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MICHAEL RAHMATOULIN

2017 PORTFOLIO


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MICHAEL RAHMATOULIN ABOUT I am interested in the intersection of tradition and innovation in architecture, both in the generation of ideas and the interaction between the new and the old. Having travelled around Europe and lived in Cyprus, Russia and the United States, I have learned to appreciate the richness of different cultures and cities. I am inspired by projects that engage the community through history, art and playfulness. I hold a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Texas at Austin and currently work as a Designer for Page Southerland Page. My work ranges from art installations and theoretical projects to urban design, housing and masterplanning.

CONTACT +1 512 997 8546 | Austin, TX mrahmatoulin@utexas.edu â“Ś mr.persona.co

BIO


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ACADEMIC

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PROFESSIONAL

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04 OTHER

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09 CONTENTS


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01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC


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TRANSCENDENCE Competition Tokyo, Japan

Independent Proposal Award:

Honorable Mention + Publication Team: Matthew Dubin, Ace Ren Software

Rhino, Grasshopper 3DS Max, VRAY Photoshop, Illustrator Indesign

“How nice it would be to die swimming towards the sun” -Le Corbusier

With a population of over 14 million people, Tokyo has rapidly transformed it’s urban environment to be one of the densest cities in the world. However, unlike most cities it has an aging population (with 25% over the age of 65), so much so that the city is running out of room for traditional cemeteries. With limited land, residential areas are now experiencing the puzzling phenomenon of “pocket cemeteries”, a silent, yet undesirable neighbor that serves as a constant reminder of death. Using a small plaza in the Shinjuku district of Tokyo, the competition asked entrants to create a modern solution for an urban cemetery, focusing heavily on the relationship between death, tradition, technology and the bustling culture of Tokyo. The only requirement was to utilize urns as the burial method, a process that is widely accepted in Japanese tradition and can afford the creation of a “vertical cemetery”. FALL 2016


The project memorializes – and even celebrates – the deceased through the introduction and manipulation of light and nature beneath the city streets. Each of the three reflection zones in the project are designed to provide a distinctly different (yet beautiful) user experience and interaction with nature. Collectively, the reflection zones all serve to temporarily severe the connection between the user and the city(at least for the duration of their visit) and offer a respite from reality. Both sound and sight are manipulated to focus a user’s attention on self reflection and meditation. Unlike a traditional cemetery, which may serve as a reminder of human mortality, Transcendence playfully interacts with the surrounding city scape.

“The zones serve to temporarily severe the connection between the user and the city, offering a respite from reality.” FORM DERIVATION As a team, we wanted to create something poetic to create dialogue between the program and the city. In Buddhist tradition, a mountain is a symbol of Buddha that represents strength, peace and honour. If one looks beyond the city skyline, Mt. Fuji looms in the far distance and is part of a group of volcanoes that are known as the “holy mountains”. Inspired by this natural form, Transcendence takes on the image of these three mountains, creating a sculptural metaphor in the heart of the city that does not immediately stand out as a symbol of death. MATERIALS & COLUMBARIUM Transcendence uses a relatively simple material pallet to contrast the steel and neon lights of Tokyo’s Shinjuku ward. A perforated copper shell, specifically chosen for its propensity to develop a patina, encapsulates the concrete wells and provides shelter for the visitors descending into the columbarium. Below grade, architectural concrete covers the floors, walls, and ceiling of each basin - accentuating the simplicity and beauty of natural light.

01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC

Pocket cemetery | Shinjuku, Japan

Transcendence is a subterranean columbarium rooted in the heart of downtown Tokyo. The primary concept driving the design is the desire to temper the morbid perception of death.

Mountain Fuji in the distance | Tokyo, Japan

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7 PROCESS SKETCHES

The columbarium utilizes a mechanized storage system that transports the individual urns to and from their storage block in the well. A network of horizontal and vertical tracks are embedded in the cast-in-place concrete and allow for visitors to locate and either retrieve or store their loved ones’ ashes. VIEWS & CIRCULATION Downtown Tokyo is not suited well for a program that emphasizes, celebrates, and manipulates the natural environment. Due to the city’s overbearing skyline, each of the three wells within the project is individually designed to capture as much natural light as possible while simultaneously retaining a clear view of the sky. The varying levels of distortion to the

wells is a result of their relative depth and the varying height of adjacent buildings. Additionally, each well is designed to offer visitors a noticeably different user experience. Transcendence consists of three subterranean reflection zones – each emulating and consisting of an element of the Zen garden: sand (which represents water), rocks (mountains), and moss (islands). In order to achieve the necessary height for the efficient and proper storage of urns, each well had to be partially submerged beneath the plaza. Visitors enter the space via a single spiral ramp that spills out into the largest basin and have the option to experience the different reflection zones at their own leisure.

FALL 2016


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SITE

01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC


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FALL 2016


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01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC


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FALL 2016


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01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC


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FALL 2016


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01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC


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FALL 2016


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01 TRANSCENDENCE ACADEMIC


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FALL 2016


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02 NEXUSAUS ACADEMIC


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NEXUSHAUS

Sustainable Micro House US Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2015 Irvine, California Award:

4th Place Overall + Publication Professors

Petra Lield, Adam Pyrek, Michael Garrison Team

Collaboration between The University of Texas at Austin + Technische Universität München Software

Revit Rhino 3D Maxwell Render Photoshop Illustrator

“I fell in to a burning ring of fire I went down, down, down And the flames went higher And it burns, burns, burns The ring of fire” -Johnny Cash Team fight song

The Solar Decathlon is a triennial competition that takes place in the United States with the aim of challenging universities and their students to design the most efficient and sustainable residential home. The competition takes place over a period of two years and requires student teams to design and build a fully functioning house. Built and exhibited in Irvine, California for the 2015 US Solar Decathlon, the NexusHaus addresses environmental issues and efforts in sustainability through four core concepts: energy, water, food and density. Through a collaboration between the University of Texas at Austin and the Technische Universitat Munchen, the project also took on an international role as it fostered learning and innovation in construction methods and technology. The house was preassembled in Austin, TX and hauled to California for final assembly under competition conditions, with the final assessment covering 10 different categories that included: energy balance, architectural innovation, engineering innovation, affordability, marketability and efficiency. The team took 4th place overall and brought home 1st prize in energy balance, 2nd place prize in affordability and 3rd place prize for engineering. SUMMER 2014-2015


“The house serves as a prototype for increased density in Austin” Environmental and economic affordability are the goals of the NexusHaus concept. The house harnesses resources (solar energy, rainwater, and auxiliary water) that would otherwise be wasted and be a burden on municipal infrastructure. Because lower-income families are more vulnerable to water and energy cost fluctuations, the ExW-Unit will increase occupants’ independence while contributing to their long-term economic, environmental, and social stability. ENERGY Air conditioning is an unavoidable fact of life in Texas and serves as the single largest load on the electricity grid during peak summer afternoon hours. To alleviate afternoon electricity grid congestion – and avoid higher-priced power – NexusHaus incorporates an Integrated Thermal Energy and Rainwater Storage (ITHERST) system to shift air conditioning load off-peak to the early morning hours. Furthermore, the NexusHaus PV array is optimized for maximum production during hours of peak demand, decreasing the overall load which is currently outpacing the generating capacity in Central Texas.

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Concept Rendering | Dogtrot Breezeway

DENSITY Nexushaus incorporates a unique energy-water nexus (ExW), a system that essentially utilizes solar energy and captured water to support the house. Serving as an accessory dwelling unit, (commonly known as an inlaw) the house can be placed in the backyard of a residential lot in Austin to operate as a unit of resource production. The house serves as a prototype for increased density in Austin as part of the Alley Flat Initiative, the goal of which is to enable lower income families to have more affordable living options that are in the neighborhoods close to the city. By maximizing the usability of lots there is a more natural density growth without the typical gentrification that occurs with planned neighborhoods.

Alley Flat Initiative | Austin, TX

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21 CORE CONCEPTS

WATER To reduce reliance on city water, NexusHaus will capture rainwater to provide all of its potable water needs and will only be connected to the city supply by a small refill line. The minimal supply from the city will serve as a backup during long dry spells. This potable rainwater harvesting system minimizes added stress to the region’s water supplies and minimizes the additional load of more residents on the existing neighborhood water and wastewater infrastructure while increasing density in the city. Additionally, the on-site treatment system avoids the water losses along the municipal distribution system by approximately 10 percent, and the thermal storage tank acts as a secondary storage volume for rainwater, giving the system additional capacity while also providing beneficial load shifting.

home, NexusHaus’ integrated rainwater thermal storage system shifts cooling off peak to low-demand nighttime hours while reducing storm water runoff which taxes the aging infrastructure in the City of Austin.

FOOD With the need to increase food production to 70 percent by 2050 to meet demand, NexusHaus proposes an all-food residential landscape using only recycled greywater for drip irrigation – providing intensive, water-efficient gardening. An aquaponics system is also introduced for food production and water treatment. With fish, microbes, and plants, 10 to 20 times more food is produced while using 90 percent less water providing significant savings on food for the inhabitants and providing free produce in areas typically In addition to providing potable water for the devoid of such resources.

SUMMER 2014-2015


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02 NEXUSAUS ACADEMIC


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SUMMER 2014-2015


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02 NEXUSAUS ACADEMIC


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My role in this project ranged from SD and DD through to construction. I specifically worked on the facade and deck elements. (Photos below show construction process at Irvine).

SUMMER 2014-2015


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02 NEXUSAUS ACADEMIC


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SUMMER 2014-2015


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03 URBAN CINEMA ACADEMIC


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URBAN CINEMA Sensory Exploration & Adaptive Reuse Austin, TX Professor

Clay Odom Software

Rhino, Grasshopper Photoshop, Illustrator

“Space occurs as the effect produced by the operations that orient it, situate it, temporalize it, and make it function in polyvalent unity of conflictual program or contractual proximities.” -Michel de Certeau

The Phantasm and the Box

Exploring the future of the movie theater through Spatial, Formal and material interventions. The goal of this project was to explore spatial conditions of the cinema by engaging the user’s senses and immerse them in worlds that can almost feel like a stage in themselves. A traditional theatre is often a collection of spaces that supports the main theatre halls, but by flipping this relationship, a sensory theatre would be a collection of spatial effects based on the programs happening inside the spaces. The effects generated for the sensory theatre SPRING 2016


By utilizing an existing building for this exploration, there was an inherent challenge to make everything fit. Without detailed drawings of the existing structure, assumptions had to be made, but close estimates, even down to structural elements were still made. This allowed the different modular programs to simply stack on top of each other and be connected through various paths. The result was a vertical cinema that challenges the typical conventions of a suburban theater that is laid out horizontally.

“The result was a vertical cinema that challenges the typical conventions of a suburban theater.” The project’s focus on exploring the interstitial and supportive spaces of a theatre allow users to be immersed in a dynamic experience before they even start watching the movie. Furthermore, these spaces also investigate the possibility of adaptive programs and spaces available to the public outside the operational hours of a cinema, such as a ground level and rooftop amphitheater that can host cultural events and art installations.

03 URBAN CINEMA ACADEMIC

Kids Interactive playscape

As well as creating this sense of delight and heightened cinema going experience, the project investigates the potential for a modular system that can shrink and grow depending on the site. These ideas culminated in a prototypical adaptive re-use investigation that proposed an urban cinema in Austin’s prominent downtown music district. Within, the “effect” application is separated into three conditions: wall, floor/ceiling, and solid/void.

Interstellar Production Set

are directly related and engage the user through the interaction of light which responds to movement, and sound generated in the spaces. The generation of these effects was driven by both precedent studies and analytical diagrams which mapped out a “typical” theater and the various forces affecting it.

2001: A Space Odyseey

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31 PROGRAM ANALYSIS

Porosity

Light Intensity

Speed/Mvmnt

Intensities SPRING 2016


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ANALYTICAL SPACE DIAGRAMS

LOBBY

03 URBAN CINEMA ACADEMIC

CIRCULATION


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LOBBY

CIRCULATION

SPRING 2016


34 EFFECT PRODUCTION

03 URBAN CINEMA ACADEMIC


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EFFECT INTEGRATION

Hallway

Lobby

Theatre

SPRING 2016


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03 URBAN CINEMA ACADEMIC


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SPRING 2016


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03 URBAN CINEMA ACADEMIC


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SPRING 2016


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04 BRACKENRIDGE FIELDS ACADEMIC


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BRACKENRIDGE FIELDS Masterplan Austin, TX Award

UTSOA Design Excellence Professor Juan Miro Team

Nathan Shepherd Software

Rhino 3D, Autocad Photoshop Illustrator InDesign

“Cities are the result of a continuous balance between ambition and compromise - lofty desires are many times scaled down, ambitious goals continually cut back - but, the most successful cities maintain the aspirations that define their identity while managing to adapt to new circumstances.” -Juan Miro

The focus of this studio was to explore the potential of Austin’s urban fabric and develop a masterplan proposal for a large portion of land known as the Brackenridge Tract that sits adjacent to the downtown area. As a studio, our initial research examined the potential of denser, more urban housing: comparing the compact city model of Madrid to the landscape city model of Austin. Through different housing project research and seeing first hand the benefits of a dense urban core during a one week travel experience to Madrid we applied the development strategies of both cities, proposing a solution that combined the best of both worlds. As much as the European city model is desirable in urban planning, we recognized that the growth of Austin as a lower density model integrated in nature was what made it unique. Hence, the proposal uses a variety of density scales, becoming a natural transition from the quiet neighborhoods that surround the area. SPRING 2015


“As much as the European city model

is desirable in urban planning, we recognized that the growth of Austin as a lower density model (integrated in nature) was what made it unique.” These routes facilitate access to the park in a way that integrates old with new and public with private, offering moments of pause and a smaller, more personal scale for people to enjoy. Throughout the design process we aimed to be sensitive to the existing conditions surrounding the site and in this way hoped to preserve the existing feel of the neighborhoods. The cross section of the development transitions from house to high-rise in a matter of just four blocks. Following a progression of typologies, the density increases from townhomes to condominiums, residential mid-rises and high rises. These high-rises define the edge of the park zone, while acting as a visual signal for new urban development. Ultimately, a new district is created that functions as an amenity for the whole city while maintaining the character of Austin with increased density.

04 BRACKENRIDGE FIELDS ACADEMIC

Compact City | Madrid, Spain

The Brackendridge Fields proposal takes advantage of the Brackenridge Tract as an opportunity to support Austin’s larger urban trajectory. The proposal offers an expansive park for the city bordered with 34 blocks of mixed use development. This development consists of dense living options and civic facilities that serve the University and local schools. Additionally, the scheme builds upon the existing traffic corridor providing an East-West connection while also envisioning the expansion of public transport through a new light rail corridor. Rather than treat the edges as a buffer zone, Brackenridge Fields sees this area as an opportunity to implement a prototypical solution to dramatic differences in urban density. The housing blocks follow the perimeter block model, maintaining a “hard” street network with “soft” pockets of interior courtyards. Green fingers alleviate the density, transforming a dense buffer into an urban filter.

Brackenridge Tract | Austin, TX

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43 OVERALL MASTERPLAN

Park + Waterfront Access

Education Hub + YMCA

Public Event Spaces

SPRING 2015


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LIGHT RAIL CROSS ARTERIES DEVELOPMENT GRID RIVERWALK PARK TRAILS

RETAIL CIVIC/INSTITUTIONAL WAYA/RECREATIONAL RESIDENTIAL

Transportation Network + Groundfloor Use

BUILDINGS GREEN FINGERS PARK BOUNDARY

Green Space

04 BRACKENRIDGE FIELDS ACADEMIC


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CIVIC/INSTITUTIONAL

TOWNHOMES

CONDOMINIUMS MID-RISE APARTMENTS

MIXED-USE MID-RISE

RETAIL PLINTH RESIDENTIAL HIGH-RISE

Typologies L A ND A R E A S U M M A R Y DEVELOPABLE LAND AREA Brackenridge Field Lab Development Blocks West Austin Youth Association OPEN SPACE LAND AREA Municipal Golf Course Public Park Streets TOTAL LAND AREA

209 55 124 30 159 -100

ac r e s

DEVELO PMENT SUMMARY

sq. f t .

56.8% 14.9% 33.7% 8.1%

Residential total units: 8625 density (units/acre): 41.9 Office Retail Entertainment Hotel Civic

74.7%

43.2% -27.2% 16.0%

59 368 100%

TOTAL DEVELOPMENT

12.7% 6.4% -0.2% 6.0% 100%

SPRING 2015


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Waterfront Access

04 BRACKENRIDGE FIELDS ACADEMIC

Trails

Retail

Transportation


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Mid-rise

Courtyard

Low-rise

Playgrounds

Townhomes

Green Finger

SPRING 2015


48 MID-RISE COURTYARD & GREEN FINGER TRAIL

04 BRACKENRIDGE FIELDS ACADEMIC


49 MID-RISE GROUND LEVEL LAYOUT

SPRING 2015


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05 CARET^6 ACADEMIC


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CARET^6 Design Installation Austin, TX Professor Kory Bieg Team

Aarti Khater, Alex Dallas, Alexis M, Alline Kane, Bernardo Jimenez, Brenda Villafuerte, Claire Miller, Estrella Juarez, Gabriel Tagliante-Saracino, Elizabeth Fuchs, Kelsey, Layla Salameh, Nadia Aseeva, Stancey Moore, and Zach Walters

Collaborators

TEX-FAB, Mitsubishi Plastics + UT Engineering Role

Design + Lead Fabricator Software

3DS Max, Rhino, Grasshopper Vcarve (CNC Software)

Caret 6, also known as ^6, is a full scale installation created to host the TEX-FAB 5 SKIN: Digital Assemblies exhibition in the spring of 2014. Working with a group of 17 students we designed an adaptive installation that would showcase the exhibit. In the spirit of digital fabrication, the project was generated usingparametric tessellations that simulate a three dimensional experience. The dynamic form transforms from an inhabitable vault-like space to a wave that cascades to the ground and supports the various boards for the competition exhibit. In addition to the school exhibit, Caret 6 was exhibited at the 2014 SXSW Renegade Craft Fair. This exhibit promoted new technologies and local artisans. While we oversaw the design of the project and form development as a team, we also each had specific roles. As lead fabricator for the project, I oversaw the fabrication of all the panels using a CNC router, performed material tests and was actively involved in construction. The project was published in major online blogs and publications including Archdaily and Architectural Record. FALL 2013-SPRING 2014


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Photo credit Casey Dunn 05 CARET^6 ACADEMIC


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FALL 2013-SPRING 2014


54 CONSTRUCTION

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55 CONNECTIONS

FALL 2013-SPRING 2014


56 MEBANE GALLERY EXHIBITION

BASE DIAMOND UNIT

SECTIONS

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57 VAULT AND SURFACE GRIDS

FALL 2013-SPRING 2014


58 CNC FABRICATION

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FALL 2013-SPRING 2014


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06 FRACTURE(d) ACADEMIC


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FRACTURE(d) Art Installation Water+ Competition Honorable Mention Winniped, Manitoba Professor

Clay Odom Software

Rhino, Grasshopper Photoshop, Illustrator

Fractured aims to examine the erosion that is created by the absence of water, a fabric installation which looks at the spaces created between the cracks of dry soil. The space will intentionally reflect the sensation of being in a cave, reinterpreting the cracks as stalactites and stalagmites. As you approach, the work presents itself as a floating cube and gradually breaks down to reveal a “raw” edge on the other side. The goal is to create varied spatial perception in the exhibit as people see each other walking through. The extruded volumes would be constructed using numerous colored nylon wires that would allow porous views, while maintaining a light, floating, feel to the experience. One of the key elements is for the stalactites to reflect through a mirror panel that will lie on the ground, contained by the dimensions of the installation. The entire design fits in a 10’ x 10’ x 9’ cube, floating approximately a foot above the ground. The installation would hang from the ceiling using light gage wires that attach to the lighting tracks. The individual forms would be structured using a formed metal wire that will also help weight them down. The design was part of an international competition to design an art installation for Atmospheres symposium at the University of Manitoba in 2015. SPRING 2016


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06 FRACTURE(d) ACADEMIC


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SPRING 2016


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06 FRACTURE(d) ACADEMIC


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SPRING 2016


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07 FOUNTAIN PLACE PROFESSIONAL


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FOUNTAIN PLACE

Residential High Rise Schematic Design Dallas, TX Page Lead

Talmadge Smith Role

Design assistant, unit layout and fitting, graphics + rendering Software

Autocad, Revit, Sketchup, Google Earth, Photoshop

Located in a very prominent location in downtown Dallas, the Fountain Place tower is an iconic landmark for the city skyline. Designed by IM PEI in 1970, the tower is defined by its full glass curtain wall, and clean lines that form its unique shape. Page was approached by it’s long term client, AMLI, to explore the possibility of designing a residential tower that would sit right next to the Fountain Place tower. The design needed to be a bold statement that could hold it’s own in the Dallas skyline, but would also start a dialogue with it’s neighbor. The client asked for a total of roughly 400 units and an amenity deck space. The resulting variants also took into account orientation, unit views, and wind. The project is currently in the design development phase. PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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07 FOUNTAIN PLACE PROFESSIONAL


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PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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Concept renderings showing tower option with unique top. Nicknamed the “diamond” the design has standard floor plates up to level 42, above that both floor plates and units become unique.

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PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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The unique shape of the tower demanded careful exploration of unit layouts, both for standard units and for corner units that needed to wrap around the stairwell cores. These studies demonstrated the viability of the project.

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BALCONY VARIATION

PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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08 SPEC HOUSE PROFESSIONAL


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SPEC HOUSES

Single-family residential Port Aransas, TX Page Lead

Justin Sabatini Role

Design assistant, aid in producing developer set, rendering Software

Autocad, Photoshop

Housing designs done for a new neighborhood community in Port Aransas, TX for the development firm MP Beach. The houses range from 2-3 bedrooms and all feature a distinct pallet of materials aimed for the Texas coast. The location offers beautiful ocean views and easy beach access. Coming onto the project towards the end, my role was to aid in the production of one of the builder sets, updating drawings, creating window schedules as well as creating a rendered view to be used for marketing. The drawings that follow are of Spec House 3 from the final packet sent to the developer. This house was distinguished by a prominent tower acting as a circulation core and a marker for the corner lot entry. PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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08 SPEC HOUSE PROFESSIONAL


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PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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08 SPEC HOUSE PROFESSIONAL


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PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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08 SPEC HOUSE PROFESSIONAL


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PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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09 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL


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SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY Student Housing West Virginia, USA Page Lead

Justin Sabatini Role

Design assistant, aid in producing proposal, rendering Software

Revit, 3DS Max, Photoshop, Illustrator

One of the more ambitious student housing projects explored a new dorm for Shepherd University that would tie in to the existing fabric of the campus while also establishing itself as a major marker along the street (with future plans of transforming the street to pedestrian only). The design focused on making connections to existing paths on campus and aimed to create an internal courtyard that could be both private an public. Unlike Commerce, there was no restriction on building construction, so the use of steel on the ground level provided opportunities for punctures into the courtyard space, while also incorporating mixed use elements like study halls. PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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09 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL


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PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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09 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY PROFESSIONAL


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Community “pods” proposal, emphasizing community.

PAGE INTERNSHIP 2015


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10 PHOTOGRAPHY INDEPENDENT


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PHOTOGRAPHY Digital and Analogue Photography Independent Medium

Canon 450D Digital Camera Nikon FM 1970’d Analogue Camera BW 400 ISO Film

Collection of photography done over the years in my free time. Photographs range from urban settings during study abroad tips to portraits and abstract compositions. Portrait studies done in 35mm film and developed using the school’s dark room equipment. 2010-2016


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10 PHOTOGRAPHY INDEPENDENT


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MADRID, SPAIN

2010-2016


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URBAN, EXPERIMENTAL+35MM FILM

10 PHOTOGRAPHY INDEPENDENT


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2010-2016


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PORTRAITS, 35MM FILM

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2010-2016


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CV MICHAEL RAHMATOULIN +1 512 997 8546 | Austin, TX mrahmatoulin@utexas.edu ⓦ mr.persona.co RESUME SUPPLEMENTARY


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WORK EXPERIENCE

SKILLS Modeling

June 2016 - Present June - December 2015

Austin , TX

Page Southerland Page Designer | Architectural Intern 2014 - 2016

Austin , TX

●●●●●●● ●●●● ●●●●● ●●●●● ●●●●●● ●●●

Rendering + Presentation

Architecture & Planning Library Student Associate Summer 2013

Rhino 3D Grasshopper Revit Autocad Sketchup 3DS Max

Austin , TX

School of Architecture, Cisco Gomes Research Assistant

Photoshop Vray Maxwell Illustrator InDesign

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Digital Fabrication

EDUCATION The University of Texas at Austin Bachelor of Architecture May 2016

HONORS

ACTIVITIES

2016 Honourable Mention, Archoutloud Competition

Design Assistant Year two architecture studio, School of Architecture AIAS Austin Community Outreach Chair Texas Society of Architects/AIA Digital Communications Committee Dean’s Ambassador The University of Texas School of Architecture

2016

2015 Design Excellence Award Recipient Overland Partners Endowed Scholarship

2011-2014

2014 Amy Dryden Endowed Scholarship

2013

2013 Design Excellence Award Nominee Adam Grote Memorial Scholarship

2013-2016

PUBLICATIONS

LANGUAGES Russian Greek

●●●●●●● ●●●● ●●●●●●

Laser cutting 3D printing CNC milling

Caret^6 - Archdaily Native Working Proficiency

Nexushaus - Residential Architect | Architect Magazine | Inhabitat MICHAEL RAHMATOULIN


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MICHAEL RAHMATOULIN ⓣ +1 512 997 8546 ⓜ mrahmatoulin@utexas.edu ⓦ mr.persona.co

THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE


Michael Rahmatoulin Architecture Portfolio 2017