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July 2018

GO DEEPER

SEPTEMBER 2017

with these winning methodologies


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InterVIEW JULY 2018


WORD FROM THE BOARD

This edition’s Word from the Board is brought to you by Jason Shoebridge, RANZ board member and CEO of Kantar Insight New Zealand, the parent company of

Publisher: Research Association

Kantar TNS and Colmar Brunton. The Research Association’s AGM in

Jason Shoebridge CEO

June will mark the end of my two years on the board. Much of the board’s time this year has been spent on the strategic review which has been undertaken to ensure that the Research Association remains relevant as the industry we work in continues to face considerable change, driven by technology. As I come to the end of my time on the Board, there are a number of things that make me feel positive for the future of the Research Association. The first is that so many people have contributed to the strategic review. In particular, I attended a

It has also been great to see the continued success of RANZ Social. The energy and the enthusiasm of the RANZ Social team are a great example of the vibrant and relevant organisation we need to aspire to, and demonstrate that the industry has some outstanding people coming through its ranks. Finally, although money is always going to be tight in the association, as the year end accounts show we have had a profitable year which has allowed us to rebuild reserves, which is critical to the ongoing viability of the Research Association.

workshop where the strategy of the association was discussed. It was great to see the workshop so well attended by a wide range of people – clients, agency staff and leaders, people in adjacent industries

and

associations

demonstrating their concern that the association is fit for purpose going forward. This is also reflected

As I finish my term on the board I would also like to acknowledge the hard work of my fellow board members, the executive committee members, Rob Bree, Claire Lloyd and Janine Bliss and wish them and the new board members all the best for next year as the association puts in place the outcomes of the strategic review.

The dedicated team which produced this newsletter includes: Emily Bing Sue Cardwell Rachel Prendergast Nicola Legge Daniel Peeters George Wilks Layout and design by Charmaine Fuhrmann Images are copyright to their owners and should not be copied without permission Copyright (c) Stock.XCHNG Photos, 123RF Stock Photos, RA. InterVIEW is published four times a year by an enthusiastic sub-committee of the Research Association committee. The views expressed are not those of the Research Association. We welcome your input and your requests for advertising space.

Visit us: www.researchassociation.org.nz

in the very good cross section of industry leaders standing for the board this year.

Jason 3


NEW2018

INTRODUCING OUR

RANZ BOARD MEMBERS RANZ would like to farewell and thank Winifred Henderson for her dedication and commitment as the Chair of the board over the last two years. She has been a very passionate and vocal supporter of the research industry for nearly 20 years, including RANZ Chair since 2016, setting up GRBN,

organising the conference, and being the convenor of judges for the RAEAWARDS. RANZ would also like to thank Nicola Legge, Vince Galvin and Jason Shoebridge as the outgoing board members in 2018, and welcome our four new board members in 2018.

Geoff Lowe Infotools Geoff is passionate about finding the right future for the research industry and the professionals that make it what it is.

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InterVIEW JULY 2018


Ian Mills Nielsen A strong supporter of having a healthy and vibrant industry association, Ian is keen to see RANZ expand its involvement with related industry organisations, and to increase its relevance to all.

Karin Curran Curran Research Associates Karin’s looking forward to creating a strong future for the industry and building the RANZ profile while on the Board.

Carl Edkins Coca-Cola Oceania Carl is is keen to apply diversity and put a client-side lens into the workings of RANZ. Karin, Carl, Ian and Geoff join existing RANZ board members, Catherine Frethey-Bentham, Carin Hercock and Galina Mitchelhill 5


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It’s coming to fruition. The initiative to develop and evolve RANZ as an organisation that operates energetically in our rapidly changing professional environment has truly begun. This follows three major listening exercises including: • Qualitative interviews with members – ascertaining the perceptions and needs of RANZ members • A quant survey of members – ascertaining professional needs •

AFTER MUCH LISTENING A NEW

STRATEGIC

DIRECTION IS

STARTING TO COME CLEAR

A co-creation session facilitated by Mark Buntzen from The Distillery – distilling the thoughts of 40 participants who had considered the research

The session, held on May 11th, featured the input from a diverse range of agency and client members and non-members, including those working with a technology focus; insights teams; and qual and quant practitioners from a variety of large and small research agencies. At the end of the session, the gang worked in groups of four to develop a shortlist of must-have priorities and directions for RANZ. In no particular order, they included: •

A step change in direction. To operate less in an isolated way and to work as part of a professional eco-system

Developing a funding model that enables RANZ to rely less on the often extraordinary effort put in by volunteers

• Rebranding and reinvigorating RANZ to reflect the diversity of needs and skill sets that we cover 8

InterVIEW JULY 2018


• Investing effort into becoming the go-to place for Thought Leadership in analytics, privacy, research and insights

participants and fellow members comment, evolve ideas and keep the conversation alive.

• Providing training – or working with training bodies (universities) to meet the changing needs of professionals

Our colleagues are busy people, but some more input is warranted. A strawman – an interim proposal for a structure and mission has been put on the SLACK site, and you are invited to add your thoughts here.

• Stronger communication – a vibrant online / social media presence that connects professionals more closely • Opening the Board membership to incorporate a wider number of voices from different disciplines and sectors A follow-up to the workshop was the posting of these types of ideas on SLACK for

The recent horror flick A Quiet Place gave the art of listening a dangerous twist; make a sound and the alien creatures would find you. Well, for RANZ, silence is even more dangerous. Join the Slack Group and make some noise.

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like “off balance on purpose” and the idea of “good stress” or as Nietzsche and Kelly Clarkson put it: what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. Share this on LinkedIn Written by Sue Cardwell

Coming from a background in marketing and market research, Sue Cardwell now looks after customer experience and insight at Public Trust. “5 trends” is her regular contribution to InterVIEW. Sue helped relaunch InterVIEW in 2011, but is now happy to have handed the magazine on to fresh talent. She loves to hear your comments - tell her what you think with a tweet.

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ANTIFRAGILE

Nassem Nicholas Taleb is obsessed with probability and risk. He rose to fame with The Black Swan at the time of the GFC, and is now persuading us to create antifragile systems, businesses and human beings. Antifragile doesn’t mean resilient (that a system can resist stress) but rather that the system thrives on stress and volatility. Taleb argues that like exercised muscles, such systems are stronger. It reminds me of Darwinism: the organism that survives is the one most adaptable to change. How can we use it? This chimes well with approaches 10

InterVIEW JULY 2018

Make yourself stronger: #antifragility and intentional adaptation. #5trends #mrx #RANZ by @tuesdaysue

SERVE YOUR BUYER’S COMMUNITY 2

“Buyers aren’t always buying, but they are always learning,” says analyst Jon Reed. With too narrow a picture of the buyer, businesses forget that buyers live and work within a network, and are influenced by people the business may have never thought of influencing. With most product awareness and consideration now happening well before buyers make contact with businesses, it’s time to take off the blinkers and serve a wider community - the buyer’s community. It’s not just about reach. Businesses need to understand the buyer’s community too. These people aren’t necessarily buyers themselves, and they won’t respond to the same messages as buyers would. Community service for businesses? Probably. As Gary Vaynerchuk says, “Give, give, give, then ask (for the sale).” Tweet this Serve your buyer’s community wisdom from @jonerp #5trends #mrx #RANZ via @tuesdaysue


RESEARCHERS

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SOCIAL SHOPPING

Social shopping might sound like a trip to the mall with your friends, but it’s more likely to happen between you and your phone, without ever entering a store. Each of the social media platforms is finding ways to give brands new and frictionless ways to sell, with Chinese giant WeChat a clear leader. Opinion polls say we’re open to buying on social media. The “Shop now” buttons which are creeping into your Facebook feed are designed to give you a seamless shopping experience. Brands should be cautious of simply replicating their website ecommerce experience on social media. Shoppers expect something slicker from social. An example is Augmented Reality (AR). With Snapchat, you’ll soon be able to try on clothes using augmented reality. Another invasion of your friend time on social, or a way of connecting designers with design lovers? Whichever you feel it is, social shopping is a trend we’ll see more of.

Tweet this Is #socialshopping antisocial or a brilliant way of democratising design? #5trends #mrx #RANZ by @ tuesdaysue

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YEARNING FOR CONSUMER CLOSENESS

Many have already noted that classic market researchers are thinner on the ground these days, as some of what researchers used to do can now be achieved by machines. Leonard Murphy – Executive Editor & Producer, GreenBook - predicts we’ll see companies use research and insights for “consumer closeness” - with qualitative skills featuring more prominently in the mix. Both tech-facilitated and traditional face-to-face qual will add flavour to what AI and automation can deliver in quantitative results for brands, he observes. Share this on LinkedIn Brands need #marketresearch for consumer closeness - so qual is on the rise, says Leonard Murphy of Greenbook. #5trends #mrx #RANZ via @tuesdaysue

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SMART SHOPPING TROLLEY TRIAL IN AUCKLAND

As global retail evolves before our eyes, it’s exciting to hear that a small store in Auckland will be the site of the first smart shopping trolley. None other than Four Square Ellerslie will house the trolleys, which scan items as they enter the smartphone-connected trolley. Items are charged to your credit card, so there’s no need to queue for checkout. Auckland-based founder William Chomley says he was motivated by the frustration of long waits in supermarket queues - something we can all relate to. Share this on Facebook 11


UNDERSTANDING THE OPPORTUNITIES IN

WHAT REALLY GOES ON INSIDE YOUR

If you’ve been keeping up on the latest findings from psychology and behavioural economics (or kept a close eye on the world around you), you’ll be aware that human beings don’t always make rational decisions. We buy $5 coffees, our likelihood to buy online can be affected by subtle word changes, and advertising that plays to our emotional side has a greater long-term impact than more rational sales driven messages. And we’ve all heard the story of New Coke – the decision to make a more Pepsi-like flavour in the 80’s based on focus group and blind taste-testing that bombed in the market. The Nobel prize winning economist Daniel Kahneman popularised the idea of System 1/System 2 thinking, demonstrating that the majority of our decision making (about 90-95% by some estimates) occurs subconsciously. Why is this? It’s because of our innate cognitive structures programmed into the brain. The fact that most of our thinking occurs subconsciously means that directly asking consumers what they think, or why they acted in a certain way, won’t always give you (or your clients) the understanding you’re after. This is what attracts me to the growing field of consumer neuroscience – the application of robust scientific methods to understand why a consumer’s brain makes certain key decisions. Internationally it’s gaining traction in America and Europe through companies such as Nielsen Consumer Neuroscience and Neurons Inc. Typically, a consumer neuroscience study would use a combination of traditional techniques (e.g. surveys and interviews) but would lean heavily on approaches such as EEG (Electroencephalogram aka brain tracking) to measure brain responses or eye tracking to record what captures attention. The key benefits are: • The ability to measure moment by moment during the experience e.g. while watching adverts or shopping in store and online 12

InterVIEW JULY 2018

Scientific robustness, making use of how people actually understand the world around them

Predictive validity – according to Nielsen Neuroscience, 3-3.5 x more effective than approaches such as surveys alone

The ability to use a common approach for different objectives, e.g. measuring motivation to purchase during an online and instore supermarket journey without using widely different metrics

Need examples? In 2008 Frito-Lay were ready to release a new advert for Cheetos, where a woman pranks someone at a laundromat by putting her orange Cheetos in their washing machine – turning her whites into a very different colour. The problem was that the focus groups said this advert would tank – who would actually enjoy such a mean-spirited advert? Well, according to cognitive testing performed by NeuroFocus (now Nielsen Consumer Neuroscience), most of us. The advert was released and led to a 30% increase in sales volume. How about determining impact across different media channels? A veritable hornets nest of issues, given the industry’s range of reach and attribution metrics. Companies such as PostNord and Oceans Outdoor have been turning to neuroscience to understand how channels such as direct mail and out of home billboards (traditionally difficult channels to measure) work with digital marketing. A key insight from this research is that using digital and non-digital channels together leads to a greater impact and ROI than using either in isolation, but the way messages are presented needs to be tailored to the channel. Interesting, right? But where does this fit in the NZ landscape? According to NZ corporates there are


In advertising it is about making best use of your marketing budget, by ensuring you’re learning from what works in one campaign and feeding it into the next campaign. Or, for a campaign in the market, making sure that you’re not tripping yourself up with one poorly received scene. A NZ campaign that I recently looked at, went to market with a 60 second advert which performed amazingly well – up until one scene half way through. After this scene was watched by consumers, the advert never quite recovered. How much lost revenue has this one scene resulted in?

MIND

three key areas attracting interest: advertising, package design, and instore and online user experience.

fully your product on the shelf) and how motivated they feel when looking at it – a proven predictor of purchase behaviour. This gives you the opportunity to problem-solve and work through new package concepts.

Instore testing is something that I’m hugely excited about, as we begin to realise the influence that subtle decisions, such as the design and placement of pricing dockets, signposting around the store, or the setup of shelves, have on likelihood to purchase. We can now send consumers around a retail store, equipped with eye tracking and EEG to get a true measure of the customer journey. This means we don’t interrupt someone’s purchase flow with shop-alongs or ask them to recall their experience with intercept interviews. This is a hugely exciting area, and one that has continued to gather interest (according to the Q3Q4 2017 GRIT report 21% of researchers were using, 22% were considering, and 44% were interested in these techniques). For market researchers, it allows us to address previously difficult to answer questions using a robust, proven approach; for clients, it provide granular and actionable insights with proven efficacy. For myself, it’s simply fascinating.

Eye tracking provides a unique view on how effective your packaging is on a busy retail shelf – while EEG can explain how effective the package is to motivate consumer purchase behaviour

Another interesting area is package design. It’s estimated that in a typical 30 minute shopping trip, a customer would have been exposed to around 40,000 products, rejecting products at a rate of 20 per second. Consumer neuroscience gives you the tools to track what someone is looking at (hope-

Cole Armstrong is founder of NeuroSpot, a consumer insights company using consumer neuroscience to help companies make more effective decisions. He's using his extensive experience as a market researcher and neuroscientist to remove some of the subjectivity that leads to differences between “what people say” and “what people do” - to bring some objectivity to understanding what people think and feel. Whether in the context of advertising, CX, UX or another issue, he's passionate about getting to the nub of why consumers do what they do. 13


MEASURING UNCONSCIOUS Mark Vincett - Research Director, Sapien

At Sapien we are obsessed with better understanding people and what drives them. Take decision making. Behavioural science has helped researchers to realise that many decisions are made on autopilot - people do not consciously and deliberately evaluate all the options every time they buy something; instead, every decision they make is influenced by unconscious instinctive and emotional shortcuts. Unfortunately, marketing research methods have relied heavily on people’s rational conscious evaluations of new products and ideas; they ask people to tell them what they like, dislike, why they think that and how likely they are to buy in the future. The problem is people often can’t or sometimes won’t tell us what they really feel, which means they say one thing and then do something different. Evidence? Take a look at everything from new product failure rates and expanding waistlines to predictions for Brexit and the US election. So, how do you find out how people feel about something without actually asking them? There are an increasing number of solutions for this, but it’s not always practical to hook people up to an EEG or use sensors to measure their galvanic skin response when testing a new product or pack design. These solutions are often limited to a few isolated tests conducted with respondents in lab like conditions, hardly representative or natural. Which led Sapien to explore implicit research and priming techniques as a means of measuring people’s’ unconscious associations. Implicit association testing has its origins in social psychology and was developed to measure unconscious bias, identifying people’s true feelings rather than claimed responses that may be constrained by socially acceptable norms. Advances in online technology are enabling us to quantify System 1 motivations and build more holistic prediction models. Fundamentally implicit research seeks to elicit and measure responses indirectly and in a way that is not controlled by the respondent, meaning it understands how they really feel rather than how they want us to think they feel or how they think they feel. Sapien uses an implicit association method optimized for online, mobile market research called affective priming. This approach measures the impact of a 14

InterVIEW JULY 2018

s n o i t c Rea

half-second stimulus exposure on a consumer’s ability to perform a simple sorting task related to contrasting concepts i.e. positive vs negative emotion or exciting vs. boring. The difference in each consumer’s response latency, accuracy and intensity relative to their own cognitive baseline reveals the strength of automatic association between the stimulus and the concept.

Imagine you’ve been sorting attributes into two categories: “Good for you” and “Bad for you” – now immediately prior to the sorting task an image of a big juicy burger flashes in front of you. Your unconscious forms an immediate visceral association with it; and I would posit that for most of you it would be far more difficult to sort an attribute like ‘Healthy’ correctly into the “Good for you” category, but far easier to sort the attribute ‘Unhealthy’ into “Bad for you”. Each respondent’s sorting times and accuracy are measured with and without primes, to provide a truly implicit measure of the strength of their associations. Results are compared to an extensive normative database, with over 100+ million associations measured in the last 12 months alone. By varying the structure of the test and the nature of the primes and attributes, this approach can be successfully used to implicitly measure people’s unconscious emotional responses to a range of marketing questions, i.e. testing motivations towards new products, packs or advertising claims, measuring brand or category attitudes and perceptions, even testing emotional impact of new advertising. This solution has helped us indirectly measure people’s emotional responses, attitudes and associations; through this we have given clients new insights into their brand’s associations and distinctive assets, informing new pack designs and brand messages. Head of research at Sapien, Mark has over 20 years shopper & consumer insight experience. During this time, he’s used a diverse range of research methods to obtain better understanding of customers, their behaviours and the motivations & needs which shape them. He’s passionate about helping clients learn more about their customers, unlocking fresh opportunities and driving future growth.


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THE

EVOLUTION OF

ONLINE

nichola@freshfocus.net.nz

Nichola Quail is founder and Research Director at Fresh Focus. She is a seasoned, consumer research specialist with over 15 years’ experience across a broad suite of brands and categories. Using a blend of digital, mobile and human interaction, Nichola loves getting up close and personal with the messy world of consumers. 16

InterVIEW JULY 2018

RESEARCH

COMMUNITIES BY: NICHOLA QUAIL, FOUNDER AND RESEARCH DIRECTOR, FRESH FOCUS


In 2009 I was introduced to online research communities and have never looked back. It all started when I was asked to moderate a rolling, 3-month customer community for Cadbury NZ. I didn’t know much about the methodology and couldn’t imagine that people would stay engaged for that length of time. ‘How much are they getting paid?’ I asked.

The main benefits of digital communities are: 1. Longitudinal - where you can build rapport and gather information over a number of days, weeks even months 2. Flexible - Allowing participants and more importantly, introverts to reflect and consider their responses in

their own time

3. Nationwide context - providing views and experiences from metro and rural/regional areas Oh we don’t pay them. Every week we award 10 of the best responses a king-size block of Cadbury chocolate and at the end of the 3 months we award 5 Cadbury hampers.’

So, customers were spending three months posting, interacting, providing feedback - all for a block of chocolate. I was intrigued…what motivated them? How does a moderator maintain this level of engagement? Since then I have run up to 100 digital communities all varying in length, size and category. What I love most about them is the ability to connect with people over a period of time and have a window into their world. A skilled moderator can weave their way into the participant’s daily life and members enjoy seeing how others respond or what their view of the world or brand is.

4. 100% Transparent - with clients able to view conversations from their desk (which can become quite addictive!) 5. Convenient for both researcher and participant – all can be done from the comfort of our desks 6. Flexible – you can change and iterate as you go. You can add things at the last minute and test response to something that happened in the market 7. No transcriptions…enough said! But don’t get me wrong…like with every methodology, there are some limitations of digital communities. It is more difficult to probe and follow up on a comment in real time. Like with focus groups, 100% participation is not guaranteed. However, I have found you get more depth and richness than in a staged group environment. Also, if you are looking for a more dynamic, creative, brainstorming-style session, a digital community will be less effective. So what next? As community platforms become more sophisticated, the possibilities are endless. Whilst I would hate to see a chatbot replace human moderation, machine learning and sentiment analysis are shortcutting the heavy load of thematic analysis. Community software is also becoming mobile-friendly allowing anytime, anywhere engagement. If you would like to know more about digital research communities, feel free to get in touch and book a coffee. 17


Galina started her career working consultancy side in market research many years ago (too many to mention she says!). Companies she’s worked at include PHOENIX Research (approx. 10 years), KTNS (almost 10 years) and IPSOS. During this time, Galina has worked across a huge range of clients, including everything from pharma, to FMCG (Nutricia will always have a soft spot in her heart), to utilities to telco to financial services. Starting as a junior research associate she worked through the market research levels to Director level. A quallie/quant by nature, Galina has had the privilege of working with amazing qual and quant researchers, and leading some great research teams.

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InterVIEW JULY 2018


LESSONS IN SETTING UP A CUSTOMER LAB On Valentine’s Day this year we launched our Customer Lab at IAG. The lab is part of our Customer Experience Strategy to put the customer at the centre of our decision-making and to bring decision-makers and the end customers together to ensure success for both in service design. The lab is a physical space designed for co-creation of experiences and propositions, and is also a CX space for Human Centred Design (HCD) sprints. Being on site at the head office was critical to ensure a real connectedness between the business, the design world and the customers/ partners. Setting up the lab was a new experience - exciting and a bit scary! We were given a ground floor space in our head office in Fanshawe St and were left to make it happen. Along the way we have been learning a few lessons, some of the main ones are below: •

Be very clear on the primary purpose of the lab – and make sure you communicate it well to stakeholders. It was a new shiny toy – so everyone wanted to use it. We put in place a hierarchy for use, starting with customer sessions, then HCD CX sprints, and restricted the ability to book the lab to a few key people.

Beware and be prepared for the ‘past use’ ghost. The area we inherited was an old kitchen space, which those in the training rooms often used, rather than going to the staff café. We had a comms campaign going over a few months with posters on the doors and a whiteboard across the entrances explaining this wasn’t a kitchen anymore!

• Be clear on how work gets into the lab and who you will hand outputs over to for action in the business. Ensure work has a Senior Sponsor and a Business Owner you will work with. • Be inclusive. The lab was deliberately set up in the head office to ensure it was tightly linked to decision-makers in

BY: GALINA MITCHELHILL Insights & Design Manager, IAG

the business and wasn’t seen as this sexy cool thing that only an elite group of people got to play in.

• Use HCD principles in designing the Lab. We went for a minimum viable proposition, so we could continue to grow and develop the space as we learnt more on what customers and those using the lab for sprints and workshops wanted. What we thought we’d kit it out with and what customers wanted, were two totally different things! • Keep showcasing and getting the Senior Management through. The more people in the business who appreciate it, the easier it is to get things done, and get funding! • Make friends with the property people. They will fix things when they go wrong (trust me they will!) and find you deals and even free stuff! •

Create separate areas. We have our main lab, whose primary purpose is being a space for working with customers, a CX Design sprint room for project teams to ‘live in the lab’ for 2 – 4 weeks, as well as our visual management workflow space.

• You can never have too many whiteboards. We thought we had a lot - two huge walls of whiteboards and 8 moveable white boards. We didn’t! • Tell users up front the guidelines/rules for use, otherwise you’ll end up being caretaker and cleaner (as well as getting complaints from the next users). People don’t know until you tell them what behaviour you expect from them in a space like this. We learnt this the hard way. We have our expectations on the walls, we put them into all the email bookings, and for projects coming for any length of time in residence, people will receive a face-to-face briefing. It is still very early days in our journey. So, watch this space for the learnings from our first year of operation! 19


WHY DO WE STILL

The latest update from Stats NZ by Vince Galvin, Chief Methodologist at Stats NZ

Have you ever found yourself thinking “Why do we still

HAVE A

have a Census? Surely we know enough to create that file from other sources?”

Stats NZ has been looking into this question since 2013 as part of the Census Transformation programme. We have been exploring how we can use the data from our Integrated Data Infrastructure (IDI) to estimate and describe the New Zealand population and its characteristics. In very broad terms, the main questions we have been looking to answer are: • Can we cover the population accurately? • What range of population variables are available within the data we have? When we started to look at this question we considered exactly which census variables are used, and what they are used for. We came to the simple conclusion that it is the counts of people at many levels of geographic disaggregation that provides the highest value to Stats NZ users. Going into this work we had some thoughts about what would be difficult and what wouldn’t. For years we have used data from government programmes as inputs to statistical processes and the main lesson out of all of this is that any information collected that isn’t needed to administer the programme is at risk of not being good quality (often by simply not being filled in at all). So, we really weren’t sure how well the sources would cumulatively cover the population. We knew from previous work that no one source does this adequately by itself. For example, we were concerned that since a lot of government services are individual entitlement based, and that very few programmes make any use of ethnicity in their administration, this wasn’t necessarily going to be an easy task. So, how is it all turning out? Well, the real answer would be have a look through the 15 or so Census Transformation research papers on the Stats NZ website (see here for publications prior to 2018), but here are some “tasters”.

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InterVIEW JULY 2018

?


?

1.

In terms of counting the population by age bands, the following graph looks at the difference between our population estimates (the Estimated Resident Population - ERP) and the estimates we have been able to derive out of the IDI for the Census years 2006 and 2013. This looks very encouraging and it’s particularly interesting that the IDI based estimates have higher numbers of young men. Dedicated census users will know that in every Census there are discussions about “missing men”.

2.

Forming households has turned out to be challenging. One of the papers on the website outlines what we know about this, however the crux is we can get about half of people into the right households, but this flows through to some uncertainty in estimates for low level geographies. Ethnicity has turned out to be easier to estimate (at least at the highest level of the classification hierarchy), but again, you can read more about this in the paper that addresses this particular issue.

3. How about all the variables that we collect on the census form? We are continuously

updating the diagram below that summarises how this is playing out. As I am sure you would expect, there are variables for which there will never be another source, and others which there are already some pretty good alternatives. In the collection of papers you can read some of our thoughts about how the IDI based data set could be used, alongside a large survey, to measure variables and check on the coverage of the administrative collections. This materials are all on our website for anyone interested to look into this deeper, and the papers contain the names of contact people who will answer questions if you’d like more details. So happy browsing!

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George is a Research Manager at NeedScope International (Kantar). Since joining NSI 2 years ago, he has taken an active role in the wider industry, as a member of the RANZ Executive committee and RANZ Social teams.

FRIDAY NIGHT DRINKS? MEET ME AT: The Beerspot. Excellent beers on tap, and occasionally excellent Poutine

CHILLED OUT WEEKEND BRUNCH? MEET ME AT: Ima bistro. Best shakshuka in Auckland

TO RELAX, I: Go running, clean house, cook food.

INTERVIEW IS COMING TO DINNER. I’M COOKING: Slow cooked Beef cheek Pappardelle, Gyokai Tonkotsu Ramen, Hui Guo Ruo (Sichuan style twice-cooked pork), Cardamom infused Crème Brulee with a Rhubarb Compote.

THE MUSIC I’M LISTENING TO RIGHT NOW IS: Little Dragon, Twin Peaks, Action Bronson, Freddie Gibbs, Kali Uchis, The Horrors

LAST GOOD BOOK / ARTICLE / PODCAST: Best poadcast I’ve listened to recently was “How did this get made” with Paul Scheer, Jason Mantzoukas and June Diane Raphael. An entry, I would recommend EP. #156: XXX Return of Xander Cage (w/ Adam Scott). WTF podcast with Marc Maron is also excellent. With over 800 episodes, it also boasts being one of the longest running podcast series of all time. He has interviewed everyone from Barack Obama to NZ’s own Rhys Darby. Worth a listen.

MY DREAM HOLIDAY IS: Tulum, Mexico

AN IDEAL WEEKEND: Lying on Tarwharanui beach.

PEOPLE WHO HAVE INSPIRED ME RECENTLY: : Ariyan Arslani, Yayoi Kusama, Hidetaki Anno, Hayao Miyazaki, Frances McDormand, Martin McDonagh, Taylor Sheridan

THE BEST THING I’VE LEARNT IN MY CAREER IS: Time management skills, how to use Microsoft excel. 16 InterVIEW 22 InterVIEW InterVIEWJanuary JULY SEPTEMBER 2018 2015 2017


&

MOVERS

SHAKERS

IAN MILLS From: Insights Director, Research First To: Executive Director of Consumer Insights, Nielsen RANZ Fellow Ian Mills has joined Nielsen New Zealand as the Executive Director of Consumer Insights.

SARAH BOLGER From: Chief Client Officer, Colmar Brunton To: Head of Colmar Brunton Sarah has recently accepted the position of Head of Colmar Brunton where she’ll lead the comany’s next stage of growth following a successful 2017.

CARIN HERCOCK From: Executive Director of Consumer Insights, Nielsen To: Managing Director, Ipsos New Zealand Carin has joined Ipsos where she leads their Wellington and Auckland offices, driving strategy, managing senior-level client relationships, and building the Ipsos brand in New Zealand.

GRANT BELL From: Owner/Director, The Acid Test, Sydney To: Group Account Director, Colmar Brunton Grant joins Colmar Brunton’s Wellington office as Group Account Director. He brings more than two decades of quantitative research and analytics experience in the Asia Pacific region, most recently with his own research consultancy in Sydney.

AIDEN REGAN From: National Qualitative Director, Colmar Brunton To: Managing Director, Ipsos UU ANZ New Zealand 23


QPMR ACCREDITATION GET THE QUALITY MARK RANZ members are now eligible to get the Qualified Practising Market Researcher (QPMR) accreditation. 3+ years industry experience and a practical research assignment.

1

Join the QPMR scheme as an international member for $220NZD.

2

Meet the eligibility requirements and submit the QPMR application and self-assessment form along with a current resume. Researchers on both client and agency side are invited to participate.

3

Once approved to undertake the QPMR assessment complete a practical research assignment in response to a prepared research brief within 14 days. Submit the brief along with a signed Statutory Declaration stating that you did not consult another person when completing the practical assignment.

4

Pass the research practical assignment and be awarded QPMR accreditation. Receive the QPMR mark (see below) and a PDF QPMR certificate.

5

To maintain your accreditation, keep learning and developing professionally, and submit a yearly QPMR diary outlining your professional development activities over the previous 12 months. Annual QPMR renewal fee is $100NZD

To undertake the QPMR assessment contact the QPMR Manager, Julie Regan, at julie.regan@amsrs.com.au 24

InterVIEW JULY 2018


BECOME A QUALIFIED PRACTISING MARKET RESEARCHER (QPMR) IN 2018! QPMR is the professional benchmark that recognises experienced market and social researchers. It is a recognised qualification in Australia and New Zealand by peers and clients that demonstrates your commitment to the industry, and your extensive experience and formal qualifications. This is the first time RANZ members have been eligible to gain QPMR accreditation through the Australian Market & Social Research Society. Two current RANZ members, Horst Feldhaeuser, Infotools and Emily Bing, Pureprofile (both accredited with QPMR since 2012) talk about the benefits of QPMR and why it’s an exciting offer for RANZ members.

Horst Feldhaeuser, Infotools

Emily Bing, Pureprofile

Why did you sign up for QPMR? Horst: I was working in Sydney at the time and QPMR is very prevalent in Australia. I also felt it was a good process to apply my practical knowledge to a ‘theoretical’ test. Apart from the application, at the time one had to sit a test (no longer required) and do the practical exam. I really enjoyed the process as it was all stuff I knew and was interesting to go through the whole process, including questions regarding qualitative and quantitative research. Emily: I was working in Melbourne and wanted to gain recognition in the industry as a qualified researcher. There is a sense of prestige being part of the QPMR membership and this is definitely recognised among clients - especially social researchers where we had clients who specified that QPMR was a requirement of their research project team. Refreshing my memory of research theory to

prepare for the exam was challenging (like going back to university!) but I actually really enjoyed it. What are some of the key benefits you've gained since becoming a QPMR? Horst: For Australian clients QPMR is a recognised accreditation. Also, just an heightened awareness to constantly develop myself and keep up with the latest in our industry. Emily: Mostly the recognition from clients, but also it’s a good way to keep up to date with the industry and continue learning and building your knowledge. Any advice for those considering QPMR? Horst: Becoming a QPMR is a great way for us here in NZ to piggy-back on the Australian accreditation process so just go for it! It’s interesting (and fun) to do the practical exam. And it’s not hard to continue to get your points and keep your QPMR diary up to date. Emily: Brush up on your reading and theory and lock in a date to sign up! It’s all stuff you probably know anyway so it’s definitely worthwhile doing once in your career. 25


UP

DA TE

FR

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What a great night at the RANZ Social Annual Pool Tournament in June! Pizza and drinks went down well to start the evening, followed by a night of networking and pool.

Most creative team name: ‘Right on Cue’ Danielle Hawkins (Kantar TNS) and Nicholl Oblitas-Costa (Ipsos)

Teams for the tournament were formed and each came up with a team name. The match was very close with a couple of great teams sinking the black (bad luck!) but it was clear that one team deserved the crown. The winning teams were: Winners: Rosanna Land and Bob Stewardson (Kantar TNS) Runner-up: Daniel Peeters, Cameron Robinson (Ipsos) 26

InterVIEW JULY 2018

Thanks to everyone who came along and made it a very enjoyable evening. Thanks to our sponsors - The Research Association of NZ for sponsoring this event and Kantar NZ for sponsoring the drinks.


CLICK HERE

HAVE YOU CHECKED OUT THE GRBN LEARNING CENTRE YET? Last year RANZ quietly launched a great new member benefit – discounted access to the GRBN learning centre, suitable for researchers at all levels. This is an online learning portal, providing access to online training courses and webinars created by national associations, regional federations and GRBN. The portal has been launched with content from AMSRS (Australia), CASRO (USA), MRIA (Canada) and MRS (UK), so it brings together the best material for your research development needs from all over the world, and makes it accessible to you here in New Zealand.

Whether you’re a qual or quant researcher, there will be something of interest here for you, so check out what’s on offer by clicking through the link on the RANZ website. There’s an opportunity to review a selection of the webinars for free, and all RANZ members are entitled to a 30% discount off the price of webinars and 15% off courses, making this an affordable and convenient training option.

Discount codes are available by emailing: Claire Lloyd secretary@researchassociation.org.nz 27


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Interview Q2 July 2018  

Interview Q2 July 2018  

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