Page 1

I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y F O U N D AT I O N

WOMEN & PHILANTHROPY

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD P.O.B OX 2230 AMES, IA 50010-2230

MAKE A DIFFERENCE continued from page 3

A Gift that Creates a Lifetime Income for You

charitable deduction equal to the fair market value of the policy or its cost basis, whichever is less.

The charitable gift annuity is a way to support the education mission of Iowa State University and provide for your own financial security. A wide variety of philanthropists might find such a gift rewarding, from working professionals to friends who are several years into a satisfying retirement.

BUSINESS REPLY MAIL MI AM S I 3 92

FIRST-CLASS MAIL

Your life insurance policy also allows for the designation of a contingent beneficiary. Designating Iowa State University Foundation as a contingent beneficiary means that the Foundation receives the life insurance proceeds only if the primary beneficiary cannot receive them.

PER T NO 0

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Example: Dr. Reynolds, an engineering professor, knew she would reach the maximum contribution limit for her qualified retirement plan, so she was looking for additional ways to help prepare for retirement. Through the Iowa State University Foundation, Dr. Reynolds (age 60) learned about the tax and income benefits of a deferred charitable gift annuity. Compared to a standard gift annuity that begins payments immediately, choosing the deferred gift annuity has two important benefits. All factors being equal, the deferred gift annuity provides (1) a

NOTE: At this time, rates for gift

annuities that begin payments immediately are also quite appealing to many of our friends. Please contact us for more information.

The Next Step Philanthropy is both personal and intentional. If you have an interest in supporting our work, we invite you to contact us to explore the ideas presented in this issue of Women & Philanthropy. Of course, you’ll also want to consult your financial advisor(s) before making any gift. We can work together to meet your philanthropic goals and make a difference for Iowa State University.

Gift Planning Staff: (L-R) Gregg Hinders, Administrative Coordinator Lynda M. Jacobson, Assistant Vice President of Development Paul Caspersen, CFP®, CMFC, Executive Director of Development

E

OFFICE OF GIFT PLANNING IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD AMES IA 50010-9802

Beneficiary designations Another way to make a charitable gift of life insurance is simply to name the Iowa State University Foundation as a policy beneficiary without assigning ownership of the policy. While a revocable beneficiary designation does not generate a current income tax deduction, it will be deductible by your executor for estate tax purposes. All you need to do is contact your insurance agent to complete the necessary forms to change your beneficiary designation.

higher payment rate, and (2) a higher income tax charitable deduction. Dr. Reynolds decides to make a $20,000 gift and defer payments for 10 years. She benefits from a current income tax charitable deduction of $8,244.* And, at age 70, she will receive annual payments of $1,620 — an 8.1% payment rate!

A

NO POSTAGE NE C E S S A RY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES

OFFICE OF GIFT PLANNING 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD P. O. BOX 2230 AMES, IA 50010-2230

4

PHONE: 515.294.5398 TOLL-FREE: 800.621.8515 www.withprideandpurpose.org giftplanning@foundation.iastate.edu

The information in this publication is not intended as legal advice. For legal advice, please consult an attorney. Figures cited in examples are based on rates current at the time of printing and are subject to change. References to estate and income tax include federal taxes only; individual state taxes may further impact results.

Donor asks Iowa State Faculty to Consider Facing History Facing history is something that Debra Engel does on a daily basis. Now she’s attempting to get others to do the same. The 1973 Iowa State University psychology graduate has established a fund to bring the Facing History and Ourselves program to campus. This past summer three faculty members from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences attended Facing History seminars in New York City and Toronto through Engel’s support.

The stories and enthusiasm of the teachers who attended this seminar revived my belief in the promise of education to make this world a better place. – Debra Engel

Facing History and Ourselves is an international educational and professional development organization that engages students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice and anti-Semitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. Each year, Facing History reaches 1.8 million students through a network of 26,000 educators. “By studying the historical development and lessons of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices we confront in our lives,” said Engel, who lives in Sunnyvale, Calif. “I’ve wanted to contribute to Iowa State for a number of years, but I couldn’t think of a project I was truly interested in.” Then Engel became involved with Facing History. She serves on Facing History’s board of trustees. “This was a way I could marry my two interests and get really excited about it,” she said. Teresa Downing-Matibag, assistant professor of sociology, was one of the three Iowa State professors to attend a Facing History seminar. She says the experience encouraged her to consider ways to engage students in history, empowering them to work for justice and positive social change. “The experience reminded me that being an upstander involves making history and that my students have this wonderful potential,” she said. “The stories and enthusiasm of the teachers who attended this seminar revived my belief in the promise of continued on page 2

SPRING 2009


Creating Your Philanthropic Footprint KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

DEBRA ENGEL continued from page 1

education to make this world a better place.” That’s exactly the impact that Engel is hoping for. An Ames native, she is the daughter of two Iowa State professors. She thought she was well equipped for the world from a moral and ethical standpoint. “I always thought I was open-minded,” she said. “But after going through a Facing History seminar, I was amazed at what my assumptions were and how they were holding me back from the kind of engagement our society so desperately needs.” Engel’s support of the three faculty members’ seminar attendance was just the beginning. Iowa State has since sponsored an event on campus in February 2009 with nearly 30 participants. The luncheon and workshop introduced interested faculty to Facing History and some of its core resources, with a presentation by a senior historian from Facing History. On August 17, 2009, Engel will sponsor a three-day Facing History seminar for all interested faculty. “Every professor can be a Facing History teacher

and each and every individual can benefit from engaging in the discussion of how we, should we choose to be fully engaged in our society, can change the course of history for the better,” she said. “In Facing History terms we can choose to be bystanders or upstanders and that applies whether you are a teacher, engineer, business person, or in any walk of life. “My interest is in planting seeds and I will stay with this project as long as there is interest in moving forward. I think we’ve begun to do that at Iowa State and if we can get enough faculty involved my hope is that it will take on a life of its own.” If Richard Mansbach, university professor of political science, is any indication, then Facing History may become more influential in university classrooms. Mansbach was one of the Iowa State faculty to attend last summer’s seminar. “The seminar brought to life some of the most powerful events in recent history and made them relevant to the world today,” he said. “It was at once profoundly moving and instructive.”

Renata J. Rafferty President and Founder, Rafferty Consulting Group Renata J. Rafferty is a nationally respected consultant, columnist and author on the business of charity, and is invited by the media to comment on nonprofit trends and breaking news. Mrs. Rafferty has been interviewed in INC., Kiplinger’s, Worth, Money Magazine, and Forbes, as well as for major dailies such as The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The New York Times. She is a frequent guest on The O’Reilly Factor and other cable news shows as a charity analyst. Rafferty is a columnist and the author of “Don’t Just Give It Away: How To Make the Most of Your Charitable Giving,” with foreword by Paul Newman. She serves on the Advisory Board of The National Philanthropic Trust and the International Association of Advisors in Philanthropy. She is the Founder and President of Rafferty Consulting Group Inc.

Pamela Jones Davidson President, Davidson Gift Design

WOMEN & PHILANTHROPY WORKSHOP

Creating Your Philanthropic Footprint Wednesday, May 13, 2009 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Scheman Building, Iowa State Center, Ames, Iowa In the past 30 years, women’s philanthropy has emerged as a distinct movement using innovative and creative ideas to improve local, national and global communities. Women view philanthropy not so much as giving as they do investing in change and causes that are personally meaningful. Iowa State University will celebrate the 10 anniversary of its annual Women and Philanthropy Workshop this year. The workshop includes keynote presentations by columnist and author Renata Rafferty and Pamela Davidson, president, Davidson Gift Design. The event also includes breakout sessions on philanthropic topics, a luncheon program and closing session. Visit www.foundation.iastate.edu/WP for details. th

Bring a friend and enjoy the day learning together. For more information about this workshop, or to add someone to the invitation list, call 515.294.4607 or e-mail us at WP@foundation.iastate.edu.

Pamela Jones Davidson, J.D., has been a nationally recognized speaker in charitable gift planning for more than 23 years. She is president of Davidson Gift Design in Bloomington, Ind., a consulting firm specializing in gift planning, planned giving program design and implementation, and training. From 1985-1996, she was with the Indiana University Foundation, leaving that organization as its executive director of planned giving and associate counsel. Ms. Davidson is a past board member and treasurer of the Indiana Chapter of the National Society of Fund Raising Executives (now AFP), and a past board member and president of the Planned Giving Group of Indiana. She serves on the community advisory boards of her local public radio and television stations. Davidson is alsoon the board and is a past president of Middle Way House, her community’s nationally recognized women’s shelter.

The cost is $30 for the first registration and $25 for each additional guest.

2

Make a Difference at Iowa State University

Doing More for Iowa State University

Without a doubt, the times are challenging as well as changing. Despite the unpredictable financial landscape, many of our friends understand that support for their favorite organizations is critical at this time. This issue of Women & Philanthropy explores some of the options available to women who want to make a difference at Iowa State University. As always, if we can be of assistance in any way, contact any member of the gift planning team by calling 800.621.8515 or by e-mail at giftplanning@foundation.iastate.edu. Your support is always appreciated, and it is our pleasure to help make certain your philanthropic goals are satisfied.

Please send a complimentary copy of the brochure, Flexible Gifts — Easy to Make, Easy to Live With. Please send The Charitable Gift Annuity — Back to Basics, a brochure presenting the various ISU gift annuity options. I’ve already included Iowa State in my estate.

Bequests: Simple, Flexible and Meaningful The charitable bequest is one of the most flexible and comfortable ways to make a major gift. There are several reasons why. Charitable bequests are easy to make. Further, you enjoy full use of your property during life, so there is no disruption of your lifestyle, no immediate cost to you.

Please sign me up for your complimentary weekly e-newsletter. (Please list preferred e-mail address below.) I’m interested in receiving a personalized charitable gift annuity illustration showing my potential income and tax benefits. Please contact me by phone by e-mail

With a charitable bequest, you simply direct in your will that part of your estate goes to one or more of your favorite charities. A charitable bequest can take many forms; you determine how to best to meet your goals. Remember, however, that without a will in place, no money or property can go to the charities you wish to help, despite your best intentions. There is a good chance you do not need a new will to make a charitable bequest — consult your attorney and ask if your will can be amended by a simple codicil.

Send me information about the May 13, 2009 Women & Philanthropy Workshop.

PLEASE PRINT

Life Insurance as a Charitable Gift There are several ways life insurance can be used to support the work of Iowa State University. Making a gift of an existing life insurance policy, and beneficiary designations are two options to consider. The no-longer-needed policy As years go by, people sometimes find that a life insurance policy is no longer needed for its original purpose. A good example is a policy purchased for the education of a child now grown, or for the financial security of a spouse now deceased. It may make sense to transfer such a policy to us. We will eventually receive the face amount of the policy, and — if you make an absolute assignment of ownership — you will receive an immediate income tax continued on page 4

I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y F O U N D AT I O N

We hope you have found useful ideas in this issue of Women & Philanthropy. To further aid your planning, send for a complimentary copy of the booklets listed below, with no obligation. Simply fill out this tear-off card, fold and tape it on the open end, and drop it in the mail to us. We’ll pick up the postage.

3

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE, ZIP

TELEPHONE

E-MAIL

WAP509


Creating Your Philanthropic Footprint KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

DEBRA ENGEL continued from page 1

education to make this world a better place.” That’s exactly the impact that Engel is hoping for. An Ames native, she is the daughter of two Iowa State professors. She thought she was well equipped for the world from a moral and ethical standpoint. “I always thought I was open-minded,” she said. “But after going through a Facing History seminar, I was amazed at what my assumptions were and how they were holding me back from the kind of engagement our society so desperately needs.” Engel’s support of the three faculty members’ seminar attendance was just the beginning. Iowa State has since sponsored an event on campus in February 2009 with nearly 30 participants. The luncheon and workshop introduced interested faculty to Facing History and some of its core resources, with a presentation by a senior historian from Facing History. On August 17, 2009, Engel will sponsor a three-day Facing History seminar for all interested faculty. “Every professor can be a Facing History teacher

and each and every individual can benefit from engaging in the discussion of how we, should we choose to be fully engaged in our society, can change the course of history for the better,” she said. “In Facing History terms we can choose to be bystanders or upstanders and that applies whether you are a teacher, engineer, business person, or in any walk of life. “My interest is in planting seeds and I will stay with this project as long as there is interest in moving forward. I think we’ve begun to do that at Iowa State and if we can get enough faculty involved my hope is that it will take on a life of its own.” If Richard Mansbach, university professor of political science, is any indication, then Facing History may become more influential in university classrooms. Mansbach was one of the Iowa State faculty to attend last summer’s seminar. “The seminar brought to life some of the most powerful events in recent history and made them relevant to the world today,” he said. “It was at once profoundly moving and instructive.”

Renata J. Rafferty President and Founder, Rafferty Consulting Group Renata J. Rafferty is a nationally respected consultant, columnist and author on the business of charity, and is invited by the media to comment on nonprofit trends and breaking news. Mrs. Rafferty has been interviewed in INC., Kiplinger’s, Worth, Money Magazine, and Forbes, as well as for major dailies such as The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The New York Times. She is a frequent guest on The O’Reilly Factor and other cable news shows as a charity analyst. Rafferty is a columnist and the author of “Don’t Just Give It Away: How To Make the Most of Your Charitable Giving,” with foreword by Paul Newman. She serves on the Advisory Board of The National Philanthropic Trust and the International Association of Advisors in Philanthropy. She is the Founder and President of Rafferty Consulting Group Inc.

Pamela Jones Davidson President, Davidson Gift Design

WOMEN & PHILANTHROPY WORKSHOP

Creating Your Philanthropic Footprint Wednesday, May 13, 2009 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Scheman Building, Iowa State Center, Ames, Iowa In the past 30 years, women’s philanthropy has emerged as a distinct movement using innovative and creative ideas to improve local, national and global communities. Women view philanthropy not so much as giving as they do investing in change and causes that are personally meaningful. Iowa State University will celebrate the 10 anniversary of its annual Women and Philanthropy Workshop this year. The workshop includes keynote presentations by columnist and author Renata Rafferty and Pamela Davidson, president, Davidson Gift Design. The event also includes breakout sessions on philanthropic topics, a luncheon program and closing session. Visit www.foundation.iastate.edu/WP for details. th

Bring a friend and enjoy the day learning together. For more information about this workshop, or to add someone to the invitation list, call 515.294.4607 or email us at WP@foundation.iastate.edu.

Pamela Jones Davidson, J.D., has been a nationally recognized speaker in charitable gift planning for more than 23 years. She is president of Davidson Gift Design in Bloomington, Ind., a consulting firm specializing in gift planning, planned giving program design and implementation, and training. From 1985-1996, she was with the Indiana University Foundation, leaving that organization as its executive director of planned giving and associate counsel. Ms. Davidson is a past board member and treasurer of the Indiana Chapter of the National Society of Fund Raising Executives (now AFP), and a past board member and president of the Planned Giving Group of Indiana. She serves on the community advisory boards of her local public radio and television stations. Davidson is alsoon the board and is a past president of Middle Way House, her community’s nationally recognized women’s shelter.

The cost is $30 for the first registration and $25 for each additional guest.

2

Make a Difference at Iowa State University

Doing More for Iowa State University

Without a doubt, the times are challenging as well as changing. Despite the unpredictable financial landscape, many of our friends understand that support for their favorite organizations is critical at this time. This issue of Women & Philanthropy explores some of the options available to women who want to make a difference at Iowa State University. As always, if we can be of assistance in any way, contact any member of the gift planning team by calling 800.621.8515 or by e-mail at giftplanning@foundation.iastate.edu. Your support is always appreciated, and it is our pleasure to help make certain your philanthropic goals are satisfied.

Please send a complimentary copy of the brochure, Flexible Gifts — Easy to Make, Easy to Live With. Please send The Charitable Gift Annuity — Back to Basics, a brochure presenting the various ISU gift annuity options. I’ve already included Iowa State in my estate.

Bequests: Simple, Flexible and Meaningful The charitable bequest is one of the most flexible and comfortable ways to make a major gift. There are several reasons why. Charitable bequests are easy to make. Further, you enjoy full use of your property during life, so there is no disruption of your lifestyle, no immediate cost to you.

Please sign me up for your complimentary weekly e-newsletter. (Please list preferred e-mail address below.) I’m interested in receiving a personalized charitable gift annuity illustration showing my potential income and tax benefits. Please contact me by phone by e-mail

With a charitable bequest, you simply direct in your will that part of your estate goes to one or more of your favorite charities. A charitable bequest can take many forms; you determine how to best to meet your goals. Remember, however, that without a will in place, no money or property can go to the charities you wish to help, despite your best intentions. There is a good chance you do not need a new will to make a charitable bequest — consult your attorney and ask if your will can be amended by a simple codicil.

Send me information about the May 13, 2009 Women & Philanthropy Workshop.

PLEASE PRINT

Life Insurance as a Charitable Gift There are several ways life insurance can be used to support the work of Iowa State University. Making a gift of an existing life insurance policy, and beneficiary designations are two options to consider. The no-longer-needed policy As years go by, people sometimes find that a life insurance policy is no longer needed for its original purpose. A good example is a policy purchased for the education of a child now grown, or for the financial security of a spouse now deceased. It may make sense to transfer such a policy to us. We will eventually receive the face amount of the policy, and — if you make an absolute assignment of ownership — you will receive an immediate income tax continued on page 4

I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y F O U N D AT I O N

We hope you have found useful ideas in this issue of Women & Philanthropy. To further aid your planning, send for a complimentary copy of the booklets listed below, with no obligation. Simply fill out this tear-off card, fold and tape it on the open end, and drop it in the mail to us. We’ll pick up the postage.

3

NAME

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE, ZIP

TELEPHONE

E-MAIL

WAP509


I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y F O U N D AT I O N

WOMEN & PHILANTHROPY

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD P.O.B OX 2230 AMES, IA 50010-2230

MAKE A DIFFERENCE continued from page 3

A Gift that Creates a Lifetime Income for You

charitable deduction equal to the fair market value of the policy or its cost basis, whichever is less.

The charitable gift annuity is a way to support the education mission of Iowa State University and provide for your own financial security. A wide variety of philanthropists might find such a gift rewarding, from working professionals to friends who are several years into a satisfying retirement.

BUSINESS REPLY MAIL MI AM S I 3 92

FIRST-CLASS MAIL

Your life insurance policy also allows for the designation of a contingent beneficiary. Designating Iowa State University Foundation as a contingent beneficiary means that the Foundation receives the life insurance proceeds only if the primary beneficiary cannot receive them.

PER T NO 0

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Example: Dr. Reynolds, an engineering professor, knew she would reach the maximum contribution limit for her qualified retirement plan, so she was looking for additional ways to help prepare for retirement. Through the Iowa State University Foundation, Dr. Reynolds (age 60) learned about the tax and income benefits of a deferred charitable gift annuity. Compared to a standard gift annuity that begins payments immediately, choosing the deferred gift annuity has two important benefits. All factors being equal, the deferred gift annuity provides (1) a

NOTE: At this time, rates for gift

annuities that begin payments immediately are also quite appealing to many of our friends. Please contact us for more information.

The Next Step Philanthropy is both personal and intentional. If you have an interest in supporting our work, we invite you to contact us to explore the ideas presented in this issue of Women & Philanthropy. Of course, you’ll also want to consult your financial advisor(s) before making any gift. We can work together to meet your philanthropic goals and make a difference for Iowa State University.

Gift Planning Staff: (L-R) Gregg Hinders, Administrative Coordinator Lynda M. Jacobson, Assistant Vice President of Development Paul Caspersen, CFP®, CMFC, Executive Director of Development

E

OFFICE OF GIFT PLANNING IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD AMES IA 50010-9802

Beneficiary designations Another way to make a charitable gift of life insurance is simply to name the Iowa State University Foundation as a policy beneficiary without assigning ownership of the policy. While a revocable beneficiary designation does not generate a current income tax deduction, it will be deductible by your executor for estate tax purposes. All you need to do is contact your insurance agent to complete the necessary forms to change your beneficiary designation.

higher payment rate, and (2) a higher income tax charitable deduction. Dr. Reynolds decides to make a $20,000 gift and defer payments for 10 years. She benefits from a current income tax charitable deduction of $8,244.* And, at age 70, she will receive annual payments of $1,620 — an 8.1% payment rate!

A

NO POSTAGE NE C E S S A RY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES

OFFICE OF GIFT PLANNING 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD P. O. BOX 2230 AMES, IA 50010-2230

4

PHONE: 515.294.5398 TOLL-FREE: 800.621.8515 www.withprideandpurpose.org giftplanning@foundation.iastate.edu

The information in this publication is not intended as legal advice. For legal advice, please consult an attorney. Figures cited in examples are based on rates current at the time of printing and are subject to change. References to estate and income tax include federal taxes only; individual state taxes may further impact results.

Donor asks Iowa State Faculty to Consider Facing History Facing history is something that Debra Engel does on a daily basis. Now she’s attempting to get others to do the same. The 1973 Iowa State University psychology graduate has established a fund to bring the Facing History and Ourselves program to campus. This past summer three faculty members from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences attended Facing History seminars in New York City and Toronto through Engel’s support.

The stories and enthusiasm of the teachers who attended this seminar revived my belief in the promise of education to make this world a better place. – Debra Engel

Facing History and Ourselves is an international educational and professional development organization that engages students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice and anti-Semitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. Each year, Facing History reaches 1.8 million students through a network of 26,000 educators. “By studying the historical development and lessons of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices we confront in our lives,” said Engel, who lives in Sunnyvale, Calif. “I’ve wanted to contribute to Iowa State for a number of years, but I couldn’t think of a project I was truly interested in.” Then Engel became involved with Facing History. She serves on Facing History’s board of trustees. “This was a way I could marry my two interests and get really excited about it,” she said. Teresa Downing-Matibag, assistant professor of sociology, was one of the three Iowa State professors to attend a Facing History seminar. She says the experience encouraged her to consider ways to engage students in history, empowering them to work for justice and positive social change. “The experience reminded me that being an upstander involves making history and that my students have this wonderful potential,” she said. “The stories and enthusiasm of the teachers who attended this seminar revived my belief in the promise of continued on page 2

SPRING 2009


Creating Your Philanthropic Footprint KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

DEBRA ENGEL continued from page 1

education to make this world a better place.” That’s exactly the impact that Engel is hoping for. An Ames native, she is the daughter of two Iowa State professors. She thought she was well equipped for the world from a moral and ethical standpoint. “I always thought I was open-minded,” she said. “But after going through a Facing History seminar, I was amazed at what my assumptions were and how they were holding me back from the kind of engagement our society so desperately needs.” Engel’s support of the three faculty members’ seminar attendance was just the beginning. Iowa State has since sponsored an event on campus in February 2009 with nearly 30 participants. The luncheon and workshop introduced interested faculty to Facing History and some of its core resources, with a presentation by a senior historian from Facing History. On August 17, 2009, Engel will sponsor a three-day Facing History seminar for all interested faculty. “Every professor can be a Facing History teacher

and each and every individual can benefit from engaging in the discussion of how we, should we choose to be fully engaged in our society, can change the course of history for the better,” she said. “In Facing History terms we can choose to be bystanders or upstanders and that applies whether you are a teacher, engineer, business person, or in any walk of life. “My interest is in planting seeds and I will stay with this project as long as there is interest in moving forward. I think we’ve begun to do that at Iowa State and if we can get enough faculty involved my hope is that it will take on a life of its own.” If Richard Mansbach, university professor of political science, is any indication, then Facing History may become more influential in university classrooms. Mansbach was one of the Iowa State faculty to attend last summer’s seminar. “The seminar brought to life some of the most powerful events in recent history and made them relevant to the world today,” he said. “It was at once profoundly moving and instructive.”

Renata J. Rafferty President and Founder, Rafferty Consulting Group Renata J. Rafferty is a nationally respected consultant, columnist and author on the business of charity, and is invited by the media to comment on nonprofit trends and breaking news. Mrs. Rafferty has been interviewed in INC., Kiplinger’s, Worth, Money Magazine, and Forbes, as well as for major dailies such as The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The New York Times. She is a frequent guest on The O’Reilly Factor and other cable news shows as a charity analyst. Rafferty is a columnist and the author of “Don’t Just Give It Away: How To Make the Most of Your Charitable Giving,” with foreword by Paul Newman. She serves on the Advisory Board of The National Philanthropic Trust and the International Association of Advisors in Philanthropy. She is the Founder and President of Rafferty Consulting Group Inc.

Pamela Jones Davidson President, Davidson Gift Design

WOMEN & PHILANTHROPY WORKSHOP

Creating Your Philanthropic Footprint Wednesday, May 13, 2009 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Scheman Building, Iowa State Center, Ames, Iowa In the past 30 years, women’s philanthropy has emerged as a distinct movement using innovative and creative ideas to improve local, national and global communities. Women view philanthropy not so much as giving as they do investing in change and causes that are personally meaningful. Iowa State University will celebrate the 10 anniversary of its annual Women and Philanthropy Workshop this year. The workshop includes keynote presentations by columnist and author Renata Rafferty and Pamela Davidson, president, Davidson Gift Design. The event also includes breakout sessions on philanthropic topics, a luncheon program and closing session. Visit www.foundation.iastate.edu/WP for details. th

Bring a friend and enjoy the day learning together. For more information about this workshop, or to add someone to the invitation list, call 515.294.4607 or email us at WP@foundation.iastate.edu.

Pamela Jones Davidson, J.D., has been a nationally recognized speaker in charitable gift planning for more than 23 years. She is president of Davidson Gift Design in Bloomington, Ind., a consulting firm specializing in gift planning, planned giving program design and implementation, and training. From 1985-1996, she was with the Indiana University Foundation, leaving that organization as its executive director of planned giving and associate counsel. Ms. Davidson is a past board member and treasurer of the Indiana Chapter of the National Society of Fund Raising Executives (now AFP), and a past board member and president of the Planned Giving Group of Indiana. She serves on the community advisory boards of her local public radio and television stations. Davidson is alsoon the board and is a past president of Middle Way House, her community’s nationally recognized women’s shelter.

The cost is $30 for the first registration and $25 for each additional guest.

2

Make a Difference at Iowa State University

Doing More for Iowa State University

Without a doubt, the times are challenging as well as changing. Despite the unpredictable financial landscape, many of our friends understand that support for their favorite organizations is critical at this time. This issue of Women & Philanthropy explores some of the options available to women who want to make a difference at Iowa State University. As always, if we can be of assistance in any way, contact any member of the gift planning team by calling 800.621.8515 or by e-mail at giftplanning@foundation.iastate.edu. Your support is always appreciated, and it is our pleasure to help make certain your philanthropic goals are satisfied.

Please send a complimentary copy of the brochure, Flexible Gifts — Easy to Make, Easy to Live With. Please send The Charitable Gift Annuity — Back to Basics, a brochure presenting the various ISU gift annuity options. I’ve already included Iowa State in my estate.

Bequests: Simple, Flexible and Meaningful The charitable bequest is one of the most flexible and comfortable ways to make a major gift. There are several reasons why. Charitable bequests are easy to make. Further, you enjoy full use of your property during life, so there is no disruption of your lifestyle, no immediate cost to you.

Please sign me up for your complimentary weekly e-newsletter. (Please list preferred e-mail address below.) I’m interested in receiving a personalized charitable gift annuity illustration showing my potential income and tax benefits. Please contact me by phone by e-mail

With a charitable bequest, you simply direct in your will that part of your estate goes to one or more of your favorite charities. A charitable bequest can take many forms; you determine how to best to meet your goals. Remember, however, that without a will in place, no money or property can go to the charities you wish to help, despite your best intentions. There is a good chance you do not need a new will to make a charitable bequest — consult your attorney and ask if your will can be amended by a simple codicil.

Send me information about the May 13, 2009 Women & Philanthropy Workshop.

PLEASE PRINT

Life Insurance as a Charitable Gift There are several ways life insurance can be used to support the work of Iowa State University. Making a gift of an existing life insurance policy, and beneficiary designations are two options to consider. The no-longer-needed policy As years go by, people sometimes find that a life insurance policy is no longer needed for its original purpose. A good example is a policy purchased for the education of a child now grown, or for the financial security of a spouse now deceased. It may make sense to transfer such a policy to us. We will eventually receive the face amount of the policy, and — if you make an absolute assignment of ownership — you will receive an immediate income tax continued on page 4

I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y F O U N D AT I O N

We hope you have found useful ideas in this issue of Women & Philanthropy. To further aid your planning, send for a complimentary copy of the booklets listed below, with no obligation. Simply fill out this tear-off card, fold and tape it on the open end, and drop it in the mail to us. We’ll pick up the postage.

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NAME

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STATE, ZIP

TELEPHONE

E-MAIL

WAP509


I O WA S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y F O U N D AT I O N

WOMEN & PHILANTHROPY

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD P.O.B OX 2230 AMES, IA 50010-2230

MAKE A DIFFERENCE continued from page 3

A Gift that Creates a Lifetime Income for You

charitable deduction equal to the fair market value of the policy or its cost basis, whichever is less.

The charitable gift annuity is a way to support the education mission of Iowa State University and provide for your own financial security. A wide variety of philanthropists might find such a gift rewarding, from working professionals to friends who are several years into a satisfying retirement.

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Your life insurance policy also allows for the designation of a contingent beneficiary. Designating Iowa State University Foundation as a contingent beneficiary means that the Foundation receives the life insurance proceeds only if the primary beneficiary cannot receive them.

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POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Example: Dr. Reynolds, an engineering professor, knew she would reach the maximum contribution limit for her qualified retirement plan, so she was looking for additional ways to help prepare for retirement. Through the Iowa State University Foundation, Dr. Reynolds (age 60) learned about the tax and income benefits of a deferred charitable gift annuity. Compared to a standard gift annuity that begins payments immediately, choosing the deferred gift annuity has two important benefits. All factors being equal, the deferred gift annuity provides (1) a

NOTE: At this time, rates for gift

annuities that begin payments immediately are also quite appealing to many of our friends. Please contact us for more information.

The Next Step Philanthropy is both personal and intentional. If you have an interest in supporting our work, we invite you to contact us to explore the ideas presented in this issue of Women & Philanthropy. Of course, you’ll also want to consult your financial advisor(s) before making any gift. We can work together to meet your philanthropic goals and make a difference for Iowa State University.

Gift Planning Staff: (L-R) Gregg Hinders, Administrative Coordinator Lynda M. Jacobson, Assistant Vice President of Development Paul Caspersen, CFP®, CMFC, Executive Director of Development

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OFFICE OF GIFT PLANNING IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD AMES IA 50010-9802

Beneficiary designations Another way to make a charitable gift of life insurance is simply to name the Iowa State University Foundation as a policy beneficiary without assigning ownership of the policy. While a revocable beneficiary designation does not generate a current income tax deduction, it will be deductible by your executor for estate tax purposes. All you need to do is contact your insurance agent to complete the necessary forms to change your beneficiary designation.

higher payment rate, and (2) a higher income tax charitable deduction. Dr. Reynolds decides to make a $20,000 gift and defer payments for 10 years. She benefits from a current income tax charitable deduction of $8,244.* And, at age 70, she will receive annual payments of $1,620 — an 8.1% payment rate!

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NO POSTAGE NE C E S S A RY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES

OFFICE OF GIFT PLANNING 2505 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD P. O. BOX 2230 AMES, IA 50010-2230

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PHONE: 515.294.5398 TOLL-FREE: 800.621.8515 www.withprideandpurpose.org giftplanning@foundation.iastate.edu

The information in this publication is not intended as legal advice. For legal advice, please consult an attorney. Figures cited in examples are based on rates current at the time of printing and are subject to change. References to estate and income tax include federal taxes only; individual state taxes may further impact results.

Donor asks Iowa State Faculty to Consider Facing History Facing history is something that Debra Engel does on a daily basis. Now she’s attempting to get others to do the same. The 1973 Iowa State University psychology graduate has established a fund to bring the Facing History and Ourselves program to campus. This past summer three faculty members from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences attended Facing History seminars in New York City and Toronto through Engel’s support.

The stories and enthusiasm of the teachers who attended this seminar revived my belief in the promise of education to make this world a better place. – Debra Engel

Facing History and Ourselves is an international educational and professional development organization that engages students of diverse backgrounds in an examination of racism, prejudice and anti-Semitism in order to promote the development of a more humane and informed citizenry. Each year, Facing History reaches 1.8 million students through a network of 26,000 educators. “By studying the historical development and lessons of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices we confront in our lives,” said Engel, who lives in Sunnyvale, Calif. “I’ve wanted to contribute to Iowa State for a number of years, but I couldn’t think of a project I was truly interested in.” Then Engel became involved with Facing History. She serves on Facing History’s board of trustees. “This was a way I could marry my two interests and get really excited about it,” she said. Teresa Downing-Matibag, assistant professor of sociology, was one of the three Iowa State professors to attend a Facing History seminar. She says the experience encouraged her to consider ways to engage students in history, empowering them to work for justice and positive social change. “The experience reminded me that being an upstander involves making history and that my students have this wonderful potential,” she said. “The stories and enthusiasm of the teachers who attended this seminar revived my belief in the promise of continued on page 2

SPRING 2009

http://www.foundation.iastate.edu/docs/wp/spring09  

http://www.foundation.iastate.edu/docs/wp/spring09.pdf

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