Page 1

SUMMER 2005

Connections For Friends of the Iowa State University Foundation

Opportunities Abound for these Future ISU Philanthropists ▼

GREAT HALL RENOVATION

AGRICULTURAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP INITIATIVE

LIBRARY GIFT


Connections

We are Agents of Change

SUMMER 2005

ne of the great joys for someone in my position is traveling to meet with alumni and friends of the university and getting to know people from all walks of life. This past year my travels have taken me to all parts of the country. I’ve gathered ideas and heard a great deal about the significance of Iowa State University, not only to alumni, but to the rest of the world as well.

O

Connections is published three times per year by the Iowa State University Foundation—a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to securing and stewarding private gifts and grants that benefit Iowa State University. This magazine serves as a link between Iowa State and benefactors who support the university. You are receiving this publication as an important member of the Iowa State family. We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions. Iowa State University Foundation Office of Communications 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, Iowa 50010-8644 Phone: 515-294-4607 Toll Free: 866-419-6768 Web: www.foundation.iastate.edu E-mail: questions@foundation.iastate.edu The Iowa State University Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact human resources, ISU Foundation, 515-294-4607.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Kelley A. Bergstrom, Chair Kenilworth, Illinois

Joanne M. Kuster Johnston, Iowa

Agatha L. Burnet Ames, Iowa

John K. Lawson Rapids City, Illinois

Lyle P. Campbell Paradise Valley, Arizona

Owen J. Newlin Des Moines, Iowa

Sandra L. Davis Edina, Minnesota

Steven T. Schuler, Treasurer Urbandale, Iowa

Gregory L. Geoffroy Ames, Iowa

James P. Stein Muscatine, Iowa

Cara K. Heiden, Vice Chair Urbandale, Iowa

Sheryl K. Sunderman Dallas, Texas

Labh S. Hira Ames, Iowa

Roger C. Underwood Ames, Iowa

Gerald A. Kolschowsky Oak Brook, Illinois

David W. Van Wert, Secretary Sun City West, Arizona

Cheryl G. Krongard Lutherville Timonium, Maryland

Marvin J. Walter Ames, Iowa

We’ve brought together a variety of people in various locations who have an interest in helping further our mission, and one point keeps coming across to me loud and clear. Each one of us—no matter who we are—has an important role to play as an “agent of change” in the life of this university. The private support I’ve seen this year is outstanding— an increase in the number of donors and gift production, as well as a record setting $3.2 million raised through our PhoneCenter. Changes are started in many ways, some so small they are hardly noticed and others of major, global scope. As a society, we need both to thrive. We are beginning to plan for a comprehensive fund-raising campaign

that will allow us to respond and contribute to a changing world and society. It will take many people to fulfill our goals. Each one of us—as an “agent of change”—will have a chance to make a difference. The opportunities are endless. As individuals, joining a momentum as great as that generated by Iowa State University gives us the capability of contributing to the advancement of humankind. In recent years, we have launched bold new research and technology transfer initiatives in such important areas as agricultural biotechnology, plant and animal genomics, bioinformatics, “smart” materials, agricultural product and market development, human nutrition, human computer performance, biorenewables and food safety and security. Any one of these areas can, and will, produce dramatic results for humankind.

Each one of us— as an “agent of change”—will have a chance to make a difference. Over the past year, a new strategic plan has emerged within Iowa State that will serve as a critical framework for scholarship and research throughout the university. That plan emphasizes excellence in our academic programs, an increase in

research addressing both local and global needs, and translating discoveries into viable technologies, products and services. These are the reasons we exist—to be responsive to the needs of all people in the global community. I am both energized and humbled by the societal contribution we have an opportunity to make, right now, in our lifetimes. Our country needs institutions like Iowa State more than ever. This fund-raising campaign will be vitally important to our future success and will keep moving us forward. While we must always rely on state support, our margins of excellence represents opportunities that only private support can achieve. You will be hearing much more from me in the future about this bold philanthropic initiative. ▼ GREGORY L. GEOFFROY PRESIDENT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

1


Connections

We are Agents of Change

SUMMER 2005

ne of the great joys for someone in my position is traveling to meet with alumni and friends of the university and getting to know people from all walks of life. This past year my travels have taken me to all parts of the country. I’ve gathered ideas and heard a great deal about the significance of Iowa State University, not only to alumni, but to the rest of the world as well.

O

Connections is published three times per year by the Iowa State University Foundation—a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to securing and stewarding private gifts and grants that benefit Iowa State University. This magazine serves as a link between Iowa State and benefactors who support the university. You are receiving this publication as an important member of the Iowa State family. We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions. Iowa State University Foundation Office of Communications 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, Iowa 50010-8644 Phone: 515-294-4607 Toll Free: 866-419-6768 Web: www.foundation.iastate.edu E-mail: questions@foundation.iastate.edu The Iowa State University Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact human resources, ISU Foundation, 515-294-4607.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Kelley A. Bergstrom, Chair Kenilworth, Illinois

Joanne M. Kuster Johnston, Iowa

Agatha L. Burnet Ames, Iowa

John K. Lawson Rapids City, Illinois

Lyle P. Campbell Paradise Valley, Arizona

Owen J. Newlin Des Moines, Iowa

Sandra L. Davis Edina, Minnesota

Steven T. Schuler, Treasurer Urbandale, Iowa

Gregory L. Geoffroy Ames, Iowa

James P. Stein Muscatine, Iowa

Cara K. Heiden, Vice Chair Urbandale, Iowa

Sheryl K. Sunderman Dallas, Texas

Labh S. Hira Ames, Iowa

Roger C. Underwood Ames, Iowa

Gerald A. Kolschowsky Oak Brook, Illinois

David W. Van Wert, Secretary Sun City West, Arizona

Cheryl G. Krongard Lutherville Timonium, Maryland

Marvin J. Walter Ames, Iowa

We’ve brought together a variety of people in various locations who have an interest in helping further our mission, and one point keeps coming across to me loud and clear. Each one of us—no matter who we are—has an important role to play as an “agent of change” in the life of this university. The private support I’ve seen this year is outstanding— an increase in the number of donors and gift production, as well as a record setting $3.2 million raised through our PhoneCenter. Changes are started in many ways, some so small they are hardly noticed and others of major, global scope. As a society, we need both to thrive. We are beginning to plan for a comprehensive fund-raising campaign

that will allow us to respond and contribute to a changing world and society. It will take many people to fulfill our goals. Each one of us—as an “agent of change”—will have a chance to make a difference. The opportunities are endless. As individuals, joining a momentum as great as that generated by Iowa State University gives us the capability of contributing to the advancement of humankind. In recent years, we have launched bold new research and technology transfer initiatives in such important areas as agricultural biotechnology, plant and animal genomics, bioinformatics, “smart” materials, agricultural product and market development, human nutrition, human computer performance, biorenewables and food safety and security. Any one of these areas can, and will, produce dramatic results for humankind.

Each one of us— as an “agent of change”—will have a chance to make a difference. Over the past year, a new strategic plan has emerged within Iowa State that will serve as a critical framework for scholarship and research throughout the university. That plan emphasizes excellence in our academic programs, an increase in

research addressing both local and global needs, and translating discoveries into viable technologies, products and services. These are the reasons we exist—to be responsive to the needs of all people in the global community. I am both energized and humbled by the societal contribution we have an opportunity to make, right now, in our lifetimes. Our country needs institutions like Iowa State more than ever. This fund-raising campaign will be vitally important to our future success and will keep moving us forward. While we must always rely on state support, our margins of excellence represents opportunities that only private support can achieve. You will be hearing much more from me in the future about this bold philanthropic initiative. ▼ GREGORY L. GEOFFROY PRESIDENT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

1


Good Feelings for Iowa State arylann Mucha just wants to give back to help others. She’s not a native Iowan, nor did she graduate from Iowa State, but she loves both for what they have added to her life.

C

2

For nearly 41 years, Carylann worked in the customer service area for United Airlines in Chicago. Then, seven years ago, she moved to Des Moines with her husband George (now deceased), who owned Burger King restaurants in Marshalltown and Des Moines. “I think Iowa sells itself short,” she says. It’s easy in this state to get involved in activities—it’s a good place and I like being here.” Today, Carylann stays busy with the many philanthropic adventures that fill her day. This time each year, she trains a group of about 28 children for the Des Moines Register and the YMCA—called the “Dream Team”—so they can go on RAGBRAI (the Register’s Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa). “The kids get a lot out of it,” she says, “but there’s a lot in it for me, too.” She volunteers at the Animal Rescue League and she works with Head Start children in a primarily Hispanic neighborhood. It was her Head Start work that first brought her to Iowa State. While taking Spanish classes at ISU in 2003 (so she could communicate better with her Head Start parents and children), she knew

that some students needed help with their tuition. Carylann tells a story about one classmate who took a study trip to Bolivia and then gave a report about that experience in class. “It was obvious that this trip changed her life,” Carylann said. “It was at that moment that I realized how important international travel was for students to really learn about the world in which they live.” Being a believer in the true spirit of philanthropy, Carylann decided to help future students through scholarships and financial support for international travel programs. The result was a scholarship fund established in the department of foreign languages and literature to help support needbased students. Annual gifts from Carylann will help this fund grow through the years. “All our students aspire to study abroad at some point in their academic careers. For many, it will be their first experience out of Iowa; for all of them it is a transformational

experience,” said Dawn Bratsch-Prince, Spanish professor and chair of the department of foreign languages and literatures at ISU. “We try to keep the program fees reasonable, but many times students are simply unable to afford the cost. Student scholarships, like the one established by Carylann, are vital to ensuring that all of our foreign language students can spend some time solidifying their study of world languages and cultures abroad.” Carylann’s annual contributions to her scholarship fund started her thinking about contributing even more to support Iowa State. She has named ISU the beneficiary of a trust that will provide unrestricted gifts of $200,000 to the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and $200,000 to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “Iowa has been very good to us,” Carylann explains. “We’ve had wonderful opportunities here, and I want to help others have the same.” ▼

Carylann Mucha and her late husband George.

Opportunities Abound for These

Future ISU Philanthropists hat Iowa State student organization includes the current Government

W

of the Study Body (GSB) president, the GSB vice president, a national

magazine top 10 college student finalist, a small business owner, and several other high energy achievers? Look no farther than to the ISU Student Foundation Committee. These young volunteers are amazing success stories, and undoubtedly will become the future leaders of their communities.

3


Good Feelings for Iowa State arylann Mucha just wants to give back to help others. She’s not a native Iowan, nor did she graduate from Iowa State, but she loves both for what they have added to her life.

C

2

For nearly 41 years, Carylann worked in the customer service area for United Airlines in Chicago. Then, seven years ago, she moved to Des Moines with her husband George (now deceased), who owned Burger King restaurants in Marshalltown and Des Moines. “I think Iowa sells itself short,” she says. It’s easy in this state to get involved in activities—it’s a good place and I like being here.” Today, Carylann stays busy with the many philanthropic adventures that fill her day. This time each year, she trains a group of about 28 children for the Des Moines Register and the YMCA—called the “Dream Team”—so they can go on RAGBRAI (the Register’s Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa). “The kids get a lot out of it,” she says, “but there’s a lot in it for me, too.” She volunteers at the Animal Rescue League and she works with Head Start children in a primarily Hispanic neighborhood. It was her Head Start work that first brought her to Iowa State. While taking Spanish classes at ISU in 2003 (so she could communicate better with her Head Start parents and children), she knew

that some students needed help with their tuition. Carylann tells a story about one classmate who took a study trip to Bolivia and then gave a report about that experience in class. “It was obvious that this trip changed her life,” Carylann said. “It was at that moment that I realized how important international travel was for students to really learn about the world in which they live.” Being a believer in the true spirit of philanthropy, Carylann decided to help future students through scholarships and financial support for international travel programs. The result was a scholarship fund established in the department of foreign languages and literature to help support needbased students. Annual gifts from Carylann will help this fund grow through the years. “All our students aspire to study abroad at some point in their academic careers. For many, it will be their first experience out of Iowa; for all of them it is a transformational

experience,” said Dawn Bratsch-Prince, Spanish professor and chair of the department of foreign languages and literatures at ISU. “We try to keep the program fees reasonable, but many times students are simply unable to afford the cost. Student scholarships, like the one established by Carylann, are vital to ensuring that all of our foreign language students can spend some time solidifying their study of world languages and cultures abroad.” Carylann’s annual contributions to her scholarship fund started her thinking about contributing even more to support Iowa State. She has named ISU the beneficiary of a trust that will provide unrestricted gifts of $200,000 to the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and $200,000 to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. “Iowa has been very good to us,” Carylann explains. “We’ve had wonderful opportunities here, and I want to help others have the same.” ▼

Carylann Mucha and her late husband George.

Opportunities Abound for These

Future ISU Philanthropists hat Iowa State student organization includes the current Government

W

of the Study Body (GSB) president, the GSB vice president, a national

magazine top 10 college student finalist, a small business owner, and several other high energy achievers? Look no farther than to the ISU Student Foundation Committee. These young volunteers are amazing success stories, and undoubtedly will become the future leaders of their communities.

3


he ISU Student Foundation Committee began in 1995 to help develop ambassadors and hosts for donors when they visit campus or attend events. The students also serve as advocates for the foundation with their campus peers, and learn the process of organized fund raising and the impact it has at Iowa State. They learn about philanthropy up

T

Elizabeth Sukup

close by meeting donors and hearing their stories. Committee members also speak at ISU events across the country, leaving audiences feeling proud of their past and excited about the future. “I am enjoying the behindthe-scenes look at how Iowa State serves Iowa, the nation and the world,” said Elizabeth Sukup, a sophomore from Dougherty, Iowa majoring in public service and administration in agriculture. “Every time our committee meets, I get more and more excited about our next event and the new things Iowa State will have to offer. This is an amazing school and that is p because of the people that Bisho Brad care so much to support it.” Donors also benefit from their experiences with these students, and many develop lasting friendships. “These kids are great to visit

with,” said Roy Reiman (AG ’57). “I’ve met a number of them while attending various campus events, and they’ve convinced me we're still attracting top students and turning out ‘quality products’ at Iowa State. I appreciate learning their perspective on the university and hearing about their involvement on campus. They help me stay connected to a place that means a lot to me.” Brad Bishop is a senior from Fairfield, Iowa majoring in industrial engineering. He has volunteered on the committee for two years. “I enjoy the personal relationships that I have developed with donors who really share a passion for Iowa State and are as interested in the university today as they were as students,” Brad said. “I have also enjoyed my opportunities to travel with President Geoffroy and the foundation staff to meet with donors and tell them what is happening on campus. Ultimately, I want to be able to give back to this university in a similar manner to many of today’s donors.” Stephanie Hilbert is a senior from Algona, Iowa majoring in marketing and management. “We experience the donor’s passion for Iowa State first-hand,” she said. “When we can live

Steph anie H ilbert

the impact of these gifts, it enhances our experiences. These interactions will stay with us long after we leave Iowa State.” If these students are any indication, then the next generation of Iowa State’s alumni reminds us that the future will be in good hands. No doubt, we will be hearing much more from these leaders in the years to come. ▼

Iowa State University Student Foundation Committee Members NAME HOMETOWN MAJOR Andrea Benzschawel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minneapolis, MN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Journalism Brad Bishop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fairfield, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Industrial Engineering Chris Deal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jefferson, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mechanical Engineering Shawn Eagleburger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Joseph, MO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interior Design Lauren Ellingson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lincoln, NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agricultural Business Hillary Forristall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Macedonia, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agricultural Business/Finance Rachel Geilenfeld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clear Lake, IA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science/Pre-Law Ashley Glade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guthrie Center, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biology Angela Groh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thornton, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science/Entrepreneurship Cory Hanson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Story City, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marketing/Management Stephanie Hilbert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Algona, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marketing/Management John Hughes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cedar Rapids, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Industrial Technology Nate Johanson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hampton, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agricultural Business

NAME HOMETOWN MAJOR Danny Jorgensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Naperville, IL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Materials Engineering/Spanish Nathan Katzer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creston, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agronomy/Public Service and Administration in Agriculture Jennifer Lowry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ames, IA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biology/Music Sophia Magill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charter Oak, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science Alison Neumann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Odebolt, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Journalism/Mass Communications Trenton Norman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decatur, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science Rohini Ramnath. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clinton, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science Elizabeth Sukup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dougherty, IA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Service and Administration in Agriculture Danielle Vance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floyd, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marketing Committee Advisor: Michelle Eppert, assistant director of donor relations

5


he ISU Student Foundation Committee began in 1995 to help develop ambassadors and hosts for donors when they visit campus or attend events. The students also serve as advocates for the foundation with their campus peers, and learn the process of organized fund raising and the impact it has at Iowa State. They learn about philanthropy up

T

Elizabeth Sukup

close by meeting donors and hearing their stories. Committee members also speak at ISU events across the country, leaving audiences feeling proud of their past and excited about the future. “I am enjoying the behindthe-scenes look at how Iowa State serves Iowa, the nation and the world,” said Elizabeth Sukup, a sophomore from Dougherty, Iowa majoring in public service and administration in agriculture. “Every time our committee meets, I get more and more excited about our next event and the new things Iowa State will have to offer. This is an amazing school and that is p because of the people that Bisho Brad care so much to support it.” Donors also benefit from their experiences with these students, and many develop lasting friendships. “These kids are great to visit

with,” said Roy Reiman (AG ’57). “I’ve met a number of them while attending various campus events, and they’ve convinced me we're still attracting top students and turning out ‘quality products’ at Iowa State. I appreciate learning their perspective on the university and hearing about their involvement on campus. They help me stay connected to a place that means a lot to me.” Brad Bishop is a senior from Fairfield, Iowa majoring in industrial engineering. He has volunteered on the committee for two years. “I enjoy the personal relationships that I have developed with donors who really share a passion for Iowa State and are as interested in the university today as they were as students,” Brad said. “I have also enjoyed my opportunities to travel with President Geoffroy and the foundation staff to meet with donors and tell them what is happening on campus. Ultimately, I want to be able to give back to this university in a similar manner to many of today’s donors.” Stephanie Hilbert is a senior from Algona, Iowa majoring in marketing and management. “We experience the donor’s passion for Iowa State first-hand,” she said. “When we can live

Steph anie H ilbert

the impact of these gifts, it enhances our experiences. These interactions will stay with us long after we leave Iowa State.” If these students are any indication, then the next generation of Iowa State’s alumni reminds us that the future will be in good hands. No doubt, we will be hearing much more from these leaders in the years to come. ▼

Iowa State University Student Foundation Committee Members NAME HOMETOWN MAJOR Andrea Benzschawel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minneapolis, MN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Journalism Brad Bishop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fairfield, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Industrial Engineering Chris Deal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jefferson, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mechanical Engineering Shawn Eagleburger. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . St. Joseph, MO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interior Design Lauren Ellingson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lincoln, NE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agricultural Business Hillary Forristall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Macedonia, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agricultural Business/Finance Rachel Geilenfeld . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clear Lake, IA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science/Pre-Law Ashley Glade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Guthrie Center, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biology Angela Groh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thornton, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science/Entrepreneurship Cory Hanson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Story City, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marketing/Management Stephanie Hilbert. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Algona, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marketing/Management John Hughes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cedar Rapids, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Industrial Technology Nate Johanson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hampton, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agricultural Business

NAME HOMETOWN MAJOR Danny Jorgensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Naperville, IL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Materials Engineering/Spanish Nathan Katzer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creston, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agronomy/Public Service and Administration in Agriculture Jennifer Lowry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ames, IA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Biology/Music Sophia Magill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Charter Oak, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science Alison Neumann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Odebolt, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Journalism/Mass Communications Trenton Norman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Decatur, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science Rohini Ramnath. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clinton, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Science Elizabeth Sukup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dougherty, IA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Public Service and Administration in Agriculture Danielle Vance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Floyd, IA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Marketing Committee Advisor: Michelle Eppert, assistant director of donor relations

5


A Relationship That Links Theory With Practice

Thanks for the Memories! f you graduated from Iowa State University within the past 75 years (most of you graduates have), and you remember attending events in the Great Hall in the ISU Memorial Union, you’ll know exactly what it looks like today.

I

6

With just a few minor updates over the years, the room remains essentially the same as it was when it opened in 1928—impressive, but getting a bit dated. It’s the dated part that’s about to change, thanks to a longtime supporter of Iowa State. Ames native Chuck Durham has fond memories of the Great Hall. He met his wife Margre there, and making the Great Hall shine once again will be a great tribute to the most important woman in his life. Chuck is the chairman and CEO of Durham Resources in Omaha, Neb., and holds two bachelor’s degrees from Iowa State (ENG ’39 and ’40). Margre, also an ISU

Margre and Chuck Durham

graduate (FCS ’39), died in 1999. “I met Margre at an event where young men and women became acquainted with each other,” Chuck said. “They called this night the “Twisters” and it cost 10 cents to dance with any girl you chose. I paid the dime to dance with Margre, and the rest, as they say, is history. She really got to me, and I don’t think I ever dated another girl after that evening.” It will take more than a dime to renovate the Great Hall, but that won’t stop Chuck. He’s given many wonderful gifts to support Iowa State over the years. You may recognize the Durham Center—the hub of most computer and communi-

cation activities for the ISU campus. Or you may have seen H. H. Henningson Plaza (next to Howe Hall)—a gift from Chuck to honor his father-inlaw, who graduated from Iowa State in electrical engineering in 1907. Renovation of the memorial Union will begin late this year and changes in the Great Hall are expected to begin in early 2008. Restoration will include new paint, lighting, electrical wiring, audio visual equipment, curtains and other updates. Once completed, there will be more dances, more chance meetings between future partners, and many more memories to come. The Charles W. and Margre H. Durham Great Hall will be even more impressive —a sight to behold. ▼

The Great Hall in the Memorial Union has been the site of many dances throughout the years.

or more than 80 years, Peoria, Ill. based Caterpillar Inc. has been building the world’s infrastructure and, in partnership with its worldwide dealer network, is driving positive and sustainable change on every continent. The world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines and industrial gas turbines, Caterpillar is a name associated with quality around the world.

F

Iowa State and Caterpillar have had a long-standing affiliation, and the company’s support of past and current projects has been outstanding. Last fall, Caterpillar named Iowa State a strategic partner school—one of only 13 universities to earn this rank. A strategic partnership provides mutual benefits. Caterpillar’s goal is to invest in student education and

Professors and students work on a hydraulic simulator in the Caterpillar Mechatronics Laboratory. L to R: Kinsey Olson, senior; Dr. Greg Luecke; Ethan Slattery, graduate assistant; and Dr. Brian Steward.

training early as a way to develop a highly skilled workforce while contributing indirectly to advances in education, technology and research. From Iowa State’s standpoint, this partnership supports people and programs, and it helps the university keep up with industry trends. It helps Iowa State link university theory with real-life practice. “Strategic partners are schools we would like to spend more time developing relationships with because they typically offer courses and training suitable for Caterpillar’s needs,” said Ken Gihring, engineering

L to R: Michael Whiteford, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean; Dan Saftig, ISU Foundation president; Ken Gihring, Caterpillar engineering manager; Labh Hira, College of Business dean; and Mark J. Kushner, College of Engineering dean all participated in a check presentation earlier this year.

manager with Caterpillar. “Additionally, Iowa State, like other partner institutions, offers diversity in the students that Caterpillar wants to hire.” In addition to being a strategic partner, Caterpillar has supported ISU for many years with generous financial gifts. A recently announced grant from the Caterpillar Foundation is unique in that it will provide benefits to three colleges— engineering, business and liberal arts and sciences. They will use the funds for student development and scholarships, program support and curriculum development. For example, 13 scholarships will be created with this grant—three in business, five in engineering and five in computer science. “Caterpillar and ISU are both highly successful organizations with great name recognition,” Gihring said. “Both are known for quality. It’s only natural for us to come together. I am looking forward to a continued relationship.” ▼

7


A Relationship That Links Theory With Practice

Thanks for the Memories! f you graduated from Iowa State University within the past 75 years (most of you graduates have), and you remember attending events in the Great Hall in the ISU Memorial Union, you’ll know exactly what it looks like today.

I

6

With just a few minor updates over the years, the room remains essentially the same as it was when it opened in 1928—impressive, but getting a bit dated. It’s the dated part that’s about to change, thanks to a longtime supporter of Iowa State. Ames native Chuck Durham has fond memories of the Great Hall. He met his wife Margre there, and making the Great Hall shine once again will be a great tribute to the most important woman in his life. Chuck is the chairman and CEO of Durham Resources in Omaha, Neb., and holds two bachelor’s degrees from Iowa State (ENG ’39 and ’40). Margre, also an ISU

Margre and Chuck Durham

graduate (FCS ’39), died in 1999. “I met Margre at an event where young men and women became acquainted with each other,” Chuck said. “They called this night the “Twisters” and it cost 10 cents to dance with any girl you chose. I paid the dime to dance with Margre, and the rest, as they say, is history. She really got to me, and I don’t think I ever dated another girl after that evening.” It will take more than a dime to renovate the Great Hall, but that won’t stop Chuck. He’s given many wonderful gifts to support Iowa State over the years. You may recognize the Durham Center—the hub of most computer and communi-

cation activities for the ISU campus. Or you may have seen H. H. Henningson Plaza (next to Howe Hall)—a gift from Chuck to honor his father-inlaw, who graduated from Iowa State in electrical engineering in 1907. Renovation of the memorial Union will begin late this year and changes in the Great Hall are expected to begin in early 2008. Restoration will include new paint, lighting, electrical wiring, audio visual equipment, curtains and other updates. Once completed, there will be more dances, more chance meetings between future partners, and many more memories to come. The Charles W. and Margre H. Durham Great Hall will be even more impressive —a sight to behold. ▼

The Great Hall in the Memorial Union has been the site of many dances throughout the years.

or more than 80 years, Peoria, Ill. based Caterpillar Inc. has been building the world’s infrastructure and, in partnership with its worldwide dealer network, is driving positive and sustainable change on every continent. The world’s leading manufacturer of construction and mining equipment, diesel and natural gas engines and industrial gas turbines, Caterpillar is a name associated with quality around the world.

F

Iowa State and Caterpillar have had a long-standing affiliation, and the company’s support of past and current projects has been outstanding. Last fall, Caterpillar named Iowa State a strategic partner school—one of only 13 universities to earn this rank. A strategic partnership provides mutual benefits. Caterpillar’s goal is to invest in student education and

Professors and students work on a hydraulic simulator in the Caterpillar Mechatronics Laboratory. L to R: Kinsey Olson, senior; Dr. Greg Luecke; Ethan Slattery, graduate assistant; and Dr. Brian Steward.

training early as a way to develop a highly skilled workforce while contributing indirectly to advances in education, technology and research. From Iowa State’s standpoint, this partnership supports people and programs, and it helps the university keep up with industry trends. It helps Iowa State link university theory with real-life practice. “Strategic partners are schools we would like to spend more time developing relationships with because they typically offer courses and training suitable for Caterpillar’s needs,” said Ken Gihring, engineering

L to R: Michael Whiteford, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean; Dan Saftig, ISU Foundation president; Ken Gihring, Caterpillar engineering manager; Labh Hira, College of Business dean; and Mark J. Kushner, College of Engineering dean all participated in a check presentation earlier this year.

manager with Caterpillar. “Additionally, Iowa State, like other partner institutions, offers diversity in the students that Caterpillar wants to hire.” In addition to being a strategic partner, Caterpillar has supported ISU for many years with generous financial gifts. A recently announced grant from the Caterpillar Foundation is unique in that it will provide benefits to three colleges— engineering, business and liberal arts and sciences. They will use the funds for student development and scholarships, program support and curriculum development. For example, 13 scholarships will be created with this grant—three in business, five in engineering and five in computer science. “Caterpillar and ISU are both highly successful organizations with great name recognition,” Gihring said. “Both are known for quality. It’s only natural for us to come together. I am looking forward to a continued relationship.” ▼

7


New Entrepreneurship Program Will Benefit Students oger Underwood (AG ’80) knows what it’s like to “do it on your own.” He has been a successful entrepreneur from an early age when he worked on farms, cut lawns and sold dog food door-to-door for a local feed company. Today, Roger is CEO and chairman of Becker Underwood, a successful international business that he and a longtime friend started in Ames, Iowa.

Underwood Named Campaign Chair

R

8

Roger has always possessed that unique entrepreneurial spirit. And he wants to help

oger Underwood (AG ‘80), CEO and chairman

R

Tau Kappa Epsilon; regularly speaks to students in

of Becker Underwood in Ames, Iowa, has

the business and agriculture business programs;

been named volunteer chair of the next

and serves as chair of the dean of agriculture’s

Iowa State University comprehensive fundraising

advisory committee. He has served on the ISU

campaign. In this capacity, Roger

Foundation development commit-

will help lead the ISU Foundation

tee since 2000 and was appoint-

in its efforts to secure private

ed committee chair in 2003. He

support for the university.

has been a member of the foundation’s board of directors since

“Roger is an outstanding

Connie and Roger Underwood

ambassador for Iowa State,” said

2003. Roger and his wife Connie

Gregory Geoffroy, ISU president.

(LAS ‘84) have generously sup-

“His support and leadership will

ported Iowa State through their

help make this campaign the

financial gifts. A volunteer campaign com-

largest in our history.”

others do the same. “I want to look kids in the eye on the first day at Iowa State and say ‘You can learn to do it on your own,’” Roger said. That is one reason why Roger and his wife Connie (LAS ’84) made a

$1.5 million gift to create a student entrepreneurship program in the College of Agriculture. “Students should know from the first day at Iowa State that they can work for themselves,” Roger said.

position on behalf of Iowa State,”

named at a later date. ISU’s com-

said Roger. “I am a life long sup-

prehensive fundraising campaign

porter of the university and will work hard to

is currently in the early stages of priority setting

achieve this bold initiative.”

and feasibility studies. No dollar goal or kickoff

Roger is an active alum with his fraternity,

Entrepreneurship is a life skill that requires creativity, prudent risk taking, persistence and other factors. The Agricultural Entrepreneurship Initiative will benefit students and faculty in several ways. Objectives include: • Create a broad understanding of entrepreneurship among faculty and students. • Provide a portfolio of educational experience to develop students’ entrepreneurial skills. • Increase interaction between students, faculty and agricultural entrepreneurs. • Increase the number of Professors Steve Nissen and Bob Jolly are co-leaders of the Agricultural Entrepreneurship Initiative at Iowa State.

mittee to assist Roger will be

“I am honored to accept this

date have been determined. ▼

“I want to look kids in the eye on the first day at Iowa State and say ‘You can learn to do it on your own.’” students and faculty engaged in entrepreneurial activities. This program is not just limited to creating and growing new businesses, but it can be applied to many areas. The teaching initiative is as diverse

as its subject matter. It’s also not just one class—rather a portfolio of activities that include internships, projects, class activities, mentors and guest speakers. “The college is rich with students interested in diverse areas—from horticulture and agriculture engineering, to biology and microbiology,” said Catherine Woteki, dean of the College of Agriculture. “Roger and Connie’s gift will help our students adopt new ways to apply their studies.” Planning is well under way for this new initiative with many activities scheduled to begin in 2006. ▼

9


New Entrepreneurship Program Will Benefit Students oger Underwood (AG ’80) knows what it’s like to “do it on your own.” He has been a successful entrepreneur from an early age when he worked on farms, cut lawns and sold dog food door-to-door for a local feed company. Today, Roger is CEO and chairman of Becker Underwood, a successful international business that he and a longtime friend started in Ames, Iowa.

Underwood Named Campaign Chair

R

8

Roger has always possessed that unique entrepreneurial spirit. And he wants to help

oger Underwood (AG ‘80), CEO and chairman

R

Tau Kappa Epsilon; regularly speaks to students in

of Becker Underwood in Ames, Iowa, has

the business and agriculture business programs;

been named volunteer chair of the next

and serves as chair of the dean of agriculture’s

Iowa State University comprehensive fundraising

advisory committee. He has served on the ISU

campaign. In this capacity, Roger

Foundation development commit-

will help lead the ISU Foundation

tee since 2000 and was appoint-

in its efforts to secure private

ed committee chair in 2003. He

support for the university.

has been a member of the foundation’s board of directors since

“Roger is an outstanding

Connie and Roger Underwood

ambassador for Iowa State,” said

2003. Roger and his wife Connie

Gregory Geoffroy, ISU president.

(LAS ‘84) have generously sup-

“His support and leadership will

ported Iowa State through their

help make this campaign the

financial gifts. A volunteer campaign com-

largest in our history.”

others do the same. “I want to look kids in the eye on the first day at Iowa State and say ‘You can learn to do it on your own,’” Roger said. That is one reason why Roger and his wife Connie (LAS ’84) made a

$1.5 million gift to create a student entrepreneurship program in the College of Agriculture. “Students should know from the first day at Iowa State that they can work for themselves,” Roger said.

position on behalf of Iowa State,”

named at a later date. ISU’s com-

said Roger. “I am a life long sup-

prehensive fundraising campaign

porter of the university and will work hard to

is currently in the early stages of priority setting

achieve this bold initiative.”

and feasibility studies. No dollar goal or kickoff

Roger is an active alum with his fraternity,

Entrepreneurship is a life skill that requires creativity, prudent risk taking, persistence and other factors. The Agricultural Entrepreneurship Initiative will benefit students and faculty in several ways. Objectives include: • Create a broad understanding of entrepreneurship among faculty and students. • Provide a portfolio of educational experience to develop students’ entrepreneurial skills. • Increase interaction between students, faculty and agricultural entrepreneurs. • Increase the number of Professors Steve Nissen and Bob Jolly are co-leaders of the Agricultural Entrepreneurship Initiative at Iowa State.

mittee to assist Roger will be

“I am honored to accept this

date have been determined. ▼

“I want to look kids in the eye on the first day at Iowa State and say ‘You can learn to do it on your own.’” students and faculty engaged in entrepreneurial activities. This program is not just limited to creating and growing new businesses, but it can be applied to many areas. The teaching initiative is as diverse

as its subject matter. It’s also not just one class—rather a portfolio of activities that include internships, projects, class activities, mentors and guest speakers. “The college is rich with students interested in diverse areas—from horticulture and agriculture engineering, to biology and microbiology,” said Catherine Woteki, dean of the College of Agriculture. “Roger and Connie’s gift will help our students adopt new ways to apply their studies.” Planning is well under way for this new initiative with many activities scheduled to begin in 2006. ▼

9


College of Veterinary Medicine— Injecting New Energy t was a prolific year. Edison’s new lamp burned for a record 13 hours, a newly patented centrifugal separator created butter from milk, Pauline Einstein named her new son Albert and the best minds in veterinary medicine established a college west of the Mississippi.

I

10

All of these 1879 developments were destined to send ripples around the world through many generations—one particularly impacting the field of animal health. Dedicated specifically to providing a scientific method and organization to the control of animal diseases, the

Iowa State College of Veterinary Medicine would more than fulfill that commitment over the next 125 years. Last April, the college marked its 125th anniversary with a gala celebration and other events. Throughout the college’s rich history, researchers have isolated the causes of diseases, developed animal vaccines and diagnostic control methods, and dramatically reduced the severity of diseases in swine, poultry, cattle and other livestock. This award-winning research has saved livestock producers hundreds of millions of dollars, impacting human and animal health worldwide. Maintaining and enhancing this legacy of veterinary medical excellence is key to the college’s future. “There is a

wonderful base of alumni support for the work of the college, and it’s time to inject new energy so coming generations will continue to benefit,” says Dean John Thomson. “Renovation of the teaching hospital (planning in progress) and the endowment fund are the two most important needs right now.” To help fund these ongoing needs, the college has established three new giving levels for supporting the ISU College of Veterinary Medicine endowment fund. Each giving level encourages a commitment to the college through annual gifts payable as pledges over five years or less. The new levels are:

11

• CVM Colleagues: $25,000 gift – $5,000 per year for five years. • CVM Associates: $50,000 gift – $10,000 per year for five years.

L to R: Dr. Nani Ghoshal, professor of biomedical sciences, with veterinary student Anton Roach, who graduated in 2004.

• CVM Partners: $100,000 gift – $20,000 per year for five years. “For donors who don’t have a specific interest, and would rather leave it up to someone else to make the decision, the veterinary medicine endowment fund is a good option,” says Thomson. This endowment

is critical to the work of the college, and used at the discretion of the dean. Without it, there would be no money for the Gentle Doctor magazine, faculty and student recruitment and other enrichments that are so critical to providing a quality program. You can even make the endowment a provision in

your will to help with future needs of the college. For more information about the ISU College of Veterinary Medicine endowment fund contact Monica Porter, senior director of development, College of Veterinary Medicine at 515-294-8562 or mgporter@iastate.edu. ▼


College of Veterinary Medicine— Injecting New Energy t was a prolific year. Edison’s new lamp burned for a record 13 hours, a newly patented centrifugal separator created butter from milk, Pauline Einstein named her new son Albert and the best minds in veterinary medicine established a college west of the Mississippi.

I

10

All of these 1879 developments were destined to send ripples around the world through many generations—one particularly impacting the field of animal health. Dedicated specifically to providing a scientific method and organization to the control of animal diseases, the

Iowa State College of Veterinary Medicine would more than fulfill that commitment over the next 125 years. Last April, the college marked its 125th anniversary with a gala celebration and other events. Throughout the college’s rich history, researchers have isolated the causes of diseases, developed animal vaccines and diagnostic control methods, and dramatically reduced the severity of diseases in swine, poultry, cattle and other livestock. This award-winning research has saved livestock producers hundreds of millions of dollars, impacting human and animal health worldwide. Maintaining and enhancing this legacy of veterinary medical excellence is key to the college’s future. “There is a

wonderful base of alumni support for the work of the college, and it’s time to inject new energy so coming generations will continue to benefit,” says Dean John Thomson. “Renovation of the teaching hospital (planning in progress) and the endowment fund are the two most important needs right now.” To help fund these ongoing needs, the college has established three new giving levels for supporting the ISU College of Veterinary Medicine endowment fund. Each giving level encourages a commitment to the college through annual gifts payable as pledges over five years or less. The new levels are:

11

• CVM Colleagues: $25,000 gift – $5,000 per year for five years. • CVM Associates: $50,000 gift – $10,000 per year for five years.

L to R: Dr. Nani Ghoshal, professor of biomedical sciences, with veterinary student Anton Roach, who graduated in 2004.

• CVM Partners: $100,000 gift – $20,000 per year for five years. “For donors who don’t have a specific interest, and would rather leave it up to someone else to make the decision, the veterinary medicine endowment fund is a good option,” says Thomson. This endowment

is critical to the work of the college, and used at the discretion of the dean. Without it, there would be no money for the Gentle Doctor magazine, faculty and student recruitment and other enrichments that are so critical to providing a quality program. You can even make the endowment a provision in

your will to help with future needs of the college. For more information about the ISU College of Veterinary Medicine endowment fund contact Monica Porter, senior director of development, College of Veterinary Medicine at 515-294-8562 or mgporter@iastate.edu. ▼


Lennox Foundation Supports Library Preservation Efforts f you’re like most people, every so often you’ve got to wade through a pile of old magazines and newspapers and throw them out. Maybe you even get rid of some old paperback books by having a garage sale. If you’re the University Library, however, you just don’t have that luxury. Older materials are still valuable tools for faculty, students and researchers, so every effort must be made to preserve them.

I

12

With more than 2.4 million volumes to care for, preservation is a challenge for the library and its staff. Thanks to some recent gifts and commitments by the Lennox Foundation, Iowa State’s library is in a better position to maintain its

resources for the university community of today and tomorrow. The foundation’s most recent commitment to the library will create the Lennox Endowment for Preservation Education, Training and Outreach. This fund will eventually support the training of future professionals in the field of library preservation through a summer internship in the University Library’s conservation laboratory. The Lennox Foundation has pledged support of $255,000 for this endowment—$85,000 annually for the next three years. Once fully funded, the endowment will create a competitive, paid summer internship program in library preservation that will allow graduate students to obtain

Once fully funded, the endowment will create a competitive, paid summer internship program in library preservation that will allow graduate students to obtain exceptional technical experiences by working in the library’s world-class conservation lab with trained specialists. exceptional technical experiences by working in the library’s world-class conservation lab with trained specialists. Currently, there are only a handful of graduate-level preservation programs in the nation, and few paid internships are available. Another significant project the Lennox Foundation has supported is the digital preservation of some materials in the library’s special collections. By storing rare volumes in digital format, the information Olivia Madison, dean of the library; and Warren Kuhn, dean emeritus.

13 Tom Booth and Betsy Anderson Booth in the library’s conservation laboratory.

can be made available electronically to a much wider audience while still protecting the original document. “The Lennox Foundation’s continued investment in our library has truly been transformational for us,” said Olivia Madison, dean of the library. “Their generosity allows ISU students and faculty—and people around the world— to have access to important historical and scientific information far into the future.” The Lennox Foundation’s connection to Iowa State, through Tom and Betsy Booth, is very personal. Tom Booth is a fourth generation member of the family that founded

To date, the Lennox Foundation has provided more than $450,000 in outright support for the library at Iowa State. Lennox International Inc., the heating and air conditioning manufacturer originally headquartered in Marshalltown, Iowa. He received his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering at ISU in 1981. Betsy Anderson Booth, a 1981 political science graduate, is currently the vice chair of the

Lennox Foundation. Although it currently has no formal ties to the company, the Lennox Foundation was originally affiliated with Lennox International Inc. According to Tom and Betsy, “We have found our continued involvement with ISU very rewarding. Dean Madison and her staff are great people, and we have enjoyed working with them. Besides, our involvement gives us a frequent excuse to come back to Ames and relive our college days!” To date, the Lennox Foundation has provided more than $450,000 in outright support for the library at Iowa State. ▼


Lennox Foundation Supports Library Preservation Efforts f you’re like most people, every so often you’ve got to wade through a pile of old magazines and newspapers and throw them out. Maybe you even get rid of some old paperback books by having a garage sale. If you’re the University Library, however, you just don’t have that luxury. Older materials are still valuable tools for faculty, students and researchers, so every effort must be made to preserve them.

I

12

With more than 2.4 million volumes to care for, preservation is a challenge for the library and its staff. Thanks to some recent gifts and commitments by the Lennox Foundation, Iowa State’s library is in a better position to maintain its

resources for the university community of today and tomorrow. The foundation’s most recent commitment to the library will create the Lennox Endowment for Preservation Education, Training and Outreach. This fund will eventually support the training of future professionals in the field of library preservation through a summer internship in the University Library’s conservation laboratory. The Lennox Foundation has pledged support of $255,000 for this endowment—$85,000 annually for the next three years. Once fully funded, the endowment will create a competitive, paid summer internship program in library preservation that will allow graduate students to obtain

Once fully funded, the endowment will create a competitive, paid summer internship program in library preservation that will allow graduate students to obtain exceptional technical experiences by working in the library’s world-class conservation lab with trained specialists. exceptional technical experiences by working in the library’s world-class conservation lab with trained specialists. Currently, there are only a handful of graduate-level preservation programs in the nation, and few paid internships are available. Another significant project the Lennox Foundation has supported is the digital preservation of some materials in the library’s special collections. By storing rare volumes in digital format, the information Olivia Madison, dean of the library; and Warren Kuhn, dean emeritus.

13 Tom Booth and Betsy Anderson Booth in the library’s conservation laboratory.

can be made available electronically to a much wider audience while still protecting the original document. “The Lennox Foundation’s continued investment in our library has truly been transformational for us,” said Olivia Madison, dean of the library. “Their generosity allows ISU students and faculty—and people around the world— to have access to important historical and scientific information far into the future.” The Lennox Foundation’s connection to Iowa State, through Tom and Betsy Booth, is very personal. Tom Booth is a fourth generation member of the family that founded

To date, the Lennox Foundation has provided more than $450,000 in outright support for the library at Iowa State. Lennox International Inc., the heating and air conditioning manufacturer originally headquartered in Marshalltown, Iowa. He received his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering at ISU in 1981. Betsy Anderson Booth, a 1981 political science graduate, is currently the vice chair of the

Lennox Foundation. Although it currently has no formal ties to the company, the Lennox Foundation was originally affiliated with Lennox International Inc. According to Tom and Betsy, “We have found our continued involvement with ISU very rewarding. Dean Madison and her staff are great people, and we have enjoyed working with them. Besides, our involvement gives us a frequent excuse to come back to Ames and relive our college days!” To date, the Lennox Foundation has provided more than $450,000 in outright support for the library at Iowa State. ▼


PhoneCenter Sets Record (Again!)

Introducing the New Order of the Knoll

he Iowa State University Foundation PhoneCenter surpassed the $3.2 million fundraising mark, topping last year’s record of $2.8 million. This was a team effort by the ISU students who spend their evening and weekend hours engaging prospective donors on the phone. Eighty to 100 students work for the PhoneCenter at any one time.

n tandem with Iowa State’s new strategic plan and escalating financial needs, the ISU Foundation board of directors recently approved a plan to restructure the Order of the Knoll—the recognition program for ISU’s most loyal and generous benefactors.

T

“These student employees do an outstanding job of talking with our donors and answering their questions about Iowa State,” said Dan Saftig, ISU Foundation president. “They represent the university well and do an important job of raising dollars to help support many programs at ISU. There are not many phone programs of comparable size that are producing at this high level.” The PhoneCenter conducts fund-raising calls for all academic units, the University Library, Greater University Fund, Honors Program, Iowa State bands, graduating class

gifts, 50-year reunions and membership calls for the ISU Alumni Association. “A considerable number of ISU alumni live outside the state, so these phone calls are often the only personal contact many of them have with the university,” said Saftig. “Not only are these students a vital link between Iowa State’s past and present, they play a critical role in the current and future success of the university.” The students work from a specially equipped room located in the Durham Center on campus. About 28 callers participate in each shift. ▼

14

I

In 1991, when the current Order of the Knoll levels were established, the cost (tuition, room and board) for a student living in Iowa to attend Iowa State for one year was $7,500 and the non-resident total was $12,000. Today, students living in Iowa pay $15,300 per year to attend ISU and non-resident students pay $25,000. With the increasing demands of the changing economy, the Order of the Knoll needs to keep up

with the times. As of July 1, the Order of the Knoll is acknowledging new levels of giving (see box below). This change was designed to encourage ongoing support of Iowa State University and its students, faculty and programs; and to better recognize our most consistent and loyal donors. To reach this objective, the foundation is increasing the gift levels and establishing a new structure within the Order of the Knoll. Order of the Knoll members who do not meet these new giving levels will always be recognized as a Founding Member and will continue to receive some of the benefits associated with the Order of the Knoll. These members are encouraged to join the restructured Order of the Knoll.

“We have long appreciated the level of support from our Order of the Knoll members,” said Kelley A. Bergstrom, chair of the ISU Foundation board of directors. “As we strive to advance Iowa State’s mission, I hope everyone will remain active in the Order of Knoll and continue their investment in the future of Iowa State’s mission. Together, we can make a difference for this great university.” All W.M. Beardshear Society, President’s Circle and Campanile Society members will receive maximum benefits, including invitations to events, interactions and communications. If you have any questions, please contact Jodi Andersen at 515-294-1005 or jandersen@ foundation.iastate.edu. ▼

Order of the Knoll Giving Levels W. M. Beardshear Society

President’s Circle

Campanile Society

Recognizes individuals who

Recognizes individuals who

Recognizes individuals who

have made cumulative gifts or

have made cumulative gifts or

make annual gifts of $2,500 or

pledges of $1 million or more

pledges of $100,000 to $999,999

more to support Iowa State.

to support Iowa State.

to support Iowa State.

Young alumni and friends (those under age 40) qualify with an annual gift of $1,500.

Individuals may be recognized at both the lifetime and annual giving levels, depending on gift history and giving preferences. All deferred commitments previously recognized through the Keystone Society will now be recognized through the W. M. Beardshear Society or President’s Circle. The value of the deferred ISU President Gregory Geoffroy celebrates a new fundraising record with students in the PhoneCener. Standing L to R: Erin O’Gara, President Geoffroy, Stacey Nimke, Justin Lawrence and Andy Seward, Sitting L to R: Dawone Robinsion, Sali Mahgoub and Ashlee Kvidera.

commitment will be included in the cumulative giving total. ▼

15


PhoneCenter Sets Record (Again!)

Introducing the New Order of the Knoll

he Iowa State University Foundation PhoneCenter surpassed the $3.2 million fundraising mark, topping last year’s record of $2.8 million. This was a team effort by the ISU students who spend their evening and weekend hours engaging prospective donors on the phone. Eighty to 100 students work for the PhoneCenter at any one time.

n tandem with Iowa State’s new strategic plan and escalating financial needs, the ISU Foundation board of directors recently approved a plan to restructure the Order of the Knoll—the recognition program for ISU’s most loyal and generous benefactors.

T

“These student employees do an outstanding job of talking with our donors and answering their questions about Iowa State,” said Dan Saftig, ISU Foundation president. “They represent the university well and do an important job of raising dollars to help support many programs at ISU. There are not many phone programs of comparable size that are producing at this high level.” The PhoneCenter conducts fund-raising calls for all academic units, the University Library, Greater University Fund, Honors Program, Iowa State bands, graduating class

gifts, 50-year reunions and membership calls for the ISU Alumni Association. “A considerable number of ISU alumni live outside the state, so these phone calls are often the only personal contact many of them have with the university,” said Saftig. “Not only are these students a vital link between Iowa State’s past and present, they play a critical role in the current and future success of the university.” The students work from a specially equipped room located in the Durham Center on campus. About 28 callers participate in each shift. ▼

14

I

In 1991, when the current Order of the Knoll levels were established, the cost (tuition, room and board) for a student living in Iowa to attend Iowa State for one year was $7,500 and the non-resident total was $12,000. Today, students living in Iowa pay $15,300 per year to attend ISU and non-resident students pay $25,000. With the increasing demands of the changing economy, the Order of the Knoll needs to keep up

with the times. As of July 1, the Order of the Knoll is acknowledging new levels of giving (see box below). This change was designed to encourage ongoing support of Iowa State University and its students, faculty and programs; and to better recognize our most consistent and loyal donors. To reach this objective, the foundation is increasing the gift levels and establishing a new structure within the Order of the Knoll. Order of the Knoll members who do not meet these new giving levels will always be recognized as a Founding Member and will continue to receive some of the benefits associated with the Order of the Knoll. These members are encouraged to join the restructured Order of the Knoll.

“We have long appreciated the level of support from our Order of the Knoll members,” said Kelley A. Bergstrom, chair of the ISU Foundation board of directors. “As we strive to advance Iowa State’s mission, I hope everyone will remain active in the Order of Knoll and continue their investment in the future of Iowa State’s mission. Together, we can make a difference for this great university.” All W.M. Beardshear Society, President’s Circle and Campanile Society members will receive maximum benefits, including invitations to events, interactions and communications. If you have any questions, please contact Jodi Andersen at 515-294-1005 or jandersen@ foundation.iastate.edu. ▼

Order of the Knoll Giving Levels W. M. Beardshear Society

President’s Circle

Campanile Society

Recognizes individuals who

Recognizes individuals who

Recognizes individuals who

have made cumulative gifts or

have made cumulative gifts or

make annual gifts of $2,500 or

pledges of $1 million or more

pledges of $100,000 to $999,999

more to support Iowa State.

to support Iowa State.

to support Iowa State.

Young alumni and friends (those under age 40) qualify with an annual gift of $1,500.

Individuals may be recognized at both the lifetime and annual giving levels, depending on gift history and giving preferences. All deferred commitments previously recognized through the Keystone Society will now be recognized through the W. M. Beardshear Society or President’s Circle. The value of the deferred ISU President Gregory Geoffroy celebrates a new fundraising record with students in the PhoneCener. Standing L to R: Erin O’Gara, President Geoffroy, Stacey Nimke, Justin Lawrence and Andy Seward, Sitting L to R: Dawone Robinsion, Sali Mahgoub and Ashlee Kvidera.

commitment will be included in the cumulative giving total. ▼

15


Thank You For A Successful Fundraising Year iscal year 2005 (July 1, 2004— June 30, 2005) has come to a close and what a year it has been! Thanks to donors like you, this past year was very positive in terms of private support for Iowa State University.

F

16

Two of the most important measures of fund-raising success include gift production (total gifts and commitments, excluding gifts-inkind) and number of donors. Figures for fiscal year 2005 show that both categories increased from last year. At the end of fiscal year 2005, the number of donors who made gifts to help ISU totaled 55,279. This is an increase of 3.4 percent

compared to the 53,441 total at the end of fiscal year 2004. Gift production for fiscal year 2005 was $82.4 million — up 30.4 percent from $63.2 million last year. Thank you for a very successful fund-raising year. Your gifts help support students, faculty, programs and buildings at Iowa State.

You help provide the "extras" that have long existed to make the ISU experience so special. A more detailed annual report with audited figures will be available this fall. Watch for more fiscal year 2005 information in the next issue of Connections and on our Web site. ▼

Number of Donors

Know your

numbers

$3,226,890

Amount of money raised through the ISU Foundation’s PhoneCenter in FY05 breaking last year’s record of $2,805,985.

143%

FY 04

Increase in student loan debt for ISU graduates over the past 15 years.

53,441

FY 05

55,279 0

10000

20000

30000

40000

50000

Total dollars raised in FY05 excluding gifts-in-kind—compared to $63,231,700 last year.

Gift Production (excluding gifts-in-kind) FY 04

55,279

$63.2 million

FY 05

$82.4 million 0

10

20

30

40

50

$82,425,530

60

70

80

Donor Confidentiality Statement The Iowa State University Foundation respects the

The foundation will honor requests from donors

privacy of donors’ personal and financial informa-

that their names not be released, and will

tion. The policy of the foundation is not to release

maintain the confidentiality of all other donor

information to the public about prospective or

information, unless otherwise required by law.

actual donors other than donors’ names, gift

If you have questions, please call 1-866-419-6768

ranges and gift designations beginning May 1, 2005.

or e-mail questions@foundation.iastate.edu.

Number of donors who have made gifts to support ISU in FY05 compared to 53,441 in FY04.

9.8.05

Groundbreaking date for the new Hixson-Lied Student Success Center, which will include the Rod and Connie French Athletic Academic Center—projects completely funded by private support.

340

Number of companies who made matching gifts to support ISU in FY04.

$709,902

Dollars NOT received in FY04 because donors did not request matching gifts from their employers.

1

The number of benefactors it takes to make a difference at Iowa State University.


Thank You For A Successful Fundraising Year iscal year 2005 (July 1, 2004— June 30, 2005) has come to a close and what a year it has been! Thanks to donors like you, this past year was very positive in terms of private support for Iowa State University.

F

16

Two of the most important measures of fund-raising success include gift production (total gifts and commitments, excluding gifts-inkind) and number of donors. Figures for fiscal year 2005 show that both categories increased from last year. At the end of fiscal year 2005, the number of donors who made gifts to help ISU totaled 55,279. This is an increase of 3.4 percent

compared to the 53,441 total at the end of fiscal year 2004. Gift production for fiscal year 2005 was $82.4 million — up 30.4 percent from $63.2 million last year. Thank you for a very successful fund-raising year. Your gifts help support students, faculty, programs and buildings at Iowa State.

You help provide the "extras" that have long existed to make the ISU experience so special. A more detailed annual report with audited figures will be available this fall. Watch for more fiscal year 2005 information in the next issue of Connections and on our Web site. ▼

Number of Donors

Know your

numbers

$3,226,890

Amount of money raised through the ISU Foundation’s PhoneCenter in FY05 breaking last year’s record of $2,805,985.

143%

FY 04

Increase in student loan debt for ISU graduates over the past 15 years.

53,441

FY 05

55,279 0

10000

20000

30000

40000

50000

Total dollars raised in FY05 excluding gifts-in-kind—compared to $63,231,700 last year.

Gift Production (excluding gifts-in-kind) FY 04

55,279

$63.2 million

FY 05

$82.4 million 0

10

20

30

40

50

$82,425,530

60

70

80

Donor Confidentiality Statement The Iowa State University Foundation respects the

The foundation will honor requests from donors

privacy of donors’ personal and financial informa-

that their names not be released, and will

tion. The policy of the foundation is not to release

maintain the confidentiality of all other donor

information to the public about prospective or

information, unless otherwise required by law.

actual donors other than donors’ names, gift

If you have questions, please call 1-866-419-6768

ranges and gift designations beginning May 1, 2005.

or e-mail questions@foundation.iastate.edu.

Number of donors who have made gifts to support ISU in FY05 compared to 53,441 in FY04.

9.8.05

Groundbreaking date for the new Hixson-Lied Student Success Center, which will include the Rod and Connie French Athletic Academic Center—projects completely funded by private support.

340

Number of companies who made matching gifts to support ISU in FY04.

$709,902

Dollars NOT received in FY04 because donors did not request matching gifts from their employers.

1

The number of benefactors it takes to make a difference at Iowa State University.


Iowa State University Foundation 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, IA 50010-8644 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Des Moines, Iowa Permit No. 5507

www.foundation.iastate.edu

A WEB SITE FOR IOWA

STATE DONORS The ISU Foundation Web site is designed especially for donors and anyone interested in learning more about Iowa State University. Update your personal information any time of day, meet foundation staff members and read the latest news releases. Browse the “reading room� loaded with helpful articles about philanthropy, estate planning, retirement income plans and wills. Check out the estate planning guide section that includes a free estate planning course you can complete at home, a gift calculator, and a quiz that helps you determine which type of gift best matches your personal needs and giving goals.

05304_Connections_summer05  

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