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SPRING 2006

Connections For Friends of the Iowa State University Foundation

The Impact of Philanthropy at Iowa State

SUPER FANS

PALMER CHAIR

MORRILL HALL UPDATE

NEW FELLOWSHIPS


Connections

Enriching the Student Experience

SPRING 2006

he campus is awakening to its wonderful spring beauty and students are active everywhere. It is at times such as this that I am reminded just how student-centered this university is! Indeed, Iowa State is by far the most studentoriented and active university I have experienced in my many years in higher education.

T Connections is published three times per year by the Iowa State University Foundation—a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to securing and stewarding private gifts and grants that benefit Iowa State University. This magazine serves as a link between Iowa State and benefactors who support the university. You are receiving this publication as an important member of the Iowa State family. We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2005-06

Iowa State University Foundation Office of Communications 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, Iowa 50010-8644 Phone: 515-294-4607 Toll Free: 866-419-6768 Web: www.foundation.iastate.edu E-mail: questions@foundation.iastate.edu The Iowa State University Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact human resources, ISU Foundation, 515-294-4607.

Cara K. Heiden, Chair Urbandale, Iowa

Joanne M. Kuster Johnston, Iowa

Sandra L. Davis, Vice Chair Edina, Minn.

Robert E. McLaughlin Arlington, Va.

David W. Van Wert, Secretary Sun City West, Ariz.

Owen J. Newlin Des Moines, Iowa

Steven T. Schuler, Treasurer Urbandale, Iowa

James P. Stein Muscatine, Iowa

Lyle P. Campbell Paradise Valley, Ariz.

Sheryl K. Sunderman Dallas, Texas

Gregory L. Geoffroy Ames, Iowa

Roger C. Underwood Ames, Iowa

Labh S. Hira Ames, Iowa

Marvin J. Walter Ames, Iowa

Sharon L. Juon Waterloo, Iowa

Stephen L. Watson South Natick, Mass.

Gerald A. Kolschowsky Oak Brook, Ill.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM

Daniel P. Saftig, president Debra Engle, vice president of development Lisa Eslinger, vice president of finance Shaun Keister, vice president of development outreach Kevin Stow, director of human resources and governance

It is very gratifying that we are able to attract such highly motivated and talented young people and support them as they work to achieve their personal and professional goals. These students — along with faculty who are the academic heart of the university — will be our top priority as we prepare for ISU’s next comprehensive fund-raising campaign. The Iowa State University experience is a wonderful adventure for our students. It is an adventure of self discovery where they follow their passion and realize their potential. Time spent here will be cherished for the rest of

their lives as they remember their first day on campus, a professor who became a mentor, and the countless life-long friendships and many other wonderful learning experiences that make up their adventure. What they learn inside and outside our classrooms will provide a foundation for their future and their continued success in their careers and personal lives. Paying for an education is often difficult for many prospective students, and options are rapidly becoming more limited. While the university receives assistance from the state of Iowa, support to enrich the campus experience, provide scholarships and loans, and compete for top students and faculty must increasingly come from private sources. We are extremely grateful for the generosity of our past and present donors, but there is much more work to be done. Having sufficient resources for both merit-based and need-based scholarships helps us maintain high quality academic programs and set higher standards to attract top students. When we are competitive for the best and the brightest students, it raises the academic bar for everyone. As always, we continue to

build a strong, innovative and vibrant university. Many Iowa State alumni have gone on to great accomplishments in their personal and professional lives. Giving someone help and encouragement when they might not otherwise have a chance to complete their education is truly one of the best investments anyone can make. I am extremely proud that, with your help, we will continue to recruit exceptional students to our outstanding university. You will be hearing more from me about the importance of support for those students and their work as the campaign approaches. Again, thanks for all you do! ▼ GREGORY L. GEOFFROY PRESIDENT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

1


Connections

Enriching the Student Experience

SPRING 2006

he campus is awakening to its wonderful spring beauty and students are active everywhere. It is at times such as this that I am reminded just how student-centered this university is! Indeed, Iowa State is by far the most studentoriented and active university I have experienced in my many years in higher education.

T Connections is published three times per year by the Iowa State University Foundation—a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to securing and stewarding private gifts and grants that benefit Iowa State University. This magazine serves as a link between Iowa State and benefactors who support the university. You are receiving this publication as an important member of the Iowa State family. We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2005-06

Iowa State University Foundation Office of Communications 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, Iowa 50010-8644 Phone: 515-294-4607 Toll Free: 866-419-6768 Web: www.foundation.iastate.edu E-mail: questions@foundation.iastate.edu The Iowa State University Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact human resources, ISU Foundation, 515-294-4607.

Cara K. Heiden, Chair Urbandale, Iowa

Joanne M. Kuster Johnston, Iowa

Sandra L. Davis, Vice Chair Edina, Minn.

Robert E. McLaughlin Arlington, Va.

David W. Van Wert, Secretary Sun City West, Ariz.

Owen J. Newlin Des Moines, Iowa

Steven T. Schuler, Treasurer Urbandale, Iowa

James P. Stein Muscatine, Iowa

Lyle P. Campbell Paradise Valley, Ariz.

Sheryl K. Sunderman Dallas, Texas

Gregory L. Geoffroy Ames, Iowa

Roger C. Underwood Ames, Iowa

Labh S. Hira Ames, Iowa

Marvin J. Walter Ames, Iowa

Sharon L. Juon Waterloo, Iowa

Stephen L. Watson South Natick, Mass.

Gerald A. Kolschowsky Oak Brook, Ill.

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION SENIOR MANAGEMENT TEAM

Daniel P. Saftig, president Debra Engle, vice president of development Lisa Eslinger, vice president of finance Shaun Keister, vice president of development outreach Kevin Stow, director of human resources and governance

It is very gratifying that we are able to attract such highly motivated and talented young people and support them as they work to achieve their personal and professional goals. These students — along with faculty who are the academic heart of the university — will be our top priority as we prepare for ISU’s next comprehensive fund-raising campaign. The Iowa State University experience is a wonderful adventure for our students. It is an adventure of self discovery where they follow their passion and realize their potential. Time spent here will be cherished for the rest of

their lives as they remember their first day on campus, a professor who became a mentor, and the countless life-long friendships and many other wonderful learning experiences that make up their adventure. What they learn inside and outside our classrooms will provide a foundation for their future and their continued success in their careers and personal lives. Paying for an education is often difficult for many prospective students, and options are rapidly becoming more limited. While the university receives assistance from the state of Iowa, support to enrich the campus experience, provide scholarships and loans, and compete for top students and faculty must increasingly come from private sources. We are extremely grateful for the generosity of our past and present donors, but there is much more work to be done. Having sufficient resources for both merit-based and need-based scholarships helps us maintain high quality academic programs and set higher standards to attract top students. When we are competitive for the best and the brightest students, it raises the academic bar for everyone. As always, we continue to

build a strong, innovative and vibrant university. Many Iowa State alumni have gone on to great accomplishments in their personal and professional lives. Giving someone help and encouragement when they might not otherwise have a chance to complete their education is truly one of the best investments anyone can make. I am extremely proud that, with your help, we will continue to recruit exceptional students to our outstanding university. You will be hearing more from me about the importance of support for those students and their work as the campaign approaches. Again, thanks for all you do! ▼ GREGORY L. GEOFFROY PRESIDENT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

1


Sowing the Seeds of Success he Iowa State University Seed Science Center is a unique place. It’s the largest comprehensive public seed laboratory in the United States. It conducts tests that ensure the successful export of hundreds of millions of dollars of U.S. seed each year, and it’s been a global leader in introducing science into policy to benefit world seed trade.

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2

In short, the Seed Science Center’s success is a critical component to the future of food and fiber production throughout the world. It is the seed that is the fundamental basis of agriculture, says Manjit Misra, director of the Seed Science Center, “and seed testing is important because governments need to assure the quality of distributed seed in order to maintain healthy crops.” Another critical aspect of the center’s work is education to produce the next generation of leaders in the seed industry. That is why a recent

initiative by the Iowa Seed Association is so important to the long-term success of the center. “The seed industry in Iowa felt they needed to provide opportunities for students to pursue graduate studies in the seed-related industry if they were going to retain their preeminent position in the world seed industry,” says Misra.

Seven New Fellowships in Seed Science Thanks to a tremendous initiative by the Iowa Seed Association that raised more than $1 million, seven new named fellowships will soon be in place at the ISU Seed Science Center. Among them are fellowships for women and minorities and for citizens of India, Nepal or Bhutan, with focuses on areas such as global or domestic seed policy and regulation, and improving or standardizing seed testing methodology. The seven fellowships are:

Manjit Misra, director of the Iowa State University Seed Science Center.

Mindy DeVries, a graduate research assistant from Monroe, Iowa; and past recipient of an undergraduate scholarship in 1999 and 2000 from the Iowa Seed Association.

“The Iowa Seed Association saw Iowa State as a solid partner and a place where they could make a difference through strategic investment.” The three-way partnership of the association, the university and the ISU Foundation has reaped tremendous benefits. Inspired by the guidance of

The Iowa Seed Association saw Iowa State as a solid partner and a place where they could make a difference through strategic investment.

Misra, and with the hard work of many association volunteers, the initiative has secured seven named graduate fellowships— each funded with a minimum of $150,000. These and other gifts have pushed the Investing in People and the Future of the Seed Industry fund-raising effort well past its $1 million goal. “This was an opportunity for an agriculture sector industry to make a critical investment in the knowledge base that will sustain that industry well into the future,” Misra says. “Iowa State is exactly the right place for that to happen, and this investment makes perfect sense.” ▼

• Pioneer Hi-Bred Graduate Fellowship in Seed Science • Monsanto Graduate Fellowship in Global Seed Policy and Regulations • Leroy and Barbara Everson Fellowship in Seed Science • Iowa Seed Association Graduate Fellowship Endowment • Committee for Agricultural Development Fellowship in Seed Science • Iowa Crop Improvement Association Fellowship in Seed Science • Edda G. Sehgal Fellowship for Graduate Studies in Seed Science

3


Sowing the Seeds of Success he Iowa State University Seed Science Center is a unique place. It’s the largest comprehensive public seed laboratory in the United States. It conducts tests that ensure the successful export of hundreds of millions of dollars of U.S. seed each year, and it’s been a global leader in introducing science into policy to benefit world seed trade.

T

2

In short, the Seed Science Center’s success is a critical component to the future of food and fiber production throughout the world. It is the seed that is the fundamental basis of agriculture, says Manjit Misra, director of the Seed Science Center, “and seed testing is important because governments need to assure the quality of distributed seed in order to maintain healthy crops.” Another critical aspect of the center’s work is education to produce the next generation of leaders in the seed industry. That is why a recent

initiative by the Iowa Seed Association is so important to the long-term success of the center. “The seed industry in Iowa felt they needed to provide opportunities for students to pursue graduate studies in the seed-related industry if they were going to retain their preeminent position in the world seed industry,” says Misra.

Seven New Fellowships in Seed Science Thanks to a tremendous initiative by the Iowa Seed Association that raised more than $1 million, seven new named fellowships will soon be in place at the ISU Seed Science Center. Among them are fellowships for women and minorities and for citizens of India, Nepal or Bhutan, with focuses on areas such as global or domestic seed policy and regulation, and improving or standardizing seed testing methodology. The seven fellowships are:

Manjit Misra, director of the Iowa State University Seed Science Center.

Mindy DeVries, a graduate research assistant from Monroe, Iowa; and past recipient of an undergraduate scholarship in 1999 and 2000 from the Iowa Seed Association.

“The Iowa Seed Association saw Iowa State as a solid partner and a place where they could make a difference through strategic investment.” The three-way partnership of the association, the university and the ISU Foundation has reaped tremendous benefits. Inspired by the guidance of

The Iowa Seed Association saw Iowa State as a solid partner and a place where they could make a difference through strategic investment.

Misra, and with the hard work of many association volunteers, the initiative has secured seven named graduate fellowships— each funded with a minimum of $150,000. These and other gifts have pushed the Investing in People and the Future of the Seed Industry fund-raising effort well past its $1 million goal. “This was an opportunity for an agriculture sector industry to make a critical investment in the knowledge base that will sustain that industry well into the future,” Misra says. “Iowa State is exactly the right place for that to happen, and this investment makes perfect sense.” ▼

• Pioneer Hi-Bred Graduate Fellowship in Seed Science • Monsanto Graduate Fellowship in Global Seed Policy and Regulations • Leroy and Barbara Everson Fellowship in Seed Science • Iowa Seed Association Graduate Fellowship Endowment • Committee for Agricultural Development Fellowship in Seed Science • Iowa Crop Improvement Association Fellowship in Seed Science • Edda G. Sehgal Fellowship for Graduate Studies in Seed Science

3


Super Fans Cheer for the Future of Football evin and Brenda Askland began attending Iowa State football games shortly after they were married more than 25 years ago. It was the beginning of a long relationship with the Cyclones and with the coaches, families and players on the team.

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That’s why it seemed natural for the couple to decide to include a contribution to the Iowa State football team in their will. “We don’t have any children of our own,” says Kevin, “and Iowa State athletics are really important to both of us.” “We feel like we’ve been embraced by people at the university,” says Brenda, a medical claims manager. She and her husband, a driver for a grocery chain warehouse, had been Kevin and Brenda Askland

contributing through the National Cyclone Club for a number of years before making their $250,000 estate gift. They became especially close to the team when an assistant coach moved into a house across the street from their Ames home, and over the years got to know the football coaching staff quite well. They attended events held for friends and families, and watched as coaches taught skills that would serve student-athletes well later in life. Many people, Brenda says, don’t understand the sacrifices made by coaches, players and their families to have a successful team. If families of coaches attend out of town games, they have to do it on their own, “so sometimes we piled in the van and took them along.” This sense of connection to ISU athletics, and watching the student-athletes learn and grow from their football experience,

Gifts Help an Old Building Stand Proud influenced Kevin and Brenda to dedicate their gift to scholarships that would develop the program. “Most of the athletes won’t be in football for the rest of their lives,” says Brenda, “but we think they’ll have a chance to do better in life because they were on the team.”

Most of the athletes won’t be in football for the rest of their lives, but we think they’ll have a chance to do better in life because they were on the team. The pair hopes others will think about supporting programs that match their interests. By working with the ISU Foundation now, they can make their wishes known and also help the department staff plan for the future. “We’re not anybody special,” says Kevin. “We don’t make lots of money, but this was something we could do. Maybe someone will think ‘if they can do it, we can, too.’” Ask yourself, he says, “If something happens to you, where would you want your assets to go?” Neither Kevin nor Brenda are ISU alumni, but their ties to the university through the community and through sports are very strong. “We didn’t have to think about it very long. It wasn’t a difficult decision.” ▼

es, you will recognize Morrill Hall when it’s finished in early 2007, but no matter when you last caught a glimpse of the grand old building, it will soon look even better. The slate-like roof, 12-foot ornately spindled turret and red brick exterior are reminiscent of its original appearance in 1890.

Y

Gone are the creaky floors and uneven ceilings. Those tired old bricks have been cleaned and tuck-pointed, natural light floods in through bright new windows and the turret is being readied for visitor access. This amazing transformation has only been possible through the generosity of some 3,200 donors making individual contributions. What a unique project! To save one of the oldest buildings on campus, students, alumni and friends of the university gave gifts of all sizes to meet the fund-raising goal. Using original architectural drawings and photos, renovators have not only re-created the building as it stood in its prime, they’ve gone even farther. They’ve added a state-of-theart highly filtered, highly controlled mechanical system

The Morrill Hall renovation project is scheduled for completion in early 2007.

to the future home of the University Museum’s special Christian Petersen collection, the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, and a new Center for Visual Learning in Textiles and Clothing. Some materials taken from the building have been recycled and reused in other projects; the new roof is made of recycled rubber to resemble slate; and Morrill Hall will be the first on campus to be LEED rated (Leadership and Energy in Environmental Design) because of its attention to environmental quality and careful use of sustainable resources. Check out Morrill Hall construction at www.iastate.edu /morrill/, where a daily Web

cam shows real time progress in breathing new life into the grand old structure. ▼

5


Super Fans Cheer for the Future of Football evin and Brenda Askland began attending Iowa State football games shortly after they were married more than 25 years ago. It was the beginning of a long relationship with the Cyclones and with the coaches, families and players on the team.

K

4

That’s why it seemed natural for the couple to decide to include a contribution to the Iowa State football team in their will. “We don’t have any children of our own,” says Kevin, “and Iowa State athletics are really important to both of us.” “We feel like we’ve been embraced by people at the university,” says Brenda, a medical claims manager. She and her husband, a driver for a grocery chain warehouse, had been Kevin and Brenda Askland

contributing through the National Cyclone Club for a number of years before making their $250,000 estate gift. They became especially close to the team when an assistant coach moved into a house across the street from their Ames home, and over the years got to know the football coaching staff quite well. They attended events held for friends and families, and watched as coaches taught skills that would serve student-athletes well later in life. Many people, Brenda says, don’t understand the sacrifices made by coaches, players and their families to have a successful team. If families of coaches attend out of town games, they have to do it on their own, “so sometimes we piled in the van and took them along.” This sense of connection to ISU athletics, and watching the student-athletes learn and grow from their football experience,

Gifts Help an Old Building Stand Proud influenced Kevin and Brenda to dedicate their gift to scholarships that would develop the program. “Most of the athletes won’t be in football for the rest of their lives,” says Brenda, “but we think they’ll have a chance to do better in life because they were on the team.”

Most of the athletes won’t be in football for the rest of their lives, but we think they’ll have a chance to do better in life because they were on the team. The pair hopes others will think about supporting programs that match their interests. By working with the ISU Foundation now, they can make their wishes known and also help the department staff plan for the future. “We’re not anybody special,” says Kevin. “We don’t make lots of money, but this was something we could do. Maybe someone will think ‘if they can do it, we can, too.’” Ask yourself, he says, “If something happens to you, where would you want your assets to go?” Neither Kevin nor Brenda are ISU alumni, but their ties to the university through the community and through sports are very strong. “We didn’t have to think about it very long. It wasn’t a difficult decision.” ▼

es, you will recognize Morrill Hall when it’s finished in early 2007, but no matter when you last caught a glimpse of the grand old building, it will soon look even better. The slate-like roof, 12-foot ornately spindled turret and red brick exterior are reminiscent of its original appearance in 1890.

Y

Gone are the creaky floors and uneven ceilings. Those tired old bricks have been cleaned and tuck-pointed, natural light floods in through bright new windows and the turret is being readied for visitor access. This amazing transformation has only been possible through the generosity of some 3,200 donors making individual contributions. What a unique project! To save one of the oldest buildings on campus, students, alumni and friends of the university gave gifts of all sizes to meet the fund-raising goal. Using original architectural drawings and photos, renovators have not only re-created the building as it stood in its prime, they’ve gone even farther. They’ve added a state-of-theart highly filtered, highly controlled mechanical system

The Morrill Hall renovation project is scheduled for completion in early 2007.

to the future home of the University Museum’s special Christian Petersen collection, the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, and a new Center for Visual Learning in Textiles and Clothing. Some materials taken from the building have been recycled and reused in other projects; the new roof is made of recycled rubber to resemble slate; and Morrill Hall will be the first on campus to be LEED rated (Leadership and Energy in Environmental Design) because of its attention to environmental quality and careful use of sustainable resources. Check out Morrill Hall construction at www.iastate.edu /morrill/, where a daily Web

cam shows real time progress in breathing new life into the grand old structure. ▼

5


Creating a Design Space for Ideas and Dreams teve and Barbara King believe in the power of play for everyone—from tiny toddlers to active grown-ups. They’ve lived those beliefs since Steve developed the continuous play concept for an Iowa State landscape architecture senior project, and then, with his wife as his partner, built it into the remarkably successful Landscape Structures, Inc.

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6

The continuous play concept involves combining/attaching traditional play activities into an endless stream of challenges within an outdoor play environment. The concept is now used in nearly all of today’s playground equipment. Now, Steve (B.S. ’68, landscape architecture) and Barbara (B.S. ’68, food science), who met at Iowa State on a blind date, have made a $1 million pledge to the ISU College of Design to help fund construction of a building addition and establish the King Laboratory for Sustainable Design Practice. This is not the first Iowa State gift from the Kings. In 2000 Barbara established the Barbara King Landscape Architecture Scholarships for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Iowa State, and Steve has provided resources for the

Barbara hopes the added space will allow students to feel good about dreaming and creating. There’s a direct connection between having a great space to work and the growth of ideas.

Steve and Barbara King

outfitting of the landscape architecture graduate studios. “Our business is based on our relationship with landscape architects,” says Steve. “This recent gift is just one more way we can show that landscape architects have been good to us, and it is a way we can share our good fortunes.” Creativity and entrepreneurship are keys to the Kings’ success, and they hope the new facilities will support these concepts. “Any university should be at the forefront of entrepreneurship,” Steve says, “and this new space will allow

students to come together in one place to learn from each other.” Barbara hopes the added space will “allow students to feel good about dreaming and creating. There’s a direct connection between having a great space to work and the growth of ideas,” she says. The new 22,000-square-foot building will house studio space for up to 600 freshmen and sophomores on the north side of the College of Design building. A “super studio” concept allows each class more hands-on space as well as a

wood workshop and additional faculty offices. The goal of the King Laboratory is to provide for the study of sustainable environmental systems using the building addition as a learning medium. The Kings, who in 2005 received the Christian Petersen Design Award from Iowa State University for contributions to safe and innovative playground designs for children, are dedi-

7 (Top Photo): Design students often present their work for public review at the end of each semester. (Bottom Photo): Small class sizes allow for personal interaction among students and faculty.

cated leaders in sustainable design. Landscape Structures develops products using recycled or reclaimed industrial

Much of a design student's time is spent in the studio.

and post-consumer waste, and the new College of Design facility will incorporate these practices as well. “Sustainable design has emerged as an important issue within all disciplines of our college,” says Mark Engelbrecht, dean of design, “and this project will provide the means to amplify this important field of study.” “It is important to be willing to support those things that you think are important,” says Barbara, “and be willing to give back to those who have given you opportunities in your life. You have to be able to turn around and say ‘thank you.’” ▼


Creating a Design Space for Ideas and Dreams teve and Barbara King believe in the power of play for everyone—from tiny toddlers to active grown-ups. They’ve lived those beliefs since Steve developed the continuous play concept for an Iowa State landscape architecture senior project, and then, with his wife as his partner, built it into the remarkably successful Landscape Structures, Inc.

S

6

The continuous play concept involves combining/attaching traditional play activities into an endless stream of challenges within an outdoor play environment. The concept is now used in nearly all of today’s playground equipment. Now, Steve (B.S. ’68, landscape architecture) and Barbara (B.S. ’68, food science), who met at Iowa State on a blind date, have made a $1 million pledge to the ISU College of Design to help fund construction of a building addition and establish the King Laboratory for Sustainable Design Practice. This is not the first Iowa State gift from the Kings. In 2000 Barbara established the Barbara King Landscape Architecture Scholarships for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Iowa State, and Steve has provided resources for the

Barbara hopes the added space will allow students to feel good about dreaming and creating. There’s a direct connection between having a great space to work and the growth of ideas.

Steve and Barbara King

outfitting of the landscape architecture graduate studios. “Our business is based on our relationship with landscape architects,” says Steve. “This recent gift is just one more way we can show that landscape architects have been good to us, and it is a way we can share our good fortunes.” Creativity and entrepreneurship are keys to the Kings’ success, and they hope the new facilities will support these concepts. “Any university should be at the forefront of entrepreneurship,” Steve says, “and this new space will allow

students to come together in one place to learn from each other.” Barbara hopes the added space will “allow students to feel good about dreaming and creating. There’s a direct connection between having a great space to work and the growth of ideas,” she says. The new 22,000-square-foot building will house studio space for up to 600 freshmen and sophomores on the north side of the College of Design building. A “super studio” concept allows each class more hands-on space as well as a

wood workshop and additional faculty offices. The goal of the King Laboratory is to provide for the study of sustainable environmental systems using the building addition as a learning medium. The Kings, who in 2005 received the Christian Petersen Design Award from Iowa State University for contributions to safe and innovative playground designs for children, are dedi-

7 (Top Photo): Design students often present their work for public review at the end of each semester. (Bottom Photo): Small class sizes allow for personal interaction among students and faculty.

cated leaders in sustainable design. Landscape Structures develops products using recycled or reclaimed industrial

Much of a design student's time is spent in the studio.

and post-consumer waste, and the new College of Design facility will incorporate these practices as well. “Sustainable design has emerged as an important issue within all disciplines of our college,” says Mark Engelbrecht, dean of design, “and this project will provide the means to amplify this important field of study.” “It is important to be willing to support those things that you think are important,” says Barbara, “and be willing to give back to those who have given you opportunities in your life. You have to be able to turn around and say ‘thank you.’” ▼


Student Callers Renew Ties to Iowa State f you’re lucky, you may have received a phone call in recent months from Andy Seward or Katie Kotz. Not only did the two callers for the ISU Foundation PhoneCenter enjoy talking to hundreds of alumni and friends of Iowa State last year, between them they raised nearly $315,000.

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8

Andy, a mechanical engineering senior, and Katie, a junior majoring in agricultural studies, are now program assistants who coach and train other student callers and help manage PhoneCenter operations.

Support from alumni is very important to us as students, and we see progress as they become involved. Katie is proud of her success in fund-raising; but she also says she heard some great stories, and had some wonderful conversations with alumni—both personal and about Iowa State. “Support from alumni is very important to us as students, and we see progress as they become involved,” says Katie. Andy agrees the job helped

him make friends and informed him about life after graduation. “It’s definitely a two-way street,” he says, adding that it’s one of the most important and highly skilled jobs on campus for students. “All you have is your voice,” he says, “so keeping it positive and really listening is important.” “It’s great sharing ISU stories and experiences,” Andy says.

“It’s nice to know what campus was like 20 or 30 years ago. We tell them why we’re trying to raise money and how they can help.” Andrew Harrison, a former student caller, now heads the PhoneCenter as assistant director of development for the ISU Foundation. “We give students an opportunity to learn great communication skills to

Katie Kotz is a program assistant at the ISU Foundation PhoneCenter.

succeed at their jobs, and to see the power of philanthropy and what it can do,” Andrew says. “These students know firsthand what can happen when people get involved.”

It’s nice to know what campus was like 20 or 30 years ago. We tell them why we’re trying to raise money and how they can help. He believes the training and quality of the callers at the ISU PhoneCenter are steps above other schools and industries. It is open six days a week with seven calling shifts. With a total of 100 student callers, each shift is staffed by as many as 32 callers plus five of the 10 to 12 program assistants. As a group, they may speak to more than 500 alumni and friends every night, and as many as 3,500 in any given week. Making sure the wishes of each donor is fulfilled throughout the night takes a lot of training, according to Andrew. “They have a job that is every bit as difficult as any internship I’ve ever seen, and they’re also going to school.” In selecting students for the job, he says, “we look for responsibility, maturity, ability to teach other people, initiative and a love for Iowa State.” The PhoneCenter raised

9

Andy Seward is a program assistant at the ISU Foundation PhoneCenter.

$3.2 million in fiscal year 2005—an amount that has tremendous impact, especially on scholarships and programs. But Andrew is quick to point out that while the first priority is fund-raising, it is only one

of three goals of the student callers. The others are to develop lifetime relationships between the university and alumni, and to make sure alumni records are up to date. ▼


Student Callers Renew Ties to Iowa State f you’re lucky, you may have received a phone call in recent months from Andy Seward or Katie Kotz. Not only did the two callers for the ISU Foundation PhoneCenter enjoy talking to hundreds of alumni and friends of Iowa State last year, between them they raised nearly $315,000.

I

8

Andy, a mechanical engineering senior, and Katie, a junior majoring in agricultural studies, are now program assistants who coach and train other student callers and help manage PhoneCenter operations.

Support from alumni is very important to us as students, and we see progress as they become involved. Katie is proud of her success in fund-raising; but she also says she heard some great stories, and had some wonderful conversations with alumni—both personal and about Iowa State. “Support from alumni is very important to us as students, and we see progress as they become involved,” says Katie. Andy agrees the job helped

him make friends and informed him about life after graduation. “It’s definitely a two-way street,” he says, adding that it’s one of the most important and highly skilled jobs on campus for students. “All you have is your voice,” he says, “so keeping it positive and really listening is important.” “It’s great sharing ISU stories and experiences,” Andy says.

“It’s nice to know what campus was like 20 or 30 years ago. We tell them why we’re trying to raise money and how they can help.” Andrew Harrison, a former student caller, now heads the PhoneCenter as assistant director of development for the ISU Foundation. “We give students an opportunity to learn great communication skills to

Katie Kotz is a program assistant at the ISU Foundation PhoneCenter.

succeed at their jobs, and to see the power of philanthropy and what it can do,” Andrew says. “These students know firsthand what can happen when people get involved.”

It’s nice to know what campus was like 20 or 30 years ago. We tell them why we’re trying to raise money and how they can help. He believes the training and quality of the callers at the ISU PhoneCenter are steps above other schools and industries. It is open six days a week with seven calling shifts. With a total of 100 student callers, each shift is staffed by as many as 32 callers plus five of the 10 to 12 program assistants. As a group, they may speak to more than 500 alumni and friends every night, and as many as 3,500 in any given week. Making sure the wishes of each donor is fulfilled throughout the night takes a lot of training, according to Andrew. “They have a job that is every bit as difficult as any internship I’ve ever seen, and they’re also going to school.” In selecting students for the job, he says, “we look for responsibility, maturity, ability to teach other people, initiative and a love for Iowa State.” The PhoneCenter raised

9

Andy Seward is a program assistant at the ISU Foundation PhoneCenter.

$3.2 million in fiscal year 2005—an amount that has tremendous impact, especially on scholarships and programs. But Andrew is quick to point out that while the first priority is fund-raising, it is only one

of three goals of the student callers. The others are to develop lifetime relationships between the university and alumni, and to make sure alumni records are up to date. ▼


New Palmer Chair Harnesses the Power of ISU Iowa with energy potential, director for power systems for the especially agricultural products, National Science Foundation. to see how we can develop new The list of recognition and opportunities,” he explains. Liu service is long for the former is starting to develop a frameprofessor and associate dean at work for “hydrogen economy” the University of Washington, research which will encompass who recently moved to Ames to a number of program areas on begin his new position. But Liu campus (for example, engineerisn’t one to rest on his laurels. ing, science and agriculHe has work to do here ture) and collaborate that could change the He knows what he’s talking with government way power systems about. Accolades abound for and industry. “This impact the world. Liu, the newly appointed will serve the “I came to Iowa Palmer Chair in Electrical country well, if it State,” Liu says, Engineering at Iowa State becomes a broader “because of its University. The Institute of solution to the energy strong tradition in Electrical and Electronics problem,” Liu said. power engineering Engineers’ Power Engineering Over the last two research and education, Society, to which he has been decades, Liu has been and I am really excited Chen-Ching Liu elected a fellow, gave him their working with the about the opportunity Outstanding Power Engineering world’s power industry on to help build the top program Educator Award in 2004, a advanced technologies to manthat will be the envy of the Distinguished Service Award age the power grids in order to country in the future.” That in 2002 and their Third avoid major outages. “There is will involve research into Millennium Medal in 2000. already a very strong Iowa State defense system technology The governor of the state of connection,” he says, “and it will (to avoid major outages), and Washington named him to be wonderful to further develop projects to forcast the price of the board of directors of the that synergy. On one hand it electricity as well as research on Washington Technology Center, renewable energy. “We should gives us better support, and on and he has been program take advantage of resources in the other it will help us stay closer to the ground and understand the real world better.” Recruiting and retaining the best faculty by creating endowed faculty positions is only made possible by private support. The Palmer Chair in Electrical Engineering was established in 1986 with a gift from Barbara Palmer, a 1946 graduate with a degree in family and consumer sciences, and her late husband Jim, who graduated in 1944 with a degree in L to R: Seongil Lim, visiting scholar; Harold Salazar, electrical engineering stuelectrical engineering. ▼ dent; Chen-Ching Liu, Palmer Chair in Electrical Engineering; and Chee-Wooi

f Dr. Chen-Ching Liu has his way, in just a few years, with a great deal of effort and teamwork, Iowa State will have the best power program in the United States.

I

10

Ten, electrical engineering student.

Sampson Gift Enhances Snedecor harles Sampson remembers sitting near a third floor window in the northwest corner of Snedecor Hall watching snow blowing in around the edges of the windows. He was an Iowa State graduate student then, back in the 1960s, working on his doctoral degree in one of the top statistics programs in the country.

C

It’s ironic that new windows for the north side of Snedecor are on the list for a major renovation of the 66-year-old building, made possible in part by a $100,000 gift from Charles Sampson (Ph.D. ’68) and his wife Vicki (B.S. ’65). A new roof, new heat regulation and many other upgrades fill out the list of much-needed projects. “It seems to me that for the purposes of recruiting both faculty and students it will be better to have a bit more of a showplace,” says Charles. After graduation, Charles returned to campus many times to hire ISU graduates before retiring as director of decision sciences for

Vicki and Charles Sampson

Eli Lilly and Company in 1993. “The Iowa State statistics department has a better reputation than it has a house.” His feelings for the statistics program run deep. “I hired ISU graduates because many had experience in statistical consulting, and that’s different than just hiring a statistician who had only experience from books,” Charles says. “Some of the best teachers I had at Iowa State were those who had joint appointments in animal sciences and plant sciences as well as other areas. They were super teachers as well as practitioners and could give you great insight.” Collaborative research among departments is alive and well at ISU, and the statistics department is integral to those efforts. Bioinformatics, for example, integrates the study of statistics with the biological sciences such as agronomy, botany and genetics. And statistics has been an integral part of ISU’s agricultural research since the early 1900s when George W. Snedecor, who

developed the first statistics course offered by Iowa State in 1915, arrived on campus. Emphasizing agricultural, engineering and environmental statistics as well as survey sampling and other research areas, has led to national prominence for the department. Charles hopes the Snedecor Hall renovation will help recruit students who are considering a career in statistics. “One of the great things about being a statistician,” he says, “is there are opportunities in so many areas—industry, government, academia—with both theoretical or applied work. It’s a great way to participate in the scientific method without being responsible for carrying out the experiment first hand; and there are many ways to earn a good and interesting living.” Charles encourages more alumni to get involved. “This is an initiative that needs to be realized,” he emphasizes, “and the quicker we get it done the closer the department will be to achieving its vision and mission.” ▼

11


New Palmer Chair Harnesses the Power of ISU Iowa with energy potential, director for power systems for the especially agricultural products, National Science Foundation. to see how we can develop new The list of recognition and opportunities,” he explains. Liu service is long for the former is starting to develop a frameprofessor and associate dean at work for “hydrogen economy” the University of Washington, research which will encompass who recently moved to Ames to a number of program areas on begin his new position. But Liu campus (for example, engineerisn’t one to rest on his laurels. ing, science and agriculHe has work to do here ture) and collaborate that could change the He knows what he’s talking with government way power systems about. Accolades abound for and industry. “This impact the world. Liu, the newly appointed will serve the “I came to Iowa Palmer Chair in Electrical country well, if it State,” Liu says, Engineering at Iowa State becomes a broader “because of its University. The Institute of solution to the energy strong tradition in Electrical and Electronics problem,” Liu said. power engineering Engineers’ Power Engineering Over the last two research and education, Society, to which he has been decades, Liu has been and I am really excited Chen-Ching Liu elected a fellow, gave him their working with the about the opportunity Outstanding Power Engineering world’s power industry on to help build the top program Educator Award in 2004, a advanced technologies to manthat will be the envy of the Distinguished Service Award age the power grids in order to country in the future.” That in 2002 and their Third avoid major outages. “There is will involve research into Millennium Medal in 2000. already a very strong Iowa State defense system technology The governor of the state of connection,” he says, “and it will (to avoid major outages), and Washington named him to be wonderful to further develop projects to forcast the price of the board of directors of the that synergy. On one hand it electricity as well as research on Washington Technology Center, renewable energy. “We should gives us better support, and on and he has been program take advantage of resources in the other it will help us stay closer to the ground and understand the real world better.” Recruiting and retaining the best faculty by creating endowed faculty positions is only made possible by private support. The Palmer Chair in Electrical Engineering was established in 1986 with a gift from Barbara Palmer, a 1946 graduate with a degree in family and consumer sciences, and her late husband Jim, who graduated in 1944 with a degree in L to R: Seongil Lim, visiting scholar; Harold Salazar, electrical engineering stuelectrical engineering. ▼ dent; Chen-Ching Liu, Palmer Chair in Electrical Engineering; and Chee-Wooi

f Dr. Chen-Ching Liu has his way, in just a few years, with a great deal of effort and teamwork, Iowa State will have the best power program in the United States.

I

10

Ten, electrical engineering student.

Sampson Gift Enhances Snedecor harles Sampson remembers sitting near a third floor window in the northwest corner of Snedecor Hall watching snow blowing in around the edges of the windows. He was an Iowa State graduate student then, back in the 1960s, working on his doctoral degree in one of the top statistics programs in the country.

C

It’s ironic that new windows for the north side of Snedecor are on the list for a major renovation of the 66-year-old building, made possible in part by a $100,000 gift from Charles Sampson (Ph.D. ’68) and his wife Vicki (B.S. ’65). A new roof, new heat regulation and many other upgrades fill out the list of much-needed projects. “It seems to me that for the purposes of recruiting both faculty and students it will be better to have a bit more of a showplace,” says Charles. After graduation, Charles returned to campus many times to hire ISU graduates before retiring as director of decision sciences for

Vicki and Charles Sampson

Eli Lilly and Company in 1993. “The Iowa State statistics department has a better reputation than it has a house.” His feelings for the statistics program run deep. “I hired ISU graduates because many had experience in statistical consulting, and that’s different than just hiring a statistician who had only experience from books,” Charles says. “Some of the best teachers I had at Iowa State were those who had joint appointments in animal sciences and plant sciences as well as other areas. They were super teachers as well as practitioners and could give you great insight.” Collaborative research among departments is alive and well at ISU, and the statistics department is integral to those efforts. Bioinformatics, for example, integrates the study of statistics with the biological sciences such as agronomy, botany and genetics. And statistics has been an integral part of ISU’s agricultural research since the early 1900s when George W. Snedecor, who

developed the first statistics course offered by Iowa State in 1915, arrived on campus. Emphasizing agricultural, engineering and environmental statistics as well as survey sampling and other research areas, has led to national prominence for the department. Charles hopes the Snedecor Hall renovation will help recruit students who are considering a career in statistics. “One of the great things about being a statistician,” he says, “is there are opportunities in so many areas—industry, government, academia—with both theoretical or applied work. It’s a great way to participate in the scientific method without being responsible for carrying out the experiment first hand; and there are many ways to earn a good and interesting living.” Charles encourages more alumni to get involved. “This is an initiative that needs to be realized,” he emphasizes, “and the quicker we get it done the closer the department will be to achieving its vision and mission.” ▼

11


Many ways to take Part, Many Rewards to Follow ngraved on Rudy Herrmann’s Iowa State University class ring is the phrase “Science with Practice.” The industrial engineering graduate and retired president and CEO of an industrial products manufacturer, Dover Resources, Inc., has referred to that motto often throughout his life.

E

12

“It very much reflects land grant university values,” he says, “to make sure students— especially in engineering— understand how to solve realworld problems.” Rudy and his wife Deborah recently significantly increased

their bequest to ISU. It was by no means their first gift to the university. For nearly 10 years, Rudy served on the College of Engineering Industrial Advisory Council (including two years as the council’s chair). The group—supporters from various constituencies, including alumni and companies who hire ISU graduates—provides input and feedback to the college, encourages practical student experiences and promotes many other initiatives. The Herrmanns have also contributed time and financial gifts in the industrial and manufacturing systems engineering department by establishing an endowed chair and providing seed money to launch a sustainable engineering initiative.

“Every time I’ve had the opportunity to become involved with something at ISU, I have grown personally as well,” says Rudy. “Every time I say ‘yes,’ I have the opportunity to become involved with another group of very interesting individuals. It opens the door to do more, and it’s a twoway street. As an individual, one also benefits.” That’s why Rudy said “yes” when asked to serve as the chair of the College of Engineering’s volunteer campaign team—part of Iowa State’s upcoming comprehensive fund-raising campaign. “Higher education is very much a partnership effort,” he explains, “among students, faculty, administration, alumni, industry and those who benefit from the work of the university

Ted Heindel, associate professor of mechanical engineering, in his lab where he conducts research on paper recycling.

and hire its graduates. That partnership can become stronger through this campaign.” Rudy (B.S. ’73, industrial engineering), who received his MBA from the Harvard Business School, and Deborah, who obtained B.S., B.A. and MBA degrees from Drake University, have lived this “just say yes” philosophy for a very long time. “It gets back to the value system at Iowa State, and that I first learned from my German immigrant parents, of giving something back,” he says. “All graduates have benefited from their ISU experience, and incumbent in that is to return whatever and whenever we can to the university and its students.” He envisions the comprehensive campaign will be successful for several reasons. First, it is driven by a plan to properly identify priorities that will support the strategic development of ISU. Second, he is

(Above Left): Maria Torres, a graduate student in chemical engineering, works on a lab project. (Above Right): Robert Brown, Bergles Professor in Thermal Sciences, professor of chemistry, and director of the Center of Sustainable Environmental Technologies, stands in a field of switchgrass. (Right): VRAC, one of the nation’s few sixsided virtual reality environments, is home to the Human Computer Interaction Initiative, which has nearly $15 million in current research activity.

confident alumni and friends will give generously; and third, he believes it will broaden the base of supporters of the College of Engineering at ISU, including alumni as well as industrial partners. Impact from the Herrmanns’ generosity has been felt throughout the college in expanded environmentally sustainable engineering; industrial and manufacturing systems engineering initiatives; additional “real-world

13

experiences” for students; and enhanced faculty opportunities. Rudy is never too busy to help out at Iowa State. “We have a responsibility to give of our time, talents and treasures—each at the level we are able—to give what we can. It’s the right thing to do.” ▼


Many ways to take Part, Many Rewards to Follow ngraved on Rudy Herrmann’s Iowa State University class ring is the phrase “Science with Practice.” The industrial engineering graduate and retired president and CEO of an industrial products manufacturer, Dover Resources, Inc., has referred to that motto often throughout his life.

E

12

“It very much reflects land grant university values,” he says, “to make sure students— especially in engineering— understand how to solve realworld problems.” Rudy and his wife Deborah recently significantly increased

their bequest to ISU. It was by no means their first gift to the university. For nearly 10 years, Rudy served on the College of Engineering Industrial Advisory Council (including two years as the council’s chair). The group—supporters from various constituencies, including alumni and companies who hire ISU graduates—provides input and feedback to the college, encourages practical student experiences and promotes many other initiatives. The Herrmanns have also contributed time and financial gifts in the industrial and manufacturing systems engineering department by establishing an endowed chair and providing seed money to launch a sustainable engineering initiative.

“Every time I’ve had the opportunity to become involved with something at ISU, I have grown personally as well,” says Rudy. “Every time I say ‘yes,’ I have the opportunity to become involved with another group of very interesting individuals. It opens the door to do more, and it’s a twoway street. As an individual, one also benefits.” That’s why Rudy said “yes” when asked to serve as the chair of the College of Engineering’s volunteer campaign team—part of Iowa State’s upcoming comprehensive fund-raising campaign. “Higher education is very much a partnership effort,” he explains, “among students, faculty, administration, alumni, industry and those who benefit from the work of the university

Ted Heindel, associate professor of mechanical engineering, in his lab where he conducts research on paper recycling.

and hire its graduates. That partnership can become stronger through this campaign.” Rudy (B.S. ’73, industrial engineering), who received his MBA from the Harvard Business School, and Deborah, who obtained B.S., B.A. and MBA degrees from Drake University, have lived this “just say yes” philosophy for a very long time. “It gets back to the value system at Iowa State, and that I first learned from my German immigrant parents, of giving something back,” he says. “All graduates have benefited from their ISU experience, and incumbent in that is to return whatever and whenever we can to the university and its students.” He envisions the comprehensive campaign will be successful for several reasons. First, it is driven by a plan to properly identify priorities that will support the strategic development of ISU. Second, he is

(Above Left): Maria Torres, a graduate student in chemical engineering, works on a lab project. (Above Right): Robert Brown, Bergles Professor in Thermal Sciences, professor of chemistry, and director of the Center of Sustainable Environmental Technologies, stands in a field of switchgrass. (Right): VRAC, one of the nation’s few sixsided virtual reality environments, is home to the Human Computer Interaction Initiative, which has nearly $15 million in current research activity.

confident alumni and friends will give generously; and third, he believes it will broaden the base of supporters of the College of Engineering at ISU, including alumni as well as industrial partners. Impact from the Herrmanns’ generosity has been felt throughout the college in expanded environmentally sustainable engineering; industrial and manufacturing systems engineering initiatives; additional “real-world

13

experiences” for students; and enhanced faculty opportunities. Rudy is never too busy to help out at Iowa State. “We have a responsibility to give of our time, talents and treasures—each at the level we are able—to give what we can. It’s the right thing to do.” ▼


Friends Calling on Friends he department of animal science in the College of Agriculture recently celebrated a unique fund-raising drive that has bonded a group of alumni toward a single goal—sustaining and growing leadership opportunities through the judging teams program.

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14

Judging teams have been an integral leadership opportunity for students at ISU since the early 1900s. Top students in the College of Agriculture vie for positions on competitive teams that judge dairy, livestock and meat product grade and quality. These judging teams compete with teams from other universities in contests held at ISU and around the country. Officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, industry and academia oversee these contests, determining which team provides the best defense for their judgments. Through their judging team experience, students learn modern livestock, meat and dairy evaluation methods. They develop good decision making and communication skills. Best of all, they become some of the most employable graduates in their fields of interest. Successful judging teams are a product of hard work. Students who participate must practice 15 to 20 hours each

week, then get up on Saturday mornings and travel to contests in cities throughout the Midwest and around the country. “It takes a lot of effort and support,” says Frederick (F.C.) Parrish, a retired ISU faculty member and former meat judging coach. “Because of this effort, coaches and team members develop strong, life-long relationships. But, in recent

years it has become difficult for faculty to take time from research and teaching to coach the judging teams.” It became apparent by the spring of 2003 that the judging teams program might no longer be sustainable without assistance from private funding. Alumni and coaches had discussed the creation of an endowment to support the

(Top Photo): F.C. and Fern Parrish receive their framed letter and meat judging helmets at a donor recognition event. (Bottom Photo): Letters were given to donors who contributed $1,000 or more to the judging team endowment campaign.

judging program for years; and that spring two groups led by Gary Lutz (B.S. ’56, animal science) and Chad Anderson (B.S. ’91, animal science) started momentum for an endowment campaign. They began serious gift discussions among their former teammates. Others soon got involved, and by October 2004 top alumni of the judging teams had launched a $1 million volunteer-driven endowment initiative. This process included creating a volunteer packet, and identifying team members from every former Iowa State judging team to become team captains.

Through their judging team experience, students learn modern livestock, meat and dairy evaluation methods. They develop good decision making and communication skills. Captains then solicited gifts from their former teammates. In six months the endowment reached $360,000 toward its goal, with 550 of the 1,200 living ISU judging team alumni contributing. More than 100 volunteers were involved and 75 percent of the donations were provided through firsttime gifts to the university. As

(Top Photo): Guests enjoyed the donor recognition event held last October. (Bottom Photo): Marv Walter, ISU Foundation board member (right), presents Dr. Maynard Hogberg, chair of the animal science department, an award for his $5,000 contribution in support of the judging team endowment campaign.

15

a result of that initial response, two major donors stepped up to the plate. Jeff Hansen of Iowa Select Farms made a gift commitment of $175,000, and F.C. and his wife Fern made a gift commitment of $250,000. Just over a year after the campaign began, the endowment has reached $825,000. With donations continuing to come in, the $1 million goal should soon be reached. In addition to much-needed coaching support, the gifts will be used to pay for student travel to contests, fees and

expenses on the road. “These people really believed in the judging team educational concept and were willing to give support not only with their money, but with their time,” says Marv Walter, alumnus of the 1961 meat and 1962 livestock judging team. “They felt the experience prepared them well for life beyond college, and they remained friends through life. Their support for this program speaks volumes for the valuable education afforded us through our judging team experience.” ▼


Friends Calling on Friends he department of animal science in the College of Agriculture recently celebrated a unique fund-raising drive that has bonded a group of alumni toward a single goal—sustaining and growing leadership opportunities through the judging teams program.

T

14

Judging teams have been an integral leadership opportunity for students at ISU since the early 1900s. Top students in the College of Agriculture vie for positions on competitive teams that judge dairy, livestock and meat product grade and quality. These judging teams compete with teams from other universities in contests held at ISU and around the country. Officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, industry and academia oversee these contests, determining which team provides the best defense for their judgments. Through their judging team experience, students learn modern livestock, meat and dairy evaluation methods. They develop good decision making and communication skills. Best of all, they become some of the most employable graduates in their fields of interest. Successful judging teams are a product of hard work. Students who participate must practice 15 to 20 hours each

week, then get up on Saturday mornings and travel to contests in cities throughout the Midwest and around the country. “It takes a lot of effort and support,” says Frederick (F.C.) Parrish, a retired ISU faculty member and former meat judging coach. “Because of this effort, coaches and team members develop strong, life-long relationships. But, in recent

years it has become difficult for faculty to take time from research and teaching to coach the judging teams.” It became apparent by the spring of 2003 that the judging teams program might no longer be sustainable without assistance from private funding. Alumni and coaches had discussed the creation of an endowment to support the

(Top Photo): F.C. and Fern Parrish receive their framed letter and meat judging helmets at a donor recognition event. (Bottom Photo): Letters were given to donors who contributed $1,000 or more to the judging team endowment campaign.

judging program for years; and that spring two groups led by Gary Lutz (B.S. ’56, animal science) and Chad Anderson (B.S. ’91, animal science) started momentum for an endowment campaign. They began serious gift discussions among their former teammates. Others soon got involved, and by October 2004 top alumni of the judging teams had launched a $1 million volunteer-driven endowment initiative. This process included creating a volunteer packet, and identifying team members from every former Iowa State judging team to become team captains.

Through their judging team experience, students learn modern livestock, meat and dairy evaluation methods. They develop good decision making and communication skills. Captains then solicited gifts from their former teammates. In six months the endowment reached $360,000 toward its goal, with 550 of the 1,200 living ISU judging team alumni contributing. More than 100 volunteers were involved and 75 percent of the donations were provided through firsttime gifts to the university. As

(Top Photo): Guests enjoyed the donor recognition event held last October. (Bottom Photo): Marv Walter, ISU Foundation board member (right), presents Dr. Maynard Hogberg, chair of the animal science department, an award for his $5,000 contribution in support of the judging team endowment campaign.

15

a result of that initial response, two major donors stepped up to the plate. Jeff Hansen of Iowa Select Farms made a gift commitment of $175,000, and F.C. and his wife Fern made a gift commitment of $250,000. Just over a year after the campaign began, the endowment has reached $825,000. With donations continuing to come in, the $1 million goal should soon be reached. In addition to much-needed coaching support, the gifts will be used to pay for student travel to contests, fees and

expenses on the road. “These people really believed in the judging team educational concept and were willing to give support not only with their money, but with their time,” says Marv Walter, alumnus of the 1961 meat and 1962 livestock judging team. “They felt the experience prepared them well for life beyond college, and they remained friends through life. Their support for this program speaks volumes for the valuable education afforded us through our judging team experience.” ▼


Volunteer Leaders Named to Executive Campaign Committee welve longtime supporters of Iowa State University have been appointed by President Gregory Geoffroy to the executive committee that will help guide ISU’s upcoming comprehensive fund-raising campaign. “These volunteer leaders will ensure the success of this campaign and provide our university with outstanding support,” Geoffroy said.

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16

Geoffroy and ISU Foundation President Dan Saftig will serve as ex-officio members of the executive committee. Members of the college/unit based committees are currently being recruited and will be named in the next few months.

Roger Underwood, Chair

Roger is chairman of Becker Underwood in Ames; he graduated from ISU in 1980 with a degree in agricultural business; he serves as an ISU Foundation board member and governor; and is on the College of Agriculture Advisory Council. He speaks regularly on campus about topics related to entrepreneurship. Roger is married to Connie (LAS ’84) and the couple lives in Ames, Iowa.

Steve and Debbie Bergstrom

Jim and Kathy Melsa

Steve is former president and COO of Dynegy, Inc.; he graduated from ISU in 1979 with a degree in business; he serves on the College of Business Dean’s Advisory Council; and is a ISU Foundation governor. Debbie is a homemaker. The couple lives in Montgomery, Texas.

Jim is the retired dean of the Iowa State College of Engineering; he graduated from ISU in 1960 with a B.S. in electrical engineering, and from the University of Arizona in 1962 with an M.S. in electrical engineering and in 1965 with a Ph.D. in engineering. Kathy graduated from the University of Arizona in 1963 with a B.S. in education. The couple lives in Naperville, Ill.

Jerry and Karen Kolschowsky

Jerry is the retired chairman and co-CEO of OSI Industries, LLC in Aurora, Ill.; he graduated from ISU in 1962 with a degree in agricultural business; and serves as an ISU Foundation board member and governor. Karen is a 1963 graduate of the College of Education at Michigan State University. The couple lives in Oak Brook, Ill.

Owen Newlin

Gene is founder, chairman and CEO of Lloyd, Inc.; he graduated from ISU in 1949 with a degree in veterinary medicine and in 1970 with a Ph.D. in veterinary pathology; and he is an ISU Foundation governor. Linda is export manager and QA assistant of Lloyd, Inc. The couple lives in Ft. Myers, Fla.

Owen is retired senior vice president of Pioneer Hi-Bred International; he graduated from ISU in 1951 with a B.S. in agronomy and in 1953 with an M.S. in agronomy, and from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 1955 with a Ph.D. in plant breeding genetics; he was president of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa from 1996-2004; and he serves as an ISU Foundation board member and governor. Owen is married to DJ who graduated from ISU in 1953 with a B.S. in household equipment. The couple lives in Des Moines, Iowa.

Chuck Manatt

Dick Stanley

Chuck is founder of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips and served as ambassador to the Dominican Republic. He graduated from ISU in 1958 with a degree in rural sociology and from George Washington University in 1962 with a J.D. in law; and he serves as an ISU Foundation emeritus governor. Chuck is married to Kathy; and the couple lives in Washington, D.C.

Dick is chairman of the Stanley Group; he graduated from ISU in 1955 with a B.S. in electrical engineering and mechanical engineering, and from the University of Iowa in 1963 with an M.S.; and he is an ISU Foundation governor. Dick is married to Mary Jo who graduated from ISU in 1955 with a B.S. in home economics. The couple lives in Muscatine, Iowa. ▼

Gene and Linda Lloyd

Know your

numbers 7

Number of new named fellowships in the ISU Seed Science Center.

5.16.06

Date of the Women & Philanthropy workshop featuring Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz (for more information, see ad on back cover).

$28,739

Original cost to build Morrill Hall which was dedicated in 1891— the renovation project should be completed in early 2007.

$1 million

The largest pledge ever to the College of Design, made recently by Steve and Barbara King.

8.3%

ISU Foundation 10-year endowment return (FY 2005).

25,500 The number of athletes, coaches, delegates, volunteers and family members expected to attend the 2006 Special Olympics U.S. National Games in Ames this July.

500+

The number of clubs and organizations available for student involvement at Iowa State.

1

The number of benefactors it takes to make a difference at Iowa State University.


Volunteer Leaders Named to Executive Campaign Committee welve longtime supporters of Iowa State University have been appointed by President Gregory Geoffroy to the executive committee that will help guide ISU’s upcoming comprehensive fund-raising campaign. “These volunteer leaders will ensure the success of this campaign and provide our university with outstanding support,” Geoffroy said.

T

16

Geoffroy and ISU Foundation President Dan Saftig will serve as ex-officio members of the executive committee. Members of the college/unit based committees are currently being recruited and will be named in the next few months.

Roger Underwood, Chair

Roger is chairman of Becker Underwood in Ames; he graduated from ISU in 1980 with a degree in agricultural business; he serves as an ISU Foundation board member and governor; and is on the College of Agriculture Advisory Council. He speaks regularly on campus about topics related to entrepreneurship. Roger is married to Connie (LAS ’84) and the couple lives in Ames, Iowa.

Steve and Debbie Bergstrom

Jim and Kathy Melsa

Steve is former president and COO of Dynegy, Inc.; he graduated from ISU in 1979 with a degree in business; he serves on the College of Business Dean’s Advisory Council; and is a ISU Foundation governor. Debbie is a homemaker. The couple lives in Montgomery, Texas.

Jim is the retired dean of the Iowa State College of Engineering; he graduated from ISU in 1960 with a B.S. in electrical engineering, and from the University of Arizona in 1962 with an M.S. in electrical engineering and in 1965 with a Ph.D. in engineering. Kathy graduated from the University of Arizona in 1963 with a B.S. in education. The couple lives in Naperville, Ill.

Jerry and Karen Kolschowsky

Jerry is the retired chairman and co-CEO of OSI Industries, LLC in Aurora, Ill.; he graduated from ISU in 1962 with a degree in agricultural business; and serves as an ISU Foundation board member and governor. Karen is a 1963 graduate of the College of Education at Michigan State University. The couple lives in Oak Brook, Ill.

Owen Newlin

Gene is founder, chairman and CEO of Lloyd, Inc.; he graduated from ISU in 1949 with a degree in veterinary medicine and in 1970 with a Ph.D. in veterinary pathology; and he is an ISU Foundation governor. Linda is export manager and QA assistant of Lloyd, Inc. The couple lives in Ft. Myers, Fla.

Owen is retired senior vice president of Pioneer Hi-Bred International; he graduated from ISU in 1951 with a B.S. in agronomy and in 1953 with an M.S. in agronomy, and from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in 1955 with a Ph.D. in plant breeding genetics; he was president of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa from 1996-2004; and he serves as an ISU Foundation board member and governor. Owen is married to DJ who graduated from ISU in 1953 with a B.S. in household equipment. The couple lives in Des Moines, Iowa.

Chuck Manatt

Dick Stanley

Chuck is founder of Manatt, Phelps & Phillips and served as ambassador to the Dominican Republic. He graduated from ISU in 1958 with a degree in rural sociology and from George Washington University in 1962 with a J.D. in law; and he serves as an ISU Foundation emeritus governor. Chuck is married to Kathy; and the couple lives in Washington, D.C.

Dick is chairman of the Stanley Group; he graduated from ISU in 1955 with a B.S. in electrical engineering and mechanical engineering, and from the University of Iowa in 1963 with an M.S.; and he is an ISU Foundation governor. Dick is married to Mary Jo who graduated from ISU in 1955 with a B.S. in home economics. The couple lives in Muscatine, Iowa. ▼

Gene and Linda Lloyd

Know your

numbers 7

Number of new named fellowships in the ISU Seed Science Center.

5.16.06

Date of the Women & Philanthropy workshop featuring Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz (for more information, see ad on back cover).

$28,739

Original cost to build Morrill Hall which was dedicated in 1891— the renovation project should be completed in early 2007.

$1 million

The largest pledge ever to the College of Design, made recently by Steve and Barbara King.

8.3%

ISU Foundation 10-year endowment return (FY 2005).

25,500 The number of athletes, coaches, delegates, volunteers and family members expected to attend the 2006 Special Olympics U.S. National Games in Ames this July.

500+

The number of clubs and organizations available for student involvement at Iowa State.

1

The number of benefactors it takes to make a difference at Iowa State University.


Iowa State University Foundation 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, IA 50010-8644

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RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

Women & Philanthropy Seminar

It Pays to Talk‌

your finances, your family, your future

A seminar featuring

$25 per person

Carrie Schwab-Pomerantz

Includes luncheon and program, breakout

Chief Strategist of Consumer Education and Senior Vice President, Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.; and President, The Charles Schwab Foundation

Tuesday, May 16 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Iowa State Center, Ames, Iowa

sessions on financial and philanthropic topics, book signing with Carrie SchwabPomerantz, and dessert reception

Register today! 515.294.4607 or WP@foundation.iastate.edu Presented by Iowa State University Foundation’s Women & Philanthropy Committee


Spring06