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FALL 2004

Connections For Friends of the Iowa State University Foundation

Opportunities Because of You

FISCAL YEAR 2004 IN REVIEW

ANNUAL REPORT


Connections FALL 2004

Opportunities...

Because of You research assistant peering into a test tube holds it up to the light and realizes a long-sought solution is at hand. A student pulls a final brush stroke across a canvas and completes a design that will start a new fashion trend. A computer downloads the final pieces of an engineering puzzle that has eluded generations.

A Connections is published periodically by the Iowa State University Foundation— a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to securing and stewarding private gifts and grants that benefit Iowa State University. This magazine serves as a link between Iowa State and benefactors who support the university. You are receiving this publication as an important member of the Iowa State family. We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions. Iowa State University Foundation Office of Communications 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, Iowa 50010-8644 Phone: 515-294-4607 Toll Free: 866-419-6768 Web: www.foundation.iastate.edu E-mail: questions@foundation.iastate.edu The Iowa State University Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact human resources, ISU Foundation, 515-294-4607.

Most likely you will not

was not available to complete

personally witness these

the engineering puzzle.

moments. There is no guide-

This has been a year of

book that can tell exactly

opportunities—many of them

when a lightbulb will go on,

made possible by contribu-

or a door will open. A university

tions from people like you. In the

cannot plan for these cherished

pages that follow, you will see what a

moments of success like it can plan

difference your commitment to sup-

to break ground for a new building, or

porting Iowa State has made through-

to dedicate a new laboratory.

out the year. You’ll see how important

But, every donor who supports

your gifts are to the university’s faculty

ISU has the power to help set the

and students, who depend upon, and

stage for these amazing moments.

appreciate your generosity.

Imagine if the researcher peering

You create the opportunities. You

into the test tube had no funds to

may not be there at the exact moment

pay for chemicals. What if students

of enlightenment; but the spirit of your

who could have designed new

gift is nearby every day, and it makes

fashions had to stay home for lack

a huge difference in the educational

of tuition or the computer software

mission of Iowa State University. ▼

1


Connections FALL 2004

Opportunities...

Because of You research assistant peering into a test tube holds it up to the light and realizes a long-sought solution is at hand. A student pulls a final brush stroke across a canvas and completes a design that will start a new fashion trend. A computer downloads the final pieces of an engineering puzzle that has eluded generations.

A Connections is published periodically by the Iowa State University Foundation— a private, non-profit corporation dedicated to securing and stewarding private gifts and grants that benefit Iowa State University. This magazine serves as a link between Iowa State and benefactors who support the university. You are receiving this publication as an important member of the Iowa State family. We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions. Iowa State University Foundation Office of Communications 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, Iowa 50010-8644 Phone: 515-294-4607 Toll Free: 866-419-6768 Web: www.foundation.iastate.edu E-mail: questions@foundation.iastate.edu The Iowa State University Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, sex, marital status, disability, or status as a U.S. Vietnam Era Veteran. Any persons having inquiries concerning this may contact human resources, ISU Foundation, 515-294-4607.

Most likely you will not

was not available to complete

personally witness these

the engineering puzzle.

moments. There is no guide-

This has been a year of

book that can tell exactly

opportunities—many of them

when a lightbulb will go on,

made possible by contribu-

or a door will open. A university

tions from people like you. In the

cannot plan for these cherished

pages that follow, you will see what a

moments of success like it can plan

difference your commitment to sup-

to break ground for a new building, or

porting Iowa State has made through-

to dedicate a new laboratory.

out the year. You’ll see how important

But, every donor who supports

your gifts are to the university’s faculty

ISU has the power to help set the

and students, who depend upon, and

stage for these amazing moments.

appreciate your generosity.

Imagine if the researcher peering

You create the opportunities. You

into the test tube had no funds to

may not be there at the exact moment

pay for chemicals. What if students

of enlightenment; but the spirit of your

who could have designed new

gift is nearby every day, and it makes

fashions had to stay home for lack

a huge difference in the educational

of tuition or the computer software

mission of Iowa State University. ▼

1


It Was A Great Year, Thanks to You

W

200

10

0

0

Dollars transferred to ISU [Excluding in-kind gifts]

Student support

$47.4

50

15% 11%10%

50 0

$54.7

Faculty support

15

5

25

$13.3

12

20

$4.1

4 $3.4

$9.9

9 6

3 2

15 $13.9 10 5

0

0

0

0

2004

1

2003

3

2004

10

2003

$22.5

20 in millions

in millions

$34.7

30

Facility support

2004

2003

Today, ISU students are given opportunities to learn in many corners of the world. They have better technology, better scholastic tools and more challenging curricula. But, most of all, they have

2004

10

100

2003

20

in millions

30

150

2004

40

2003

20

in millions

percent

30

80 70 $63.2 60 50 40 $38.9 30 20 10 0

2004

$208.5

50

40

40

Gift production [Excluding in-kind gifts]

250

70 64% 60

53,441 46,986

in millions

50

Gift production [Including in-kind gifts]

Alumni Friends , Corp. s , Found. s

60

2004

GREGORY L. GEOFFROY PRESIDENT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

Sources of gifts [Excluding in-kind gifts]

2003

Number of donors

2004

“Never before have the opportunities for students been as great or as varied as they have been this past year.”

hat better way to say it than It Was A Great Year! It was a year in which donors voted with their checkbooks—saying in part, “We believe in ISU.” Your dollars provided added value to the university and its students and faculty. Your support made a valuable impact and a world of difference for so many. Following are some highlights from the past fiscal year (July 1, 2003June 30, 2004) that help tell the incredible story of philanthropy at Iowa State. To view our complete annual report, please turn to page 13. ▼

2003

2

As I walk down the steps of Beardshear Hall everyday, I see the amazing progress we’ve made in the education of our students. Never before have the opportunities for |students been as great or as varied as they have been this past year. Despite economic uncertainties and budget trimming, our future is looking brighter.

would never have achieved this year without your generosity. As you read these philanthropy highlights and annual report from the ISU Foundation, I ask you to remember the strength and vigor you give to our mission of educational distinction. As you continue to invest in the future of Iowa State, we will continue to reward you with our success. ▼

in thousands

I

outstanding faculty. It is a powerful formula for success. If we could walk across campus together, I would ask you to imagine the infrastructure of philanthropy that bolsters our university and guides us toward greatness. I would take you into the classrooms and lecture halls, through the chemistry labs and libraries. I would introduce you to the scholarship recipients, the chair and professorship holders and show you the world-renowned research and knowledge we

in millions

wish you could be here to see the Iowa State University I see every day. You would be so proud! We have always had a remarkable university, never satisfied with just being good. Because we are always striving for excellence we have achieved greatness in so many ways.

2003

A Formula for Greatness

3


It Was A Great Year, Thanks to You

W

200

10

0

0

Dollars transferred to ISU [Excluding in-kind gifts]

Student support

$47.4

50

15% 11%10%

50 0

$54.7

Faculty support

15

5

25

$13.3

12

20

$4.1

4 $3.4

$9.9

9 6

3 2

15 $13.9 10 5

0

0

0

0

2004

1

2003

3

2004

10

2003

$22.5

20 in millions

in millions

$34.7

30

Facility support

2004

2003

Today, ISU students are given opportunities to learn in many corners of the world. They have better technology, better scholastic tools and more challenging curricula. But, most of all, they have

2004

10

100

2003

20

in millions

30

150

2004

40

2003

20

in millions

percent

30

80 70 $63.2 60 50 40 $38.9 30 20 10 0

2004

$208.5

50

40

40

Gift production [Excluding in-kind gifts]

250

70 64% 60

53,441 46,986

in millions

50

Gift production [Including in-kind gifts]

Alumni Friends , Corp. s , Found. s

60

2004

GREGORY L. GEOFFROY PRESIDENT IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

Sources of gifts [Excluding in-kind gifts]

2003

Number of donors

2004

“Never before have the opportunities for students been as great or as varied as they have been this past year.”

hat better way to say it than It Was A Great Year! It was a year in which donors voted with their checkbooks—saying in part, “We believe in ISU.” Your dollars provided added value to the university and its students and faculty. Your support made a valuable impact and a world of difference for so many. Following are some highlights from the past fiscal year (July 1, 2003June 30, 2004) that help tell the incredible story of philanthropy at Iowa State. To view our complete annual report, please turn to page 13. ▼

2003

2

As I walk down the steps of Beardshear Hall everyday, I see the amazing progress we’ve made in the education of our students. Never before have the opportunities for |students been as great or as varied as they have been this past year. Despite economic uncertainties and budget trimming, our future is looking brighter.

would never have achieved this year without your generosity. As you read these philanthropy highlights and annual report from the ISU Foundation, I ask you to remember the strength and vigor you give to our mission of educational distinction. As you continue to invest in the future of Iowa State, we will continue to reward you with our success. ▼

in thousands

I

outstanding faculty. It is a powerful formula for success. If we could walk across campus together, I would ask you to imagine the infrastructure of philanthropy that bolsters our university and guides us toward greatness. I would take you into the classrooms and lecture halls, through the chemistry labs and libraries. I would introduce you to the scholarship recipients, the chair and professorship holders and show you the world-renowned research and knowledge we

in millions

wish you could be here to see the Iowa State University I see every day. You would be so proud! We have always had a remarkable university, never satisfied with just being good. Because we are always striving for excellence we have achieved greatness in so many ways.

2003

A Formula for Greatness

3


FACULTY SUPPORT

Faculty is Heart and Soul of ISU utstanding scholars make an outstanding university. Faculty is the heart and soul of ISU, and our potential for attracting and retaining the nation’s most outstanding scholars to instruct students has never been stronger. Ongoing financial support for excellence in teaching is critical to our institution. And thanks to donors like you, more than $4 million private dollars were transferred to ISU last year to support our faculty.

O

4

The world is changing at a faster pace, and research and teaching at Iowa State must keep up with that change in order for students to remain on the cutting edge. Funding faculty positions and hiring top-notch teachers to prepare students for today’s evolving world is not only desirable; it’s at the core of educational excellence. This past year’s gifts supporting faculty offered amazing opportunities throughout the university. Many of the gifts bore a direct relationship to advancements in industry, the evolution of agriculture, or worldwide attention to health and the environment.

There are so many ways and reasons to contribute to teaching excellence. For example, a gift to the animal science department has funded an important new faculty position, resulting in a mutually beneficial university-industry tie. When Professor Ken Stalder focuses his extension program on environmental education and refining management practices, his work is sure to benefit students, farmers and the entire pork production industry. Many gifts are given in gratitude for an ISU education that was received years ago. This is the case with Roger Hanson who created a new professorship in aerospace engineering because he wanted to “give something back to the university.” Hanson received three of his five college degrees from Iowa State. For some supporters of Iowa State, estate gifts are an ideal way to leave a legacy. One example of such a gift secured

last year is from David (BUS ’71) and Ellen March (FCS ’71) Raisbeck who created the Raisbeck Professorship in the College of Business. Through a provision in their wills, the professorship will become an endowed chair when their estate is realized. Often, similar interests between donors and faculty merge and create great synergy. It was a common desire to study integrated medicine that spurred the creation of a new faculty fellowship at the Center for Research on Dietary Botanical Supplements at Iowa State. Lura Merrill Lovell (FCS ’51), through the David C. and Lura M. Lovell Foundation, established the Lura M. Lovell Faculty Fellowship, which will ensure continued research and education about botanical supplements. Many people choose gifts to enhance teaching at Iowa State for different reasons, but there

is no doubt that with funding from supporters like you, faculty and student collaboration will continue to set the pace in educational advancement for many years to come. Endowed faculty positions established last year: • Trane Sales Chair in Engineering • Jay Lush Endowed Chair in Animal Breeding and Genetics • Raisbeck Professorship in Business • Leonard Dolezal Professorship in Agriculture Law • Martin C. Jischke Professorship in Aerospace Engineering • Lura M. Lovell Faculty Fellowship ▼

Dr. Carla Fehr, assistant professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies

Professorships Take Faculty in New Directions ifts of professorships allow faculty to move

very directed research,” said Dr. Brown, “leaving

into exciting study areas they might not

little opportunity for faculty to pursue truly novel

otherwise be able to explore. One of those

and high-risk ideas. The Bergles professorship

G

whose work will benefit greatly from

provides me a base of support in

the generosity of Iowa State’s loyal

which to explore new ideas without

donors is Robert C. Brown. An Iowa

fear of failure.” As an example, Brown has teamed

State professor in mechanical engineering, chemical engineering

up with other engineers, microbiolo-

and agricultural and biosystems

gists, and biochemists to produce

engineering, and director of the

biopolymers and hydrogen fuel from a hybrid thermal biological process

Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies, Brown was named

Robert C. Brown

last year as the first recipient of the Bergles

on preliminary studies, the group won a $1 million

Professorship in Thermal Science.

grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture last

“Funding agencies are increasingly demanding

Dr. Dan Zhu, associate professor, Management Information Systems

called syngas fermentation. Based

fall to further pursue their research.

5


FACULTY SUPPORT

Faculty is Heart and Soul of ISU utstanding scholars make an outstanding university. Faculty is the heart and soul of ISU, and our potential for attracting and retaining the nation’s most outstanding scholars to instruct students has never been stronger. Ongoing financial support for excellence in teaching is critical to our institution. And thanks to donors like you, more than $4 million private dollars were transferred to ISU last year to support our faculty.

O

4

The world is changing at a faster pace, and research and teaching at Iowa State must keep up with that change in order for students to remain on the cutting edge. Funding faculty positions and hiring top-notch teachers to prepare students for today’s evolving world is not only desirable; it’s at the core of educational excellence. This past year’s gifts supporting faculty offered amazing opportunities throughout the university. Many of the gifts bore a direct relationship to advancements in industry, the evolution of agriculture, or worldwide attention to health and the environment.

There are so many ways and reasons to contribute to teaching excellence. For example, a gift to the animal science department has funded an important new faculty position, resulting in a mutually beneficial university-industry tie. When Professor Ken Stalder focuses his extension program on environmental education and refining management practices, his work is sure to benefit students, farmers and the entire pork production industry. Many gifts are given in gratitude for an ISU education that was received years ago. This is the case with Roger Hanson who created a new professorship in aerospace engineering because he wanted to “give something back to the university.” Hanson received three of his five college degrees from Iowa State. For some supporters of Iowa State, estate gifts are an ideal way to leave a legacy. One example of such a gift secured

last year is from David (BUS ’71) and Ellen March (FCS ’71) Raisbeck who created the Raisbeck Professorship in the College of Business. Through a provision in their wills, the professorship will become an endowed chair when their estate is realized. Often, similar interests between donors and faculty merge and create great synergy. It was a common desire to study integrated medicine that spurred the creation of a new faculty fellowship at the Center for Research on Dietary Botanical Supplements at Iowa State. Lura Merrill Lovell (FCS ’51), through the David C. and Lura M. Lovell Foundation, established the Lura M. Lovell Faculty Fellowship, which will ensure continued research and education about botanical supplements. Many people choose gifts to enhance teaching at Iowa State for different reasons, but there

is no doubt that with funding from supporters like you, faculty and student collaboration will continue to set the pace in educational advancement for many years to come. Endowed faculty positions established last year: • Trane Sales Chair in Engineering • Jay Lush Endowed Chair in Animal Breeding and Genetics • Raisbeck Professorship in Business • Leonard Dolezal Professorship in Agriculture Law • Martin C. Jischke Professorship in Aerospace Engineering • Lura M. Lovell Faculty Fellowship ▼

Dr. Carla Fehr, assistant professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies

Professorships Take Faculty in New Directions ifts of professorships allow faculty to move

very directed research,” said Dr. Brown, “leaving

into exciting study areas they might not

little opportunity for faculty to pursue truly novel

otherwise be able to explore. One of those

and high-risk ideas. The Bergles professorship

G

whose work will benefit greatly from

provides me a base of support in

the generosity of Iowa State’s loyal

which to explore new ideas without

donors is Robert C. Brown. An Iowa

fear of failure.” As an example, Brown has teamed

State professor in mechanical engineering, chemical engineering

up with other engineers, microbiolo-

and agricultural and biosystems

gists, and biochemists to produce

engineering, and director of the

biopolymers and hydrogen fuel from a hybrid thermal biological process

Center for Sustainable Environmental Technologies, Brown was named

Robert C. Brown

last year as the first recipient of the Bergles

on preliminary studies, the group won a $1 million

Professorship in Thermal Science.

grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture last

“Funding agencies are increasingly demanding

Dr. Dan Zhu, associate professor, Management Information Systems

called syngas fermentation. Based

fall to further pursue their research.

5


STUDENT SUPPORT

Support for Students—Never Better! cholarships, loans, awards—there are so many ways students have benefited throughout the year from your generous gifts. In a year with 14 percent increase in tuition, private support is critical to education at Iowa State. More than $13 million private dollars supported students in their quest for higher learning this past year—amazingly, this represents a 34 percent increase from the previous year.

S

6

Thomas Hill, the university’s vice president of student affairs, lauds these donations as a wonderful way to help students who might not otherwise be willing or able to attend. “This year,” he says, “we were able to offer more scholarships to students in need. That goes right to the heart of our landgrant mission.” By offering more merit-based scholarships, he says, Iowa State is better equipped to attract the best and brightest young minds. Donations, which will enhance Iowa State’s dynamic learning environment, came from many sources this past year. There was a mix of endowment earnings and one-time annual gifts, and as the financial markets improved,

Scholarships Attract the Brightest Minds to Ames

M

elissa Fox is a junior from Vassar, Kan.,

amazing experience—normally a first year

majoring in nutritional science and minor-

student would never get the chance to receive

ing in biochemistry. She’s serving as a

that type of hands-on lab experience. As an out-

George Washington Carver intern for

of-state student, the financial aid

The World Food Prize in Des Moines

package I received was a key

and will receive credit for this in her

contributing factor in my decision—

Honors Program project. Melissa

it made Iowa State more affordable

has received financial support from

than some Kansas schools. The

seven different privately-supported

World Food Prize internship is an

scholarship accounts.

incredible opportunity that will enable me to develop professional

“I only had to visit Iowa State once before I knew it was the right

investment earnings on endowed funds rose as well. With tremendous donor support, 99 new scholarships were created in fiscal 2004. Gifts came in many forms and in many disciplines. Some, like a recent estate bequest from a pioneering female chemistry alumna, were established to fund scholarships for students well into the future. The gift was realized from Dr. Esther C. (Peterson) Daniel (LAS ‘23) last year after her death at age 102.

Other gifts offered global opportunities, which greatly enhance the Iowa State experience. One example is a generous deferred gift, which will assure Iowa State agriculture students and faculty will continue to travel to the Ukraine to study their farming culture for years to come. The gift will benefit Ukrainian students who come to America to learn as well. The Rosenthal Scholarships were established by a caring anonymous donor to motivate and reward non-traditional

Melissa Fox

contacts and gain a better under-

choice for me. The Nutritional Science and Food

standing of the fields I’m entering. I am extremely

Science labs were incredible, and their academic

grateful for the scholarships I have received,

programs are nationally recognized for their

because they allow me to pursue a more

quality. The freshman mentor program was an

constructive academic path.”

Heather White and David Kagima rest between classes.

(23 years and older), full-time female students who are single parents. This opportunity helps break down barriers than could limit academic success. Scholarships are as unique as the donors who create them. They allow donors to chose the opportunities which fulfill their desires to make a difference, while giving students the chance to continue studies in fields and curricula that interest them. It’s a perfect match. ▼

Callie Busch and Velliyur Mahesh take a break in the Memorial Union.

7


STUDENT SUPPORT

Support for Students—Never Better! cholarships, loans, awards—there are so many ways students have benefited throughout the year from your generous gifts. In a year with 14 percent increase in tuition, private support is critical to education at Iowa State. More than $13 million private dollars supported students in their quest for higher learning this past year—amazingly, this represents a 34 percent increase from the previous year.

S

6

Thomas Hill, the university’s vice president of student affairs, lauds these donations as a wonderful way to help students who might not otherwise be willing or able to attend. “This year,” he says, “we were able to offer more scholarships to students in need. That goes right to the heart of our landgrant mission.” By offering more merit-based scholarships, he says, Iowa State is better equipped to attract the best and brightest young minds. Donations, which will enhance Iowa State’s dynamic learning environment, came from many sources this past year. There was a mix of endowment earnings and one-time annual gifts, and as the financial markets improved,

Scholarships Attract the Brightest Minds to Ames

M

elissa Fox is a junior from Vassar, Kan.,

amazing experience—normally a first year

majoring in nutritional science and minor-

student would never get the chance to receive

ing in biochemistry. She’s serving as a

that type of hands-on lab experience. As an out-

George Washington Carver intern for

of-state student, the financial aid

The World Food Prize in Des Moines

package I received was a key

and will receive credit for this in her

contributing factor in my decision—

Honors Program project. Melissa

it made Iowa State more affordable

has received financial support from

than some Kansas schools. The

seven different privately-supported

World Food Prize internship is an

scholarship accounts.

incredible opportunity that will enable me to develop professional

“I only had to visit Iowa State once before I knew it was the right

investment earnings on endowed funds rose as well. With tremendous donor support, 99 new scholarships were created in fiscal 2004. Gifts came in many forms and in many disciplines. Some, like a recent estate bequest from a pioneering female chemistry alumna, were established to fund scholarships for students well into the future. The gift was realized from Dr. Esther C. (Peterson) Daniel (LAS ‘23) last year after her death at age 102.

Other gifts offered global opportunities, which greatly enhance the Iowa State experience. One example is a generous deferred gift, which will assure Iowa State agriculture students and faculty will continue to travel to the Ukraine to study their farming culture for years to come. The gift will benefit Ukrainian students who come to America to learn as well. The Rosenthal Scholarships were established by a caring anonymous donor to motivate and reward non-traditional

Melissa Fox

contacts and gain a better under-

choice for me. The Nutritional Science and Food

standing of the fields I’m entering. I am extremely

Science labs were incredible, and their academic

grateful for the scholarships I have received,

programs are nationally recognized for their

because they allow me to pursue a more

quality. The freshman mentor program was an

constructive academic path.”

Heather White and David Kagima rest between classes.

(23 years and older), full-time female students who are single parents. This opportunity helps break down barriers than could limit academic success. Scholarships are as unique as the donors who create them. They allow donors to chose the opportunities which fulfill their desires to make a difference, while giving students the chance to continue studies in fields and curricula that interest them. It’s a perfect match. ▼

Callie Busch and Velliyur Mahesh take a break in the Memorial Union.

7


FACILITY SUPPORT

Reshaping ISU’s Campus for the Future oughly a century ago, some of Iowa State’s most famous landmarks were beginning to dot the landscape, helping to create what is now one of the most beautiful college campuses in the nation. Morrill Hall (1891), Marston (1903), Beardshear (1906), Curtiss (1909) and MacKay (1911) are shining examples of what ISU leaders envisioned for the long-term future of the university. In addition to being objects of fine architecture, these buildings were erected to serve as important learning and administrative centers, benefiting students and faculty alike.

R

8

Gary and Donna Hoover Hall

Over the next 100 years, as the Iowa State campus continued to grow, private support began playing a key role in the development of many building projects. ISU benefactors were taking pride in helping create modern facilities that were attracting a new generation of students and faculty. And now more than ever, donors are realizing what it means to provide quality environments for teaching and learning. Perhaps this is why Iowa State has just completed one of its most successful years in terms of new facility dedications.

Last year, more than $22 million of private dollars was spent on building projects.

The Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory

Last year, more than $22 million of private dollars was spent on building projects. Five buildings and four laboratories were officially dedicated thanks to the generous support of hundreds of benefactors. These new facilities include: • Reiman Gardens Conservatory and Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing • Gary and Donna Hoover Hall • Extension 4-H Youth Building • The Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory • Gerdin Business Building • P. Craig Livesay Structural Materials Testing Facility

What People are Saying About ISU’s New Facilities “Academically speaking, going

Christina Reiman Butterfly

have as graduate students to

learning center on the campus

Wing are spectacular additions

learn new techniques, develop

of one of the best science and

to what has become the

new scientific ideas and par-

technology schools in the

premier educational, research

ticipate in important research.”

nation is an advantage that

and public garden complex in

is uniquely ours.”

the Midwest.”

Andrea Rheinhart, a business major speaking at the dedication of the Gerdin Business Building, February 20, 2004

Iowa State University President Geoffroy, speaking at the dedication of the Reiman Gardens Conservatory and Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing, August 30, 2003

Ann Perera, laboratory manager and Ph.D. candidate, speaking at the dedication of the W.M. Keck Metabolomics Research Laboratory, June 3, 2004

R

“It is our conviction that the generation of biotechnology enterprises will be incubated

• Gerald and Audrey Olson Soil Mechanics Laboratory

Carver Co-Laboratory.”

Watch for more facility updates in the next issue of Connections, including the dedication of the Steve and Debbie Bergstrom Indoor Training Facility that took place September 3. ▼

“This will fill the hunger that we

to class in a state of the art

• Caterpillar Mechatronics Laboratory

• W.M. Keck Metabolomics Research Laboratory

“The new conservatory and

and hatched in the Roy J.

Stephen H. Howell, Plant Sciences Institute director, speaking at the dedication of the Roy J. Carver CoLaboratory, October 18, 2003

Reiman Gardens Conservatory and Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing

R

“It is our family’s hope that other

R

“We must develop a new paradigm for engineering education and research to better prepare

men and women will be able to

our students to meet the

use the education they receive

challenges that lie ahead. This

in this lab to make the world a

new building is proof of our

safer place.”

commitment, not only to meet

David Livesay, son of the late P. Craig and Mary Livesay, speaking at the dedication of the P. Craig Livesay Structural Materials Testing Facility, April 30, 2004

those challenges, but also to

Extension 4-H Youth Building

transcend them and redefine what it means to be an engineer in the 21st century.” James L. Melsa, College of Engineering dean, speaking at the dedication of Gary and Donna Hoover Hall, October 4, 2003 ▼

Gerdin Business Building

9


FACILITY SUPPORT

Reshaping ISU’s Campus for the Future oughly a century ago, some of Iowa State’s most famous landmarks were beginning to dot the landscape, helping to create what is now one of the most beautiful college campuses in the nation. Morrill Hall (1891), Marston (1903), Beardshear (1906), Curtiss (1909) and MacKay (1911) are shining examples of what ISU leaders envisioned for the long-term future of the university. In addition to being objects of fine architecture, these buildings were erected to serve as important learning and administrative centers, benefiting students and faculty alike.

R

8

Gary and Donna Hoover Hall

Over the next 100 years, as the Iowa State campus continued to grow, private support began playing a key role in the development of many building projects. ISU benefactors were taking pride in helping create modern facilities that were attracting a new generation of students and faculty. And now more than ever, donors are realizing what it means to provide quality environments for teaching and learning. Perhaps this is why Iowa State has just completed one of its most successful years in terms of new facility dedications.

Last year, more than $22 million of private dollars was spent on building projects.

The Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory

Last year, more than $22 million of private dollars was spent on building projects. Five buildings and four laboratories were officially dedicated thanks to the generous support of hundreds of benefactors. These new facilities include: • Reiman Gardens Conservatory and Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing • Gary and Donna Hoover Hall • Extension 4-H Youth Building • The Roy J. Carver Co-Laboratory • Gerdin Business Building • P. Craig Livesay Structural Materials Testing Facility

What People are Saying About ISU’s New Facilities “Academically speaking, going

Christina Reiman Butterfly

have as graduate students to

learning center on the campus

Wing are spectacular additions

learn new techniques, develop

of one of the best science and

to what has become the

new scientific ideas and par-

technology schools in the

premier educational, research

ticipate in important research.”

nation is an advantage that

and public garden complex in

is uniquely ours.”

the Midwest.”

Andrea Rheinhart, a business major speaking at the dedication of the Gerdin Business Building, February 20, 2004

Iowa State University President Geoffroy, speaking at the dedication of the Reiman Gardens Conservatory and Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing, August 30, 2003

Ann Perera, laboratory manager and Ph.D. candidate, speaking at the dedication of the W.M. Keck Metabolomics Research Laboratory, June 3, 2004

R

“It is our conviction that the generation of biotechnology enterprises will be incubated

• Gerald and Audrey Olson Soil Mechanics Laboratory

Carver Co-Laboratory.”

Watch for more facility updates in the next issue of Connections, including the dedication of the Steve and Debbie Bergstrom Indoor Training Facility that took place September 3. ▼

“This will fill the hunger that we

to class in a state of the art

• Caterpillar Mechatronics Laboratory

• W.M. Keck Metabolomics Research Laboratory

“The new conservatory and

and hatched in the Roy J.

Stephen H. Howell, Plant Sciences Institute director, speaking at the dedication of the Roy J. Carver CoLaboratory, October 18, 2003

Reiman Gardens Conservatory and Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing

R

“It is our family’s hope that other

R

“We must develop a new paradigm for engineering education and research to better prepare

men and women will be able to

our students to meet the

use the education they receive

challenges that lie ahead. This

in this lab to make the world a

new building is proof of our

safer place.”

commitment, not only to meet

David Livesay, son of the late P. Craig and Mary Livesay, speaking at the dedication of the P. Craig Livesay Structural Materials Testing Facility, April 30, 2004

those challenges, but also to

Extension 4-H Youth Building

transcend them and redefine what it means to be an engineer in the 21st century.” James L. Melsa, College of Engineering dean, speaking at the dedication of Gary and Donna Hoover Hall, October 4, 2003 ▼

Gerdin Business Building

9


PROGRAM SUPPORT

Campus Programs Enhance ISU rivate support for students, faculty and building projects at Iowa State have seen tremendous growth this past year. These are the obvious things you see and hear about on campus—a new building under construction; students darting from one class to the next preparing for their future; and professors shaping the minds of a new generation of leaders. However, not to be forgotten are the hundreds of programs at ISU that require private support to provide meaningful benefits.

P

10

Many of these programs are funded in part or entirely by private dollars received from the annual giving program. Last year a record $5.6 million was raised through annual giving—and many of these donors designated their money to specific program funds. Some of the larger programs that receive support include the academic colleges and departments, the Greater University Fund for Excellence, ISU Athletics, ISU Extension, Reiman Gardens, University Museums, Honors Program, Morrill Hall, WOI Radio and the University

Library. However, many smaller programs also benefit from annual giving support. Donors established funds to assist in targeted areas including animal science, forestry and equipment, technology in education, women’s studies, band instruments, religious studies,

Benefactors like you help provide and protect the “extras” that have long existed to make the ISU experience special. journalism computers, agriculture research, agronomy club, karate club and the music string program—just to name a few. In fact, donors contributed to 458 funds last year

The University Library receives donor support to help enhance programs.

through the annual giving program. Private program dollars are added value, margin-ofexcellence difference makers in the lives of ISU students and faculty. And because of sliding state support, they are more valuable than ever before. Benefactors like you help provide and protect the “extras” that have long existed to make the ISU experience special. ▼

ISU boosters support a variety of athletic programs.

Program Support Helps Make the ISU Experience Special he Iowa State University Honors Program

make that experience something unique and

promotes an enriched academic environment

special,” said Ricki Shine, administrative director

for students of high ability, regardless of

of the program.

T

Private dollars helped establish a summer

major, who are interested in taking advantage of

research program for freshmen and sophomores

educational and intellectual opportunities and challenges. These include the

who want to continue working on

pursuit of a broad liberal education;

projects they began in the Freshman

the ability to individualize the

Honors Mentor Program. Honors

student’s program of study; access

students also have the opportunity to

to graduate-level courses; and

participate in independent research

the opportunity to be involved in

projects thanks to five to 10 grants

research projects. There are cur-

of up to $600 each that are awarded annually. Other examples of donor-

rently 1,200 student members of the Honors Program and 3,000 alumni.

Ricki Shine

Philanthropy plays a key role in the success of

ship that helps students concentrate on leadership

the Honors Program. Projects such as research

opportunities at Iowa State, thereby reducing their

opportunities and studying abroad are funded

need for outside jobs to cover expenses.

by generous benefactors who want to support

Private support helps fund the purchase of computers at Iowa State.

funded programs include a scholar-

“Iowa State offers an outstanding Honors

students in this academic enriched environment.

Program,” Shine said. “Our donors make that

“Students experience so many wonderful opportu-

program even more appealing to students by pro-

nities in the Honors Program and donors help

viding the extras that really make a difference.” ▼

11


PROGRAM SUPPORT

Campus Programs Enhance ISU rivate support for students, faculty and building projects at Iowa State have seen tremendous growth this past year. These are the obvious things you see and hear about on campus—a new building under construction; students darting from one class to the next preparing for their future; and professors shaping the minds of a new generation of leaders. However, not to be forgotten are the hundreds of programs at ISU that require private support to provide meaningful benefits.

P

10

Many of these programs are funded in part or entirely by private dollars received from the annual giving program. Last year a record $5.6 million was raised through annual giving—and many of these donors designated their money to specific program funds. Some of the larger programs that receive support include the academic colleges and departments, the Greater University Fund for Excellence, ISU Athletics, ISU Extension, Reiman Gardens, University Museums, Honors Program, Morrill Hall, WOI Radio and the University

Library. However, many smaller programs also benefit from annual giving support. Donors established funds to assist in targeted areas including animal science, forestry and equipment, technology in education, women’s studies, band instruments, religious studies,

Benefactors like you help provide and protect the “extras” that have long existed to make the ISU experience special. journalism computers, agriculture research, agronomy club, karate club and the music string program—just to name a few. In fact, donors contributed to 458 funds last year

The University Library receives donor support to help enhance programs.

through the annual giving program. Private program dollars are added value, margin-ofexcellence difference makers in the lives of ISU students and faculty. And because of sliding state support, they are more valuable than ever before. Benefactors like you help provide and protect the “extras” that have long existed to make the ISU experience special. ▼

ISU boosters support a variety of athletic programs.

Program Support Helps Make the ISU Experience Special he Iowa State University Honors Program

make that experience something unique and

promotes an enriched academic environment

special,” said Ricki Shine, administrative director

for students of high ability, regardless of

of the program.

T

Private dollars helped establish a summer

major, who are interested in taking advantage of

research program for freshmen and sophomores

educational and intellectual opportunities and challenges. These include the

who want to continue working on

pursuit of a broad liberal education;

projects they began in the Freshman

the ability to individualize the

Honors Mentor Program. Honors

student’s program of study; access

students also have the opportunity to

to graduate-level courses; and

participate in independent research

the opportunity to be involved in

projects thanks to five to 10 grants

research projects. There are cur-

of up to $600 each that are awarded annually. Other examples of donor-

rently 1,200 student members of the Honors Program and 3,000 alumni.

Ricki Shine

Philanthropy plays a key role in the success of

ship that helps students concentrate on leadership

the Honors Program. Projects such as research

opportunities at Iowa State, thereby reducing their

opportunities and studying abroad are funded

need for outside jobs to cover expenses.

by generous benefactors who want to support

Private support helps fund the purchase of computers at Iowa State.

funded programs include a scholar-

“Iowa State offers an outstanding Honors

students in this academic enriched environment.

Program,” Shine said. “Our donors make that

“Students experience so many wonderful opportu-

program even more appealing to students by pro-

nities in the Honors Program and donors help

viding the extras that really make a difference.” ▼

11


Annual Report

ISU Foundation Board of Directors and Committee Members 2003-2004

JULY 1, 2003 TO JUNE 30, 2004 Dear Friends: his past fiscal year has been a truly successful one in terms of philanthropy and private support for Iowa State University. A personal thank you to all the donors who made gifts—your generosity makes a difference in the lives of many! The impact that is generated from benefactors like you is appreciated by the students, faculty and staff at ISU. There was much to celebrate this year and I’d like to share some of the highlights with you:

T

12

“A personal thank you to all the donors who made gifts—your generosity makes a difference in the lives of many!” • The number of donors who gave last year was 53,441—a 14 percent increase from the previous year and a positive sign that the future of fundraising will be strong. • Total gift production last year set a new record at more than $208 million, which includes outright gifts, new pledges, new deferred commitments and inkind gifts. Without in-kind gifts, production reached $63.2 million compared with $38.9 million the previous year.

• Investment return for the endowment pool was 16.6 percent—a vast improvement from the previous year’s return of 3.4 percent. • Last year, the amount of private gift support transferred to ISU (excluding in-kind gifts) increased 34 percent.

This was indeed a great year and we accomplished a lot. Fiscal year 2005 promises to be an exciting time as we keep advancing the cause of our great university. Raising dollars to support faculty and students will be critical to our mission. I look forward to continuing to help the ISU Foundation maximize private support for Iowa State. Thank you again for your gifts and support this past year. As always, we encourage your suggestions and comments.

KELLEY A. BERGSTROM CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION

Iowa State University Foundation 2003-2004 Board of Directors Front Row: Owen Newlin, Cara Heiden (secretary), Dan Saftig (president), Kelley Bergstrom (chair), Gregory Geoffroy and Marvin Walter Back Row: Steve Schuler, Agatha Burnet, Joanne Kuster, Roger Underwood, Jack Cosgrove (vice chair), Sherry Sunderman, John Lawson (past chair), Diane Greenlee, David Van Wert, Labh Hira, Cheryl Gordon Krongard and Sandra Davis Not pictured: Jerry Kolschowsky (treasurer) and Martha Lagomarcino Gleason

Audit and Professional Relations Committee

Finance Committee

Sherry Sunderman, chair, Lyle Campbell, G.W. Cornwell, Joe Cunning, Mary Dubas, Cara Heiden, Norm Skadburg, Jim Stein, David Van Wert, Thelma Voetberg, Lynn Vorbrich

Steve Schuler, chair, Gregg Behrens, Dwight Conover, Marla Franklin, Bill Goodwin, Cheryl Gordon Krongard, Rudy Herrmann, Labh Hira, John Hsu, Roger Rinderknecht, Robert Stafford, Murray Wise

Awards Committee

Sandy Rogers May, chair, John Axel, Irene Beavers, Maxine Burch, Bill Bywater, Barbara Forker, Dale Grosvenor, Marilyn Kollmorgen, Noel Smith, Jamie Stensland

Investment Committee

Cheryl Gordon Krongard, chair, Steve Bergstrom, Lloyd Bettis, Gary Hoover, Bob Jester, Bob McLaughlin, Warren Madden, John Rogers, Bob Vasko, Steve Watson, Bob Wolter, Dennis Wood

Board Governance Committee

Jack Cosgrove, chair, Bill Binger, Sandra Davis, Denise Essman, Jerry Kolschowsky, Joanne Kuster, Jean Steffenson, Tom Whitson Development Committee

Roger Underwood, chair, Vance Coffman, Beth Cross, Russ Cross, Linda Dasher, Glenn De Stigter, Mike Dubes, Diane Greenlee, Sharon Juon, Andy Lashier, Craig Marrs, Scott Olson, Kay Runge, Jean Steffenson, Donna Whitney

Nominating Committee

John Lawson, chair, Jack Cosgrove, John DeVries, Jim Frevert, Dan Krieger, Gene Lloyd, Beverly Madden, Roger Rinderknecht, Arend Sandbulte, Dave Shoultz, Chelon Stanzel, Gary Thompson, Ellen Walvoord, Don Zuck

13


Annual Report

ISU Foundation Board of Directors and Committee Members 2003-2004

JULY 1, 2003 TO JUNE 30, 2004 Dear Friends: his past fiscal year has been a truly successful one in terms of philanthropy and private support for Iowa State University. A personal thank you to all the donors who made gifts—your generosity makes a difference in the lives of many! The impact that is generated from benefactors like you is appreciated by the students, faculty and staff at ISU. There was much to celebrate this year and I’d like to share some of the highlights with you:

T

12

“A personal thank you to all the donors who made gifts—your generosity makes a difference in the lives of many!” • The number of donors who gave last year was 53,441—a 14 percent increase from the previous year and a positive sign that the future of fundraising will be strong. • Total gift production last year set a new record at more than $208 million, which includes outright gifts, new pledges, new deferred commitments and inkind gifts. Without in-kind gifts, production reached $63.2 million compared with $38.9 million the previous year.

• Investment return for the endowment pool was 16.6 percent—a vast improvement from the previous year’s return of 3.4 percent. • Last year, the amount of private gift support transferred to ISU (excluding in-kind gifts) increased 34 percent.

This was indeed a great year and we accomplished a lot. Fiscal year 2005 promises to be an exciting time as we keep advancing the cause of our great university. Raising dollars to support faculty and students will be critical to our mission. I look forward to continuing to help the ISU Foundation maximize private support for Iowa State. Thank you again for your gifts and support this past year. As always, we encourage your suggestions and comments.

KELLEY A. BERGSTROM CHAIR, BOARD OF DIRECTORS IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION

Iowa State University Foundation 2003-2004 Board of Directors Front Row: Owen Newlin, Cara Heiden (secretary), Dan Saftig (president), Kelley Bergstrom (chair), Gregory Geoffroy and Marvin Walter Back Row: Steve Schuler, Agatha Burnet, Joanne Kuster, Roger Underwood, Jack Cosgrove (vice chair), Sherry Sunderman, John Lawson (past chair), Diane Greenlee, David Van Wert, Labh Hira, Cheryl Gordon Krongard and Sandra Davis Not pictured: Jerry Kolschowsky (treasurer) and Martha Lagomarcino Gleason

Audit and Professional Relations Committee

Finance Committee

Sherry Sunderman, chair, Lyle Campbell, G.W. Cornwell, Joe Cunning, Mary Dubas, Cara Heiden, Norm Skadburg, Jim Stein, David Van Wert, Thelma Voetberg, Lynn Vorbrich

Steve Schuler, chair, Gregg Behrens, Dwight Conover, Marla Franklin, Bill Goodwin, Cheryl Gordon Krongard, Rudy Herrmann, Labh Hira, John Hsu, Roger Rinderknecht, Robert Stafford, Murray Wise

Awards Committee

Sandy Rogers May, chair, John Axel, Irene Beavers, Maxine Burch, Bill Bywater, Barbara Forker, Dale Grosvenor, Marilyn Kollmorgen, Noel Smith, Jamie Stensland

Investment Committee

Cheryl Gordon Krongard, chair, Steve Bergstrom, Lloyd Bettis, Gary Hoover, Bob Jester, Bob McLaughlin, Warren Madden, John Rogers, Bob Vasko, Steve Watson, Bob Wolter, Dennis Wood

Board Governance Committee

Jack Cosgrove, chair, Bill Binger, Sandra Davis, Denise Essman, Jerry Kolschowsky, Joanne Kuster, Jean Steffenson, Tom Whitson Development Committee

Roger Underwood, chair, Vance Coffman, Beth Cross, Russ Cross, Linda Dasher, Glenn De Stigter, Mike Dubes, Diane Greenlee, Sharon Juon, Andy Lashier, Craig Marrs, Scott Olson, Kay Runge, Jean Steffenson, Donna Whitney

Nominating Committee

John Lawson, chair, Jack Cosgrove, John DeVries, Jim Frevert, Dan Krieger, Gene Lloyd, Beverly Madden, Roger Rinderknecht, Arend Sandbulte, Dave Shoultz, Chelon Stanzel, Gary Thompson, Ellen Walvoord, Don Zuck

13


14

The ISU Foundation strives to maximize the interest, involvement and commitment of donors, and to manage donated assets for the benefit of Iowa State University in accordance with the wishes of donors. The ISU Foundation’s financial statements are audited by the international firm of KPMG LLP in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States. The foundation’s full financial statements are available at www.foundation.iastate.edu or by request.

Summary Financial Information

Financial Highlights ALL NUMBERS EXCLUDE IN-KIND GIFTS.

Summary Financial Position as of June 30, 2004 and June 30, 2003 2004 2003 Total assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 439,820,087. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 392,654,154 Total liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 41,943,195. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 39,643,449 Net assets* Unrestricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9,709,970. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 10,600,130 Temporary restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 92,911,942. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 101,420,732 Permanently restricted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 295,254,980. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 240,989,843

Gifts by Donor Designation

Gift Fund Categories Cash for Endowment 5%

Cash for Expenditure 21%

Deferred 38%

Faculty and Staff Support 8% Student Unrestricted 3% Financial Aid 23%

Total net assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 397,876,892. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 353,010,705 *The ISU Foundation’s net assets are categorized as follows: • Unrestricted net assets are not subject to donor-imposed restrictions. • Temporarily restricted net assets have been restricted by the donors for use for a specific purpose or time period. • Permanently restricted net assets are subject to donor-imposed restrictions that will be maintained permanently by the ISU Foundation.

Private Funds Spent Over 5 Years to Benefit Iowa State University

Sources of Gifts

Financial Activities for the Years Ended June 30, 2004 and June 30, 2003

Colleges and Administration Support 39%

Buildings and Maintenance 27%

Pledges 36%

$47.4

50

Foundations 10%

15

Corporations 11%

40 Alumni 64%

2004

2003

Revenues Total contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 57,630,855. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 44,353,064 Total investment return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 42,029,724. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 18,041,184 563,706 Other earnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,796,057. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ Total revenues

.........................................

$33.2 in millions

T

ANNUAL REPORT

30

$27.4 $30.7

10 Other Individuals 15%

0 '00

$ 102,456,636. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 62,957,954

Expenditures University programs*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 48,112,695. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 51,282,969 Operating/fundraising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 6,368,472. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5,877,832 Operating/administrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,729,271. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3,270,845 380,011. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ <277,895> Annuity liability adjustment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $

$34.7

20

ISU Foundation Endowment Allocation

'02

'03

20

Large Cap Equity 25%

Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 57,590,449. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 60,153,751

'01

16.6%

Change in net assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 44,866,187. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $

2,804,203

Bonds 29%

Mid Cap Equity 10%

Beginning net assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 353,010,705. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 350,206,502 Ending net assets

...................................

$ 397,876,892. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 353,010,705

*University program expenditures are amounts provided by the ISU Foundation for expenditure by Iowa State University according to donor direction.

15 8.9%

10 5

Private Equity 6%

Small Cap Equity 10% Global Absolute Return 10% Equity 10%

'04

ISU Foundation Endowment Return

percent

he mission of the Iowa State University Foundation is to secure and steward private gifts and grants that support Iowa State University’s aspiration to become the best university in the nation in fulfilling its landgrant responsibilities.

ANNUAL REPORT

2.6% 0 1 year 5 years 10 years (FY04)


14

The ISU Foundation strives to maximize the interest, involvement and commitment of donors, and to manage donated assets for the benefit of Iowa State University in accordance with the wishes of donors. The ISU Foundation’s financial statements are audited by the international firm of KPMG LLP in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States. The foundation’s full financial statements are available at www.foundation.iastate.edu or by request.

Summary Financial Information

Financial Highlights ALL NUMBERS EXCLUDE IN-KIND GIFTS.

Summary Financial Position as of June 30, 2004 and June 30, 2003 2004 2003 Total assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 439,820,087. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 392,654,154 Total liabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 41,943,195. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 39,643,449 Net assets* Unrestricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 9,709,970. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 10,600,130 Temporary restricted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 92,911,942. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 101,420,732 Permanently restricted. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 295,254,980. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 240,989,843

Gifts by Donor Designation

Gift Fund Categories Cash for Endowment 5%

Cash for Expenditure 21%

Deferred 38%

Faculty and Staff Support 8% Student Unrestricted 3% Financial Aid 23%

Total net assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 397,876,892. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 353,010,705 *The ISU Foundation’s net assets are categorized as follows: • Unrestricted net assets are not subject to donor-imposed restrictions. • Temporarily restricted net assets have been restricted by the donors for use for a specific purpose or time period. • Permanently restricted net assets are subject to donor-imposed restrictions that will be maintained permanently by the ISU Foundation.

Private Funds Spent Over 5 Years to Benefit Iowa State University

Sources of Gifts

Financial Activities for the Years Ended June 30, 2004 and June 30, 2003

Colleges and Administration Support 39%

Buildings and Maintenance 27%

Pledges 36%

$47.4

50

Foundations 10%

15

Corporations 11%

40 Alumni 64%

2004

2003

Revenues Total contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 57,630,855. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 44,353,064 Total investment return . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 42,029,724. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 18,041,184 563,706 Other earnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,796,057. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ Total revenues

.........................................

$33.2 in millions

T

ANNUAL REPORT

30

$27.4 $30.7

10 Other Individuals 15%

0 '00

$ 102,456,636. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 62,957,954

Expenditures University programs*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 48,112,695. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 51,282,969 Operating/fundraising. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 6,368,472. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 5,877,832 Operating/administrative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 2,729,271. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 3,270,845 380,011. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ <277,895> Annuity liability adjustment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $

$34.7

20

ISU Foundation Endowment Allocation

'02

'03

20

Large Cap Equity 25%

Total expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 57,590,449. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 60,153,751

'01

16.6%

Change in net assets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 44,866,187. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $

2,804,203

Bonds 29%

Mid Cap Equity 10%

Beginning net assets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 353,010,705. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 350,206,502 Ending net assets

...................................

$ 397,876,892. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 353,010,705

*University program expenditures are amounts provided by the ISU Foundation for expenditure by Iowa State University according to donor direction.

15 8.9%

10 5

Private Equity 6%

Small Cap Equity 10% Global Absolute Return 10% Equity 10%

'04

ISU Foundation Endowment Return

percent

he mission of the Iowa State University Foundation is to secure and steward private gifts and grants that support Iowa State University’s aspiration to become the best university in the nation in fulfilling its landgrant responsibilities.

ANNUAL REPORT

2.6% 0 1 year 5 years 10 years (FY04)


A New Year—

New Opportunities nother summer has come and gone, students have returned to campus and fall traditions at Iowa State are well underway. A new academic year also means a new set of fundraising goals and priorities for the university. There are a variety of high priority projects that require private dollars. However, at the top of the list is support for our students and faculty.

A

Know your

numbers

$208,496,771

Total dollars raised in FY04, including gifts-in-kind.

53,441 The number of donors who have gave gifts to support ISU in FY04 (an increase of 14% from FY03).

10,236

The number of new donors who supported ISU in FY04.

16

Faculty play a major role at ISU as

the brightest minds to Ames. During

their efforts determine the level of

the past academic year, more than

excellence in all aspects of the univer-

$13 million private dollars supported

sity’s mission. Faculty support comes

students in their quest for higher

in the form of chairs, professorships,

learning. That amount was a significant

fellowships and program enhance-

increase from the previous year, but the

ments. ISU must retain and attract

bar must now be raised even higher.

the most talented faculty to guarantee

passion for the people factor at ISU.

from the very best. The marketplace

Many can recount firsthand their own

for top-notch faculty is extremely

experiences with a great professor or

competitive, but your gifts help ensure

receiving financial help.

in this arena. Thousands of students rely on

99

The number of new scholarships that were created by donors in FY04.

458

Donors have always had a strong

students are learning and engaging

that Iowa State remains competitive

$285,000,000

The total amount of private gifts and endowment earnings made available to ISU in the last 10 years.

The number of funds donors contributed to in FY04 through the annual giving program.

50

The age Cy turns this year.

It’s the role of the Iowa State University Foundation to bring the interests of donors and the priorities

scholarships to achieve their dreams of

of ISU together for meaningful

an ISU degree. Scholarships help Iowa

engagements. Raising funds to sup-

State make higher education affordable

port students and faculty is mission-

for our future leaders, as well as attract

critical for the 2004-05 year. ▼

226,039

Total donor contacts in FY04 (in person, phone, mail and e-mail.)

1

The number of benefactors it takes to make a difference at Iowa State University.


A New Year—

New Opportunities nother summer has come and gone, students have returned to campus and fall traditions at Iowa State are well underway. A new academic year also means a new set of fundraising goals and priorities for the university. There are a variety of high priority projects that require private dollars. However, at the top of the list is support for our students and faculty.

A

Know your

numbers

$208,496,771

Total dollars raised in FY04, including gifts-in-kind.

53,441 The number of donors who have gave gifts to support ISU in FY04 (an increase of 14% from FY03).

10,236

The number of new donors who supported ISU in FY04.

16

Faculty play a major role at ISU as

the brightest minds to Ames. During

their efforts determine the level of

the past academic year, more than

excellence in all aspects of the univer-

$13 million private dollars supported

sity’s mission. Faculty support comes

students in their quest for higher

in the form of chairs, professorships,

learning. That amount was a significant

fellowships and program enhance-

increase from the previous year, but the

ments. ISU must retain and attract

bar must now be raised even higher.

the most talented faculty to guarantee

passion for the people factor at ISU.

from the very best. The marketplace

Many can recount firsthand their own

for top-notch faculty is extremely

experiences with a great professor or

competitive, but your gifts help ensure

receiving financial help.

in this arena. Thousands of students rely on

99

The number of new scholarships that were created by donors in FY04.

458

Donors have always had a strong

students are learning and engaging

that Iowa State remains competitive

$285,000,000

The total amount of private gifts and endowment earnings made available to ISU in the last 10 years.

The number of funds donors contributed to in FY04 through the annual giving program.

50

The age Cy turns this year.

It’s the role of the Iowa State University Foundation to bring the interests of donors and the priorities

scholarships to achieve their dreams of

of ISU together for meaningful

an ISU degree. Scholarships help Iowa

engagements. Raising funds to sup-

State make higher education affordable

port students and faculty is mission-

for our future leaders, as well as attract

critical for the 2004-05 year. ▼

226,039

Total donor contacts in FY04 (in person, phone, mail and e-mail.)

1

The number of benefactors it takes to make a difference at Iowa State University.


Iowa State University Foundation 2505 Elwood Drive Ames, IA 50010-8644

Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Ames, Iowa Permit No. 130

RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

“YOUR GIFTS MAKE IOWA STATE GREAT“ MAHESH, DAVE, PETE, DAVID, CALLIE, KRISTIN, HEATHER AND NATE –

on behalf of 26,000 other ISU students and 1,700 faculty members

Private support remains critical to the future of Iowa State University. No matter the size of the gift, your donation allows today’s ISU students and faculty to become their best, and creates opportunities for future generations of Iowa Staters.

We can’t thank you enough for your generosity during the past year.Your willingness to provide financial support to ISU students, faculty and programs continues to make Iowa State an exciting and dynamic learning environment. Last year, more than 53,000 friends and alumni helped build on ISU’s reputation of excellence through their contributions, and committed more than $60 million to various programs. Your gifts truly do make Iowa State great!

Help make Iowa State great by making your gift today! Call the ISU Foundation at 1-866-419-6768, or visit us at www.foundation.iastate.edu


4175 Connections Fall 04