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Curriculum for Excellence Maths and Numeracy Experiences and Outcomes Third Level MTH 3-17a

I can name angles and find their sizes using my knowledge of the properties of a range of 2D shapes and the angle properties associated with intersecting and parallel lines.

Key Learning Intentions

Learners’ Experiences / Possible Contexts Consider: collaborative learning, creativity, problem solving/investigative approaches, use of ICT, links across the curriculum etc.

We use 3 capital

Key Vocabulary: Angle, vertex, right angle, straight line, complete turn, vertically opposite, corresponding, alternate, equilateral triangle, isosceles triangle, right-angled triangle, scalene triangle, quadrilateral, polygon, intersecting, parallel. A This is B

ABC (or CBA)

C

Opportunities to find missing angles in: • equilateral triangles (all angles missing) • isosceles triangles (2 angles missing) • scalene triangles (one angle missing) Angle, Symmetry and Transformation

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Success Criteria

Evaluation and Next Steps

I can name an angle using 3 letters. I can find the size of an angle, given its vertically opposite angle. I can find a missing angle within a right angle. I can find a missing angle on a straight line.

I can find an angle, given its corresponding angle.

I can find an angle, I can find a missing given its alternate angle. City of Edinburgh Council


Curriculum for Excellence Maths and Numeracy Experiences and Outcomes letters to name an angle, with the middle letter representing We remember that angles in a the vertex of the angle. right angle add up to 90˚. We remember that angles on a straight line add up to 180˚. We remember that angles round a complete turn add up to 360˚. We know that vertically opposite angles are equal. We know that corresponding angles (F angles) are equal. We know that alternate angles (Z angles) are equal.

angle within a complete turn. • right-angled triangle (right angle marked and one angle missing) • parallelogram (3 angles missing) • rhombus (3 angles missing) • kite (one or 2 angles missing) • regular polygon (no angles given) Ask pupils to make up diagram with parallel and intersecting lines and fill in enough angles to allow others to complete the diagram. Then share with others on a sheet or swap with a partner.

We know that the angles in a triangle add up to 180˚. We use angle facts to help us find missing angles in triangles. We know that the angles in a quadrilateral add up to 360˚. We use angle facts to help us find the angles in a polygon. We use angle facts to help us Angle, Symmetry and Transformation

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City of Edinburgh Council


Curriculum for Excellence Maths and Numeracy Experiences and Outcomes find missing angles in a diagram of intersecting and parallel lines. Links to current 514 Planners

E9.6 F1.3 F3.10 F9.2

Angle, Symmetry and Transformation

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City of Edinburgh Council


Angle, Symmetry and Transformation MTH 3-17a