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3D PRINTING & PROTOTYPING

THE TINY REVOLUTION AS THE CURRENT GLOBAL IMMUNIZATION AGAINST COVID-19 ROLLOUT HAS SHOWN ADMINISTERING CONVENTIONAL NEEDLE VACCINES AT SCALE HAS ITS LIMITATIONS. JOHN KAWOLA, CEO — GLOBAL, BOSTON MICRO FABRICATION, EXPLAINS HOW MICRO 3D PRINTING MICRONEEDLES COULD RADICALLY CHANGE HOW THE WORLD RESPONDS TO VACCINE DISTRIBUTION.

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ore than 1.5 billion doses of the COVID-19 vaccine have been administered around the world, according to the latest figures from Bloomberg.1 Those numbers are certainly impressive considering the short timeline from vaccine development to deployment, but the last several months have exposed some major logistical challenges of conventional needle vaccines — most notably, their difficulty in administering at scale. Imagine how much easier distribution could be if a vaccine could be mailed directly to your door and administered via a tiny, painless patch that sticks to your arm. What if vaccines in this form could be sent out to impoverished or remote locations that don’t have access to healthcare? Advanced immunization technologies, namely microneedles, are bringing these ideas closer to reality. The concept of microneedles for vaccinations or other drug delivery has been around for a while, but COVID accelerated demand and research to make it happen. But once the delivery method for microneedles is finalized, the industry faces another hurdle:

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Profile for MPN Magazine

MPN NA Issue 17  

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