes the cost of what it takes to have lunches every day, Monday through Thursday, so we’re really glad for they work they do - - they put in a lot of labor.” The gardens “actually work hand in hand” with H.O.P.E.’s mission to serve those in need, she added. “They’re a very good resource to help us give back,” she said. Selman, who said he enjoys working with plants and helping people, agreed with Fry This program “is an opportunity to give back to the community through volunteering,” he said.

Daily Progress photo/Jo Anne Embleton

Right, Sandra Fry, executive director of The H.O.P.E. Center, recently inspects a bell pepper still on the plant at a vegetable garden maintained by Cherokee County Master Gardeners on Ragsdale Street. The raised-bed garden – and a second one located in a demo garden in Ruth Nichols Arboretum – produces a variety of veggies year-round.

For Your Information: An upcoming Cherokee County Master Gardener program begins Jan. 3, 2019, in Rusk. To learn more, contact the Cherokee County Agricultural Extension office, 903-683-5416. To learn more about the programs at H.O.P.E., call 903-586-7781.

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August-September 2018

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

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Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

PREDATOR FRIENDLY A

concept in protecting coyotes has been introduced by a group of Montana animal rights disciples; Predator Friendly Wool. They proposed to develop a market for wool raised on ranches where sheep are not protected from predators. The sheep raisers who do not practice predator control are to be paid a bonus on their wool. They propose to sell Predator Friendly Wool products through boutiques. Well, all I can say is HALLELUJAH! When was the last time anybody wanted to help sheep people? The government took away wool subsidies,

eco-freaks wear petrochemical derivatives and cowboys won’t eat sheep. Suddenly, from out of left field we have concerned citizens with expendable income willing to buy and wear wool items. The hitch is that the sheep ranchers must help feed the coyotes, wolves, bears, lions, eagles, wild dogs, carnivorous poachers and mutton loving piranha. How can we go wrong? We’ll get national promotion. We can reduce costs by laying off herders and border collies. Park the camp wagons, use the carbine guns as planters, sell the mules. And all for the price of a few baby lambs and old ewes. Sounds pretty good, doesn’t

it? And if the idea works it may spread to other areas. Inner cities, for instance. They suffer from a terrible image problem. The streets are unsafe, tourism is nill, budgets are always in the red. How about Predator Friendly Neighborhoods. Any community that did not discourage muggers, buglers,

murderers, arsonists, purse snatchers and other assorted predators would be given increased federal dollars. Police expenses would be cut drastically. Courts would close at noon. Lawyers would desert the community. Tours could be scheduled that allowed sensitive patrons to see predators in their natural habitat rolling winos, mugging passers-by, selling drugs and stealing cars. And all in an environment nationally advertised as Predator Friendly. And just like the Predator Friendly Wool program, the new Predator Friendly Neighborhood plan could all be accomplished simply by sacrificing a few more

sheep. Or, how ‘bout new election laws where presidents and politicians were elected for life. A Predator Friendly Congress, unaccountable to any voter. Ah, my imagination ran away with me. But the sheep business needs a shot in the arm and the trade-off, though distasteful, is well worth considering. I guess my hesitation is the calling we have chosen. Ezekiel 34:8 “...and my flock became prey to every beast of the field because there was no shepherd...” We are the shepherds.

Texas Bass Couples Championship approaching Staff Reports

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Corsicana Daily Sun

he Texas Bass Couples 2018 Championship will be held Oct 5-7 on Richland Chambers Reservoir. The tournament is hosted by Corsicana Convention and Visitors Bureau and sponsored by Plano Marine and Skeeter Boats. First Place is guaranteed to be $5,000 and the Skeeter Demo Team will be there again. Make sure you take that ride for a chance to win a “Free” entry for next year. (Six tournaments in one region.)

Texas Bass Couples Championship Richland Chambers Reservoir

October 5-7, 2018 Hosted by: Oak Cove Marina

Plano Marine will be offering a $5,000 incentive to the Winners of the Championship if you’ve purchased a new boat from them between Oct. 1, 2017 to Oct. 1, 2018. If you win the tournament and are in an older boat purchased from Plano Marine, you’ll win an additional $1,000. Boats purchased at Plano Marine. The Banquet will be held Friday, Oct. 5 at the Corsicana Opry. This is located in downtown Corsicana, so parking is somewhat restricted. Please share a ride with other Anglers so that there will be plenty of space. It will be difficult to park a truck and boat anywhere close to the Opry. Entry fee is $150 and is due no later than Sept. 1, 2018. Make checks payable to: Texas Bass Couples Mail to: 1112 Brigham Drive, Forney, TX 75126 (Once check is received, no refunds will be issued.) Schedule of events will be announced at a later date, so

Accomodations:

• Oak Cove Marina, 903-872-0888 Hotel/RV • Fisherman’s Point Marina,903-389-2423 On the south end of Richland Chambers, boat ramp, cabins, RV • Fisherman’s Cove Lodge, 903-396-7788 On south end of Richland Chambers, cabins • Countryside Inn, Malakoff, 903-489-0400 about 20 miles from lake. • Holiday Inn Express, Corsicana, 903-641-0450 Parking is limited, but have electrical for boats • Hampton Inn, Corsicana, 903-872-2238 Parking is limited

Never let a stumble in the road be the end of your journey.

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Advertising Executive

Lezlie Hoover

903-729-0281 • 903-948-8283 • lhoover@palestineherald.com

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check back often. 2018 Championship Sponsors include Plano Marine, Skeeter Boats, Bev’s Fish Creations, Ranger Cup, and Corsicana Convention and Visitors Bureau.


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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

August-September 2018

more ways to conserve water

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Every living thing on the planet requires water to survive. Without water, life as we know it would quickly perish. Despite the importance of water, many do not think ahead to what would happen if water supplies dwindled. To avoid such a fate, it’s best to begin conserving water whenever possible. Though estimates vary, most people use between 80 to 100 gallons of water each day. So many daily necessities require water use. By making a few changes here and there, it’s possible to considerably reduce the amount of water we waste each day.

When hand-washing dishes, don’t let the tap run. Fill up the sink and wash them that way then rinse afterward.

2 Spread a layer of mulch in planting beds 3 and around trees to keep roots moist. Check the home indoors and outdoors for 4 any leaks. 5 Use one glass or bowl all day for food and Wash clothing only when the entire machine is full.

drink to reduce the number of items that need to be washed.

6 Use the water conservation cycle on a 7 dishwasher. Bathe small children in the kitchen sink to 8 avoid having to fill up an entire bath tub. Report broken pipes or hydrants quickly. 9 Use a water-efficient showerhead to reduce water consumption by 75 percent.

Blessed and unicorn obsessed

4-H program teaches new skill, decorates cakes By Sierrah Sowell

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Corsicana Daily Sun

nicorns may be a mythical legend, but at the Lonestar Cowboy Church located on West Hwy. 22, with the help of the 4-H club, they came to life in cake form. Lorie Stovall, Texas Agrilife Extension agent, organized the event to encourage creativity and bring smiles into the organization. “We do a little bit of everything,” Stovall said. “We want the kids to have many different types of experiences to learn from and to build character.” The local H-E-B bakery sent three of their team’s best bakers, Amanda Dodds, Jade Thomas, and Hollie Allen. They taught a class on decorating unicorn cakes, from frosting the cake, to mixing icing colors together for a mane, a cone for a horn and icing eyes. Dodds, a former Emhouse 4-H member, put together

the baking class with the help of H-E-B. The 4-H program paid for the supplies for the class. The 4-H members enjoyed the opportunity to engage in creating their own masterpieces as they each got to pick their own icing colors to create a unicorn cake. The children started with a unfrosted cake base. They then picked their own overall icing color and had help from Dodds, Thomas and Allen to twirl their cake stands to cover the cake. They were allowed three color choices for the mane of the unicorn. After choosing, they set all three icing colors side by side in thin lines and then placed them in an icing bag, creating their own swirls on the top and back of the cake. The final touches were marshmallow ears, icing eyes and a waffle-cone horn. Sarah Beck, 11, and Patricia Reed, 10, could not have been more excited to be at the event. When asked about their work in the 4-H program, the girls had many positive things to share. “We raise our own animals,” Beck said. “We show them and do a lot of really fun group projects.”

Reed loves the craft projects the group does. “We made a really cool cross with shells all over it and I liked that a lot,” she said. The 4-H program stands for heads, hands, heart and health. The group reaches far beyond agriculture as they do multiple projects and cover a vast area of personal development aspects of children as well. According to the official 4-H website, the group is a global network of youth organizations who share the mission of “engaging youth to reach their fullest potential while advancing the field of youth development.”

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August-September 2018

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

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New Leaders at AgriLife C

By Becky Whisenant Special Contributor

herokee County was honored to host the new vice chancellor and dean of agriculture and life sciences Dr. Patrick Stover of Texas A&M University July 24 in the Lone Oak community south of Rusk. Spokesperson for TAMU, Adam Russell (adam. russell@ag.tamu.edu), said Dr. Stover, also acting director of Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas Forest Service, has been visiting around the state to get a first-hand look at AgriLife assets and to meet scientists, specialists, growers and stakeholders to glean information with a goal “to better align agriculture with a focus on public health to benefit producers, consumers, the environment and the economy.” The timber tract of Phil and Norleine Power, members of the Trinity Neches Forest Landowners Association was chosen to represent timber growers in East Texas. Managers of the family homestead settled in 1905, the Powers are proactive, experienced producers, employing all the recommended sustainability practices through consultation with TFS and NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Service). “Coming to East Texas following visits to other regions of the state, most recently the Panhandle plains, it’s easy to recognize the geographic diversity within the state of

Texas,” Dr. Stover said. “But there’s also something else that is as recognizable, and that is the common ethos of problem solving. There is a great deal of mutual reliance and alliance that has taken years to cultivate. That spirit creates incredible opportunities for rapid, effective and collaborative interactions with a variety of industry stakeholders to address problems for the benefit of all Texas residents and consumers.” Dr. Stover said AgriLife Research, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and Texas A&M Forest Service efforts align well with solving an array of state, national and global challenges - from feeding, clothing and housing a growing global population to providing new technologies and agriculture methods that better integrate their respective missions in a sustainable way. Representatives of TFS and TAMU toured Mr. Power’s property, receiving briefings on pest control, forest entomology, thinning cycles, streamside management, diversity and sustainability. The ubiquitous feral hog trap was on view enroute to a bald cypress stand and a black walnut stand, both planted as grandfather/granddaughter investments in the future. The importance of southern pine beetle prevention and water source protection was emphasized during the trek through approximately 150 acres of predominantly pine timber. The vital contribution of private timber growers in Cherokee and similar counties was made apparent. Over

90% of forests in Texas are privately owned. Dr. Stover previously visited Weslaco, Corpus Christi, Amarillo and Lubbock. He also toured Texas A&M Forest Service operations in Lufkin and met with producers and other regional stakeholders in Nacogdoches during his visit to East Texas. Prior to this visit, the vice chancellor’s experiences have been in the northeast. Dr. Stover joined the Texas A&M System in March from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He is a recognized leader in nutritional science as a member of the National Academy of Sciences. At Cornell, he served as director of the university’s Division of Nutritional Sciences, jointly administered by the College of Human Ecology and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Now at Texas A&M, Stover’s interests focus on food, nutrition and added-value agriculture. In this role, Dr. Stover oversees TAMU’s teaching, research, extension, and service missions. These vital pursuits are carried out by more than 5,000 employees of the Texas A&M System’s statewide agricultural agencies— Texas A&M AgriLife Research, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, the Texas A&M Forest Service, and the Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory— as well as the Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. As dean, Dr. Stover leads more than 7,800 students and 400 faculty members in 14 academic departments.

A Plant Propagation Workshop was held Friday, Aug. 10, at the Cherokee County Extension Office, 165 E. 6th St. Ste. 104 in Rusk. The event was hosted by the Cherokee County Master Gardener Association. Courtesy Photos

TBGC encourages support for Hunters for the Hungry Program

If you are shor t on hay...

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elebrating its 28th year, the Texas Big Game Awards (TBGA), a partnership of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) and the Texas Wildlife Association (TWA), continues to be the leader in recognizing the contributions that landowners, land managers and responsible hunters make to managing and conserving wildlife and wildlife habitat on Texas’ private and public lands. To kick off the 2018-2019 hunting season, the TBGA would like to encourage the hunters and landowners of Texas to enter the TBGA this coming fall hunting season. The TBGA is a free, certificate-based awards program recognizing hunters, landowners, youth, and first-time hunters across the state. As Texas Governor Greg Abbott said during his video message at the TBGA’s statewide ceremony held this past July, “On behalf of the state of Texas, I want to congratulate all of the winners at this year’s Texas Big Game Awards.” Governor Abbott continues, “I am so proud of your legacy. A legacy that stretches back to the very beginning of our great state. A legacy that was founded on private land ownership, on conservation and a deep respect for the land and our wildlife.” The TBGA would also like to encourage all hunters to support the ‘Hunters for the Hungry’ program this season. You may also help support the program through a donation when you purchase your hunting license. Are you interested in knowing what the records are for the county you hunt in? Then check out the Texas Big Game Awards ‘Trophy Search’ feature on the TBGA’s website. You can search by animal type, county, score and more to see all kinds of unique information about trophy animals from across the state. Also, if you are looking for more information on how to get youth into hunting, please check out the Texas Youth Hunting Program (TYHP). To learn more, visit: www.tyhp.org The purpose of the TBGA is to make everyone aware of the important role ethical hunting and habitat management play in the lives of our young people, and to the ecosystem over which we must be responsible stewards. To do that, the TBGA’s objectives are to recognize: 1. The importance of our hunting heritage. 2. The landowners who work to achieve healthy habitats. 3. The quality of big game animals in Texas. 4. The achievements of young and new hunters. 5. The hunters who harvest these animals.

About the Texas Big Game Awards: Under the Texas Big Game Awards (TBGA) program, awards are given to all “Scored Entries” that meet minimum regional requirements, and there are no entry fees. Deadline to enter is a postmark date of March 1, 2019. Hunters who harvest a white-tailed deer, mule deer, pronghorn antelope, javelina, or desert bighorn sheep this season meeting the minimum Boone and Crockett (B&C) net score requirements for their respective Region may be eligible to receive recognition in the “Scored Entry” category, as well as the landowner of the property from which the trophy was taken. Hunters of any age who harvest their first big game animal in Texas are eligible for the “First Big Game Harvest” category. Hunters who harvest a white-tailed deer, mule deer, javelina, or pronghorn antelope are eligible whether they harvest a buck or doe, regardless of score of the animal in this category. And, any youth hunter (under 17 years of age when they purchase their hunting license) with a Special Resident Hunting License who harvests a white-tailed deer, mule deer, javelina, or pronghorn antelope is eligible for the “Youth Division,” whether they harvest a buck or doe, regardless of score. For more information on the Texas Big Game Awards, certified scorers list, entry rules and minimum scores are also featured on the TBGA website at www. TexasBigGameAwards.org. The website also features photos of entries, links to great TBGA Sponsors, and Trophy Search.

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Farm & Ranch Supply So we can discuss your options. We have a ration with built in roughage that can be fed through this drought and this winter so you can get by with little or no hay. Cost per head per day comparable to hay and cubes. Purina accuration forage extender uses intake modifying technology to control consumption without salt so it is high in energy (14% Protein, 5.5% Fat, 15% Fiber). It is fed free choice in bulk feeders, so it requires less labor, less fuel, and is very convenient, we put it out for you. Also available in bags.

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East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

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Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

August-September 2018

World’s top bull riders take on toughest bovines By Brett Hoffman

Special to the Athens Review

T

he Professional Bull Riders’ top tier tour stopped in Tulsa on the Aug. 11-12. Like past years, Northeastern Oklahoma sports fans saw the world’s top bull riders take on the toughest bovines around. But this isn’t just any year for the PBR. The world’s leading pro bull riding organization has been celebrating its silver anniversary throughout 2018. This year, the association has a significant sponsorship deal with Monster Energy, which backs its top tier tour that’s called the 25th PBR: Unleash the Beast. The PBR has been unleashing bulls and cowboys from the bucking chutes from coast to coast, from New York to Anaheim, Calif., and points in between. Since its humble inaugural season in 1994, the PBR has capitalized on the fact that bull riding, which began as a rodeo event, became a prosperous stand-alone sport. Fans can watch the PBR on weekends on the CBS Sports Network. For the 16th consecutive year, the PBR world champion will receive a $1 million bonus on the final day of the World Finals in Las Vegas, which is scheduled for Nov. 7-11 at T-Mobile Arena. Fans are drawn to bull riding for the same reason they’re attracted to NASCAR. It’s an easy-to-follow sport with an element of danger. PBR performances also feature rock music and pyrotechnics that wow the crowds during high energy performances. “It’s the world’s most dangerous and exciting sport wrapped in a rock concert,” said Sean Gleason, the PBR’s chief executive officer. “And it’s just great family entertainment. We pack it in and you’re going to buy the whole seat, but you’re going to only use the front edge of

it because you’re not going to be able to sit back and relax because it’s such an intense experience when you’re in the building.” When the PBR conducted at twoday show in Tulsa, the tour stopped in an area of the country where there are an abundance of cowboy sports fans. But the PBR also draws great crowds in markets with a low percentage of the population that grew up around the western lifestyle. For example, the PBR’s tour stops in New York and Chicago earlier this year were well attended. “We’ve had to work at it pretty hard over 25 years to really build the base,” Gleason said. “For example, this was our 12th year at Madison Square Garden [in January], and it took a number of years to really break through and get people to come out and give this sport a try to see if they enjoyed it. We win our fans one at a time, and so over time, we’ve built a great audience.” Gleason said the PBR thrives because organizers can conduct a pro bull riding show pretty much anywhere. “We’re not bound by a track like NASCAR or even rodeo grounds like in San Antonio and Houston where your fans have to come to the

same location year in and year out,” Gleason said. “We have a sport that can travel to almost any arena in the country. I think that’s one of the big reasons we’ve been able to build a national following because we can do Portland and Bangor, Maine, Anaheim, Calif., Tacoma, and then go to Florida and anywhere in between.” At the Tulsa tour stop, Jose Vitor Leme, a Brazilian who lives in Decatur, clinched the title after turning in a score of 90.5 on a bovine named Bottoms Up (TNT Bucking Bulls/Hart Cattle Co.) during the final round on Aug 11. He earned $39,967. Meanwhile, Guilherme Marchi, the 2008 world champion, announced he will retire at the end of the 2018 World Finals, according to pbr.com. Marchi, another Brazilian who is from Decatur, is on pace to qualify for the 2018 PBR World Finals, which would put Marchi in a tie with 2004 world champion Mike Lee of Alvord, Texas, for the most World Finals appearances (15).

Hall of Famers

Pro rodeo fans who followed the sport in the late 1960s and early 1970s had many opportunities to read about world class bull rider and stock contractor Billy Minick. Minick qualified for the National Finals Rodeo in bull riding and then became a stock contractor who produced some of the world’s largest rodeos. He was inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame on Aug. 4 in Colorado Springs, Colo. During the induction ceremony, Minick, 79, who is from the Fort Worth area, was introduced by his wife, Pam, a former Miss Rodeo America who became a successful rodeo TV journalist. Minick qualified for the 1966 National Finals in Oklahoma City in bull riding. In 1968, he purchased the Harry Knight Rodeo Co. from Knight and legendary entertainer

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Gene Autrey. The company supplied the stock for some of the world’s largest rodeos in cities such as Fort Worth, Houston, San Antonio and Cheyenne, Wyo. Minick also provided the stock at the Santa Rosa Roundup Rodeo in Vernon. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Minick owned numerous highprofile bucking stock animals such as Tiger who was the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association’s Bull of the Year in 1974. He also owned the notorious bull V-61. Minick said rodeo is a very challenging business. “For anyone involved in the rodeo business, it’s a tough business and I have a lot of respect for them,” Minick said. “It enabled me to see the contestant side of it and then the stock contracting side of it and then the business side of it when I was a stock contractor. Those experiences still help us today in our business.” Minick currently is the chief executive officer of Billy Bob’s Nightclub in Fort Worth, which features bull riding competition on the weekends. Minick has a long-time relationship with the Fort Worth Stock Show Rodeo. He grew up regularly attending the famous winter pro rodeo. “I came up through the ranks at the Stock Show,” Minick said. “I went on to be a bull riding winner

there. Then, I ended up being a stock contractor and then Pam and I have been on the board of directors for 25 years.” Former Dallas Cowboys runningback Walt Garrison, who also was a prize winning steer wrestler on the PRCA circuit, was inducted into the Prorodeo Hall of Fame last weekend. Garrison used his stardom from football and rodeo to raise more than $4 million to fight multiple sclerosis with his Walt Garrison All Star Rodeos for more than 20 years. The charity rodeo was conducted in Dallas in the 1980s and in Mesquite in the 1990s. Garrison was instrumental in the U.S. Smokeless Tobacco program which sponsored individual cowboys and provided scholarships for college rodeo athletes. His charitable involvement also included, at the time of his induction, serving on the board of directors for the Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund for more than two decades, according to prorodeo. com. Speed Williams and Rich Skelton, who won eight consecutive PRCA team world championships together from 1997-2004, also were inducted. They were joined by gold bucklewinner Deb Greenough (bareback riding, 1993), contract personnel recipient Leon Coffee, and the committee for the Black Hills Roundup in Belle Fourche, S.D., as the PRCA inductees. Barrel racers from the Women’s Professional Rodeo Association (WPRA) were among the class of inductees. The class consisted of Kristie Peterson, Billie McBride and a WPRA equine inductee French Flash Hawk (Bozo). In addition to the 10 inductees, former PRCA Chief Operating Officer Kay Bleakly received the Ken Stemler Pioneer Award, which honors individuals in recognition of their groundbreaking, innovative ideas and forward thinking.


August-September 2018

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

9

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

From Scratch with Love Bacon-Wrapped Pork Tenderloin

Total time: 45 Minutes makes 3-4 servings Juicy pork tenderloin meets crispy bacon and savory-sweet apples. Simple enough for a weeknight, but impressive enough for a dinner party. Serve with roasted mashed potatoes for an easy but decadent meal.

Ingredients

Instructions

1. Heat the oven to 500°F and arrange a rack at the top.

• 1 (1-pound) pork tenderloin • 4 teaspoons olive oil • 4 to 5 slices thin-cut bacon (about 4 ounces) • 2 pounds Pink Lady apples, or other firm, sweet apples • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for seasoning the tenderloin • Freshly ground black pepper

2. Coat the tenderloin with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil and season with salt and a generous amount pepper. Wrap the bacon around the tenderloin in a spiral so it completely covers the meat. Place on a baking sheet and roast until the bacon just begins to render, about 10 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, core the apples, slice into 6 wedges each, and place in a large bowl. Add the remaining 3 teaspoons olive oil, measured salt, and pepper. Toss until well coated. 4. Scatter the apples around the tenderloin without allowing them to touch each other or the pork, and roast until the bacon is light brown, the underside of the tenderloin is browned and the meat registers 150°F on a digital thermometer, and the apples are knife tender, about 10 minutes more. 5. Set the oven to broil and cook the tenderloin until the apples begin to brown, the bacon is golden brown, and the pork reaches 155°F to 160°F. Let rest at least 5 minutes before serving.

Recipe by Aida Mollenkamp and Amy Wisniewski via Chowhound

East tExas stock PricEs

ANDERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK

EAST TEXAS LIVESTOCK INC.

Updated: 08/22/2018 Head Count: 427 Buyers: 39 Sellers: 52

Updated: 08/21/2018 Headcount: 1648 Feeder Calf Buyers: 16 Sellers: 191

STEERS

STEERS

200lb - 300lb

1.40

2.05

300-DOWN

$140

$208

300lb - 400lb

1.32

1.99

305lb - 400lb

$135

$200

400lb - 500lb

1.27

1.85

405lb - 500lb

$122

$187

500lb - 600lb

1.20

1.60

505lb - 600lb

$118

$157

600lb - 700lb

1.05

1.45

605lb - 800lb

$115

$149

700lb - 800lb

0.95

1.41

200lb - 300lb

1.30

1.75

300-DOWN

$133

$188

300lb - 400lb

1.27

1.67

305lb - 400lb

$125

$172

400lb - 500lb

1.22

1.55

405lb - 500lb

$115

$153

500lb - 600lb

1.10

1.50

505lb - 600lb

$110

$147

600lb - 700lb

1.00

1.40

605lb - 800lb

$105

$140

700lb - 800lb

0.80

1.25

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

SLAUGHTER

SLAUGHTER

Cows

0.40

0.65

Cows

$45

$62

Bulls

0.70

0.85

Bulls

$75

$84

PAIRS

$875

$1500

PAIRS

STOCKER COWS GOATS

$575hd

$1200hd

$25hd

$150hd

TRI-COUNTY LIVESTOCK MARKET Updated: 08/25/2018 Head Count: 1374

STEERS UNDER 300lb

1.45

2.05

300lb - 400lb

1.35

2.00

400lb - 500lb

1.25

1.70

500lb - 600lb

1.20

1.60

600lb - 700lb

1.00

1.40

700lb - 800lb

1.00

UNDER 300lb

BRED COWS

NACOGDOCHES LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

HUNTS LIVESTOCK EXCHANGE

Updated: 08/23/2018 Head Count: 895 Buyers: 55 Sellers: 146

STEERS

NO TEST

$800/hd

$1200/hd

ATHENS COMMISSION COMPANY

Updated: 07/16/2018 Head Count: 1158

STEERS

NO TEST

Updated: 08/24/2018 Head Count: 1710 Sellers: 230

STEERS

UNDER 300lb

1.30

1.95

200lb - 299lb

1.00

2.10

300-DOWN

1.35

2.00

300lb - 400lb

1.22

1.80

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.94

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.85

400lb - 500lb

1.10

1.90

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.68

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.65

500lb - UP

0.95

1.49

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.55

500lb - UP

0.80

1.50

1.38

600lb - 700lb

N/A

N/A

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.52

HEIFERS

700lb - 899lb

1.00

1.39

300-DOWN

1.25

1.85

1.25

1.65

UNDER 300lb

1.25

1.85

HEIFERS

300lb - 400lb

1.00

1.70

300lb - 400lb

1.20

1.42

300lb - 400lb

1.15

1.75

200lb - 299lb

1.00

1.48

400lb - 500lb

0.85

1.45

400lb - 500lb

1.10

1.44

400lb - 500lb

1.00

1.72

300lb - 399lb

1.00

1.54

500lb - UP

0.80

1.35

0.80

1.48

400lb - 499lb

1.00

1.57

SLAUGHTER

N/A

N/A

500lb - 599lb

1.00

1.52

Cows

0.35

0.64

600lb - 699lb

1.00

1.52

Heavy Bulls

0.65

0.88

1.00

1.29

PAIRS

HEIFERS

HEIFERS

500lb - 600lb

1.05

1.40

500lb - UP

600lb - 700lb

1.00

1.28

600lb - 700lb

700lb - 800lb

0.92

1.20

SLAUGHTER Cows

SLAUGHTER

0.35

0.62

700lb - 899lb

Cows

0.30

0.61

Bulls

0.60

0.82

SLAUGHTER

Heavy Bulls

0.70

0.84

PAIRS

$650

$1300

Cows

0.30

0.68

Low-Middle

PAIRS

$950

$1100

STOCKER COWS

Bulls

0.63

0.77

PAIRS

$550

$1270

BABY CALVES STOCKER COWS LOW-MIDDLE

NA $700hd NA

NA

GOATS

$1200hd

BABY CALVES

NA

HORSES

$450hd

$1200hd

$25hd

$250hd

$25

$150

STOCKER COWS

N/A

N/A

BABY CALVES

Top

$235hd NA

$1150

$1400

$800

$1150

STOCKER COWS

0.60lb

1.00lb

GOATS

$40hd

$200hd

$75hd

$300hd

$100hd

$500hd

$1,160hd

BABY CALVES

NA

HORSES


East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

10

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

August-September 2018

A Texas Fest

Elite Series heading to fabled Lake Fork in 2019 By Matt Williams Outdoors Writer

B

ig bass junkies across Texas got a nice surprise last week when one of pro bass fishing’s biggest leagues announced it is bringing its traveling road show to what is arguably the most storied big bass fishery in America next spring. On August 16, Bassmaster announced that the Elite Series will land at Lake Fork on May 2-6 for the 2019 Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest. The Texas Fest tournament is one of nine regular season events on next year’s Elite Series schedule. Word of the event is big news because it will mark the first time the big league circuit has visited the legendary big bass lake 90 miles east of

Dallas. Historically, major bass tournaments have steered clear of Fork because of its 16-24 inch “slot limit.” The limit requires the immediate release of all fish measuring between 16 and 24 inches; only one fish 24 inches or greater may be retained per day. Lake Fork has a rich history of producing whopper bass. The 27,000-acre reservoir has produced 260 bass weighing 13 pounds or more for the Toyota ShareLunker program, including two state records weighing 17.67 and and 18.18 pounds. John LaBove of Greenville caught a Top 50 15.48 pounder at Fork last March. It’s the biggest bass reported from Fork since 2013 and third largest reported statewide the last six years. Fork is a special lake, indeed. And the Texas Fest is an equally

special bass tournament, but not just because it plays out under a format that is truly unique from other Elite Series events. Just so you know, the Texas Fest began in 2007 as the Toyota Texas Bass Classic. The tournament historically brought together the top qualifiers from BASS, FLW and the Professional Angler’s Association for what many billed the world championship of fishing. The name was changed to Texas Fest in 2017, when the tournament became a BASSsanctioned Elite Series event held annually as a benefit to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The benefit comes largely in the form of a $250,000 donation made annually to TPWD by Gulf States Toyota ever since the first TTBC was held on Fork in 2007. TPWD inland fisheries director Craig Bonds says the money is used as funding for several fishing-focused youth outreach programs and in support of various marketing and communications efforts associated with those programs. Bonds said there is added value to the event, because it helps the department connect with anglers nationwide and spread the word about Texas’ high quality fishing through various media outlets.

Catch, Weigh and Release

Courtesy Photo

Keith Combs of Huntington milked Lake Fork for a record- setting, three-day total of 110 pounds on 15 fish in the 2014 Toyota Texas Bass Classic. Only time will tell if the 27,000-acre reservoir will be able to maintain that pace when the Elites roll into town in nine months.

What sets the Texas Fest format aside from most tournaments are the manners in which weights are tallied and weigh-ins conducted. Under the traditional format, anglers fish throughout the day and retain their five heaviest bass in the boat’s livewell. The fish are brought to an organized stage weigh-in then released back into the lake. The Texas Fest format of “catch-weigh-immediate release” is built around minimizing stress on fish while simultaneously complying with Fork’s restrictive slot. Individual anglers are paired with a non-fishing judge. The judge weighs and records the weight of each bass and the fish goes right back into the lake. The angler’s five heaviest bass each day count towards his accumulative, four-day total of 20 fish. At Fork, the Elite pros will be allowed to bring one fish over the slot to the weigh-in stage each day to show off to fishing fans. Bassmaster.com will cover the event in real-time Internet programming. Plus, it will broadcast on The Bassmasters television program on ESPN2 and ESPN Classic. Previous Texas Fest events were held Sam Rayburn and Lake Travis in 2017 and 2018.

Banking on Big Ones Lots of folks are

Photo by Matt Williams

Bassmaster recently announced Lake Fork as the site of 2019 Toyota Bassmaster Texas Fest event. It will mark the first time the big league circuit has visited the legendary big bass fishery near Quitman. The tournament is set for May 2-6. understandably excited about the Elites coming to Fork, particularly local community organizations like the Lake Fork Area Chamber of Commerce, Wood County Industrial Commission and Emory Tourism who lobbied to bring it there. If the lake shows out with some big bass like everyone hopes it will, it could be a shot in the arm for area businesses. Big league tournaments have shown to generate serious bucks for local economies. Lake Fork Area Chamber of Commerce president Michael Rogge said in a recent Bassmaster.com press release that bringing the Elites to Fork will be a much welcomed meeting of the giants. “Lake Fork is world-renowned for its record-breaking fishing,” Rogge said. “Bassmaster is world-renowned for its elite fishing competitors. It is only fitting that these two giants come together for a classic fishing event. A coalition of community organizations is proud to have the opportunity to host such a premier event as the Bassmaster Elite Series tournament benefiting Texas Parks and Wildlife, which has committed so much time and resources to Lake Fork to make it what it is today. Lake Fork is the destination for fishermen from all over the world because of their efforts.” BASS CEO Bruce Akin said in the release that holding an Elite Series event on Fork is like a dream come true. “B.A.S.S. and the Bassmaster Elite Series anglers have long wanted to conduct an Elite event

on Lake Fork, which is a bucketlist fishery for bass anglers worldwide,” Akin said. “The innovative catch-weigh-release format --along with the support of Gulf States Toyota, Texas Parks and Wildlife and the family of B.A.S.S. sponsors -- enables us to finally show what Lake Fork is capable of producing. We can’t wait to go there.” Actually, plenty of folks already know what Fork is capable of producing. Elite Series pro Keith Combs of Huntington is among them. Combs won the 2014 Toyota Texas Big Bass Classic held on May 9-11 at Fork with an enormous three-day of 110 pounds on 15 bass. Combs’ total crushed the former three-day weight record of 83-5 that was set by Byron Velvick during a Bassmaster event on California’s Clear Lake in 2000. No doubt, Combs was a fast track towards topping the BASS four-day weight record of 132-8 set in 2008 at Lake Falcon by Mississippi’s Paul Elias. He may have done it with one more day to fish. Some have hinted that tournament fishing’s most storied weight record could be in jeopardy when the Elites come to Fork next May. Only time will tell on that one. New record or not, it’s sure to be like a bunch of big kids walking in to candy store where the jaw breakers have a history of growing extremely large. Matt Williams is a freelance writer based in Nacogdoches. He can be reached by e-mail, mattwillwrite4u@yahoo.com.

USFWS duck survey shows decline but numbers still above LTA

T

here is good news and bad news the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2018 Waterfowl Population Status Report released earlier this month. The good news is that populations of most species continue to remain above the long term average. The bad news is the overall population of breeding ducks in North America appears to have declined about 13 percent. The annual survey, carried out largely by air, has been conducted each spring since 1955 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Canadian Wildlife Service. This year’s survey pegs the breeding duck population at 41.19 million birds. The number represents a 13 percent decrease over the last year’s total of 47.27 birds. It is also the lowest breeding duck population recorded by the survey in the last eight years, but still remains 17 percent above the LTA.  According to reports from Delta Waterfowl, a North Dakota-based duck hunter’s organization, mallards showed a decline of 12 percent to 9.26 million, but remain 17 percent above the LTA. The report says wigeon are the only index species that showed an increase in 2018. Wigeon numbers jumped about two percent to 2.82 million, or eight percent above the LTA.  “The breeding population decreased, but remains quite strong, with most species remaining near or above long-

term averages,” said Dr. Frank Rohwer, president and chief scientist of Delta Waterfowl. “Ducks declined due to dry conditions in large portions of the breeding grounds. Fortunately, we continue to benefit from ‘carryover birds’ hatched during highly productive springs over the past several years.” Blue-winged teal fell 18 percent to 6.45 million, 27 percent above the LTA, according to the report. Gadwalls dropped 31 percent to 2.89 million, 43 percent above the LTA. Green-winged teal decreased 16 percent to 3.04 million, still 42 percent above the LTA. Northern shovelers declined three percent to 4.21 million, 62 percent above the LTA. Redheads declined 10 percent to 1 million, 38 percent above the LTA. Canvasbacks dropped 6 percent to 686,000, 16 percent above the LTA.  The report says only two breeding population estimates are below long-term averages. Northern pintails declined a concerning 18 percent to 2.37 million, 40 percent below the LTA. Scaup (lessers and greaters combined) declined nine percent to 3.99 million, 20 percent below the LTA.  “Bluebills are drifting dangerously close to a return to restrictive harvest regulations,” Rohwer said. “And the pintail number is disappointing. We’d hoped that good wetland conditions across Montana, and portions of southern Alberta and southeastern Saskatchewan, would be enough to give pintails a boost. That was

clearly not the case.” Across the U.S. and Canada, the May pond count registered 5.23 million -- four percent lower than last year and in line with the LTA. Pond counts in prairie and parkland Canada, which covers Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, decreased 15 percent to 3.66 million, but were still four percent above the LTA. Pond counts in the north-central United States, which covers Montana and the Dakotas, declined 11 percent to 1.57 million, eight percent below the LTA. “The pond count has been above, in some cases way above, the long-term average for many years, and we’ve enjoyed huge duck estimates as a result,” Rohwer said. “This year, the count is average and in some cases, well-below average.”  Dry conditions in the eastern Dakotas (down 32 percent) and southern Saskatchewan (down 21 percent) impacted duck distribution this spring.  “Dry conditions across many areas of the prairies doesn’t bode well for duck production,” Rowher said. “However, timely rains in during nesting season, particularly in North Dakota, certainly aided duck production in some regions.” Experts say habitat conditions grew even more variable following the May surveys, forcing ducks to further compete for breeding habitat and decreasing their odds of nest success. That could impact waterfowl seasons, because hunters shoot the fall flight, not the breeding population,

the report says. “There will be plenty of ducks in the fall flight, but unlike years when there are plenty of easily decoyed juveniles, hunters can expect savvy, adult birds,” Rohwer said.  You can review the complete 2018 Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey at: www.fws.gov/ migratorybirds/pdf/surveys-anddata/Population-status/Waterfowl WaterfowlPopulationStatusReport18.pdf.


August-September 2018

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

11

Drought conditions persist in Henderson county, despite occasional rain BY RICH FLOWERS Athens Daily Review

Several ways of monitoring drought show conditions exist in the county, but they are far less severe than other in parts of the state. The Keetch-Byrum Drought Index is monitored closely by Henderson County Fire Marshal Shane Renberg and other officials to keep track of how dry conditions are locally. When Henderson County is at or above 575 on the scale, court consider a burn ban. On Monday, the county average had risen to 612. The range was from 502 to 696. According to Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Henderson County is in a period of moderate drought conditions for the past 90 days. Portions of East Texas are showing severe or extreme dryness during the same period. Much of Henderson County had only received 50 to 75 percent of the average rainfall during the period. A standardized precipitation index was developed by the Colorado Climate Center in 1993. On the map, Henderson County is shown as abnormally dry to moderately dry. The US Geological Survey reports Lake Athens’ elevation on Monday was 438.63 feet. The highest recent elevation was 440.85 on Feb. 23. Cedar Creek Reservoir was reading 320.08 on Monday. It had been 322.6 on March 3. Lake Palestine read 342.98 on Monday after a recent high of 346.87 on March 1. AgriLife Today reported in July that if dry conditions continue, ranchers should prepare to possibly cull cattle herds. Herds have been increasing since about 2009, when the last drought began to lose its grip. The Texas Drought Preparedness Council created a preparedness plan in 1999 that defines four types of drought. A meteorological drought involves a period of substantially diminished precipitation that persists long enough to produce a significant hydrologic imbalance. An agricultural drought occurs when inadequate precipitation or soil moisture exists to sustain crop or forage production systems. The water deficit results in serious damage and economic loss to plant or animal agriculture. Hydrological drought refers to deficiencies in surface and subsurface water supplies. It is measured as streamflow and as lake, reservoir and groundwater levels. A socioeconomic drought occurs when water shortages start to affect the health, wellbeing and quality of life of the people, or when the drought starts to affect the supply and demand of an economic product.

The Cherokee County Master Gardener Fall Plant Sale will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 8, at the Ruth B. Nichols Arboretum, 1015 SE Loop 456 in Jacksonville. Locally grown plants will be offered for sale. For more information, contact Cherokee County horticulturist Kim Benton, 903-683-5416.

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Farmers bale hay in Athens this month. Texas ranchers are again dealing with a shortage of rainfall as East Texas remains in moderate drought conditions. Athens Daily Review photo/Rich Flowers

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12

East Texas Farm & Ranch Living

Support Agriculture Businesses... They are the Heartbeat of Our Economy

August-September 2018

The various benefits of farm-to-table

Special to the Herald-Press

Few things are more satisfying than biting into a fresh tomato right from the garden or seasoning a meal with herbs picked from a windowsill greenhouse. Restaurants recognize the value of such experiences, and more and more are relying on locally sourced products in their kitchens. The farm-to-table movement is not new, but it has gained momentum as consumers become increasingly enamored with the flavor and environmental impact of locally sourced foods. The National Restaurant Association found that farm-to-table food was one of its top 10 trends for 2015. Furthermore, the group says that one in five consumers are willing to pay more for local food, and 41 percent admit that locally sourced ingredients influence their decisions when choosing where to dine. Newcomers to the farm-to-table dining experience may not understand all the fuss surrounding this popular trend. The following are some of the key benefits of farm-totable. • Peak freshness and ripeness: Local produce ripens on the plant and can be harvested at the last possible minute before it turns up on a plate. This helps ensure that it contains the highest amount of nutrients and flavor, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Food that has to travel further is often picked well before it is ready, ripening on the way to stores or other vendors. • Better for the environment: Food that needn’t travel far before reaching diners’ plates saves roughly 500 gallons of diesel fuel to haul produce a distance of 1,500 miles. This conserves fossil fuels and prevents harmful emissions from entering the atmosphere. • Supports neighboring farms: Supporting farm-to-table restaurants and other eateries keeps business local in two different ways. It not only benefits local restaurants, but it also directly supports neighboring farms, fisheries and other suppliers. • Accessibility to seasonal choices: Farm-to-table eating provides a wide variety of inseason foods. This can translate into tastier foods because they are grown and harvested during their optimal growing season. • Reduces factory farming: According to O.info, the informational resource powered by Overstock.com, farm-to-table and local farming can reduce reliance on large, profitdriven corporations that may focus on maximum production over animal health and welfare. Local farms may be more inclined to treat their animals well and institute sustainable practices. • Learn about the community: A person might live in an area and never know that a local vineyard is in the vicinity or that a producer of straight-from-the-hive honey is nearby. Exploring farm-to-table resources can open people’s eyes to local businesses doing great work in and around their communities.

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August 2018 Farm & Ranch Living  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

August 2018 Farm & Ranch Living  

A special supplement to the Palestine Herald-Press focusing on East Texas Farm and Ranch Living.

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