Page 1

MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 1

MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF

NEWS VOL. 1, NO. 4

WINTER 2011

MPSTMA Annual Meeting Set Jan. 5 During Northern Green Expo at MCC The MPSTMA Annual Meeting is set for 10:45 a.m. on Thursday, January 5, 2012 at the Minneapolis Convention Center during the Northern Green Expo. Every MPSTMA member is encouraged to attend. Super Tuesday Session Geared Towards Park and Sports Turf Managers The MTGF hosts an educational event the day before the Northern Green Expo begins called Super Tuesday. This year’s session is of interest to Park and Sports Turf Managers. The session is entitled “Grassy Weed and Broadleaf Herbicide Research Update by Dr. David Gardner, The Ohio State University. Several important new herbicides have come onto the market in the past few years for the control of broadleaf weeds, including mesotrione and aminocyclopryachlor. The uses, advantages and disadvantages of these products will be discussed, as well as how these products might fit into your weed management program. New products have been developed that help control grassy weeds. However, many other products have appeared on the market that are novel combinations of existing herbicides. The uses, advantages and disadvantages of these products will be discussed. Go to www.mpstma.org or www.mtgf.org. for more information.

NETWORKING IN COON RAPIDS AT THE MPSTMA FALL WORKSHOP IN SEPTEMBER

2011 Events Well-Supported by Vendors; General Member Attendance Lacking Watch your inboxes for a survey from the MPSTMA Board of Directors. The events of 2011 were all successful from the standpoint of vendor support. Whenever called upon, the vendors stepped to the plate with financial support. General member attendance declined a bit in 2011. Realizing the economy is tough may be one answer but the Board feels it may not be the only reason. A survey will be distributed to members to gain a better perspective of the situation. Other possible reasons may be location, cost or taking a work day off. The MPSTMA Annual Meeting is set for Thursday, January 5 at the Minneapolis Convention Center during the Northern Green Expo. The Board would like to get feedback at this meeting to plan how best to keep moving the association forward in the best interest of its membership.

www.mpstma.org


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 2

PRESIDENT’S PERSPECTIVE

“Opportunities Knock, Please Answer” STEVE GILBERTSON MPSTMA President OFFICERS PRESIDENT

As we come to the end of 2011, the MPSTMA is now giving all members the opportunity to get more familiar and involved during the 2012 season. Please consider the following ways to get involved. First of all, the MPSTMA is looking for individuals to give time and offer their name to be listed on the ballot for one of many Board of Director positions or serve on one of the many committees that help plan the events for the 2012 season.

STEVE GILBERTSON City of Lino Lakes 612-599-8017 socassign@aol.com VICE PRESIDENT

DAVE NOZAL Tree Trust 651-644-5800 daven@treetrust.com VICE PRESIDENT

KEVIN FERNANDEZ White Bear Lake Area Schools #624 651-653-2736 kmfern@wbl.whitebear.k12.mn.us TREASURER

Secondly, the Sports Turf Managers Association offered the Minnesota Chapter one free registration to the Jan. 9-13 STMA national convention in Long Beach, Calif. This is a $350 value. Several folks from Minnesota have registered so you will not be without friends. Before I close this section of the newsletter, I just want to say thank you to all MPSTMA members who helped make this first year of combined organizations a success. This will be my final “President's Perspective” and I will running my last Board Meeting at the Annual Meeting in January. I also would like to thank all current Board members and committee members for their time and efforts through out the 2011 season and hope they continue their support for incoming president Dave Nozal from Tree Trust. Thank you, once again, for a great 2011 year and hope that every member’s future is bigger and better than the past.

Steve Gilbertson

E-mail:

magicturfs@msn.com

11920 Park Dr., Rogers, MN 55374

PAST PRESIDENT

PHIL GALLIGER City of Woodbury 652-714-3721 pgalliger@ci.woodbury.mn.us DIRECTORS GENERAL MEMBERSHIP

JEFF HINTZ Northwestern College 651-631-5103 jdhintz2@nwc.edu

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP

SCOTT MELLING Par Aide Products Company 651-429-4513 scott@paraide.com

President, Minnesota Park and Sports Turf Managers Association

Mike Brunelle (612) 817-5396

PAST PRESIDENT

STEVE BERG CSFM Indiana

COMMERCIAL MEMBERSHIP

Steve Gilbertson

Landscaping of Rogers, Inc.

TREASURER

ROGER WEINBRENNER CSFM University of St. Thomas 651-962-6546 roger.weinbrenner@mpstma.org

AMY HOWARD City of Woodbury 651-714-3721 ahoward@ci.woodbury.mn.us

Regards,

Town & Country

LOWELL LUEBECK City of Plymouth 763-509-5946 lluebeck@ci.plymouth.mn.us

Athletic Field • Construction • Re-Construction • Maintenance

• Sodding

• • • •

Seeding Over Seeding Laser Leveling Grading

COMMERCIAL MEMBERSHIP

Golf Course

• Tee Construction • Re-Construction

• Spraying • Aeration • Fertilizing • Detailing • Consulting

www.magicturfs.com Here Today, Lawn Tomorrow!

2 MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF NEWS

JOE CHURCHILL Reinders Inc. 612-790-7333 jchurchill@reinders.com MTGF REPRESENTATIVE

PAUL GRIFFIN City of Woodbury 651-714-3720 pgriffin@ci.woodbury.mn.us MTGF REPRESENTATIVE

KEVIN MANLEY JRK Seed & Turf Supply 651-686-6756 kmanley@jrkseed.com MPSTMA OFFICE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

JEFF TURTINEN 952-473-3722 jeff.turtinen@mpstma.org www.mpstma.org

www.mpstma.org


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 3

Irrigation Water, Science and Emotion, Is EPA a Friend or Foe of Turf? By BRIAN HORGAN, Ph.D. University of Minnesota

(Authors Note: This article was written based on testimony given at a hearing to construction code officials on the benefits of turf in the environment). I am a board member of the National Turfgrass Federation and an active participant in many national debates about turfgrass and the environment. This is an example of one such debate by the turfgrass industry and regulators. When EPA started their Water Sense program (www.epa.gov/watersense), their intention was to bring national attention to potable water demands and to reward those that implemented a comprehensive water conservation program. Water Sense is an EPA partnership program whereby retailers, builders and landscapers subscribe to the water saving techniques and EPA rewards them with the use of Water Sense labels for marketing purposes. Products listed on their website as Water Sense certified include urinals, showerheads, toilets, faucet fixtures, and landscape irrigation controllers. The program is analogous to the Energy Star Program Designed to conserve energy. Jumping ahead to “outdoor” criteria for a certified Water Sense home, EPA originally intended for builders/landscapers to have two options for landscape water conservation; (1) no more than 40% of the landscapable area can be turf or (2) utilize a water budget tool to direct irrigation. The turfgrass industry from the very beginning did not see value in restricting turf to 40% of the landscape area. Assuming the goal is to conserve all sources of water, one cannot infer that a generalized turf limitation of 40% or less will reduce water consumption of the landscape when the remainder of the landscape has not been specified. In fact, we pointed out that restricting turf to 40% of the vegetated area connotes a negative environmental value to turfgrass and completely discounts the positive social, economic and environmental attributes. In a study evaluating the effect of three landscape types on residential energy and water use in AZ, McPherson et al. (1989) found that energy consumed for air-conditioning a home with a rock landscape was 20-30% more than for the turf and shade landscape. This was due to a 4°C depression in landscape temperature attributed to evaporative cooling from the www.mpstma.org

turf. Even when accounting for CO2 and N2O emissions from inputs required to maintain turfgrass in the urban landscape, Townsend-Small and Czimczik (2010) found turfgrass is a net sequester of carbon when applying up to 8 lbs N / 1000 ft2 yr-1. Milesi et al. (2005) used satellite imagery and modeling and estimates total potential C sequestration of turf in the continental U.S. to range from -0.2 to 16.7 Tg C yr1 depending on management. The CENTURY model has identified intensively managed turf can sequester approximately 1 t C ha-1 yr-1 (Qian and Follett, 2002). This rate of sequestration is similar to perennial grasslands following cultivation (1.1 t ha-1 yr-1) (Gebhart et al., 1994), is much higher than unmanaged grasslands (0.33 t ha-1 yr-1) (Post and Kwon, 2000), and is twice as much soil C stored compared to native prairie (Bandaranayake et al., 2003). Alternative landscapes are sometimes touted for their putative ability to reduce urban runoff and enhance groundwater recharge but such outcomes are not necessarily realized. Erickson et al. (2001) found no significant differences in runoff water quantity when comparing a native Florida woody perennial landscape to a St. Augustinegrass landscape. However, significantly greater amounts of P were leached from the native perennial landscape compared to the turfgrass landscape (Erickson et al., 2005). The thatch-forming capabilities of turfgrass in combination with a permanent and dense plant structure yields a less channelized pathway for water movement, which increases resistance, horizontal spread, and infiltration of surface runoff (Linde et al., 1995). This effect was demonstrated by Krenitsky et al. (1998) who observed turfgrass sod to be more effective than synthetic erosion control materials in reducing both runoff and sediment losses through the delay of runoff initiation. This combination of factors may be enough to reduce runoff water volumes and therefore nutrient loading, regardless of soil nutrient concentrations. Steinke et al. (2007) showed managed Kentucky bluegrass turf was as effective as a buffer for runoff from paved surfaces as a planting of native prairie and yielded no more nutrient or sediment pollution despite fertilization. Kentucky bluegrass turf had similar water infiltration (Continued on Page 4) MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF NEWS 3


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 4

Is EPA Friend or Foe(Continued from Page 3)

capacity as the native prairie plantings (Steinke et al., 2009). This is where the debate got interesting. One of EPA’s arguments was the Water Sense program was voluntary. No one was forced to participate. The turfgrass industry argued that once EPA published their guidelines, communities and municipalities would adopt them as tools to conserve water and this is exactly what happened. In fact, Code Officials when writing their new International Green Construction Code (IGCC) adopted the entire EPA Water Sense program as a starting point and made it even more restrictive. The IGCC stated, “Water used for outdoor landscape irrigation shall be non-potable.” We stated that significant challenges exist as to why water source should not be dictated and left as a jurisdictional option. Although a long-term outcome from the IGCC may be greater access to alternative sources of water, the current distribution system is not capable of meeting large increases in volume and landscape irrigation may not be possible due to the random distribution of the demand (Tchobanolglous et al., 2011). Based on 2004 numbers, the EPA estimates 1.7 billion gallons per day of wastewater were reused (U.S. EPA, 2004). This is only slightly more than the 1.5 billion gallons

4 MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF NEWS

that may be applied for landscape irrigation each day in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2011). Florida is the leading producer of recycled water followed by California. Together these two states produce nearly 30% of the total recycled water. The most recent analysis shows that Florida uses 56% of the 243 billion gallons of reclaimed water produced annually for irrigation of golf courses, landscape, or other public access areas (Parsons et al., 2010). However, in 2009 California allocated just 18% of it's 235.86 billion gallons for landscape irrigation (California EPA, 2009). A 2005 inventory in California determined that 1.5 billion gallons of wastewater are discharged into the ocean each day (Hauser, 2005). These numbers indicate that current infrastructure in California is capable of treating just 30% of it's wastewater for reuse. These statistics, from the two states most advanced at recycling and reusing water, demonstrate significant challenges as to why water source should not be dictated in the proposed IGCC and left as a jurisdictional option. Our primary argument was a sensible approach to water conservation is based on a water budget that is regionally based and calculates ET using specific crop coefficients for various turfgrasses. The water budget should account for all plants in the landscape as Park et al. (2005) documented that irrigation requirements for an ornamental mixed-species landscape increased over time and used more water than St. Augustinegrass. Ranked ET rates of four turfgrasses under field conditions in a semiarid region were: tall fescue (6.8 mm d-1) > zoysiagrass (5.6 mm d-1) > buffalograss (5.1 mm d-1) = bermudagrass (5.0 mm d-1)(Qian et al., 1996) and intra-species ET rates can vary up to 60% among 61 Kentucky bluegrass cultivars (Ebdon et al., 1998). Most regions of the U.S. have specific crop coefficients for turfgrass; however when lacking 80% replacement ET will be effective at maintaining turfgrass and conserving water (Sass and Horgan, 2006). In addition, smart irrigation controllers should account for diurnal variability in crop coefficients, which range 0.2-0.8. Fu et al., (2004) found tall fescue and bermudagrass could be irrigated at 40-60% replacement ET while maintaining acceptable quality and function. In the end, Code Officials voted not to include the 40% turf restriction at the same time that EPA decided to pull it from Water Sense. I certainly learned from this process. I learned that: 1. One must advocate and participate in the process to affect change 2. EPA and other regulators in government can be reasonable. Some offices are better than others. 3. This process took years with involvement from many people in industry. 4. Spending time in DC will either make you sick or invigorate your passions in life. 5. I am proud of the turf industry for advocating for change with EPA and using science as their primary mechanism for defense. We are now engaged in a positive discussion with EPA’s office of water about the best water budget tool to conserve water recognizing that we can do better with the water we apply to our landscape. www.mpstma.org


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 5

Turf’s Up! STMA Heads to the West Coast By PATRICK ALLEN Sports Turf Managers Association

www.mpstma.org

on-site. Attendees can purchase entries and bid on electronics, autographed merchandise, memorabilia, equipment and products, and much more at these events. Items in the silent auction will start at just $5 and raffle tickets will be $10. There will be some equipment, products or services available in the live auction that may require authorization from your employer and purchase orders will be accepted. Come prepared, as some items are not available at these reduced prices outside of this auction and can provide a great value for your facility or organization. The new www.STMA.org has all the Conference and Exposition details on the Conference Tab. Click on the yellow tab at the top of the website homepage, and then on the 2012 drop-down link. From there you can see the digital brochure, register on line, print a registration form, and book a hotel -- all in one convenient location. Early bird registration closes on Dec. 15, so don’t delay! STMA accepts purchase orders, checks and credit cards. If you have any questions about the STMA Conference and Exhibition, please contact STMA Headquarters at 800.323.3875 or STMAInfo@STMA.org.

- Can be used with a golf cart or utility vehicle - 57” working width - Sweeper & vacuum come standard - Sifts & removes debris from top layer of the infill - Adds the striping appearance of natural turf - Max Speed of 5.7 mph

ARTIFICIAL TURF

VERTI - TOP

The 23rd Annual Sports Turf Managers Association Conference and Exhibition heads to Long Beach, Calif., Jan. 10-14, 2012. For four days, nearly 1,500 people will converge on the Long Beach Convention Center for more than 90 hours of sports turf specific education, dedicated networking functions, eight unopposed hours viewing the newest products and equipment in the trade show hall and other events that provide ample opportunity to meet your professional development needs. Not to mention that there are CEU’s available from STMA, GCSAA, NRPA, NIAAA, ASBA, PLANET and ASLA, plus 8.5 hours of pesticide recertification credits from the state of California. Fully-registered attendees at the world’s largest gathering of sports turf professionals will receive a full day of pre-conference workshops and access to receptions, the STMA Annual Meeting and the STMA Awards Banquet. Most meals are provided throughout the event, meaning if you’re local, you only cost might be registration! Full registration starts at $375 for an STMA member and $485 for non-members. However, there are several al a carte options available, starting at $45 per day to attend the trade show only, which have been created to minimize your time away and maximize your educational investment. If you do need to stay the night, hotel rates start at $179 at the Long Beach Westin and $185 at the Hyatt Long Beach. Optional activities including two different Seminaron-Wheels Facility Tours, the SAFE Golf Tournament and SAFE Casino Night enhance the conference experience. The always popular SAFE Golf Tournament will be taking place Wednesday, Jan. 11 at Industry Hills Golf Club at Pacific Palms. This event has limited space available and registration rates are $135 per player through Dec. 15, 2011. Golf clubs will be available for rental at the rate of $50 per set. On Wednesday night after the Golf Tournament, SAFE will host its first ever Casino Night at the STMA Welcome Reception in the Regency Ballroom at the Hyatt Long Beach. Join other conference attendees to support the SAFE Foundation and have a good time in the process. Participants will gain entry to SAFE Casino night, where they can then enjoy many casino-style games and compete to win prizes, including wine, electronics and more. Early registration rates are $45 and go up to $55 onsite. As usual, SAFE will be conducting auctions and raffles

800-592-9513 www.turfwerks.com

MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF NEWS

5


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 6

MPSTMA COMMUNITY SERVICE Each year, Minnesota sports turf managers pick out a field to renovate and spruce up as a Community Service Project. This year’s project for the Minnesota Park and Sports Turf Managers Association (MPSTMA) took place at Christian Life School in Farmington, Minn. Project coordinators, Mike McDonald, a certified sports field manager (CSFM) from TCF Bank Stadium at the University of Minnesota, and Paul Griffin, sports turf manager from the City of Woodbury, led a group of volunteers on October 19. Commercial vendors were instrumental in the success of the project. The Tessman Company donated over 40 bags of starter fertilizer; the Minnesota Vikings Football Club donated bags of grass seed and fertilizer; Reinders Inc. helped with five acres of fertilizer with pre-emergent; The City of Prior Lake brought truckloads of ag lime and, for the pitching mound and Ervasti Sales donated three pallets of Hilltopper Clay. Patrick Schoen, Tri-State Bobcat, brought a skid-loader with forks and knives. Ken Rost, Frost Services, and Mike Peschel, Property Props, both volunteered their time all day. Mike Brunelle, Town & Country Landscape, and his son, Eric Brunelle, spread the ag lime across the infields of the baseball field and softball field. A little over a year ago, Christian Life Schools had five acres of land that was not being used in the back of the school. They cleared the land and the corn that was growing on it, grew grass last year and had the basics ready for a baseball field, softball field and a soccer field running between it. Bob Nurnberger, ath-

With the help of others, Jon Hummel, center, St. Anthony Schools, and Josh Graham, second from right,, TCF Bank Stadium, spent most of the day preparing a pitcher’s mound which is a very lengthy process.

letic director at Christian Life Schools, heard from Bob Frank, MTI Distributing Inc., that the MPSTMA annually renovates one field a year as a Community Service Project and encouraged Nurnberger to apply. The MPSTMA Community Service Project committee visits all entrants’ fields. Christian Life School was the (Continued on Page 7) winning entrant.

• Earlier spring green-up • Faster seed germination • Deeper root development • Delays dormancy in fall

• Ideal winter blanket • 3, 7 & 10 yr. warranty covers • Best for quick turf repairs • Available in any size

© 2011,

wrote Dann Daly, Park Maintenance Supervisor, Parks & Recr. Dept., North Smithfield, RI

Coverm aster In c. STM A

EVERGREEN Turf Blankets... ...trusted around the world! “Results Outstanding..., Could Not Believe...”

AIR, WATER AND HEAT PENETRATE THE COVER, WARMING THE SOIL

Want to know more?

CALL TOLL FREE 1- 800-387-5808

EXCESS HEAT ESCAPES THROUGH THE PATENTED VENTING SYSTEM

INCREASES ROOT DEVELOPMENT

TM

covermaster.com MASTERS IN THE ART OF SPORTS SURFACE COVERS

! 6 MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF NEWS

E-MAIL: info@covermaster.com

"

" www.mpstma.org


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 7

Mike Brunelle, Town & Country Landscape, grooms the infield at the CSP at Christian Life Schools in Farmington on October 19.

The One’s Who Made The Project Happen!

Paul Griffin, City of Woodbury Edges the infield during the Community Service Project.

Mike Peschel, Property Props Putting the finishing touches around home plate.

www.mpstma.org

Vendors: Jirik Sod Bachman’s Town & Country Landscape Tessman Co. Minnesota Vikings Reinders, Inc. City of Prior Lake Ervasti Sales Tri-State Bobcat MTI Distributing Inc. Turfwerks Twin City Seed Company

400 sq. ft. of Sod 4 Trees Equipment and Services Starter Fertilizer Seed and Fertilizer Fertilizer w/pre-emergent Ag Lime, trucks Hilltopper Clay Skid Loader, Bobcat Workman Utility Carts Cushman Cart 400 lbs. Fertilizer

Volunteers: Mike McDonald, CSFM Paul Griffin Josh Graham Jon Hummel Mike Peschel Roger Weinbrenner, CSFM Ken Rost Eric Brunelle Chad Maatta Travis Sticha Don Klingberg Mike Buesgens Jon Almquist Bob Frank Dave Nozal Mike Brunelle Eric Brunelle Jeff Turtinen

TCF Bank Stadium City of Woodbury TCF Bank Stadium St. Anthony Schools Property Props University of St. Thomas Frost Services Town & Country Landscape City of Prior Lake City of Prior Lake City of Prior Lake City of Prior Lake MTI Distributing Inc. MTI Distributing Inc. Tree Trust Town & Country Landscape Town & Country Landscape MPSTMA

MPSTMA PARK AND SPORTS TURF NEWS

7


MPSTMA NEWSLETTER - WINTER 2011_MPSTMA SEPTEMBER 0FFICIAL.qxd 6/22/2012 10:03 AM Page 8

P. O. Box 617 Wayzata, MN 55391

MPSTMA NEWS - WINTER 2011  

A publication for park and sports turf managers.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you