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Revealing The Unseen In NYC

BACK

ROAD


CONTENTS The High Line opens up its 3rd section to a select few while it’s still under construction

THE END OF THE LINE:

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THE UNFINISHED THIRD SECTION OF THE HIGH LINE

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EDITORS LETTER

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HIDDEN GEMS

Welcoming everyone to the first edition of Backroads and a little bit about what this publication will have to offer!

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TRAVELING BIBLIOPHILE The next time you find yourself wandering down a side street in Manhattan, be sure to drop in one of the many bookstores eagerly awaiting your exploration.

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FLASHBACK

A brief look at when the Highline as it was used in the 1930’s.

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The little jems of Manhattan.

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ART SPOTLIGHT KENKELEBA HOUSE This museum nestled in the East Village, features African-American art that we’ve never seen.

TOP 3 LEAST 18HIGHLINE ART: INSTAGRAMMED SPRING 2014 PLACES High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program

While you’re traveling through tihs bustling city, there might be a few places you’ve overlooked if you’re a savvy Instagrammer!

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TRAVEL TECH

Taking a look at the SONY QX Series Lenses.

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GETTING AROUND How Citi Bike is helping New Yorkers and vistors get around on a budget.

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BACKROAD Editor’s Letter

WELCOME TO BACKROAD! I’m happy to present to you the first issue of Backroads Magazine! This magazine came from the idea of wanting to explore and discover the “not-so-popular” locations of cities around the world. This first issue focuses on my hometown of New York CIty! NYC is visited by millions of tourists each year, but most don’t make it out of the overwhelming and bustling hubs of Midtown. With this in mind, the team here at BACKROAD would like to invite travelers to immerse themselves in all the hidden nooks and crannies of the cities of the world.

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POINT OF INTEREST

The Top 3 Least Instagrammed Places in NYC BY SPENCER SMITH

PHOTO: COURTESY OF @MATERIALJUNKY .

PHOTO: COURTESY OF @RHYSGILYEAT

Fort Tryon Park.The park alone houses greenery and gardens that are very gram-worthy, but the Billings Estate tunnel is a massive enclosure that swallows any photo errors.

Artist Tom Fruin has created a monumental water tower sculpture in colorful salvaged plexiglas and steel. Watertower is mounted high upon a water tower platform becoming part of the DUMBO, Brooklyn skyline.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF @NEWYORKCITY

The overpass on Staples Street has been painted, mimicked, and honored by artists and passerbyers alike. But, despite its timeless presence, it has yet to become an insta-celeb.

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HIDDEN GEMS

Manhattan

Beautifully preserved City Hall station from 1904.

The Old City Hall Station tour is only available to members. City Hall station was the original southern most station of the original IRT line built in 1904. Due to its close proximity to Brooklyn Bridge station, along with the better connections at Brooklyn Bridge, low ridership at City Hall Station, and modifications required for longer trains and movable platform extensions required for new center doors on subway cars, the station was closed in 1945. BY MICHAEL CARGIAN

The oldest standing structure in Central Park.

You could walk around the main road for decades and never even notice the oldest building in Central Park hidden on a cliff on the north end. But venture off the main road near Warrior’s Gate at Powell Boulevard (7th Avenue) and climb up a steep, dirt path, and you’ll find The Blockhouse, which dates back to 1814. It might not be much to look at — it really does look like a huge block — but it’s a reminder of New York’s past. It’s one of the last remaining fortifications that was used to protect the city from the British army during the War of 1812. BY CRAIG NELSON

Over thirty years ago, this vacant land became a local garden. In 1999, the city attempted to repurchase the land and replace this lovely garden with condos, but the neighborhood came together and with help from Green Thumb (the largest community gardening program in the nation), Garden 48 is now maintained exclusively by neighbors. The current theme of the stunning murals on the wall is “women who made a difference in America.”

FROM: MANHATTANSIDEWAYS.COM

Not only a garden, but a place to help enrich women and girls. MAY 2014

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POINT OF INTEREST

Traveling Bibliophile BY MICHAEL CARGIAN

THREE LIVES & COMPANY BOOKSELLERS, located in the West Village of Manhattan, sits perched on its corner of West 10th Street like a dependable dear friend who’s always on time, smiling, and happy to meet you. In many ways, the friend remains the same after all these years. The ubiquitous red brick in the Village frames the corner windows, which are stuffed with handsome titles that face the street. For many regulars, it’s hard not to put a full-cover price dent in their wallet every time they pass by. How is it that when other bookshops in the neighborhood are shutting their doors or moving to spots with more favorable leases, Three Lives keeps standing firm? While many businesses are rushing to change with the times, Three Lives’ success rests in staying very much the same as it did when it first opened its doors in 1968.

before walking away to take over the store. “You know, I’d never considered book selling as a career. In marketing you’re so focused on getting books to booksellers, not to readers, and I was certain I didn’t want to go any further with that.” Cox bought the store nine years ago from the original founders when they decided to retire. He was a long-time FOS (friend of the store) and when they came ready to pack it in, they thought of him. He had had a stint selling books in Providence, Rhode Island at the Brown University Bookstore before moving to New York, and after his droll and unsatisfying turn in marketing, he took the leap. “When I first took over the store… I had a table out with my favorites so people could see that I did — now it’s full of staff favorites.”

“See this little sign here? You’ll never see anything bigger than that here.” Toby Cox, the owner of the shop for the last nine years, points to a small standing poster about 2½ by 2 feet tall, celebrating the 75th anniversary of Penguin Books, sitting atop a table full of Penguin Classics. Ironically, Cox worked for three years in the marketing department of Broadway Books

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“When I first took over the store… I had a table out with my favorites so people could see that I did — now it’s full of staff favorites.”

When you ask Cox if there is anything new going on to speak of — say, new initiatives, business plans, collaborations with publishers — he sort of wrinkles up his nose and offers up a decided: “No. I guess the new thing that I’m trying to do is to do nothing new at all. When I first moved here 12 years ago, I used to come into this store about once a month. I loved it, and made friends with the owners. They used to tease me because I’d always come in and start straightening out the books on the tables… ‘Once a bookseller, always a bookseller,’ they’d tease.” Cox excuses himself to pick up the phone. In the store today are just himself and his staffer Amanda, a 6-year veteran and relative newbie among his four person staff, the longest clocking in at over 13 years. She’d been helping a lingering and indecisive customer about what to pick up for her summer reading. “Is this like The Secret History?” she asked, holding up Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. “Well, it’s really quite different,” said Amanda, diplomatically, “but maybe you might like this.” She ducks behind the counter and emerges with a couple of other choices. They talk back and forth.

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Visually, the shop’s exposed brick interior is heaven for any book jacket junkie. The walls are packed with floor-to-ceiling shelves, and floor space is dominated by browser-friendly display tables. In the front of the store, books are generally arranged face-out, offering up a cacophony of color and subject matter. “Generally, when books face out, it’s just a pleasurable way to browse,” offers Amanda. Toward the rear of the store is a wall of travel guides and a massive wall of fiction. Small sections hone in on books about New York; another houses literature by Americans in Paris. Another gentleman comes in looking for a journal; they have it, he’s happy and on his way. “More and more booksellers are moving away from the notion of community,” Cox considers. “It’s more and more fractured. I want to be a place of retreat… The store exists for the reader, not for the publisher or the marketer.” BR

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ART SPOTLIGHT

Kenkeleba House FEATURED IN MANHATTANSIDEWAYS.COM

When Joe Overstreet invited us in for a private viewing of his gallery, we had no idea that we would spend the next two hours looking through some of the most impressive African-American art we have ever seen. We had walked on 2nd Street many times, but it wasn’t until this particular day that our curiosity got the best of us, and we decided to enter this unmarked building and find out what was behind the doors. We did not realize, as we began our personal tour of the incredible collection that Overstreet and his wife Corinne Jennings have amassed over the last four decades, that this would become one of the highlights not only of our walk across 2nd Street, but perhaps one of the most memorable experiences we have had on any street. Had we not been personally escorted through the unmarked double doors that lead to Kenkeleba Gallery, we might not ever have known it was here. The only sign on the building reads Henington Hall, etched into the stone facade along with the year it was built, 1908. According to Overstreet, in the 70’s the building was condemned until he and his wife were able to strike a deal with the city in 1978. Although 2nd Street was teeming with drug activity back then, the arrangement proved worthwhile for Overstreet, as it gave him, his wife, three children and the emerging Kenkeleba House a home in an area that eventually cleaned up its act and became one of the most important neighborhoods for the arts in New York City. The exhibits on display in this gallery recognize the rarely explored contributions that people of African descent have made to the art world. It is here, hanging on the walls and filed away in the deepest recesses of his private collection, that Overstreet showed us a portrait of Dr. John DeGrasse painted by a largely forgotten African-American artist by the name of Edward Mitchell Banister (1828-1901). Banister won a national award for his most famous painting, “Under the Oaks.” The magnificent framed picture of Dr. DeGrasse is easily worth more money than we could count, but the history lesson we received from Overstreet was priceless. Dr. DeGrasse was a native New Yorker and also one of the first African-Americans to receive a medical degree. He gained acceptance to the Boston Medical Society in 1854, making him the first African-American to belong to a medical association in that state.

Selected work from the gallery. MAY 2014

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And to boot, he was also the first African-American medical officer in the U.S. Army serving as Assistant Surgeon in the Civil War. Finding out these little-known facts alone made the time we spent at Kenkeleba Gallery worth every second. But there was so much more to learn and Overstreet was happy to teach us. He showed us works dating back to 1773 that included a few by an African-American artist who studied with Picasso and some by the late Hale Woodruff, an African-American abstract painter who lived in New York City from 1943 until his death in 1980. In addition to being an artist who aspired to express his heritage, Woodruff was also an art educator and member of the faculty at NYU. 9


“We are African-American, so that is what we do,” said Jennings when we sat down for a chat with her before being ushered off again by Overstreet to view the studio where he creates his own works of art, “but we are also interested in artists from the Lower East Side.” Jennings was born into a family of artists, so it is no surprise that today she is a prominent art dealer. Her father, a talented printmaker, who studied under Hale Woodruff, is widely known for his black and white wood engravings, although he later settled into a career making costume jewelry. The Wilmer Jennings Gallery across the street is named for him. Jennings’ mother was a Yale graduate and painter. Jennings’ personal art collection reflects much of her parent’s amazing work, as well as that of other African-American artists, both well-known and yet undiscovered. Together, Overstreet and Jennings aim to teach the younger generations about African-American history. “Every nationality walks by here on a daily basis, but they have no idea who we are as a people,” Overstreet explained.

Had we not been personally escorted through the unmarked double doors that lead to Kenkeleba Gallery, we might not ever have known it was here.

He went on to talk about the contribution African-Americans have made to the arts that began right here in this community. Their private collection is made up of over 30,000 paintings, artifacts, art books and jazz records that tell the rich history of African-Americans in this country. And their stockpile is so vast that the works spill over into Kenkeleba’s large sculpture garden that can be entered from both 2nd and 3rd Streets. Since it’s founding in 1974, Kenkeleba House has flown under the radar as a not-for-profit gallery space and artist center. Not only is it an art gallery, but it is also an artist workspace. Twenty-five artists currently rent space here. Overstreet and Jennings say that they are only interested in promoting new ideas, emerging artists, experimental work and solo shows for those deserving of the recognition. They prefer to showcase artists whose works are not typically featured in commercial galleries. Needless to say, Overstreet and Jennings gave us plenty to mull over when we returned to our side walking across 2nd Street. We were honored by this extensive tour and their thoughtful conversation with us. The rich cultural heritage, massive collection spanning hundreds of years, and the discreet, impassioned owners, made our experience at Kenkeleba House unforgettable. BR

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A Walk To The End Of The Line The (Almost) Untouched Third Section Of The High Line BY LAURA TEPPER

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Sunbathers vie for seats on the custom rolling lounge chairs of Section 1

The northernmost and last unfinished section of New York’s acclaimed High Line park won’t open to the public in earnest for at least another year, but this summer small groups of lucky ticketholders have the opportunity to experience the 300-yard stretch of urban wilderness in the raw. High Line park rangers are leading visitors on a series of sold-out walks along the yet-undeveloped site known as the “High Line at the Rail Yards,” or simply as “Section 3.” The tours occur under the premise of previewing “Caterpillar” a site-specific sculpture installation created by Brooklyn-based artist Carol Bove. However, the landscape itself steals the show. The High Line, of course, is a wildly successfully public park built atop a 1.2 mile-long decommissioned elevated freight rail structure that runs along Manhattan’s west side. Sections 1 and 2 of the park weave through the Meatpacking District and Chelsea between Gansevoort and 30th streets and attract so many visitors, both locals and tourists, that it can be hard to move through the more narrow sections of the park.

Many people flock to the High Line in almost any season.

Section 3 begins at 30th Street where the completed sections of the park end. From here, the main tracks wind around the Western Rail Yard along the Hudson River and end at 34th Street across from the Jacob Javits Conference Center. A short spur (known as the Eastern Rail Yards of Section 3 or just “The Spur”) extends east along 30th as well. Context Map of Section 3

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The terminus of the High Line at the West Side Rail Yards, part of the third and final section of the elevated rail line to be added to New York’s favorite, not-quite-new-anymore public park and the site of new art installation.

The tracks slope up from grade at 34th Street.

Section 3 in Context of Hudson Yards Master Open Space Plan

The feral landscape of Section 3 offers insight into the High Line’s past in between being decommissioned in 1980 and redeveloped as a public park a quarter century later. In stark contrast to the suspended bleachers, milled granite pavers, and rolling chaise lounges of the completed sections of the park, Section 3 is a self-seeded landscape of scrap and debris. Roughly 1’-2’ of rock ballast cover the structure and it is in this medium—amidst the railroad ties, steel rails, and reinforced concrete—that an ecology of crab apple trees, black cherry, bayberry, wildflowers and grasses emerged.

THE JOURNEY To get the sneak peak of Section 3, you pass through a locked-gate on 34th Street and duck under a thicket onto the tracks, which begin at grade and gently peel up to cross the Rail Yards. The tracks bend to run parallel to (and offer impressive views of) the Hudson River and wind around the Rail Yards, soon to be part of “Hudson Yards,” a planned 24-acre “new neighborhood” with a hefty 12 million square feet build-out underway. Sections 2 and 3 meet at a T junction above 30th Street where the Spur extends east over 10th Avenue towards Midtown. intended to “punctuate the wild landscape” and “reveal themselves among the unruly vegetation, like mysteriously pristine ruins of a lost civilization or a contemporary version of a Zen garden.”

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THE EXHIBITION Currently (and through May 2014), Section 3 is home to a collection of seven site-specific sculptures created by Carol Bove at the invitation of High Line Art, which manages the park’s robust public art program. The sculptures— constructed out of industrial materials like steel I-beams and rough concrete—are, according to the exhibition literature, intended to “punctuate the wild landscape” and “reveal themselves among the unruly vegetation, like mysteriously pristine ruins of a lost civilization or a contemporary version of a Zen garden.” The work is embedded in, straddling, and cast aside the rails, alongside the other beautiful textures and objects found on the site. This serves Bove’s intention of putting the detritus of the High Line on display as “Readymades,” the term Dadaist Marcel Duchamp used when placing everyday object (like a urinal) in a museum. The installation—composed of careful insertions that offer perspective on, but do not disrupt the landscape— speaks to the immediate future of Section 3 at the Western Rail Yard. Though “designed” by the same team (James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro), when it opens to the public next year it will continue to have an entirely different feel from the rest of the High Line, with most of it remaining au natural.

Bove refers to her oversized, thrice powder-coated steel curlicues “Celeste” (left) and “Prudence” (right) as glyphs.

Carol Bove The artist Carol Bove has installed her works in the the final undeveloped section of the High Line.

“Visible Things and Colors”, constructed of concrete and brass, approximates the size and shape of the rail line’s switch boxes and is easily overlooked.

Tetris-like arrangements of steel I-beams make up Bove’s sculpture “14”.

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View of the Spur, looking east from Section 2 of the High Line at 30th Street.

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WHATS NEXT? Over the course of the next year, one set of tracks will be filled with resin-bonded aggregate to create a narrow path (termed the ‘Interim Pathway’) along which, in an ideal world (or rendering), one might meander pondering the remnants of things past. This path and a safety railing will be the only developed In elements.

light of this change and densification it seems like a poetic and uniquely New York gesture to let the High Line touch down with an air of wildness.

This interim design strategy facilitates the speedy timeline for opening, impressive considering that the City of New York only closed the purchase of Section 3 last summer. It is yet unclear how long that “interim” might last and what will succeed it.

One of the design concepts for the Spur features amphitheater-style seating, creating a unique opportunity for performances or casual gatherings.

The long-term prospects of the High Line at the Eastern Rail Yard, on the other hand, are somewhat clearer and do not involve any urban wilderness. The Spur will be built out separately from its Western counterpart in concert with a new hotel condo complex at the South Tower of Hudson Yards. Demolition is already underway with the rail ties, soil, ballast and tracks having been cleared to prepare the concrete deck for the construction. The vision for this piece of Section 3 is more in line with the existing park, which has inspired, evolved with, and is embedded in surrounding developments. Construction is proceeding rapidly everywhere around the High Line, not just at Hudson Yards, but throughout much of the former meatpacking district and Chelsea. The transformation of the urban environment is its own spectacle beyond the park itself. Jordan Benke of High Line Art observed that the park has become a place to watch construction, an observation deck. People sit in amidst the pounding of jackhammers and watch the city evolve. In light of this change and densification it seems like a poetic and uniquely New York gesture to let the High Line touch down with an air of wildness. It’s worth questioning whether the experience of the Interim Pathway will remain as intended once the masses overflowing the Sections 1 and 2 make it that far, but we’ll leave such questions to the fire marshal and relish this taste of post-industrial nectar while it’s still sweet. BR View looking northeast along West 30th Street. MAY 2014

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High Line Art’s Spring Season 2014 BY Ashley Tickle

High Line Art will premiere several new projects this spring as part of its ever-changing public art program, including the outdoor group exhibition Archeo, a new billboard by Faith Ringgold, and a large-scale mural by legendary artist Ed Ruscha.

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Archeo opens April 17 and will be on view through March 2015. Centered on technology and obsolescence, Archeo brings together the work of seven artists who use out-of-date technologies and machinery as a reflection on humanity’s continuous fascination and frustration with technology. Presenting sculptures and installations that range from rusty railways to high-tech refrigerators, the group exhibition treats the High Line as an archaeological dig where the artifacts of a post-industrial society can be unearthed.

Marianne Vitale (b. 1973, United States) creates installations inspired by vernacular architecture and American folklore. On the High Line, Vitale presents Common Crossings, a series of dramatic sculptures realized with decommissioned steel railroad track components that were once used to switch the directions of trains by allowing tracks to cross each other. Positioned vertically on the High Line– itself a re-purposed railway– the single-cast junctions, known in the industry as ‘frogs’, evoke the history of the park as well as that of westward expansion and industrialization in America.

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Jessica Jackson Hutchins (b. 1971, United States) is known for ceramic sculptures that are often displayed in precarious environments and are charged with personal memories and collective associations. For the High Line, Jackson Hutchins presents two new sculptures: Him and Me, a ceramic piece balanced gently in a hand-woven hammock stretched among trees and Fountain, a ceramic piece installed on an old cushion.

Isabelle Cornaro’s (b. 1974, France) initial training as an art historian specializing in sixteenthand seventeenth-century Western art influences her unique visual language. For the High Line, Cornaro presents God Box (column), a suite of three columns extending from her series God Box (2013). These monoliths contain assemblages of countless objects that are unified through their casting. Though they incorporate modern objects, Cornaro’s cast monolithic blocks resemble sixteenth-century wunderkammer or artifacts from ancient cultures preserved in a time capsule.

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Antoine Catala (b. 1975, France) is known for sculptures that integrate cutting-edge technology, including holograms and pneumatic images in response to technology’s control of our interpretation of images. Spanning from highly sophisticated systems to a simple, DIY vocabulary, Catala’s language is embedded with jarring, humorous surrealism. For Archeo, the artist presents Logo to Me and the Others Breathing, a kinetic sculpture that intermittently expands and contracts to mimic the breathing rhythm of a part organic, part artificial creature. Gavin Kenyon (b. 1980, United States) produces abstract sculptures that assume a biomorphic quality. Drawing his inspiration from the woodlands of upstate New York, Kenyon creates his bulbous sculptural forms through the chance-laden process of filling fur-lined bags with plaster and then constraining them with rope. For Archeo, Kenyon presents Realism Marching Triumphantly Into the City, a sculpture resembling a crumbled equestrian monument from a distant past.

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Faith Ringgold’s Groovin’ High is a colorful and paradigmatic story quilt. Depicting a crowded dance hall bordered by quilted handdyed fabrics, Groovin High is evocative of Ringgold’s memories of Sunday afternoon dances at the Savoy and her connection to the African American communities of her native Harlem. Her style reflects formal treatments of shape, color, and perspective reminiscent of many painters whose styles defined the Harlem Renaissance, an immensely productive and creative cultural movement of the 1920s that erupted out of the African American community living in the eponymous New York neighborhood. The High Line is honored to host the talented and legendary Ed Rusha’s new billboard installation Honey, I Twisted Through MOre Damn Traffic Today. Camouflaged in the architecture surrounding the High Line, Ruscha’s giant street sign reads like a speech bubble emanating directly from the streets of New York – a collective thought balloon hovering on the High Line like a silent soundtrack for a new symphony of the city. Ruscha’s mural combines his interests in architecture, language, and public space to create a dry and humorous commentary on life in the contemporary metropolis. BR

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The Highline’s Heyday

West Side Cowboys rode in front of trains before the High Line was built.

FLASHBACK

The High Line was built in the 1930s, as part of a massive publicprivate infrastructure project called the West Side Improvement. It lifted freight traffic 30 feet in the air, removing dangerous trains from the streets of Manhattan's largest industrial district. No trains have run on the High Line since 1980. Friends of the High Line, a community-based non-profit group, formed in 1999 when the historic structure was under threat of demolition. Friends of the High Line works in partnership with the City of New York to preserve and maintain the structure as an elevated public park.

1934

Peter Obletz, a Chelsea resident, activist, and railroad enthusiast, challenges demolition .

So many accidents occur between freight trains and street-level traffic that 10th Avenue becomes known as Death Avenue. For safety, men on horses, called the West Side Cowboys, ride in front of trains waving red flags.

Mid-1980’s

A group of property owners lobbies for demolition of the entire structure. Members of this group own land under the High Line that was purchased at prices reflecting the High Line’s easement. Peter Obletz, a Chelsea resident, activist, and railroad enthusiast, challenges demolition efforts in court and tries to re-establish rail service on the Line.

2004

Mayor Bloomberg announces City funding for the High Line.

Friends of the High Line and the City of New York conduct a process to select a design team for the High Line. The selected team is James Corner Field Operations, a landscape architecture firm, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, an architecture firm, and experts in horticulture, engineering, security, maintenance, public art, and other disciplines

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TRAVEL TECH

The Sony QX10 & QX100

The QX10 and QX100 Smart Lenses are rewriting the books. They’re the first ever ‘lens cameras’ that have their very own camera bits inside. You control them with your phone, and the images upload directly to your camera roll as you shoot. How? Your phone acts as a live viewfinder, it sees what the lens sees. The QX lenses use NFC (if your phone is into that sort of thing) or create their very own Wi-Fi signal. You don’t need to be near an internet connection) to connect to your Android, iPhone or tablet wirelessly. You can attach the QX lens to your phone, or shoot ‘off camera.’ Snap the shutter from across the room holding just your phone. You can control white balance, exposure settings, zoom and more using the Sony app. The QX100 has a 1-inch, 20.2 megapixel sensor (that’s 4x as big as your iPhone!) and up to f/1.8 aperture for great low-light photos and shallow depth of field. It also has a manual zoom for ultimate control over your shooting depth. The compact QX10 offers a 10x optical auto-zoom with none of the pixel damage that a phone cam’s digital zoom leaves behind. BR

SONY QX Series In Action The Smart Lens connects to your phone or tablet via its own wifi signal. It's totally wireless, so your lens is free to roam. The lenses charge via USB for hours of shooting time.

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CITI BIKE

GETTING AROUND HOW IT WORKS The Citi BikeSM system, operated by NYC Bike Share features thousands of bikes at hundreds of stations around New York. Citi Bikes are available 24/7, 365 days a year. Station locations are based on population and transit needs, and were selected through a participatory public input process. Each station has a touchscreen kiosk, a map of the service area and surrounding neighborhood, and a docking system that releases bikes for rental with a card or key. You must be 16 or older to ride a Citi Bike.

1. UNLOCK

Purchase a 24-Hour or a 7-Day Access Pass. A $101 security hold will be placed on your card for every pass you purchase. Frequent rider? Join Citi Bike by signing up for an Annual Membership! 24-Hour and 7-Day Pass holders are provided with a ride code. Type the code into the keypad on a dock with an available bike. Annual Members simply dip their own unique key into the key slot at any dock with an available bike. Citi Bike seats are adjustable to fit a wide range of rider heights. Throw your bags into the front basket, strap it down, and you’re ready to go!

2. RIDE

24-Hour and 7-Day Access Pass holders may ride for 30 minutes without incurring any overtime fees. Annual Members have 45 minutes to ride before incurring overtime fees. (For more information, please visit our Pricing page .) Ride as many times as you want during your Access Pass or Annual Membership period. Keep pedaling! 24-Hour and 7-Day Access Pass holders must request a new ride code to unlock another bike. Just swipe your card at the kiosk and a new code will be generated for you automatically. Annual Members just dip their key to ride again! MAY 2014

3. RETURN

Find locations using a station map or download the Citi Bike App.

Citi Bike is the perfect choice for New Yorkers and visitors alike to get around the city in a convenient and affordable way!

Firmly push the bike into the dock and wait to see a green light blink on the dock to confirm it’s been properly locked. Select “Request Time Credit” on the start screen of the kiosk. You will have 15 minutes added to your time at no charge to find a nearby station with available docks. BR

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BACKROADS  

An inside look at the hidden treasures of cities around the world. This first issue features NYC.

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