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AL I A N Z A S Celebrating 15 years of Research Alliances

Texas A&M University–CONACYT: Collaborative Research Grant Program

en

Investigación

Are chemical contaminants impacting

migratory birds

a s t h e y c r o s s t h e Yu c a t á n P e n i n s u l a ?


Welcome to ALIANZAS en Investigación, This publication highlights fifteen years of a successful research alliance between Texas A&M University and Mexico’s Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT). Established in 2001, the Texas A&M University–CONACYT: Collaborative Research Grant Program has proven to be a significant partnership between a Texas university and a Mexican government body that share a commitment to serving the public, improving lives, ensuring economic stability and making a difference for the future. The original grant program spanned five years. Fifteen years and 219 projects later, well over $5 million has been awarded through the program. Participating researchers have achieved numerous successes that have truly changed lives in Mexico and Texas. This publication celebrates the progress of this outstanding program and the successful collaboration between these two countries. In 2001, officials signed detailed documents, reviewers polished contracts and photos marked the occasion. The mission of the Texas A&M–CONACYT: Collaborative Research Grant Program was just beginning, but the leaders of research at Texas A&M and CONACYT knew the potential of giving researchers an opportunity to collaborate across borders. So, as you can see from glancing at the complete awards listed in the back of this publication, the program has flourished while maintaining its focus on the future and improving research within Texas and Mexico. At the heart of this program is a desire to do research that actually will improve the lives of people in the US and Mexico. We look forward to the continuation of the program and many more future successes. Thank you for spending time learning about how Texas A&M and CONACYT are working to accomplish new and exciting research that benefits both nations.

Glen A. Laine

Julia Tagüeña-Parga

Vice President for Research

Directora Adjunta de Desarrollo Científico

Texas A&M University

Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT)

This publication was produced by Mexico Partnership Services, the Representación de Texas A&M University en la República Mexicana, A.C. Mexico Partnership Services is a non-profit corporation registered in Mexico and operated through Public Partnership and Outreach in the Office of the Provost at Texas A&M University. The mission of Mexico Partnership Services is to facilitate partnerships between Texas A&M University faculty and departments wanting to establish academic, research, engagement and training linkages with Mexican and US universities, industries and governmental agencies. Such services include assisting both US and Mexico-based faculty with finding appropriate contacts, applying as a Mexican corporation for funded projects, managing grant contracts, hiring employees in Mexico, making local arrangements and providing other similar services. For more information about our company or to contact us, find us online at mexico.tamu.edu.


CO N TEN TS

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Engineering Algae

A Nauseating Veggie Tale

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Birds of a Feather

Don’t Sneeze You’ll Kill the Shrimp

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Testing the Water

Building a Better Fuel Cell

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Texas A&M University– CONACYT

CONACYT Collaborative Research Grant Awards

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ALIANZAS en Investigación is published by Texas A&M University to highlight the breadth and depth of research being conducted through the Texas A&M-CONACYT: Collaborative Research Grant Program. Integra, the font used in this publication, was designed by Gabriel Martínez Meave, type designer and director of the Kimera Typefoundry/Mexico. Texas A&M University CONACYT: Collaborative Research Grant Program Division of Research 1112 TAMU College Station, Texas 77843 vpr.tamu.edu/conacyt

Mexico Partnership Services Public Partnership & Outreach Shakespeare 15 Oficina 1002 Col. Anzures Del. Miguel Hidalgo C.P. 11590 México, Ciudad de México mexico.tamu.edu/about

Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) Av. Insurgentes Sur 1582 Colonia Crédito Constructor Delegación Benito Juárez C.P. 03940 México, Ciudad de México www.conacyt.mx/


Enginee ring

Al g a e by

K ara Bo u n d s S o c o l 2


Biochemist Timothy Devarenne likes to tell the story of a 1976 Australian fishing expedition that produced a highly unusual catch.

Green Microalgae Botryococcus braunii

Fishermen in the northern Australian town of Darwin were growing increasingly frustrated as algae gradually covered the Darwin River Reservoir. Finally, they joined efforts to rid their waters of this menace by scooping up as much of the floating algae as they could and bringing it back to land. The result was a massive, 1,500-pound “bloom” of Botryococcus braunii—a green microalga known for its high liquid hydrocarbon content. The oil was extracted from the algal colonies, fueling the city of Darwin for an entire month. Devarenne, an associate professor in Texas A&M University’s Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, says the story shows the potential of B. braunii as an alternative fuel source, which scientists recognized as early as the 1880s. Like many other alternative fuels, the cost of producing and processing the alga remains far higher than that of burning traditional fossil fuels, like petroleum, gas or coal. One of the biggest obstacles to cheaply growing and harvesting B. braunii is that the alga grows too slowly. With a Texas A&M-CONACYT grant, Devarenne and his counterpart in Mexico, Edmundo Lozoya-Gloria, hope

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to speed things up by learning how the alga fights off pathogens bent on destroying it. “If we can identify the pathogens that attack this alga and understand how the alga responds, then maybe we can use that information to engineer the alga to be more resistant to the pathogens,” Devarenne says. That small piece of the puzzle is vital to accelerating the alga’s growth rate

Botryococcus braunii is known for its high liquid hydrocarbon content. and to the ultimate goal of making B. braunii a viable fuel source. Devarenne explains that, while B. braunii grow in single cells, they join to form colonies. The oil made within each cell is exported to the colony’s extracellular matrix (ECM), which eventually stores some 95 percent of the colony’s total oil output. Once water is extracted from the ECM, about half


The oil created by B. braunii is essentially petroleum.

the remaining weight consists of oil alone. When pressurized, that oil can be squeezed out of the ECM, resulting in a tremendous amount of hydrocarbons. B. braunii is not the only oilproducing alga; other species produce oil in smaller quantities and with different chemical makeups. However, the oil created by B. braunii is essentially petroleum. This particular alga is the only species known to provide a petroleum-equivalent fuel source for combustion engines. The alga is also plentiful. What’s more, B. braunii can grow in virtually any fresh body of water on any continent, with the exception of Antarctica. Also, it can flourish in almost any climate. That sets it apart from many other alternative plantbased fuel sources, which require the rich soil that might otherwise be used for food production. The problem is that the most feasible way to grow and harvest B. braunii is in open-air ponds, making the alga extremely vulnerable to outside pathogens. That’s where the Texas A&M-

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CONACYT grant shared by Devarenne and Lozoya-Gloria—a researcher with CINVESTAV Unidad Irapuato’s Department of Genetic Engineering in Guanajuato, Mexico—comes in. “The idea of this particular project was to determine the molecular mechanisms this alga uses to defend against pathogens,” Devarenne says. “If we understand that, we’ll be a step closer to making the alga resistant to pathogens coming from the outside.” Devarenne says their research yielded anticipated results. For instance, he and Lozoya-Gloria—aided by CINVESTAV graduate student Ivette Cornejo Corona—found that B. braunii produces toxic reactive oxygen species that could be used to kill pathogens. They also found evidence of a gene involved in the “cell suicide” practice known as program cell death. This gene could possibly be involved in fighting pathogens, he says. Ultimately, Devarenne wants to advance the research necessary to turn B. braunii into a viable alternative energy source. While the alga isn’t the sole contributor to petroleum deposits, it is one of the most significant. It’s


A m i cr o sco p y i m a g e o f a co l o n y o f B o t r yo co ccu s b r a u n i i sh o w i n g t h e i n d i vi d u a l ce l l s o f t h e co l o n y ( g r e e n o va l s) , t h e o i l p r o d u ce d i n si d e e a ch ce l l ( sm a l l ci r cl e s i n e a ch ce l l ) a n d o i l b e i n g e xp e l l e d f r o m t h e e xt r a ce l l u l a r m a t r i x ( se e e d g e o f co l o n y a n d ci r cl e s b e yo n d e d g e o f co l o n y) .

also renewable. Although carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the burning of B. braunii hydrocarbon-derived fuels do occur, those emissions are offset by the amount of carbon dioxide absorbed by the alga during photosynthesis. Traditional fuels, on the other hand, create carbon dioxide without absorbing it. In addition, Devarenne and LozoyaGloria’s research touches on benefits specific to the US–Mexico economic relationship. In 2009, President Obama and thenMexican President Felipe Calderón signed the US–Mexico Bilateral Framework on Clean Energy and Climate Change to support joint scientific efforts already underway. Since then, the two countries have formulated additional legislation related to the framework’s goals, while scientists like Lozoya-Gloria and Devarenne collaborated to turn the goals into realities. As the third-largest supplier of crude oil to the United States, Mexico is economically bound to the United States, while the United States is dependent on Mexico’s oil. However, as US demand for oil is rising, crude oil

production in Mexico is falling. It’s critical to both economies that other energy sources offset any downturns in their crude-oil trade. Devarenne and Lozoya-Gloria’s research could contribute toward boosting development, employment and economic growth in Mexico, while meeting the escalating demand for clean energy in the United States. With that in mind, Devarenne hopes to continue working with Lozoya-Gloria to find a way to produce B. braunii more rapidly. Enhancing its ability to ward off pathogens is only one part of this goal. Another involves a better grasp of the alga’s genetic makeup. “What we are really interested in is determining the genes responsible for making oil and understanding how they function,” Devarenne says. “When we understand this, maybe we can manipulate those genes to make more oil. We might even be able to transfer the genes into other photosynthetic organisms—such as tobacco plants— that can be grown plentifully, cheaply and quickly.”

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Characterization of Defense Mechanisms in the Green Microalgae Botryococcus braunii Timothy Devarenne Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics Texas A&M University Edmundo Lozoya-Gloria Department of Genetic Engineering Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN) Irapuato


STUBBORN BACTERIA CAN PRODUCE A VEGGIE TALE

by

Leann e So u th 6


a

N AUSE AT ING veg gi e t al e

Caution: When you serve fresh fruits and vegetables at your next dinner party, you could make your guests sick.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in six Americans, or 48 million, will get sick each year from a food-borne illness. Yet Americans have a healthy appetite for fresh produce. Meeting that demand requires help from foreign growers. Mexico is the largest international supplier of fresh vegetables and fruits to the United States. Almost half of that supply arrives by truck through Texas border stations. If a contaminated produce shipment is discovered, it generally is recalled or earns an import alert. Mexican farms suffer and public trust in Mexican produce is damaged. Mexican commercial growers know that using stringent hygienic practices to grow, harvest and package their vegetables and fruits is the best line of defense against contamination. What they can’t control is what happens when the produce is handed off to a third-party shipper. So what does happen? That’s what two food safety researchers sought to find out with a 2011 CONACYT grant.

Texas A&M University food microbiologist Alejandro Castillo and Elisa Cabrera-Díaz from the University of Guadalajara have spent their careers researching food safety and have collaborated for more than a decade. Using funds from their CONACYT grant, Castillo and Cabrera-Díaz investigated how two bacterial pathogens— Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes—reacted when attached to tomatoes and avocados and put under conditions similar to when produce is shipped to market. Former PhD student Liliana Martínez, now an associate professor at the University of Guadalajara, led the team working at Cabrera-Díaz’s lab in Mexico using tomatoes and avocados collected from farms in the states of Jalisco and Michoacán. Contamination during harvest may happen when a fruit or vegetable stem is cut with an infected knife or during packing when produce is washed in compromised dump tanks. The research team mimicked these scenarios by either dunking

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the tomatoes and avocados in a solution containing Salmonella and Listeria or by placing 10 droplets of the solution on the skin of the produce. The produce was kept at 25°C (54°F) for one hour, then randomly divided into groups and stored for 10 days at 5°C (41°F), 12°C (54°F) or 25°C (77°F) for avocados and at 12°C (54°F) or 25°C (77°F) for tomatoes. At regular intervals during the storage period researchers removed small samples of the produce to check for changes in the pathogens. The number of pathogens declined over the 10-day period, though the decline was greater among produce in the colder temperature. Yet, while the bacteria declined, they did not disappear. Salmonella and Listeria were still present on the tomatoes and avocados, regardless of the temperature. Those that remained

Temperature makes a difference. had attached themselves more securely to the surface of the produce. But temperature did make a difference in turning some of the pathogens into the unwelcome relatives who won’t leave. After ten days at the higher temperature, the pathogens had formed a sticky biofilm that acted as a protective shield from cleaning agents and activated virulent genes that would lead to a severe infection if consumed. These findings tell Cabrera-Díaz and Castillo that as long as truckers keep their loads cold and reach their market on time, contamination has a slim chance. However, if that truck breaks down or if it gets stopped for a prolonged search at a border station, chances for contamination rise with the thermostat. Next, the researchers want to study what happens between the pathogens and produce surface when the temperature is correct.

Magnified view of salmonella b acteria inv ading hu man cells .

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“It’s one thing to already have the microorganism,” said Castillo. “You better keep produce cold. Your best bet is to not have the micro-organism in the first place. So what happens if you have a few pathogen cells and you follow all these guidelines? Are they sufficient to say nothing is going to happen? That the risk is very low? Or is there a risk, even if we’re doing everything right as we now know it, of something happening?” The two also are lending their CONACYT grant findings and expertise to a Texas A&M research team on a pending proposal with the US Department of Agriculture Castillo says each new discovery moves their work closer to helping ensure a safe, steady food supply for American consumers and a stable, robust trade partnership with Mexico.

Your best bet is to not have the microorganism in the first place.

Diagnostics of Potential for Bacterial Colonization and Study of Virulence Factors in Bacterial Pathogens on Fresh Produce During Export from Mexico to the USA as Affected by Produce Surface Topography and Transport Conditions Alejandro Castillo Department of Animal Science Texas A&M University Elisa Cabrera-Díaz Department of Salud Pública University of Guadalajara

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BI RDS OF A F E ATHER Like-minded ecologists flock together to save migratory species

by

K ara Bo u n d s S o c o l 10


For decades, migratory-bird populations have been on the decline. Hypotheses vary from climate change to habitat loss to the use of pesticides on crops. It’s the latter premise that sparks the interest of Texas A&M University’s Miguel Mora Zacarías. Joining forces with fellow ecologists, Víctor Cabos Gasca and Jorge Navarro Alberto, from Mexico’s Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, they used a Texas A&M-CONACYT grant to study the impact of agricultural and industrial contaminants on migratory birds as they cross the Yucatán Peninsula, making their winter pilgrimage from North America to South America. “The ultimate question that we pursued is determining to what extent chemical contaminants are impacting wildlife populations,” Mora said. In this study, the wildlife under consideration were songbirds, including the yellow-rumped warbler (Dendroica coronata)—a migratory bird that often chooses its habitat near cropland. Are chemical As the study indicates, Mora’s academic field is highly specialized. contaminants Housed within Texas A&M’s Department of Wildlife and impacting wildlife Fisheries Sciences, he is a professor and wildlife ecotoxicologist, populations? meaning that his work is focused on the impact of contaminants on wildlife. But Mora is also an

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ornithologist: an expert on birds. His research is generally narrowed from contamination effects on wildlife as a whole to its effects on avian species in particular. For this study, Mora focused on the seasonally migrating neotropical songbirds. Providing additional fieldwork support was Texas A&M graduate student Alejandra Maldonado. Agricultural contaminants can have a detrimental impact on birds that eat the treated plants and the insects that feed on those plants. The contaminants can negatively affect the birds’ congenital development, their behavior and their reproductive, endocrine and immune systems. Flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and various persistent organic pollutants can additionally affect the birds’ thyroid function and mating practices. Mora and his colleagues tested the warblers specifically for agricultural pesticides, fire retardants and other man-made organic chemicals. Other goals of the study aimed at evaluating potential DNA damage and determining the residue levels of these contaminants, which are stored in the birds’ fatty tissue.


The study began in Texas during the warblers’ fall migration and ended there when the birds returned in the spring. Near the cotton and cornfields of Brazos County, the researchers set up mist nets, which catch birds without harming them. Researchers then collected blood samples from the captured birds and inspected their feathers. In some cases, the birds also provided liver, muscle and fatty-tissue samples. The process was repeated further south at the Gulf Coast Bird Observatory in Lake Jackson and, in the winter months, at the Celestun Biosphere Reserve on the northwest coast of the Yucatán Peninsula. The Texas A&M-CONACYT grant covered costs for the Texas and Yucatán portion of the bird study, which extended to Costa Rica. Sharing ideas and Mora admits that the data acquired in the study were a bit research findings surprising. As expected, a small amount of pesticides was detected is vital to reaching in the birds during all three seasons. However, while pesticides conservation goals. are not as highly regulated in Latin America as in the United States, the researchers did not detect a significantly higher level of contaminants in the warblers once they reached Yucatán, nor when they traveled on to Costa Rica and back to Texas. Mora says that any number of factors could have influenced the results. Farmers in Latin America, for instance, often choose not to spend as much money on pesticides as their Texas counterparts. He also emphasizes that one study does not provide a definitive answer—a similar study next year might yield different results.

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With this in mind, Mora believes that scientists need to continue to look more carefully at the potential effect of pesticides on migratory bird populations. The sooner an answer is found, the sooner the problem can be addressed. “The importance of these studies start from a conservation standpoint,” he said. “Is there a problem, and if there is, what can natural resource managers like state and federal agencies do to help the bird populations persist?” Mora says his contact with Cobos and Navarro will continue. He likens the Texas A&M-CONACYT grants to “seed money” that brings like-minded researchers together to build relationships and continue collaborative efforts long after the funded project is over. A previous Texas A&M-CONACYT grant, for instance, funded Mora’s research on the impact of mercury on migratory American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) at Mexico’s Lake Chapala. Three manuscripts resulted from that project, and Mora continues to consult with his co-investigators in Mexico. Sharing ideas and research findings is vital to reaching conservation goals. “Understanding the function of individual species and conserving what we have is important not only for the joy of seeing these animals, but because they play an important role in the balance of the ecosystem,” he says. “A little, tiny bird might not mean a lot, but we never know what far-reaching role that bird might play.”


An Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Agricultural Pesticides and Persistent Organic Pollutants on Neotropical Birds During Migration Miguel A. Mora-Zacarías Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Texas A&M University Jorge Augusto Navarro Alberto Department of Ecología Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán (UADY)

Summer bree ding gr ounds M ig rato r y zone W in ter feed ing gr ounds

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DON’T SNEEZE

You’ll Kill the Shrimp Researchers seek genetic solution for healthier shellfish

by

Leann e So u th 14


Americans love shrimp and, on average, eat about four pounds of it annually. The shellfish is the most popular seafood imported into the United States, accounting for more than 30 percent of all seafood imported each year. The booming demand has led to an equally booming shrimp farming (or aquaculture) industry in the United States and Mexico, as well as worldwide. With the growth in shrimp farms came a troubling discovery: shrimp have a lousy immune system.

Antibodies—the missing link It’s like this: If you get an infection, your body produces an antibody that attacks the bad stuff (antigen) and kills it before you get sick. That antibody remembers the bad antigen and is ready the next time it shows up in your system. This is how you build immunity with a flu shot. Shrimp can’t do this. So, if a virus gets into a large shrimp tank, it can cause problems, like when a stomach virus hits an elementary school. But not every child gets sick and not all infected shrimp die. Two researchers who study different aspects of shrimp immune systems believe they know why: some shrimp possess a gene that fights off the virus. “There’s great interest in figuring out how we can use the shrimp’s immune system to increase resistance to these diseases,” said Texas A&M immunogeneticist Michael Criscitiello, who partnered with Rogerio Sotello-

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A genome is an organism’s genetic instruction manual “written” in DNA. Mundo from the Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, (CIAD) in 2010 when they met to discuss their mutual research interest. Criscitiello, Sotello-Mundo and Texas A&M geneticist Scott Dindot formed a research team and, with funding from a 2011 CONACYT grant, started looking for disease-resistant genes in the popular shellfish.

the DNA doesn’t do the heavy lifting. It tells RNA what to do and sends it to a workshop in the cell that builds that gene’s character trait or function. When DNA sends a message via RNA, that means that genetic trait will be turned on and show up in that organism. But not every gene is turned on. So, along with developing the DNA sequences, the team created a complete list, known as a transcriptome, of all RNA messages sent out among the 16,000 genes harvested in the Pacific whiteleg shrimp.

Searching for immunity needles in an 16,000-gene haystack The first task was to create a complete sequence of the genome of the Pacific whiteleg shrimp, the most popular shellfish used in shrimp farming. A genome is an organism’s genetic instruction manual “written” in DNA. The DNA in each gene contains a specific set of instructions, or sequences, for that gene’s unique function. But

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The researchers extracted tissue from the abdominal muscle (which is the part people eat), the hepatopancreas (which is like the liver, pancreas and spleen’s lymphatic tissue all rolled into one organ), the gills and the legs of a male Pacific whiteleg shrimp. They sent the tissue samples to the AgriLife Genomics and Bioinformatics Service Center, a facility in California and a lab at Duke University for complex sequencing and analysis. The resulting two terabytes of data (equivalent to about 500,000 digital photos) took the research team two years to parse out into the genome sequences and transcriptome. The researchers then stored all of the data online through the Texas A&M University Libraries for public access—a common practice among researchers. Now other shrimp researchers have access to this data, expanding the areas being studied and contributing to additional new discoveries.


Down syndrome gene: a possible shrimp antibody In their search for immune properties,

The research team identified a set of genes called DSCAM – Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule.

the research team identified a set of genes called the Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (DSCAM). These genes may cause Down syndrome in the vertebrate brain, but act more like an antibody in invertebrates. Researchers also discovered that shrimp lectins, molecules that bind sugar, appear to recognize bacterial sugar groups. Shrimp have a whole lot more lectins and more interesting kinds of lectins than humans. These findings were detailed in Nature Scientific Reports doi:10.1038/ srep07081 in 2014.

Next step: compare RNA messages of infected shrimp Criscitiello and Sotello-Mundo leveraged their CONACYT findings into new funding to continue their work. Next, they will compare the transcriptome against shrimp from Sotello-Mundo’s lab in Mexico that have either survived a viral infestation or died from an outbreak. “Now that we know what the transcriptome is, we can look for differences in ones that are protected from the virus or are susceptible to it,” Criscitiello says. “We can look at the whole transcriptome and see if there were other things I might not have thought were important that show up between these disease resistant/ susceptible populations.” And with each new project, Criscitiello and Sotello-Mundo move closer to their ultimate goal: to create a genetic blueprint of a shrimp’s immune system and develop breeding or other techniques that result in healthier farm grown shrimp.

Genomic and Immunogenetic Tools for Aquacultured Shrimp Disease Resistance Michael F. Criscitiello Department of Veterinary Pathobiology Texas A&M University Scott V. Dindot Department of Veterinary Pathobiology Texas A&M University Rogerio R. Sotelo-Mundo Department of Aquatic Molecular Biology Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo (CIAD)

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Testing the

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Sh aro n Ro e 18


Aquifers around the world are being depleted. For the farmers, industrialists and residents relying on the Independence Aquifer in Guanajuato, Mexico, depletion has become a million-dollar question: When will the water run out? With the help of a Texas A&MCONACYT grant, Rick Giardino and Peter Knappett of Texas A&M University’s Department of Geology and Geophysics joined forces with Yanmei Li, Horacio Hernández and Raúl Miranda from Mexico’s University of Guanajuato (UGTO) to define the parameters of the diminishing water supply facing Guanajuato. Their findings revealed another huge problem—the quality of the water. Knappett explains, “It’s a semiarid climate—getting less than twenty inches of rain per year. It doesn’t have rivers and is built on volcanic rock and sediment. Because 99 percent of the population is dependent on groundwater, a lot of things are driven by water scarcity. We wanted to understand how widespread this huge depletion in the aquifer is and how rapidly it is continuing to change.” That 99 percent equals more than 500,000 people, and the population is growing. Industrial development is also on the rise, further complicating

the situation. But as one of Mexico’s top food-producing areas, Guanajuato’s dependence on irrigation decreases the water-table depth the most. “Nobody we talk to really knows where the groundwater table used to be,” Knappett says, “but now the water table is typically 200 meters below the surface. It’s been documented that it has fallen over the last sixty years, and in some places the water-table depth can fall as much as four meters per year.”

99% of the population is dependent on groundwater.

G u a n a j u a t o , Me xi co

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Water Quality

Much of the Independence Aquifer has toxic levels of arsenic and fluoride.

At the same time, the general problem involves not just the amount of water available, but also the quality of that water. Knappett’s description is chilling. “Even in the US there’s a lack of testing going on in ground water. Much of the Independence Aquifer has toxic levels of arsenic and fluoride. There are non-governmental organizations in Mexico working with communities whose kids’ teeth are falling out due to excessive amounts of fluoride in the drinking water. Fluoride especially affects young children’s bones, too. And we’re really part of the same geologic province, so arsenic, and to some extent fluoride, shows up through Central Mexico and into Texas.”

to campus every day and went to the Brazos River to do measurements on monitoring wells and measuring aquifer properties. Three months later, we all went down to work in the field together. Bonding had already taken place, so we could go straight to work.” The relational focus of the project facilitated research goals while laying important groundwork for the future. Knappett believes that it is important to work with the University of Guanajuato and to have A&M students coming down with them together—there is local connection. The UGTO students live in that area and people know them and trust them—they went to high school together.

Cooperation

Sharing the Knowledge

A long-term, cooperative approach was obviously the only way lasting change could occur, and it meant not only training, educating and developing up-to-date research methods, but also fostering solid relationships. “The CONACYT grant really facilitated the research and the outcomes,” Giardino says, “providing us with the opportunity to build strong research and educational relationships with UGTO. It not only connected us, but also our students.” Directly funded by the CONACYT grant, Li and her husband, Hernández, brought fifteen undergraduate and graduate students from UGTO to Texas A&M for one week of training and hands on demonstrations with Knappett and A&M graduate students. “The idea was to have a week of Texas A&M training,” Knappett says, “and then go down to Mexico. Students from both universities came

The cooperation doesn’t end in the field. “We don’t just grab the data,” Knappett says. “We go back and share it. We’re providing communities and state government with information about the scope of the problem and the quality of the water they are drinking— which is something they didn’t know before. It allows them to plan for the future in terms of the investment they might have to make.” As they pump the water table and start drawing water from much deeper in the aquifer—this volcanic, hot aquifer with water temperatures of 60 degrees Celsius—it could cause an upwelling of arsenic and fluoride. Giardino adds, “We want to help the government solve the problem. Now we have a very good relationship with government officers—they have asked us to help them determine how to manage the problem. The CONACYT grant has been a catalyst. It started

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with two universities and has expanded to six universities, communities and non-governmental organizations. It’s provided us with the opportunity to go after other grants. We’ve built a strong relationship that will last over years.”

Vulnerability Assessment of Surface Water and Ground Water Resources in the San Miguel de Allende Region in the State of Guanajuato, Mexico: A BiNational Approach to Research and Education Peter S. Knappett Department of Geology and Geophysics Texas A&M University John R. Giardino Department of Geology and Geophysics Texas A&M University Christopher A. Houser Department of Geography Texas A&M University Jesús Horacio Hernández Anguiano Department Ingeníeria Geomática e Hidráulica University of Guanajuato

Yanmei Li Department of Mine, Metallurgy and Geology Engineering University of Guanajuato Raúl Miranda Avilés Department of Mine, Metallurgy and Geology Engineering University of Guanajuato

an upwelling of

ARSENIC and

FLUORIDE 21


Building a better

FUEL

by

Geor g e Ha le 22


CELL

Thanks to a Texas A&M-CONACYT grant, researchers from the United States and Mexico are working together to improve hydrogen fuel cells that could one day diminish the world’s dependence on fossil fuels while also reducing pollution. Led by Perla Balbuena, a professor in Texas A&M University’s Dwight Look College of Engineering, and Omar Solorza-Feria, a professor at the Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN) in Mexico City, the project is using different materials and techniques to make a key component of fuel cells—known as the catalyst—more effective, more durable and less expensive to produce.

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Like batteries, fuel cells work by converting chemical energy into electricity. However, instead of having a fixed supply of chemicals stored inside like a battery, fuel cells use a constant flow of hydrogen and oxygen to generate electricity. This means that fuel cells produce electricity without pollution, with only water and a small amount of heat as by-products. “From the point of view of the environment this is good,” Balbuena said. “It doesn’t produce pollution.”


Fuel cells There are several types of fuel cells, each works in different conditions. The fuel cells Balbuena and Solorza-Feria are working on—proton exchange membrane fuel cells—work well at temperatures below 100 degrees Celsius. PEM fuel cells rely on a permeable membrane, which allows hydrogen ions to pass through to combine with oxygen with the help of a catalyst. The catalyst is made from nano-particles of noble metals, such as platinum or palladium and their alloys. To be truly useful, fuel-cell designs need to balance their ability to generate electricity with durability and cost. They need to produce enough energy to power a car, be durable enough to keep working for years and be affordable for consumers. High production costs, mostly due to the use of platinum, have put a damper on fuel-cell adoption so far. To reduce costs, some designs use less expensive materials like iron, nickel or cobalt. But fuel-cell membranes are made of an acidic material. Catalysts made of these materials tend to dissolve. Those made of platinum or palladium, which are non-reactive, are more durable. Balbuena and Solorza-Feria’s solution is to build a catalyst using a structure made of bismuth coated with a thin layer of nanometer-scale platinum or palladium particles. This would provide adequate

24

energy output while keeping fuel-cell production costs low enough to create a viable alternative energy source. In addition, the design would be durable because the bismuth structure is protected from the acidic membrane by its noble-metal coating. The key is finding the best combination of materials and structure, which calls for researchers to test many different designs. This is time-consuming and expensive, which is why the project is using some of Texas A&M’s expertise and computing resources to test designs with computer simulations of chemical reactions. This saves time and money by allowing the researchers to test many combinations of structure, materials and environmental conditions. Computer simulations will narrow prospective designs to a handful of top performers for further testing at CINVESTAV-IPN. After building prototypes of these catalysts, the research team will evaluate the designs with a series of tests. First, the team will use x-ray diffraction and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope to examine the catalyst’s tiny structures, morphology and chemical compositions; this will help the team to make sure it has produced


A i r p o l l u t i o n i n Me xi co C i t y i s a co n t i n u i n g co n ce r n f o r ci t i ze n s, h e a l t h e xp e r t s a n d e n vi r o n m e n t a l i st s.

what it wants. After passing this thorough characterization, each prototype will go through various electrochemical tests, measuring how much energy it would produce and how much it is affected by an acidic environment. After passing these tests, each catalyst will then be assembled with a proton exchange membrane and put into a housing to make a single and complete fuel-cell stack. The team will then install the stack in its custom-built test car and run a series of tests that mimic real-world conditions. In addition, the collaboration benefits students at both universities. The project involves two to three graduate students, with occasional parttime undergraduate and visiting students. With research taking place in both countries, there is a great deal of communication between the schools. Balbuena said the most important aspect is the exchange of students. The grant, although limited, has allowed a student from Mexico to

come to College Station for six months, providing insight into both the research at hand and international collaboration in general. This collaborative approach will help bridge the technological gap between the two countries and will advance technology on both sides of the border by developing human infrastructure through an integrated plan.

Alloy Nanocatalysts for Fuel Cell Electrodes Perla B. Balbuena Department of Chemical Engineering Texas A&M University Omar Solorza-Feria Department of Chemistry Centro de InvestigaciĂłn y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto PolitĂŠcnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN)

25


Texas A&M University–CONACYT: Collaborative Research Grant Program

more than

$5 MILLION in seedfunding

Texas A&M University and the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT) began the Collaborative Research Grant Program in 2001— fifteen years ago. To date, nearly 219 joint research teams from Texas A&M and Mexico have received more than $5 million in seed-funding under this program. The program grew from mutually recognized interests in topics important to the United States and Mexico. The objectives of the program are to develop and sustain international research collaborations between Texas A&M, higher education institutions in Mexico, and CONACYT research centers; jointly author high-impact publications in leading professional journals or books; and submit joint proposals for external research funding from competitive grant agencies. The purpose of the competitive, peer-reviewed Collaborative

26

Research Grant Program is to advance inter-institutional cooperation in science, technology and scholarly activities through the complementary efforts of scientists and scholars from Texas A&M and Mexican institutions. A principal investigator is required from both Texas A&M and a CONACYT-registered institution. Texas A&M is the state’s first public institution of higher education. With a student body of more than 59,000 and more than 5,200 acres on the College Station campus, Texas A&M is also among the nation’s largest universities. Texas A&M is dedicated to the discovery, development, communication and application of knowledge in a wide range of academic and professional fields. Its mission of providing the highest quality undergraduate and graduate programs is inseparable from its mission of developing new


understandings through research and creativity. It prepares students to assume roles in leadership, responsibility and service to society. As one of only 62 members of the prestigious Association of American Universities (AAU), an association of leading public and private research universities in the United States and Canada, Texas A&M boasts some of the top programs in academic research and scholarship. Texas A&M is one of only 17 institutions in the nation to hold the triple designation as a land-grant, sea-grant and space-grant university and is an active member of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) — a research, policy and advocacy organization dedicated to strengthening and advancing the work of public universities in the US, Canada and Mexico. Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (the National Council of Science and Technology) (CONACYT) is Mexico’s entity in charge of the promotion of scientific and technological activities, setting government policies for these matters, and granting scholarships for postgraduate studies. It is the equivalent of the US National Science Foundation. It is officially designated as a decentralized public agency of Mexico’s federal government. CONACYT

grants scholarships for graduate studies (masters and doctoral) in Mexico for programs that have been recognized by CONACYT in the Registry of Quality Graduate Programs (PNPC). CONACYT also grants scholarships for Mexican nationals to pursue graduate studies in foreign countries and provides funding for postdoctoral positions and sabbatical leaves. In addition, CONACYT administers the National System of Researchers (SNI); manages programs to encourage industry and private sector involvement in science and technology research and development through the RENIECYT (National Registry of Institutions and Businesses in Science and Technology) to offer financing to technical and technological development projects; and manages 27 public research centers.

27

The program grew from mutually recognized interests in topics important to the United States and Mexico.


2016

Awards Mechanisms Mediating Brucella Intracellular Parasitism

A Land Cover Multispectral Classification and IoT-based Intelligent Sensor Management for Real-time Precision Agriculture Applications

Paul de Figueiredo Edgar Sánchez Sinencio

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

José Luis Puente García Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Alejandro Castillo Atoche Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán (UADY)

Ecohydrology of Sonoran Desert Shrublands

Texas A&M University

Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation of Arsenic, Antimony and Heavy Metals in Soils and Sediments Contaminated by Mine Tailings

Alejandro E. Castellanos V.

Youjun Deng

Bradford P. Wilcox

10

Projects Funded

Universidad de Sonora (UNISON)

Texas A&M University

María Aurora Armienta Dynamic Corrosive Modeling Affecting Reinforced Concrete Durability and Reliability Structures in the Gulf of Mexico

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Survey of RNA Viruses in the Mediterranean Fruit Fly

Homero Castaneda-López Maríana Mateos,

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Pedro Castro Borges Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV IPN)

Did the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) Modulate Late Holocene Hurricane Strikes on the Yucatán Peninsula

José Pablo Liedo Fernández El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR), Unidad Tapachula

Connectivity of Large Apex Predators in the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) Using Natural Tracers

David Wells Peter J. van Hengstum

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Sharon Herzka

Luis M. Mejía-Ortíz

Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE)

University of Quintana Roo (UGROO)

28


Cyber-Enabled Assembly System Monitoring and Intelligent Prognostics

Sheng-Jen Hsieh Texas A&M University

José A. Segura-Victorino Center for Engineering and Industrial Development (CIDESI)

Border State Beef Production Efficiency in México and the United States: Genomic Improvement of Early Life Fertility in Heat Tolerant Cows

David Greg Riley Texas A&M University

Pablo Luna Nevárez Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora (ITSON)

Special Research Program Characterization of the Cyclin Dependent Kinase Gene(s) Involved in the Interaction Between the Cyclin D and Retinoblastoma Genes, and their Function Related to the Cell Cycle of the Green Microalga Botryococcus braunii

Timothy P. Devarenne Texas A&M University

Edmundo Lozoya-Gloria

2

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV IPN)

Exploiting Biodegradable Packaging and Electron Beam Pasteurization for Fruits and Vegetables to Develop Healthy Vending Food Items

Suresh D Pillai Texas A&M University

Tomás J. Madera-Santana Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo (CIAD)

29

Special Projects Funded


2015

Awards Advanced Computational Methods for Detection of High-Risk Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques Based on OpticalCoherence Tomography and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

Molecular Characterization of the Adverse Effects of Shift Work on Metabolic and Cardiovascular Functions

Jerome S. Menet Javier Jo

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Rudolf M. Buijs

Daniel Ulises Campos Delgado

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (UASLP)

10

Projects Funded

The Mexican Plateau as a Center of Diversification for Arid Land Fauna: A Comparative Phylogeographic Study of Multiple Rodent Species

Immunogenetic Assessment of the Critically Endangered Totoaba Fish to Enhance Survival and Repopulation After Hatchery Rearing

Micheal Criscitiello Jessica E. Light

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Aldo A. Arvizu-Flores

Jesús A. Fernández Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua (UACH)

Distribution patterns of anchialine fauna in the Yucatán Peninsula

Thomas Iliffe Texas A&M at Galveston

Fernando Álvarez Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

30

Universidad de Sonora (UNISON)


Plastic in Diabesity—an Epigenetic Investigation

Mahua Choudhury Texas A&M University

Antonio De León Rodríguez Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICYT)

Antibody-guided Vaccination to Prevent Coccidial Infections in Poultry— Correlation with Xanthophyll Absorption, an Indicator for Gut Health

Luc Berghman Texas A&M University

Xóchitl Hernández-Velasco Reactivity and Stability of Core-shell Nanocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Theory and Experiments

Perla B. Balbuena Texas A&M University

Omar Solorza Feria Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Special Research Programs

Role of Flippase Proteins During Polarized Growth in Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora Crassa

Characterization of Population Genetic Structures and Outbreak biotopes of the Central American Locust (Schistocerca piceifrons piceifrons) Using Novel and Integrative Technologies

Brian D. Shaw

Hojun Song

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Rosa R. Mouriño-Pérez

María Guadalupe Galindo Mendoza

Centro de Investigación Científica y Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

Development of High Throughput DNA Sequencing Genomic Tools for Conservation Genomics of the Critically Endangered Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtle (Lepidochelys kempii): A Binational Genomic Monitoring Effort for Nesting Populations in Tamaulipas and Texas

Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí (UASLP)

Microcapsule Delivery Platform to Enhance Immune Protection against Brucellosis

Thomas A. Ficht Texas A&M University

Francisco Suárez Guemes Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Luis A. Hurtado Texas A&M University

Miguel Ángel Reyes López Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN)

2 31

Special Projects Funded


2014

Awards

11

Projects Funded

An Investigation of the Effects of an Intensive Science and Social Shared-Reading Curriculum on Spanish-speaking Children’s Oral Language Development

Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Associated to Growth, Fertility and First-calf Survival Traits in Brangus Heifers Managed Under Semi-arid Extensive Conditions in Southern Sonora

Cynthia Riccio

David G. Riley

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Gabriela López

Pablo Luna Nevárez

Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM)

Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora (ITSON)

Deep-tissue Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissue

High-performance Electrode Architecture for Lithium–Air Batteries

Vladislav Yakovlev Partha P. Mukherjee

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Rubén Ramos García

Abel Hernández-Guerrero

Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE)

Universidad de Guanajuato (UGTO)

Future Climate Change Impacts on Agroclimate and Surface Hydrology: Case Studies in Baja California (Mexico) and Texas

Nanoclusters for the De-sulfurization of Heavy Oils

Huilin Gao

Donald H. Galvan

Texas A&M University

Jorge M. Seminario Texas A&M University Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Francisco Bautista Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Identification of Mycoplasma genitalium and its Correlates in Mexican Women

Vulnerability Assessment of Surface Water and Ground Water Resources in the Guanajuato-San Miguel de Allende region of Mexico: A Bi-national Approach to Research and Education

Brandie D. Taylor

John R. Giardino

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Fernando Martín Guerra-Infante

Horacio Hernández Universidad of Guanajuato (UGTO)

Instituto Nacional de Perinatología

32


Can Vegetation Reduce Sand Dune Erosion in the Gulf of Mexico? A Bi-national Research Experiment and Student Exchange

Rusty A. Feagin Texas A&M University

María Luisa Martínez

Role of CRAC Channels in Control of Inflammation

Shenyuan Zhang Texas A&M University

Roberto Carlos Munoz Garay Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Instituto de Ecología A.C. (INECOL)

Preliminary Study to Detect Aflatoxin and Fumonisin Co-exposure in a Mexican Population from the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey, Mexico

Timothy D. Phillips Texas A&M University

Alicia G. Marroquín Cardona Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

Special Research Programs An Alternative Use of Horticultural Crops: Stressed Plants as Biofactories of Health Promoting Compounds Targeting High Value Health Markets for the US-Mexican Trade

Luis Cisneros-Zevallos Texas A&M University

Daniel Alberto Jacobo-Velázquez Tecnológico de Monterrey (ITESM)

2

Special Projects Funded

Characterization of Resistance to Root- and FoliageFeeding Insects in Maize Breeding Lines, Landraces and Wild Ancestors

Julio S. Bernal Texas A&M University

Ruairidh Sawers Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

33


2013

Awards The Entomopathogen Beauveria Bassiana as a Beneficial Endophyte in Cotton

Alloy Nanocatalysts with Porous Structures for Fuel Cells

Perla B. Balbuena Gregory A. Sword

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Omar Solorza Feria

Patricia Taméz Guerra Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (FCB-UANL)

Power-Efficient High-Performance Sigma–Delta Digitizers with Decimating Filter for Wireless Communication Systems

10

Projects Funded

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Poorly Crystalline Nanoparticles Formed in Acid Mine Drainages and Their Effects on Arsenic Speciation, Transformation and Transport in a Limestone Environment

José Silva-Martínez Youjun Deng

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Gordana Jovanovic Dolecek Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE)

34

María Aurora Armienta Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)


Developing Genetic Markers to Assess Population Structure, Connectivity, Effective Population Size and Genetic Traceability of Gulf Red Snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in Mexican and US Waters of the Gulf of Mexico

John R. Gold Texas A&M University

Development of Phage Cocktail for Prophylaxis of Travelers’ Diarrhea

Ryland F. Young III Texas A&M University

Gabriel Guarneros-Peña Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Axayácatl Rocha-Olivares Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

Reducing the Dependence on Fishmeal by using Plant Protein Feedstuffs in the Diets of Sciaenid Species for Enhanced Aquacultural Production

Next-Generation Genomic Tools for Management and Conservation of Wild and Domestic Stocks of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus Punctatus, an Important Aquaculture Species in Southern US and Northeast Mexico

Delbert M. Gatlin III

Luis A. Hurtado

Special Research Programs

Texas A&M University

Gaspar Manuel Parra Bracamonte

Texas A&M University

Martín Pérez-Velázquez Universidad de Sonora (UNISON)

Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN)

Torrefaction of Agricultural Biomass for Enhancing the Energy Content of Fuels Utilizing Global Warming CO2 gas

Devesh Ranjan Texas A&M University

Víctor Hugo Rangel Hernández University of Guanajuato (UGTO)

Ecology and Epidemiology of Chagas Disease across a Transnational Gradient

Sarah Hamer Texas A&M University

Virgilio Bocanegra García Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN)

Social Selection and Functional Constraints on Morphological Diversification in Xiphophorus Fishes

Gil Rosenthal Texas A&M University

Guillermina Alcaraz Zubeldia Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

PET- and PDT-based Approaches for Diagnostics and Treatment of Melanoma In Vivo

Kevin Burgess Texas A&M University

Eduardo Peña Cabrera Universidad de Guanajuato (UGTO)

35

2

Special Projects Funded


2012

Awards Thermography-based System for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

Sheng-Jen Hsieh Texas A&M University

Carmen Clapp Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

An Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Agricultural Pesticides and Persistent Organic Pollutants on Neotropical Birds During Migration

10

Projects Funded

Miguel A. Mora Texas A&M University

Jorge A. Navarro Alberto Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán

Characterization of Nano-precipitates in NiTi (Zr,Hf) High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

Ibrahim Karaman Texas A&M University

Francisco Javier Espinoza Beltrán

Characterization of Defense Mechanisms in the Green Microalgae Botryococcus Braunii

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Timothy P. Devarenne Texas A&M University

Role of Microvesicles from Breast Cancer Cells Stimulated with Linoleic Acid as Inductor of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in Breast Epithelial Cells

Weston Porter Texas A&M University

José-Eduardo Pérez-Salazar Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-PIN)

36

Edmundo Lozoya Gloria Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)


Nearshore Physical Processes, Contamination and Macroalgae and Invertebrate Communities in a Threatened Bay in Baja California, Mexico

What Promotes Species Diversification in Anchialine Habitats?

Thomas M. Iliffe Ayal Anis Texas A&M University

Lydia Ladah Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

Expanding Native Marine Fish Aquaculture in the Gulf of Mexico: Unraveling the Early Development of the Common Snook (Centropomus Undecimalis) through International Collaboration

Kevin W. Conway Texas A&M University

Carlos Alfonso Álvarez González

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Fernando Álvarez Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Special Research Programs Elucidating the Pathobiology of Muscular Dystrophies: Regulation of Intracellular Ca2+ in the Drosophila Model of Dystroglycanopathies

Vlad Panin Texas A&M University

Agustín Guerrero-Hernández

Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Novel Algorithms for Quantitative Molecular Imaging with Multispectral Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

Generation of a Cross-protective Vaccine Against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

Javier A. Jo

Waithaka Mwangi

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Daniel Ulises Campos Delgado

Jesús Hernández

Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí

Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD)

Exploring the Use of Endosymbiotic Bacteria (Genus Wolbachia) to Control Fruit Fly Pests of Anastrepha Genus in Mexico

Maríana Mateos Texas A&M University

José Pablo Liedo Fernández El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)

2 37

Special Projects Funded


2011

Awards Modeling Selective Growth of Carbon Nanotubes for Electronic Devices

Perla B. Balbuena Texas A&M University

Detoxify Atoxins by Integrating Mexican Food Processing Traditions and Advances in New Findings on Clay-Mycotoxin Interactions

Youjun Deng

Juan Francisco Javier Alvarado

Texas A&M University

Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya (ITC)

María Guadalupe Tenorio Arvide Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla

Persuasive Health Games with Wearable Sensors

Ricardo Gutiérrez-Osuna

16

Projects Funded

Texas A&M University

Development of Tuna Larviculture Protocols: Toward Responsible Tuna Mariculture

Isaac Rudomin

Frances Gelwick

Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey, Campus Estado de México (ITESM-CEM)

Texas A&M University

Dariel Tovar Ramírez Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIB)

Collaborative Research: Controlling Diffusion of Indium in Metal/dielectric/InGaAs Nanofilms Investigating the Role of Endosymbionts in Mexico and Texas Populations of the Potato Psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), Vector of Zebra Chip Disease in Relevance to Fitness of the Insect

Raymundo Arroyave Texas A&M University

Alberto Herrera-Gómez Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Cecilia Tamborindeguy Texas A&M University

Norma Elena Leyva López Improving Welfare, Physiology and Carcass Quality Through Management in Broiler Chickens

Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigación para el Desarrollo Integral Regional (CIIDIR)

Ciro A. Ruiz-Feria Texas A&M University

High Gain DC-DC Converters for PV Systems

Arturo Pro Martínez

Prasad Enjeti

Centro de Ganadería, Colegio de Postgraduados (COLPOS)

Texas A&M University

Jaime Eugenio Arau Roffiel CENIDET

38


Diagnostics of Potential for Bacterial Colonization and Study of Virulence Factors in Bacterial Pathogens on Fresh Produce During Export from Mexico to the USA

Alejandro Castillo Texas A&M University

Elisa Cabrera-Díaz

Nutritional Manipulation as a Health Management Tool for the Yellowtail Kingfish, Seriola ialandi

Chris Bailey Texas A&M University

Juan Pablo Lazo Corvera Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada

Centro Universitario de Ciencias Biológicas y Agropecuarias (CUCBA)

Midgut Receptors of Bt Toxin(s) in North American Populations of Helicoverpa zea: Markers Development for Resistance Diagnostics Kits

Screening for Caterpillar and Spider-mite Resistance Among Balsas Teosinte Populations and Corn Landraces to Improve Corn Resistance to Insects

Julio Bernal Patricia V. Pietrantonio Texas A&M University

Patricia Tamez Guerra

Texas A&M University

Ricardo Ramírez Romero Universidad de Guadalajara

Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León

Genomic and Immunogenetic Tools for Aquacultured Shrimp Disease Resistance

Non-traditional Approaches in the Development of Fuel Cells: Surface Implantation of Biological Catalysts on Inexpensive Electrodes

Michael F. Criscitiello

Manuel P. Soriaga

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Rogerio R. Sotelo-Mundo

Nikola Batina Skeledzija

Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD)

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa

Seafloor Imaging of Alacran Reef and Related Features Typing Virulent Isolates of Lyme Disease Agents in Central Mexico

Albert Mulenga Texas A&M University

Javier Torres López

Niall Slowey Texas A&M University

Pedro Luis Ardisson Herrera Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Coordinación de Investigación en Salud, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS)

39


2010

Awards An Assessment of Mercury Contamination in Fish and Wildlife of Lake Chapala: Implications for Human and Environmental Health

Fatty Acid-CoA Ligase (ACL) as a Novel Drug Target in Giardia intestinalis

Guan Zhu Miguel A. Mora

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

M. Guadalupe Ortega Pierres

Dioselina Álvarez Bernal Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigación para el Desarrollo Regional (CIIDIR)

18

Projects Funded

Use of Molecular Genetics to Characterize Population-genetic Differences Between Long-fin Amberjack from Hawaii and Mexico

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Converting Tuna By-products Into Value Added Ingredients and Products

Robert R. Stickney Texas A&M University

John R. Gold

María Teresa Viana Castrillon

Texas A&M University

Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (UABC)

Ricardo Vázquez Juárez Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Prevalence and Characterization of Hantaviruses and Arenaviruses in Wild and Peridomestic Settings of Northeastern Mexico

A Preliminary Health Assessment of Cultured Pacific Bluefin Tuna, Thunnus orientalis

Thomas E. Lacher

William H. Neill

Iván Castro-Arellano

Texas A&M University Instituto Tecnológico de Ciudad Victoria

Texas A&M University

Felipe Ascencio Valle Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Enterosorbent Applications to Reduce Food-borne Exposure to Mercury and Aflatoxins in Cultured Fish

Hydrodynamics of a High-Altitude Tropical CraterLake Ecosystem

Timothy D. Phillips

Ayal Anis

Roberto Civera

Texas A&M University Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Anatoliy Filonov Universidad de Guadalajara (UCG)

40


Origin and Role in Exchange Bias of Uncompensated Magnetization in Antiferromagnets

Sustainable Practices in Heritage Urban Centers: Strategies for Rehabilitation and Energy Efficiency in Historic and Vernacular Buildings

Igor V. Roshchin

Robert Warden

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Aldo Humberto Romero Castro

Abel Hernández-Guerrero

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Universidad de Guanajuato (UGTO)

Development of Packaging Designs to Facilitate Adoption of E-Beam Irradiation of Fresh Cut Produce and Fruits

Next Generation Heterogeneous Wireless Access Networks: Supporting Mobility, Security and Roaming

Alex Sprintson Suresh D. Pillai Texas A&M University

Jesús Leobardo Valenzuela García

Texas A&M University

Javier Gómez Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Universidad de Sonora (USON)

Impact of US-Mexico Border Transport of Ozone and its Precursors on Attainment of the Proposed 2010 NAAQS

Assessment of Health Literacy for Improved Diabetes Self-Management and Outcomes: A Bi-National Comparison of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans

Renyi Zhang

Ranjita Misra

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Gilberto Velázquez Angulo

Roxana Valdés Ramos

Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez (UACJ)

Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México (UAEMEX)

Generation of a Cross-protective Vaccine Against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

Modeling and Analysis of Interdependent CyberPhysical Systems with Applications to Power Grids

Waithaka Mwangi

Chanan Singh

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Jesús Hernández

Ernesto Vásquez Martínez

Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD)

Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

Characterization of New Transport Molecules that Function in the Unconventional Transport and Secretion of the Rotavirus Enterotoxin, NSP4

Judith M. Ball Texas A&M University

Susana López

Isotope Effects and the Mechanism of the BaeyerVilliger and Related Oxidation Reactions in Water

Daniel A. Singleton Texas A&M University

Juan Raúl Álvarez-Idaboy Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

41


2009 Awards

16

Projects Funded

Quantifying the Contribution of Major Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds to Ozone Air Pollution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Zone

The Evolving Coastline of the Gulf of Mexico: How Does the Salinity Tolerance of Mangroves Impact Coastal Community Structure?

Qi Ying

Anna R. Armitage

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Humberto Bravo Álvarez,

Jorge A. López-Portillo

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Instituto de Ecología A.C. (INECOL)

Adaptation of Biotechnologies for Reproduction of Cattle in the Tropics

A Unified Approach (Chemical, Plant, Microbial) for Optimized Reclamation of Metal Contaminated Soils

Thomas H. Welsh, Jr. Richard H. Loeppert

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Salvador Romo-García Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Rogelio Carrillo González Colegio de Postgraduados (CP)

Macrofaunal Species Boundaries in the Sigsbee Abyssal Plain, Gulf of Mexico

Anja Schulze Texas A&M University at Galveston

Characterization of Endosymbiotic Bacteria Associated with Fruit Fly Pests of Anastrepha Genus in Mexico

Maríana Mateos

Elva Escobar Briones Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Texas A&M University

Jorge Toledo El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)

42


Nutritional Research as a Health Management Tool for the Mexican Long-Fin Amberjack

Texas A&M University

Development of Molecular Markers to Assess Population Genetic Differentiation and Conduct QTL Studies in the Blue Crab Callinectes sapidus, An Important Commercial Fishery in Mexico and the US

Roberto Civera

Luis A. Hurtado

Christopher Bailey

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Texas A&M University

Fernando Álvarez Noguera Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Catalytic Routes to Highly Fluorescent Probes

Kevin Burgess Texas A&M University

Intelligent Control of Building Structures Subjected to Earthquakes

Eduardo Pena-Cabrera

Reza Langari

Universidad of Guanajuato (UGTO)

Texas A&M University

Wen Y Strengthening the Mexican and US Tropical Fruit Industry by Developing Value-added Processed Products and By-products as Functional Foods for Protection against Cardiovascular Disease

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN)

Texas A&M University

Developing Collaborative Relationships to Promote Multiple Land Uses: Case Study from Wildlife Ecology

Carmen Hernández-Brenes

Michael L. Morrison

Luis Cisneros-Zevallos

Instituto Tecnológico de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM-Campus Monterrey)

Texas A&M University

José I. González Rojas Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

A Preliminary Assessment of Protein Synthesis Using Deuterated Water: A Novel Approach to Characterize Growth of Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

Investigating Dynamic Fracture Toughness of Composite Materials

James D. Fluckey

Jyhwen Wang

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Dariel Tovar Ramírez

Carlos Rubio-González

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI)

Inter-American Philosophy Project Risk and Reliability-Based Criteria Applied to Optimal Decision-Making for Bridge Maintenance

Monique Hite Texas A&M University

David De León Escobedo

Gregory F. Pappas Texas A&M University

Guillermo Hurtado Pérez Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM)

43


2008 Awards

Semiochemicals in Pecan Integrated Pest Management to Promote Industry and Environment Health in Texas and Mexico

Marvin Harris Texas A&M University

Irasema Vargas Arispuro Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD)

15

Projects Funded

Healing Strategies for Broadband Mobile Wireless Communication System

José Silva-Martínez Texas A&M University

Alejandro Díaz-Sánchez Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE)

Ontogeny of the Gastrointestinal Tract of Tunas: Basic Research to Improve Larval Survival and Hatchery Efficiency

Delbert M. Gatlin III

Fluxes and Transport Mechanisms on Continental Shelves

Ayal Anis

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University at Galveston

María Teresa Viana Castrillon Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (UABC)

Anatoliy Filonov Universidad de Guadalajara (UDG)

The Tuna Aquaculture Research Consortium: Organized and Applied Science to Resolve Critical Problems. Preventing Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Cultured Tuna

Size-dependent Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Antiferromagnets and Ferromagnets With Reduced Dimensionality

William H. Neill

Igor V. Roshchi

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Felipe Ascencio Valle

Aldo Humberto Romero Castro

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

44


Micro Welding of Advanced Aluminum Graphite Composites

Wayne N.P. Hung Texas A&M University

Mauricio Garza Corporación Mexicana de Investigación en Materiales, S.A. de C.V. (COMIMSA)

Biomarkers and Bioassays to Examine the Health of Highly Genetically Differentiated Populations of the Coastal Isopod Ligia occidentalis Endemic to Mexico and US Rocky Intertidal Pacific Shores

Luis A. Hurtado Texas A&M University

Jaqueline García-Hernández Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C. (CIAD)

Manufacturing Improvements through Coupled Models and Controls Thermal Stability and Mass Transport in Nanofilms

Tamás Kalmár-Nagy Texas A&M University

Raymundo Arroyave

Juan Carlos Jáuregui Correa

Texas A&M University

Centro de Tecnología Avanzada de Querétaro (CIATEQ)

Alberto Herrera-Gómez, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

An Economic Assessment of Mexican Manufacturing When Incorporating Distribution Costs

Texas A&M University

Enhancing the Anticancer Potential of Phytochemicals Obtained from Indigenous Plants of the Mexican-USA Border

Graciela González-Farías

Daniel Romo

Michael D. Johnson

Centro de Investigación en Matemáticas, A.C. (CIMAT)

Texas A&M University

Elsa M. Guajardo Touché Experimental and Theoretical Characterization of Ferroelastic Domain Switching of Ferroelectric Ceramics Induced by Contact Mechanic Experiments

Tahir Cagin Texas A&M University

Juan Muñoz-Saldaña Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV)

Escuela de Biotecnología y Salud (EBA)

Creation of a Process to Identify Culturally Appropriate Food Products, Nutritional Intervention Strategies and Educational/ Marketing Messages for Economically and Culturally Transitional Populations

Rosemary L. Walzem RD Texas A&M University

Salvador Francisco Villalpando Hernández MD Stygobitic Crustacea from the Texas-Mexico Border Region: A Binational Fauna?

Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública (INSP)

Thomas M. Iliffe Texas A&M University at Galveston

Fernando Álvarez Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

45


2007 Awards

Pollutant Dispersion in Coastal Waters and Reef Systems

Ayal Anis

Stefan Hurlebaus

Texas A&M University at Galveston

16

Projects Funded

Development of an Ultrasonic Technique for Monitoring Damage of Overhead Power Lines

Texas A&M University

David Alberto Salas-de-León

Arturo Baltazar Herrejón

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV)

Arginine and Glutamine Metabolism in Cultured Fish: Growth, Biosynthesis and Homeostasis

Collaborative Research: Computational Modeling and Experimental Verification of Solidification and Microstructural Evolution of AlSi-Sr Alloys

Duncan S. Mackenzie Yongmei M. Jin

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Dariel Tovar-Ramírez

Gerardo Trápaga

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN)

Interactions Between Fish and Microbes Within Aquatic Systems and their Effects on Ecosystem Services to Humans

An Optimal Plant Laying-out Approach Based on Process Safety Issues

Frances Gelwick

M. Sam Mannan

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Karim Acuna-Askar

Richart Vázquez Román

Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya (ITC)

Design for Remote Monitoring, Control and Diagnosis of Automated Assembly System

Enhancing Vaccine Efficacy against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus by Dendritic Cell Antigen Targeting

Sheng-Jen Hsieh Waithaka Mwangi

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Jesús Carlos Pedraza Ortega Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI)

Jesús Hernández Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo (CIAD)

46


Applying Science to Resolve Critical Problems of the Tuna Industry: Optimized Technology and Sustainability for Yellowfin Tuna Ranching in Baja, Mexico

FLOO - Fluxes Linking Offshore and Onshore: Transport of Pollutants, Nutrients and Larvae, and the Effect on Ecologically and Economically Important Benthic Species

William H. Neill

Gilbert T. Rowe

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Felipe Ascencio Valle

Lydia B. Ladah

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

Towards Target Validation of Proteins for the Control of the Cattle Fever Tick Boophilus microplus, Phase I: Development of Gene Silencing Techniques (RNA Interference) and Supporting Protocols for Legumains and G Protein-coupled Receptors

Electron Beam Pasteurization of Fresh Produce to Eliminate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Hepatitis A Virus Contamination and Consumers’ Willingness to Pay for Electronically Pasteurized Fresh Produce in Mexico

Patricia V. Pietrantonio Texas A&M University

Consuelo Almazán García Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas (UAT)

Calibration of Ultrasonic Transducers for a Pipeline Inspection Device Station

Angie Hill Price Texas A&M University

Carlos Rubio-González Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI)

Suresh D. Pillai Texas A&M University

Marisa Mazari Hiriart Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Studies on the Biology of Meliutobia Parasitoid Wasps in Mexico, A Possible Emerging Control of Mexican Fruit Flies and/or Mushroom Flies

Brad Vinson Keeping of Underwater Robotic Vehicles

Othon Rediniotis Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Martín Aluja Instituto de Ecología, Unidad de Entomología Aplicada (INECOL-UEA)

Tomás Salgado Jiménez Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI)

Designing Sorghum and Sorghum Production Systems for the Biofuels Industry

William L. Rooney Texas A&M University

Sergio Serna-Saldivar Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

47

$


2006 Awards

An Integrated Assessment of Cross-Border Land and Water-Use Changes in the Lower Rio Grande/ Bravo Valley Since 1990

Evaluation of Phenolics, Antioxidant and Anticancer Properties of Sorghums

Lloyd Rooney Wendy Jepson, Christian Brannstrom Texas A&M University

Sergio Serna-Saldívar

Gustavo Garza, Casey Walsh Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Combating Failures and Malicious Attacks in Communication Networks

16

Projects Funded

Texas A&M University Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Preventing Colibacillosis Diarrhea in Bovine Calves with Anti-F5 Recombinant Antibodies Produced in Rice Plants

Luis Cisneros-Zevallos Gerald Wagner

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Carmen Hernández-Brenes Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Electrochemical Technology Development for Micro/nano Manufacturing

Alfredo Sahagún Ruíz Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Hybrid Active Imaging Techniques for Potato Inspection

Wayne Hung Sheng-Jen Hsieh

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Luis Godínez Mora-Tovar Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico en Electroquímica (CIDETEQ)

Estimating the Non-monetary and Monetary Burden of Taenia solium Cysticercosis in Mexico

Ismael López-Juárez Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV)

Synthesis of Three Term Controllers Free of Analytical Model Acronym: SCFAM

Christine Budke Shankar Bhattacharyya

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Ana Flisser Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

María Cristina Verde Rodarte Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

48


Microbiological Safety of Fresh and Fresh-Cut Produce

Alejandro Castillo Texas A&M University

Alejandro López-Malo Universidad de las Américas Puebla (UDLAP)

New Solutions to Solving Sea Turtle Bycatch from Fisheries Industry Gear in Both US and Mexican Waters

Christopher Marshall Texas A&M University at Galveston

Axayacatl Rocha-Olivares Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

Retrieval and Interpretation of Shared Cultural Memory from the New Spain Collections of the Cushing Library (Texas A&M) and the Biblioteca Cervantina (Tec de Monterrey)

Nancy Dyer, Gregory Cuellar Texas A&M University

Blanca Guadalupe López Morales Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Strengthening the Mexican and US-Avocado Industry by Developing Value-added Processed Avocados and By-products as Functional Foods for Protection Against Cardiovascular Disease

Luis Cisneros-Zevallos Texas A&M University

Phytoremediation: Merging Biotechnology and Native Species

Carmen Hernández-Brenes Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Marla Binzel Texas A&M University

Omar Pantoja Instituto de BioTecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (IBUNAM)

Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Their Accumulation by the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in the Pueblo Viejo Lagoon, Veracruz and Laguna Madre, Tamaulipas

Improving the Fatty Acid Composition and Shelf-life Stability in Eggs and Poultry Meat from Poultry Fed with Dietary Levels of Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Conjugated Linoleic Acid

Marcos Sánchez-Plata Texas A&M University

Ernesto Ávila González Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Luis Cifuentes Texas A&M University

Felipe de Jesús Carrillo Romo Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada Unidad Altamira, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CICATA Altamira-IPN)

High Efficiency Air Cleaning Cyclone Separators

Yassin Hassan Texas A&M University

Claudia del Carmen Gutiérrez-Torres Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN)

49


2005 Awards

Association of Natural Disease Resistance in Cattle and Macrophage Inflammatory Gene Expression Profiles

Development, Calibration and Implementation of a Micro-Scale Flow Meter

Jorge Alvarado Leslie G. Adams

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

José Mireles, Jr.

José Gutiérrez-Pabello

Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez (UACJ)

Médico Veterinario Zootecnista (FMVZ-UNAM)

15

Projects Funded

Comparing Combustion and Syngas Processes using Petroleum Coke (Pet-Coke) and Coal for Industrial Heat and Power Generation

Developing Environmentally Friendly Management Technologies for Emerging Insect Pests of Tequila Agave

S. Vinson Christine Ehlig-Economides

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Héctor González-Hernández

Alberto Mendoza,

Colegio de Postgraduados (CP)

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Development of Brucella canis virB Mutants and its Study in a Cellular Model

Integrated Pest Management for Pecans in the Laguna Region of Coahuila

Thomas Ficht

Julio Bernal

Efrén Díaz-Aparicio

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP)

Enrique Aranda-Herrera Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

50


Optimization Algorithms for Network Design and Data Processing in Remote Sensing

Sergiy Butenko Texas A&M University

Yuriy Shkvarko Center for Research and Advanced Studies of the National Polytechnic Institute (CINVESTAV)

Mango Slices Dryer Using Continuously Fed Air Heated by Solar Energy

Use of Precision Agriculture Technologies to Reduce the Overuse and Degradation of Water in Pecan Production

Chii-Der Suh

Stephen Searcy

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Martín Baltazar López

Juvenal Gutiérrez-Castillo

Centro Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico (CENIDET)

Tecnológico de Monterrey

Facial Caricaturing as a Training Tool for Security

Quantifying Health Risks in Mexico Associated with Contaminated Fruits and Vegetables via Pathogens in Irrigation Water

Ricardo Gutiérrez-Osuna Texas A&M University

Isaac Rudomin Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM Campus Estado de México)

Green Electronalytical Chemistry: Remote TraceLevel Selenium Sensor

Suresh Pillai Texas A&M University

Ilangovan Kuppusamy Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Validation and Development of Diagnostic Assays for Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infections

Manuel Soriaga Texas A&M University

Nikola Batina Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana (UAM)

Allison Rice-Ficht Texas A&M University

Gilberto Chávez Gris Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Investigation of Fuel Cells for Distributed Energy

Prasad Enjeti Texas A&M University

Jaime Arau Centro Nacional de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico (CENIDET)

Vitrification of in vivo and in vitro-Derived Brahman Cattle Embryos

Duane Kraemer Texas A&M University

Salvador Romo Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

51


2004 Awards

Determinants, Outcomes and Burden of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease among Mexicans and Mexican Americans: Need for a Public and Private Sector Partnership

Design of an Electronic Nose for Hydrogen Measurement in Liquid Aluminum Alloys for the Casting Industry

Ricardo Gutiérrez-Osuna Ranijta Misra

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Ismael López-Juárez

Roxana Valdés-Ramos

13

Projects Funded

Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos (UAEM)

Centro de Investigaciones y Asistencia Técnica del Estado de Querétaro (CIATEQ)

Development of Automation Technique for Microrobotic Applications

Insecticidal Agents Based on Neuropeptide Analogs Containing beta-Amino Acids

Wayne P. Hung

S. Vinson

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Francisco J. Ruiz-Sánchez

Eusebio Juaristi

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV)

Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CINVESTAV-IPN)

Effect of Electronic Pasteurization on Nutritional Properties and Shelf-life of Pecan Kernels

Promoting Organic Coffee Production in Chiapas through Pest Management, Agronomic and Economic Research

Leonardo Lombardini Julio S. Bernal

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Uriel Figueroa Viramontes Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP)

Improving the Security of Food Products Through the Use of Antimicrobial Substances in Combination with Novel Processing Technologies

Luis Cisneros-Zevallos Texas A&M University

Carmen Hernández-Brenes Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

52

Juan F. Barrera Gaytan El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)


National Security Enhancement Through Pecan IPM Research and Program Development in Mexico and Texas

Ultrasonic Technology for Waste Water Disinfection

Suresh Pillai Marvin K. Harris Texas A&M University

Agustin C. Fu Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales Agricolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP)

New Organometallic Precursors for the Deposition of Pnictogen-chalcogenide Thin Films

Texas A&M University

Ilangovan Kuppusamy Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

A Recombinant Vaccine for Simultaneous Protection of Goats Against Brucellosis and Orf L.

Garry Adams David Goodman Texas A&M University

Pankaj Sharma Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Texas A&M University

Alberto Morales-Loredo Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agrícolas y Pecuarias (INIFAP)

Sea Water Upcoming under Pumping Horizontal Wells in Coastal Aquifers

Hongbin Zhan Texas A&M University

Rogelio Vázquez-González Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

The Natural Enemies of Rhagoletis spp. (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Mexico, with Emphasis on the Apple Maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella

Robert Wharton Texas A&M University

Martín Aluja Institute of Ecology (INECOL)

53


2003 Awards

Biodiversity Assessment and Community Ecology of Yucatán Wetland Fish Assemblages

Ecology, Biodiversity and Hydrology of Anchialine Caves: the Ox Bel Ha System, Quintana Roo, Mexico

Thomas J. DeWitt Thomas M. Iliffe

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Luis Zambrano Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Fernando Álvarez Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Development of Biotechnological Tools to Aid in Stock Delineation in California Pacific Sardine

16

Projects Funded

John R. Gold Texas A&M University

Axayacatl Rocha-Olivares Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

Development of a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Method for Detecting Enterobacter Sakazakii in Infant Milk Formulas

Alejandro Castillo Texas A&M University

Rosalba Gutiérrez Rojo Centro de Investigación y Asistencia en Tecnología y Diseño del Estado de Jalisco (CIATEJ)

Encyrtid Parasitoids of Mealybugs in Mexico Dynamic Failure of a Thermally Efficient Structural Dome

Paul N. Roschke

James B. Woolley Texas A&M University

Alejandro González Hernández

Texas A&M University

Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

Francisco Yeomans Reyna Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

54


Experimental Study of Drag Reduction within Boundary Layer Using Particle Image Velocimetry and Hot Film Measurement Techniques

Regulation of H+ Pumps by Vacuolar H+ Dependent Transporters?

Marla L. Binzel Yassin A. Hassan Texas A&M University

Javier Ortiz-Villafuerte

Texas A&M University

Omar Pantoja Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ)

In Vitro Fertilization in the Horse

New Approaches to Provide Electric Energy by Alternative Renewable Resources (ARR)

Katrin Hinrichs

Prasad N. Enjeti

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Salvador Romo

José L. Duran-Gómez

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Instituto Tecnológico de Chihuahua

Production and Evaluation of Brucella Melitensis Native Hapten Conjugated with Gluorescein Isotiocianate for the Diagnosis of Brucellosis by the Fluorescent Polarized Assay

Strategic Research to Increase Fisheries Productivity and Strengthen the Tuna Aquaculture Industry in Northwest Mexico: The Yellowfin Tuna Plan

L. Garry Adams

William H. Neill

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Ricardo Gómez Flores

Alejandro Buentello-García

Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas del Noroeste (CIBNOR)

Puebla Center for Engineering Education

Cesar O. Malave Texas A&M University

Enrique Palou Universidad de las Américas

Strategies for Sustainable Management of Fisheries Resources in Durango, Mexico

Frances I. Gelwick Texas A&M University

Leticia Mar Tovar Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (UAS)

Puebla Design and Analysis of Dual Tube Hydroforming Process

Texas A&M University

Understanding Individual, Social, Cultural, Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in Mexicans and Mexican Americans: A Pilot Study

Carlos Acosta

Nilesh S. Chatterjee

Jyhwen Wang

Universidad de las Américas

Texas A&M University

Rafael Chorné Navia Universidad Autónoma De Coahuila (UACOAH)

55


2002 Awards

Biomarkers of Chemical Exposure and Sensitivity in Populations on the Texas-Mexico Border

Information Theory to Forest Genomics

Claire Williams Kirby Donnelly

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

M. Humberto Reyes Valdés

Karim Acuna-Askar

Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro (UAAAN)

Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León (UANL)

Design and Optimization of Oil Field Brine Conversion Processes to Water of Irrigation Quality

16

Projects Funded

Investigation of the Physical and Biogeochemical Processes in Valle de Bravo Freshwater Reservoir

Ayal Anis Texas A&M University at Galveston

María Barrufet

Martín Merino

Texas A&M University

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Gustavo Iglesias Instituto Tecnológico de Celaya (ITC)

Methane in Marine Karst Environments: A Joint US/Mexico Interdisciplinary Program Development of Intelligent Rollover Warning and Control Systems for Tractor-Semitrailers

Mahlon Kennicutt III Texas A&M University

Reza Langari

Elva Escobar Briones

Texas A&M University

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Edgar Sánchez Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV)

Influence of the Host Genetic Background; the Bacterial Virulence and Mycobacterial Peptides in Bovine Macrophage

Process Development and Health Benefits of Value-added Functional Extracts from Native American Crops for their Use in the US Food and Pharmaceutical Industry

Luis Cisneros-Zevallos Texas A&M University

L. Garry Adams

Carmen HernándezBrenes

Texas A&M University

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

José Ángel Gutiérrez-Pabello Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

56


Natural Hydrocarbon Seeps of the Gulf of Mexico

Sustainable Growth: Mexico and the United States

Ian MacDonald

John Moroney

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Elva Escobar Briones

Flory Anette Dieck Assad

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM)

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Carbon Foam Composites

Ozden Ochoa Texas A&M University

Sergey Kanaun Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Understanding How Connectivity Between and Among Children, Families, Community and Schools Promotes and/or Impedes School Readiness in Colonias on the US-Mexico Border

Jan Hughes Texas A&M University

María T. Montero Mendoza Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez (UACJ)

Molecular Basis of the Mycoparasitic Response in the Biocontrol Fungus Trichoderma

Chuck Kenerley Texas A&M University

Alfredo Herrera-Estrella Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (CINVESTAV)

On the Development of a Virtual Software System Laboratory Architecture and its Prototype

Steve Liu

User-Oriented Models for Assessing Ecological and Economic Drought Risks on Semi-Arid Rangelands

Merwyn Kothmann Texas A&M University

Heriberto Díaz Solis Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro (UAAAN)

Virtual Laboratory for Advanced Manufacturing Automation and Control

Sheng-Jen Hsieh Texas A&M University

Texas A&M University

Manuel Macías

Jorge Enrique Preciado Velasco

Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (ITESM)

Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE)

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Texas A&M and Conacyt: Research 2016  
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