Page 1

MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 1


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 2


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 3

April 2013

18 S O M UCH M ORE T HAN

A

S HELTER

ARTICLES

6

17

24 www.metropetmag.com

5

Golf and Walking on a Leash

6

Large or Small — I Will Search Until I Find Them All

10

Do April Showers Make Your Dog Cower

13

We Love Our Pets

14

Cats are at Risk for Heartworms

17

Music: The Effects on Dogs

18

So Much More Than A Shelter

23

Top 10 Reasons — Grooming

24

Public Manners

28

The Importance of Microchipping Your Pet

30

Pawzlle

32

Chip’s Next Adventure

34

Pet Services Directory

We Love Our Pets Submit your favorite pet’s photo at www.metropetmag.com

METROPET RESOURCES 16

Lee’s Summit Subaru MetroPet Magazine

3


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 4

IT’S FINALLY SPRING! The calendar actually says it is Spring! Many people are are wishing snow away! And, I am one of them. With Spring comes the opportunity to get out with your fourlegged friend. Before you go, please read the article on page 24 about Public Manners. If we all strive to have well behaved pets, we will all have a better time. In this issue, MetroPet magazine introduces a new series featuring local shelters and rescue groups. The first in this series is Wayside Waifs. Formed in 1944, this shelter has changed to meet the changing needs of the companion animal world. This article not only highlights this organization, but provides opportunities for people looking for volunteer opportunities. Please enjoy this first of many articles. This issue also includes a terrific article about Search and Rescue dogs, see page 6. With the advent of Spring, children can go wandering. This article talks about how one animal destined for death, found a new life in search and rescue and saving lives. Included in this article is a list of local Search and Rescue groups.

Did you know that cats can get heartworms? Take a moment to read the article on page 14 and learn how cats can get this deadly disease. As always, we have Chip’s next adventure and the Pawzlle. This month both focus on the importance of putting a microchip in your pet. Is your pet chipped? Hundreds of pets are lost every year. If your pet is chipped and the chip is registered, you have a much better chance of your pet coming home safely. Placing a chip in your pet costs just a few dollars and this chip may mean the difference between your pet coming home safely. Finally, springtime weather is here. This weather brings thunderstorms and lots of noise. Some pets are fearful of the noise produced by these storms. If this is your pet, check on the informative article on page 10 for tips to sooth your pet. We are still getting awesome pet photos. Check out the latest photos on page 13. Please send us your wonderful photos and we will share them with others.

Sincerely, Barbara Riedel, Publisher P.S. Check out the Pet Services Directory Listing on page 34!

Publishing Policy: Articles printed in the MetroPet Magazine express the opinions of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the formal position of MetroPet Magazine. Acceptance of advertising does not necessarily constitute endorsement by MetroPet Magazine. Articles: Readers are invited to submit articles for consideration for publication to editor@metropetmag.com. All materials are subject to editorial review. © 2012 MetroPet Magazine. All rights reserved. Request reprint permissions at info@metropetmag.com. MetroPet Magazine is owned and published by ROI Marketing Services, all rights reserved.

Staff & Contacts Publisher

Barbara Riedel barbara@metropetmag.com

Editor/Pr oduction Manager Dan O’Leary editor@metropetmag.com

Magazine Layout ROI Marketing 816.942.1600• roi@kc.rr.com

4

MetroPet Magazine

Advertising Sales Ad Sales: 913.548.1433

Deals of the Week

ContributingAuthors

deals@metropetmag.com

Mike Deathe Pat Hennessy Pawlean Journe Heddie Leger Kate Sidun Mary Sellaro Cheryl Waterman,CVPM

Contact MetroPet PO Box 480065 Kansas City, MO 64148 Phone:913.548.1433 Ad Sales:913.548.1433 Fax: 913.387.4313

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 5

Golf

and

Walking

on a Leash

OK

so I really do like to play golf. Sounds funny I know and what the heck does it have to do with dog training? Well to be honest, a lot, and specifically with walking your dog. So I golf at most 5-6 times a year. I have my own clubs, in fact I used to even have my own golf cart! But what I do on the golf course should really be called playing at the game of golf, not playing golf. Why? Because I don’t play the game near enough to get any good at it. And, I am OK with that fact that by playing only 5-6 times a year, I will never be Tiger Woods. Many may be wondering when am I getting to the point? Well it is simple — if you don’t practice at something you will never get any better! I get calls all the time from people who want to teach their dogs to quit pulling on the leash. I will charge them good money, teach them all the skills needed to fix the problem. But then, they only walk their dogs once a week (at best) and then get frustrated because the problem never improves. Well the reason is obvious. If you don’t commit to walking your dog 4-5 times a week, half an hour to an hour a day, how can you expect it to get any better? Look I don’t mind if you don’t want to practice but understand paying good money to a dog trainer and expecting a “secret” skill or “magic” solution is well, a waste of time and money. I understand that my golf game is probably never gonna get much better because I don’t practice. I hope you understand the same in regards to your pooch and his leash skills! Don’t shoot the messenger, instead grab your leash and go practice!

BY MIKE DEATHE

Mike Deathe is a stay-at-home dad who found his passion as a dog trainer in 2008. He is the author of Keep It Simple Stupid (K.I.S.S.) Pet Blog, and has written several books on dogs and dog training. As an avid pet lover, he regularly sees dogs and cats that never find a home, so in 2009, he and his wife Kate founded Muttz “R” Us, a tshirt and pet product company with the motto of “Saving Pets...One T-Shirt at a Time.” In 2010, KEEP IT SIMPLE STUPID (KISS) DOG TRAINING was born. Since then Deathe has been teaching dogs and owners at Broadmore Kennels, located in Shawnee, KS. For more information about KISS or Muttz “R” Us visit us on Facebook, twitter or follow the blog at http://muttzmembers.blogspot.com. We can’t wait to help you speak dog as a second language.

www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

5


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 6

Large

OR

I will Search Until I Find Them All

Small

BY KATE SIDUN

T

hink about your typical day. You arrive at work by 9 am and get home by 5 pm. By the time you have completed one day at work 2,185 children will have been reported “Missing.” During a one year time-frame, an average of 800,000 children under the age of 17 will be reported missing.

CATEGORIES OF MISSING There are many categories for these missing children. Of the 800,000 missing children, more than 200,000 have been abducted by a family member. The average number of children taken by non-family members range between 58 - 115 each year. These abductions are called “stereotypical” kidnapping. A stereotypical kidnapping occurs when a stranger or slight acquaintance transports a child 50 miles or more from home and either kills the child, holds the child for ransom, or intends to keep the child permanently. Some children are reported missing because they wandered off, forgetting to tell their parents, and were returned safely. Finally, some children become run-aways. The reasons for run-aways vary, but most often they feel misunderstood; are suffering from physical abuse and want to escape from the life of pain; or feel left out and think that they are invisible to the world around them and no one would even notice if they are gone. These incidents seem to reach their peak during the Holiday season and summer; when stress and activity levels are at their highest. 6

MetroPet Magazine

When they have exhausted every emergency resource possible searching for the child, they call for the fourlegged Heroes that always “Nose” where they’re going: the Search & Rescue dog.

Search and Rescue Dogs wear vests to identify them. April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 7

RESCUE ME In rare cases a curious toddler will wonder off without the parents’ knowledge, through something as simple as an unlocked gate or back door. On average it takes even the most watchful parent 20 minutes before they report their child missing; and where the child could be no one knows. When they have exhausted every emergency resource possible searching for the child, they call for the fourlegged Heroes that always “Nose” where they’re going: the Search & Rescue dog.

MISSING CHILDREN AND THE SEARCH AND RESCUE DOG K9 Search and Rescue can be found in documentation dating back to the 17th century. The Monks of Saint Bernard hospice trained their dogs to find and rescue travelers trapped in avalanches. There is no documentation stating how many lives the dogs and their monk handlers saved, but it is safe to say it is in the hundreds. The number of children that have been recovered by search and rescue dogs is truly unknown for it continues to grow every day. Without them more lives would be lost and some families would be left without closure. These amazing lifesaving dogs are trained to detect human scent. Although the exact process is still unknown, it may include skin rafts (scent-carrying skin cells that drop off living humans at a rate of about 40,000 cells per minute) respiratory gases, evaporated perspiration, or decomposition gases. A four-legged partner in the search and rescue field is a valuable and vital resource to his/her team especially in wilderness tracking, natural disasters, mass casualty events, and in locating missing loved ones.

7

www.metropetmag.com

THE HEART OF A SEARCH AND RESCUE DOG

Gretchen on a search exercise.

It takes a physically fit person on average 8-12 minutes to run one mile on a flat surface track, with the weather conditions in his favor. With all odds against him, Diesel, a three-year old search and rescue German Shepherd Dog ran a one

MetroPet Magazine

7


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 8

WHERE TO FIND SEARCH AND RESCUE DOG GROUPS MONROE CITY K9 SEARCH & RESCUE Monroe City K9 Search & Rescue is a Non-Profit 100% volunteer based organization dedicated to finding the missing, lost and injured. We are a group of highly motivated and dedicated volunteers and have devoted our lives to saving others. The time and effort we put into training ourselves, our team, and our dogs is tremendous or as one could say limitless. If you wish to contact us you may do so by emailing MC.K9SAR@gmail.com. https://sites.google.com/site/mck9sar/ Gretchen on a search exercise.

KANSAS SEARCH AND RESCUE DOG ASSOCIATION We would rather be called and not needed than needed and not called! All Services Are Provided Free Of Charge. 913-73K-9SAR (913-735-9727) KSARDA gives educational presentations to schoolaged children around ages 4-12 years old and to any requesting school, Boy or Girl Scouts, or other children’s groups. The 12 minute video is produced by the National Park Service and teaches children to be prepared before going out into the woods. It offers helpful advice on what they can do if they become lost. The highlight of the educational presentation is meeting a few of the KSARDA K9s afterwards. Contact KSARDA at info@ksarda.org for scheduling. http://www.ksarda.org/

8

Gretchen was about to lose her life and now 7 months later she is training to find the living after natural disasters... mile trail through the thickest brush, in pouring rain, with no light (only his LED collar), through five one-foot tall creek embankments, and fallen trees to block his path in a mere 13 minutes and 26 seconds. At the end of his run, Diesel located the victim and alerted his handler. Diesel, the young search and rescue dog, was later praised and rewarded for his act of valor and selflessness. The actual heart and roots of search and rescue comes down to one thing — in the search and rescue personnel’s blood is a driving motivation to help others in need, in whatever way that might may be. It is the willingness to place one’s self in harm’s way or possibly sacrifice one’s life to save another. Many search and rescue dogs and personnel have given their lives in an attempt to save another.

MOSAR MISSOURI SEARCH AND RESCUE K-9

AMAZING DOGS

MoSAR is a volunteer, non-profit dog/handler unit operating under the laws of the United States and the state of Missouri. Our service group’s primary objective is to find lost or injured persons and to assist in saving lives. Before being allowed to participate in an actual search operation, every dog/handler team receives a full year’s training to ensure a professional level of performance. We can only be activated by law enforcement, fire department, or emergency management agencies. To initiate stand-by status or immediate deployment, have the agency call: MoSAR Emergency Unit Pager: 816-292-1232 or 816-969-9824. http://www.missourisearchandrescue.com/

Where do these astounding dogs come from? Many Search and Rescue dogs have been rescued themselves. My year and a half old German Shepherd, Gretchen was on death row. Her parents were military working dogs who had been imported from Russia and the Ukraine. This made her driven, and intelligent, with extreme working abilities. Gretchen’s owner was deployed to Afghanistan and his wife was not willing to take care of the puppy while he was gone. A local animal rescue saved Gretchen, but all of the rescue’s “foster homes” were at full capacity. A reputable K9 Search and Rescue team was automatically contacted. This group was over 200 miles away. Gretchen was saved and flown to her new home, courtesy of Pilots and Paws. Gretchen was about to lose her life and now seven months later she is training to find the living after natural disasters, lost hikers/hunters and working on her “Master Tracking” certification specializing in finding missing children.

MetroPet Magazine

8 April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 9

Both Diesel and Gretchen are classified as “Variation” search and rescue dogs. They use every sense they have, eyes, ears and nose, to locate the victim. Their tenacity, courage and drive are only a few of the search and rescue dog traits that keep them going until they make the “Find.” Many search and rescue dog handlers have stated that it is as if the dog knows that there are lives at stake and the lost are depending on them to save their lives.

IN A WORLD OF DARKNESS K9 LIGHTS THE WAY Gretchen and Troy. You will see the phrase That Others May Live on many search and rescue organizations’ websites. However, Phantom K9 put it in to another perspective when they stated In a World of Darkness, K9 lights the way. The emotional darkness that a parent feels when their child is missing is nothing but consuming and purgatorial. The seconds feel like minutes, and at times it is as if the minutes have turned to days. While they want to believe their child will be found, there is always the fear that the child will be Dead or not found at all.

www.metropetmag.com

The handlers and their four-legged partners battle against time and trust in their K9 to “light the way.” The SAR dog’s character and attitude is summed up in one sentence — “Be it a task big or small, I will search until I find them all.” Kate Sidun has wanted to help people ever since she was a small child. In 2009, she started training Cotton, her 3 year old Lhasa Apso, to be a therapy dog. Cotton visits with Veterans every Thursday, and also with children at local hospitals. Since 2011, Sidun has been using her professionalism, love of animals and dedication to help find those in need in her position as Chief Financial Officer for Monroe City K9 Search & Rescue.

MetroPet Magazine

9


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 10

April Showers Make Your Dog Cower? Do

If this scenario is all too familiar — attempting to calm your dog, turning up the TV, or finding her burrowed in the closet — there is hope for both you and your canine companion to get through the spring without trauma. We don’t usually know why our dogs are afraid of storms. It could be from a lack of exposure and socialization during early development that creates insecurity. It could be due to having had a bad experience during a storm, for example a dog that had to survive on his own in the elements. It could be a learned reinforced response due to getting “extra” attention, and especially seen in dogs that are highly attached to their people. Regardless of the reason, there are tools and techniques to give your dog a new experience and alter the behavior.

PLAY A CD

by Pat Hennessy

Y

ou just sat down, got comfortable, and turned on your favorite show with your sweet little bundle of fur by your side. Next thing you know Roxie gets up, starts pacing, then whining, then nudging you. “What’s wrong, girl?” you say. “Do you need out?” She paws at you and wants to climb in your lap. You pet her for a minute and go back to watching your show. Roxie continues to paw at you and pushes in behind you. A few moments later you hear a distant rumble. “Oh, that’s what’s bothering you.” You hadn’t seen a storm on the horizon, but Roxie can predict it better than Doppler radar, and you know that you have an hour or more of whimpering, scratching, panting and pacing. 10 MetroPet Magazine

A common recommendation is to try desensitizing your dog to storms, for example play a CD of storm sounds while you offer him something enjoyable during that time, such as a game of fetch or a kong stuffed with treats. This may work for some dogs, but often the fear of storms is not just a noise aversion but is triggered by multiple stimuli, such as the electrical charge in the atmosphere or the barometric pressure change.

REDUCING ANXIETY Behavior modification is definitely needed, but fear inhibits the ability to focus. If you can lower the anxiety level, then learning can take place. The first choice for reducing anxiety would be non-pharmaceutical methods, such as TTouch™ or Alpha-Stim™, which influence the nervous system to provide a calming effect and can be cumulative. TTouch communicates to the nervous system through a gentle technique of specific touches, much lighter than April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 11

massage, and relaxes you and your dog together. Another tool in the TTouch toolbox is the Body Wrap, a technique utilizing a stretchy fabric (like an Ace bandage), that you place around your dog. It works like swaddling a baby. If you don’t have a stretch fabric, you can substitute a t-shirt and adjust the fitting so that it is not too loose or too tight. Wraps or t-shirts should only be used with supervision. Another version of this technique is the Anxiety-Wrap (www.anxietywrap.com), a combination of a shirt and a wrap (the best of both worlds). Alpha-Stim is an electro-therapy technique using low-grade variable frequencies which foster the flow of energy through the body, especially to areas that can be shut down due to fear or pain.

MODERATE TO INTENSE STORM PHOBIA If your dog has a moderate to intense storm phobia, additional tools you can try in conjunction with behavior modification and non-pharmaceutical techniques, would be: • Calming supplements, such as ProQuiet® made with L-tryptophan or Calmazon a blend of Amazon Rainforest herbs • Dog Appeasing Pheromone (DAP) diffusers (that come as a plug-in unit or a spray to use on bedding or add to a scarf around the neck)

www.metropetmag.com

It works like swaddling a baby. If you don’t have a stretch fabric, you can substitute a t-shirt and adjust the fitting so that it is not too loose or too tight.

MetroPet Magazine

11


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 12

• Aromatherapy, such as lavender oil, can have a calming effect • Flower essences, such as Rescue Remedy which is available at most health food stores, are a blend of flowers infused with water — used to help restore balance (several animal blends are available at www.greenhopeessences.com ) • Soft soothing music can help balance body rhythms (www.rhythmicmedicine.com)

If your dog has a more severe case of storm phobia and you want to avoid pharmaceuticals, consult a veterinarian that offers alternative techniques such as acupuncture, acupressure, or homeopathy. • Calming Cap, is a nylon mask-like item that attaches to your dog’s collar and goes over his face. Be very observant on this one to make sure that your dog really relaxes, often times he will just “shut down” but it will appear that he is calm. If that is the case, he is really not “learning” how to relax during a storm.

SEVERE STORM PHOBIA If your dog has a more severe case of storm phobia and you want to avoid pharmaceuticals, consult a veterinarian that offers alternative techniques such as acupuncture, acupressure, or homeopathy. If you and your veterinarian feel that you are down to the pharmaceutical options, be aware of the side effects. With some drugs it can appear that your dog is relaxed but she is still experiencing fear; she just can’t react due to the sedative effect. This can actually make her fear worse. If your vet determines medication is necessary, you can still use TTouch™, DAP, music, and aromatherapy as complimentary techniques. There are many ways to approach the storm phobia problem. You need to assess the level of anxiety and apply the appropriate tools. The next time that the thunder rolls in, you can be ready before the lightning strikes. Pat Hennessy, is the founder of N2paws, LLC, an organization that provides companion animal attunement through behavior analysis, energy work, and Tellington TTouch. Pat is a certified TTouch practitioner and member of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT), the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants (IAABC), and Animal Wellness Association (AWA). You may contact N2Paws via email pat@n2paws.com, phone 816-522-7005, or visit the website www.n2paws.com. 12 MetroPet Magazine

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:52 PM

Page 13

We

Our Pet s

BRUNO This is our miniature pincher, Bruno, he’s the most faithful of any little dog. Where you go he is always sure to follow. Submitted by Nyree W.

WALLY Two neighbor lads love playing with our little Wally, as you can see the feeling is mutual. Submitted by Mary Lou

JETTER Jetter at his 6th birthday a couple months ago where after eating his puppy ice cream and cake, he clearly was all partied out! Submitted by Deanna D.

GIZMO (L) AND SPUNKY (R) Gizmo is a 4 year old, long-haired Dachshund. Spunky is a 3 year old, short-haired Dachshund. They are my fur kids! Submitted by Karissa S

www.metropetmag.com

Submit your favorite pet’s photo at www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

13


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 14

Cats Are At

Risk for Heartworms

BY CHERYL WATERMAN nfortunately, many of us have been under the false impression that our cats are not susceptible to heartworm disease. That may be because until recently not much has been publicized regarding feline heartworm disease, proven by the fact that studies show that less than 5 percent of U.S. households with cats regularly administer heartworm prevention, while 59 percent of households with dogs use a heartworm prevention product on a regular basis. The American Heartworm Society, an organization called “KNOW Hard” and others such as the American Association of Feline Practitioners are in the process of spreading the word about this potentially deadly issue. KNOW states that, “One mosquito bite can infect a cat with heartworm.” While some of us may feel that our cats are not prime candidates for this disease, due to the fact that we keep them indoors, KNOW states that, “28% of cats diagnosed with heartworms are indoor cats.” This

U

14 MetroPet Magazine

reminds us that mosquitoes get inside our homes, and so, do present a risk to our indoor cats, as well as outdoor kitties. As I researched this article, I thought about the questions you, as readers, may have about this disease, and will attempt to answer these questions.

Chronic signs of feline heartworm disease include difficulty breathing, gagging or coughing, heavy breathing and vomiting.

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 15

Q A

What exactly are heartworms and how can they affect my cat?

Q A

What are the signs or symptoms of feline heartworm disease?

Heartworms are exactly what they sound like‌parasitic worms that can live inside our pets. Cats typically have fewer than dogs, and the life span of the parasite is shorter in cats, but the consequences can be much more serious. The cat contracts this disease when a mosquito carrying microscopic-size heartworm larvae bites a cat. The larvae enter through this bite wound and develop in the tissues. These immature worms then enter blood vessels and are carried to arteries in the lungs, where an inflammatory reaction is caused. Most worms die at this stage, causing even more inflammation. Worms that do progress to adults can live undetected for a couple of years, but when adults die, the inflammation can be severe enough to cause death.

Chronic signs of feline heartworm disease include difficulty breathing, gagging or coughing, heavy breathing and vomiting. These respiratory symptoms associated with these reactions are called Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease or H.A.R.D. Remember, however, that many cats with heartworm infection may show no signs at all.

www.metropetmag.com

Heartworms are exactly what they sound like‌ parasitic worms that can live inside our pets

MetroPet Magazine

15


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 16

M ETRO P ET R ESOURCE WHO? LEE’S SUMMIT SUBARU WHERE? 2101 NE Independence Ave, Lee’s Summit, MO Phone 816-251-8600 Fax: 816-251-8617 www.leessummitsubaru.com email: patrick@leessummitsubaru.com

HOW LONG IN BUSINESS? Since April, 2007 WHY ARE YOU DIFFERENT? The relationships we form with our clients. Our clear intent is to have them last forever. We also offer a pet friendly service department! We service most vehicles and you can enjoy time with your pet, while your vehicle is being serviced.

BENEFITS OF LEE’S SUMMIT SUBARU Of course our great service, selection and pricing. But if I had to pick one word, it would be “FUN!” Our clients have fun doing business with us. This is not the “norm” at car dealerships.

REASONS CUSTOMERS COME BACK! They know we genuinely care about them and their needs. We WOW them from the first visit because that’s our everyday standard.

See our ad inside front cover

Q A

Is there a test for feline heartworm disease?

Q A

Are there treatments or preventatives for heartworm disease?

There are antigen and antibody tests that can help or rule out feline heartworm disease; however these tests have their limitations. Unfortunately, a “false” test doesn’t necessarily mean that a cat does not have heartworms.

The short answer is “yes.” However, the treatments can range from monitoring by x-ray to actual heartworm extractions. As with most disease, the very best treatment is prevention. There are actually three different approved preventatives for feline heartworm. They are as follows: • Revolution® manufactured by Pfizer, which is administered topically once a month. This preventative also protects against fleas, treats and controls ear mites, intestinal hookworms and roundworms; • Advantage Multi™ for Cats, manufactured by Bayer, which is administered topically; and • Heartgard® for Cats, from Merial, which is administered orally, also protects against hookworms.

ASK YOU VETERINARIAN While any of these products may do the trick, the best way to proceed is to ask your veterinarian about the best option for your feline. Cheryl Waterman was the Hospital Administrator at the Cat Clinic of Johnson County and is a long-time cat lover. She is a member of the Veterinary Hospital Managers Association and the American Animal Hospital Association. If you have any questions regarding kittens or cats, please call the Cat Clinic of Johnson County, 913-541-0478. We are always happy to help. 16 www.metropetmag.com

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 17

Music:

The Effects on Dogs

MUSIC CAN SOOTHE OR IRRITATE Have you considered playing music for your dog when you leave home? According to the Universities Federation for Animal Welfare, music is proven to have a positive effect on our dogs. Listening to certain types of music may actually help with the welfare of dogs in animal shelters, as there are types of music that have soothing qualities. On the other hand, there are also certain types of music which agitate dogs and should not be played around dogs in kennels or the shelter environment.

HEAVY METAL

CLASSICAL

Did you know Clair de Lune may soothe your dog while Halestorm will agitate her?

Dogs become agitated and nervous when listening to heavy metal. The effects of heavy metal music on dogs can also make the dogs bark. In the same study, it was found that when exposed to heavy metal music, dogs of all breeds, sizes and ages became quite agitated www.metropetmag.com

Classical music soothes and calms dogs. In fact, the Arizona Animal Welfare League plays classical music in the shelter to calm their resident dogs. A study in Northern Ireland found music from Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons,” among other classical pieces, calmed dogs to such a point that many of them lay down and slept. Classical music appears to be a great tool to use in an owner’s absence to help decrease the symptoms of separation anxiety for many dogs.

MetroPet Magazine

17


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 18

Welcome to A New Series In the 1950’s movie Lady and the Tramp shows what life was like for dogs in the early twentieth century. While much has changed in the past 100 years, some things have not. Pets, like Tramp, are still being left behind by their owners. They need a home, food, vet care, and someone to love. If Tramp lived in Kansas City in 2013, and was caught by a dogcatcher, he would be taken to a shelter or a rescue group. But that wouldn’t mean he only had a few days to live. Today he would be given a second chance - beginning with an exam by a veterinarian, food, tender loving care and, then adoption. Residents of the Kansas City metropolitan area are fortunate to have several premier shelters and outstanding rescue groups. These organizations are supported and run by thousands of dedicated volunteers. But who are these shelter and rescue organizations? MetroPet magazine is pleased to introduce a new series to showcase these groups. Each article will highlight the strengths of the group. Each article will also include information for individuals interested in getting involved in the pet community. Please enjoy the first article in our new series.

18 MetroPet Magazine

O

n June 5, 1940, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, known as the Jackson County Animal Betterment Association, was incorporated in the State of Missouri. In 1944, it was revived with new leadership and the name was changed to Wayside

Waifs, Inc. Under the leadership of Fenby Webster, contributors purchased a 20-acre farm and built a small shelter building. That building remained in use until 1999, when a state-of-the-art facility was built adjacent to it. While the original purpose of Wayside has remained constant through the years, much has changed. In the last five years, Wayside has completed two major renovations. The first updated the adoption and pet care facility. The second renovated the shelter veterinary clinic and admission center. The Wayside Waifs campus now includes 44 acres of green space. The 47,000 square foot building can now shelter and care for up to 800 animals. It features a new state-of-the-art veterinary center that provides life saving medical care to thousands of shelter animals. The Wayside Waifs campus also includes a pet memorial center, a 5acre Bark Park, a gift store, and so much more! Here is a small glimpse inside this incredible organization.

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 19

M

SO MUCH ORE THAN A SHELTER CERTIFIED RESCUE TEAM Animals arrive at Wayside Waifs from local animal control officers, individual and family surrenders and transfers from other shelters. Each year Wayside Waifs rescues more than 6,500 abandoned, abused and homeless animals from locations all over the country. The Wayside Waifs’ FEMA-certified rescue team regularly partners with national animal welfare organizations in situations of natural disasters, animal hoarding and puppy mills. In 2012, a very special donor funded a new state-of-the-art 28-foot trailer that allows Wayside to transport up to 50 animals in a climate-controlled space. The unit also features a large generator for natural disasters or crisis situations that require an extended stay. A special ventilation system was designed specifically for transporting animals and decreasing the possibility of illness. The trailer is stocked with equipment if immediate medical care is needed.

www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

19


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 20

ADOPTION Regardless of how an animal arrives at Wayside Waifs, the first step is human kindness and proper veterinary care. Each animal will experience a blanket to lie on, toys to play with, and daily food and water. A member of the veterinary staff will evaluate each pet and it will receive the proper medical treatment. Most of all, each animal receives the kindness of a human being. Adoptable pets include not only dogs and cats, but other small animals, including bunnies. The selection includes pets at all stages of life — puppies or kittens, teenagers, adults and seniors. You will also find all types of sizes and shapes, including pure-bred animals, designer breeds and regular old mutts! On any given day, the shelter can have more than 400 animals awaiting adoption. This means 400 pets that need to be fed, walked, petted, and cared for on a daily basis. While Wayside Waifs wants each pet to find forever homes as quickly as possible, it doesn’t want them to have an unfortunate experience and end up back at the shelter. Matching the correct pet with the right family is extremely important.

To aid in the adoption process, Wayside Waifs posts photos of adoptable animals on its website, www.waysidewaifs.org. Potential adopters are encouraged to do online research before coming to the shelter. While the adoption process is easy, it does include a few very important steps. Each adoptive individual or family is asked to complete an application. A Wayside Waifs team member reviews the application and assists the adoptee(s) in the selection of a pet. This is extremely important. Why? Because if you lead a sedentary life and the animal

you select is active and needs lots of exercise, or vice versa it won’t be a good match. Another example of a bad match would be a family adopting a breed that normally bonds to just one person. In both these cases the pet could come back to the shelter and everyone is disappointed. Adoptees are encouraged to spend time with the animal. You want to get to know the animal before you take the pet home. Adoptees will also want to review the life and medical history of the pet. The adoption process tries to make sure the match is perfect — for your family and the pet. Once the process is completed, the pet can go home immediately!

20 MetroPet Magazine

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 21

FOSTER CARE While some animals are ready for adoption right away, moms with litters, young single babies, pets in need of training or behavior modification, or pets in a transition mode may need a little extra attention. Some fosters care for extremely sick animals, literally saving their lives. So Wayside Waifs developed a foster care program. Foster families provide care for pets in their own homes. Away from the noise and activity of the shelter, foster families provide a quiet place for pets to prepared them for their forever home. In the case of a pregnant mom, a foster home allows her to recover and provides the puppies or kittens much needed time with mom and a loving home. Time in a foster home can range from 2-4 weeks. The TLC provided by these foster families ensures that animals can return to the shelter to be adopted Not only is fostering a fun and educational activity for the whole family, but foster families report they are enriched by their experiences. They feel significant satisfaction knowing they made a direct impact on an animal’s life. Potential foster families can express their interest when signing up for Wayside’s volunteer program at www.waysidewaifs.org.

www.metropetmag.com

SHOP AT WHISKERS AND WAGS! Before leaving Wayside Waifs, many new adopters shop at the Whiskers and Wags retail boutique located inside the adoption center. This store offers a great selection of basic and luxury pet items. Profits from the store are used to pay for the care of shelter animals.

BARK PARK — IT’S A DOGS LIFE Come back to Wayside Waifs for the Bark Park! Opened in 2003, the Wayside Waifs Bark Park is a 5-acre off-leash park. It is a great place for dogs to romp with canine friends! The park is open 24/7, offering separate enclosed areas for small dogs, watering stations, trees and shaded areas, ample lighted

MetroPet Magazine

21


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

CONTACT INFORMATION Wayside Waifs 3901 Martha Truman Road Kansas City, MO 64137 • 816-761-8151 www.waysidewaifs.org info@waysidewaifs.org Director of Marketing and Development Anne Dykes • 816-986-4401 adykes@waysidewaifs.org Humane Education Jo Dean Hearn • 816-986-4430 jdhearn@waysidewaifs.org Pet Memorial Services 816-986-4406 cemetery@waysidewaifs.org Foster Care Tyler Petty • 816-986-4429 tpetty@waysidewaifs.org Volunteer Programs 816-986-4431 volunteer@waysidewaifs.org

Page 22

parking near the park entrance, “kennels” for overly excited dogs or a place to rest one dog while training a second, and lots of open space to run, play Frisbee and just have fun. Membership fees directly support Wayside Waifs homeless pets.

HUMANE EDUCATION The Wayside Waifs Humane Education program delivers programs to over 30,000 students each year in the greater Kansas City area. Presentations are given at preschools, public and private elementary schools, libraries, churches and health and safety fairs. Programs include the Circle of Friends Education, Safety Around Dogs, Pet Suitcase, Paws, Claws, Feathers and Fins, Service Dogs in Action, and the nationally recognized No More BULLIES! anti-violence program.

PET MEMORIAL SERVICES Established in 1946, the Wayside Waifs Pet Memorial Services has been providing families with compassionate end-of-life and aftercare for cherished family pets. It is one of the largest pet cemeteries in the United States, with more than 12,000 pets interred on three pet burial grounds. All the revenue from Wayside Waifs’ Pet Memorial Services goes back into the shelter. 22 MetroPet Magazine

VOLUNTEERS! The success of Wayside Waifs is in its volunteers. The volunteer program is filled with dedicated and remarkable people. These individuals contribute time, energy, money and heart to make life better for homeless companion animals. The first step in volunteering at Wayside Waifs is to attend an orientation program. Two orientations are offered each month, excluding December. Getting started is easy. Visit www.waysidewaifs.org to sign up for an invitation to class. Warning: Volunteers are paid with slobbery pet kisses, purrs and dog hugs!

DONATIONS Wayside Waifs is entirely funded by grants and public donations. Each year thousands of individuals support Wayside by attending events or making contributions. If you are interested in supporting Wayside, either financially or as a volunteer, please see the contact information box, above left.

SUMMARY Wayside Waifs board members, staff and volunteers have worked hard for over 73 years to make pets’ lives better. Its work has touched hundreds of thousands of pets and people. While much has been accomplished there is more to be done. You can rest assured that Wayside Waifs will keep going and will continue to make contributions to the pet community in the Kansas City metropolitan area. 22 April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 23

TOP 10 REASONS Why Your Dog’s Grooming Costs More than Your Haircut 10. Your hairdresser doesn’t wash and clean your rear end.

4. Your haircut doesn’t include a manicure or pedicure.

9. You don’t go for 6-8 weeks without washing or brushing your hair.

3. Your hairdresser only washes and cuts the hair on your head.

8. Your hairdresser doesn’t have to give you a sanitary trim.

2. You don’t bite or scratch your hairdresser. (I hope not anyway).

7. Your hairdresser doesn’t have to clean inside your ears. 6. Your hairdresser doesn’t have to clean boogies from your eyes. 5. You sit still for your hairdresser.

www.metropetmag.com

And the Number 1 reason your dog’s haircut costs more than yours: 1. The likelihood of you pooping or peeing while your hair is being cut is extremely slim!

MetroPet Magazine

23


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 24

Public

Manners BY MARY SELLARO reat weather is just around the corner and with that brings the opportunity to take our dogs into the public eye. The Kansas City area is growing dog friendlier, as dogs can commonly be seen on restaurant patios, in stores and at dog-themed events held in venues which generally do not welcome canine guests. The trend to take our dogs everywhere we go is on the rise and is not one which is going to fade any time soon. The role of the dog for some is changing from companion to helper. Pet therapy programs are being recognized for providing therapeutic benefits and make it possible for dogs to be found in hospitals, schools and libraries. The reality is a dog’s behavior will determine if they will continue to be welcomed in public places. Good manners are a must if we want dogs to be seen in a positive light.

G

WHAT ARE CONSIDERED GOOD PUBLIC MANNERS? Good manners begin with training a dog simple obedience exercises and practicing a lifestyle which involves implementing what the dog has learned. A dog also needs daily exercise to have the ability to focus and learn. In order to become a canine ambassador, dogs need to know how to sit reliably, come when called, stay in place, refocus their attention back to their human when distracted and walk on lead without pulling. These exercises should be considered basic training; consistency and patience are the key ingredients in a successful training program. A group obedi-

24 MetroPet Magazine

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

A well trained dog is a start to being successfully accepted in public, but it doesn’t end there.

Page 25

Besides teaching your dog basic commands, here are more training exercises to help your pet be well behaved in public. Leave It — prevents your dog from enjoying the jelly beans, chocolate bunnies, and other springtime delicacies just a little too much.

Drop It — saves your dog from tummy trouble associated with munching mulch (and keeps that game of fetch going, too).

Tricks

— a great way to include your dog and provide entertainment during warm-weather get-

togethers with friends.

ence class with a reputable trainer can provide a good setting for teaching the human how to train their dogs as well as preventing or resolving behavioral problems. A class is also a step forward in teaching the dog to listen and respond when distractions are present, as will be necessary in a public situation.

RESPECTING OTHERS A well trained dog is a start to being successfully accepted in public, but it doesn’t end there. The pleasure of being able to have our dog’s company in the community is a privilege and not an entitlement. The fact is not everyone shares a love for dogs and tolerance will only gain support if humans train their dogs to behave in an acceptable manner. Dogs which are allowed to display bad manners in public will have a negative impact on future opportunities for conscientious dog owners.

SIMPLE RULES FOR PUBLIC PLACES When the goal is to successfully share public space with both dog and non-dog lovers, keep in mind a few simple rules:

www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

25


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 26

• While walking keep the dog by your side, within touching distance, on a relaxed but controlled leash and out of other people’s way. A dog pulling on the leash and walking you is unacceptable. Avoid using a retractable leash, stay off your cell phone and pay attention to your dog. • Do not allow your dog to approach or greet people uninvited. If someone expresses a desire to meet your dog, the dog should stay calm and sit to be petted. Jumping up, licking or pawing must be discouraged, even if the person says they don’t mind. It is not fair to the dog to be allowed to do this with some people and not others. • Dog-to-dog meetings on leash need to be kept short, calm and with enough distance for a comfortable interaction. Never let your dog run up to another dog — no matter how friendly they

Restaurant patio manners — keep your dog in your space, no eating from plates or drinking from glasses, no sitting in the chairs or on the tables. appear. Observe the other dog’s behavior, if the dog is out of control or appears aggressive or fearful, say no thanks and move on. • Bring disposable bags with you to pick up after your dog, every time. There is nothing which will make a dog more unwanted anywhere than leaving piles of feces around for people to step in. • Restaurant patio manners — keep your dog in your space, no eating from plates or drinking from glasses, no sitting in the chairs or on the tables. Make sure your dog is comfortable and provide what they need for the duration. • Barking needs to be checked as it can make people fearful and implies a dog is out of control. • If you are unsure whether a dog is allowed in a store or on a restaurant patio — ask before entering. Look for signs in windows and be respectful of pet policies. • Keep your dog on leash unless the area is specifically zoned for off leash use.

26 MetroPet Magazine

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 27

• Dogs or puppies need to be housebroken before an indoor social outing or an outdoor area where an accident will be an issue. • Think about and provide anything your dog may need for your outing — this might include water, bowl for food, treats, bags for clean-up, towel or pad to lay on, etc.

STILL NOT SURE? Not sure about your dog’s social suitability? • Aggressive dogs need to be left at home. • Anxious or fearful dogs need to be introduced to social situations slowly and from a comfortable distance to build confidence. • Puppies need to have emphasis placed on building positive associations. Choose their outings carefully and avoid ones with large crowds and noises. A well-mannered dog and an attentive human is a step in the right direction for dogs to be welcomed in public and in social situations. Remember, not everyone loves your dog and they have the right to expect a level of respect, just as dog lovers want the simple joy of spending time with their dogs.

We Our Pets Submit your favorite pet’s photo at www.metropetmag.com

Mary Sellaro has been training dogs since 1990. She has taught group and private lessons from puppy through advanced. Mary has also worked with dog owners on behavioral issues, including aggression. She developed and implemented a training class program for Retired Greyhounds as Pets. Mary has been the temperament test evacuator for the Children’s Mercy Hospital’s Pet Pal Program since 1997. Mary is now the Director of Training for Pooches Paradise Daycare and Resort in the Waldo area of Kansas City. Mary is a certified American Kennel Club Canine Good Citizen evacuator. www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

27


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 28

The Importance of

MicroChipping Your Pet

BY HEDDIE LEGER ccording the American Humane Association and other animal welfare organizations an estimated ten million dogs and cats are lost or stolen every year in the United States. One in three pets will become lost at some point during their life. A study published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, including over 50 animal shelters across the United States were able to confirm that a high rate of animals that were returned to their owners was due to them being microchipped. Those dogs and cats with microchips were more likely to be returned to their families. And, the importance of microchip registration cannot be emphasized enough.

A

IMPORTANT STATISTICS

mal shelters were reunited with their families. However, the return-to-owner rate for dogs with microchips was over 52%, a major improvement. • Less than 3% of lost cats that entered the animal shelters were reunited with their families. The return-to-owner rate for cats with microchips was dramatically higher at over 38%, again a major improvement.

Registered microchips give lost pets the best chance of returning home.

Statistics indicated that: • Only about 25% of dogs that entered the ani-

MICRO-CHIP FOR MAXIMUM RETURN

The pet microchip is a simple product of our highly technological society. The chip itself is no bigger than a grain of rice. The cost is generally no more than a month’s supply of pet food. A pet microchip and enrollment in a pet recovery database brings lost pets home and provides peace of mind that your beloved companion will never wander unknown. Pet sitters, trainers, shelters, rescues, Veterinarians and groomers encourage microchipping and with very good reason-microchipping substantially increases the likelihood of a pet returning home by offering secure, reliable, unique and permanent identification.

A SIMPLE PROCEDURE There is never any 100% guarantee that a lost pet will be found or returned to the rightful owner, however, with microchipping a responsible owner can greatly increase the likelihood of regaining their pet should it become lost (or stolen) for any reason. The process is simple: A microchip, 28 MetroPet Magazine

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 29

HERE IN KANSAS CITY

The return-toowner rate for dogs with microchips was over 52%.

“At the KC Pet Project we sometimes see 20 to 30 pets a day that arrive with no tags and no microchip. This makes it almost impossible to return pets to their original owners,” said Teresa Johnson, KC Pet Project, CEO/Executive Director. “In just two days we had 64 pets come in the shelter; none of them microchipped. If more pets were microchipped, it would help us to reunite lost pets with their owners more quickly and fewer pets would wind up in shelters. As Kansas City’s animal shelter, we are dedicated to creating a ‘No-Kill’ Kansas City. Since the KC Pet Project took over running the shelter in 2012, we’ve achieved a live release rate 90% or greater. We’re extremely proud of how many precious lives we’ve saved over the last year and we continue to encourage the public to spay/neuter and microchip their pets to reduce the number of pets in shelters each year.”

no bigger than a grain of rice, can be implanted by a veterinarian, or tech, under a veterinarian’s direction. The chip can be implanted into all kinds of pets — from reptiles and birds to cats and dogs. The device carries a number, and this number is plugged into a database that includes the name and contact information of a pet’s owner. There are two major manufacturers (AVID and HomeAgain) and several smaller companies. Regardless of the manufacturer, the most important step is to make sure the chip is registered. There are now universal readers; in the past reading of the chip could be a challenge. Sometimes the chip can float under the skin, so those looking for a chip should always scan the entire body of the animal, just in case the chip might have moved.

A LIFE SAVING IMPACT In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and other natural disasters, thousands of pets were left stranded, homeless and separated from owners. These situations highlight the need for a permanent identification system to reunite animal with master. Microchip implants offer such a solution. In addition to tags, microchips theoretically provide a surefire, permanent identification method for pets. While, thieves can easily remove tags, it takes a surgical procedure to remove a microchip. Heddie Leger is a Certified Humane Education Specialist (CHES). Her lifelong passion for animal welfare has taken her down the path of rescue, rehabilitation, training and rehoming of many animals through the Missouri Puppies for Parole Program. She is a charter member of the Heartland Positive Dog Training Alliance and KC Representative for Animals and Society Institute through the KCCAN Link Coalition. She can be reached at pawzone@yahoo.com.

www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

29


3/28/13

Chip’s Corner

MetroPet April 13

11:53 PM

Page 30

PAWZZLE

BY PAWLEAN JOURNE

For tips on the answers to this pawzzle, read the story about Chip’s Adventure on page 32.

30 MetroPet Magazine

April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 31

Down:

Across:

1.

3.

An estimated ten _______________ pets are lost each year.

7.

Chip’s mom’s name.

8.

Pets lost during natural _________________ are more likely to be reunited with their owners if they are microchipped.

2.

4.

5.

6.

9.

11. 13.

16.

18. 20. 21.

22.

State where this episode takes place. A major company that offers microchip registration service and supplies. An important step to take after microchipping a pet to make sure the pet is returned to the owner if the pet is lost. It would take a difficult _____________ procedure to remove a microchip. What emotion did Chip demonstrate when he saw the lady coming towards him. After microchipping a pet the return rate is dramatically __________________. A __________________ should administer the microchip. Less than ____________ percent of lost cats are ever returned to their owners. If a pet is sold, or adopted, or if the owner moves, it is important to ______________ information in the database. The microchip is placed under the skin with a small _____________. A microchip is more reliable than a removable _____________. When Chip was in the back of the truck in the crate, he felt ____________ when the truck was moving. The microchip is no bigger than a grain of _____________.

10. Small rice like item inserted under the skin that helps owners find pets when pet is lost. 12. The lady’s face looked ____________________. 14. Place where lost pets are housed. 15. The microchip device carries an identification _______________ that connects it to the registration information. 17. A pet with a microchip is more likely to be ______________ to the owner. 19. A microchip is considered a __________________ identification tool. 23. Pet and owner information is entered into a pet recovery ________________ at registration. 24. Most frequent placement of the microchips is between the __________. 25. Sometimes the microchip can _____________ under the skin and move locations. 26. The microchip can be read by using a _________ and running it over the animal’s entire body.

March Pawzzle Answers

Clues for this pawzzle can be found in Episode 3 on pg 32 www.metropetmag.com

MetroPet Magazine

31


Chip’s

MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 32

Next

Adventure

EPISODE 3, 2013 — THE MICROCHIP

BY HEDDIE LEGER

s the man got closer, Chip tried to make himself small by cowering farther back behind the bench, then Chip realized this was not a man at all, but a very large woman. Her face was weathered and tired looking. Her eyes looked like she had not slept in days. He felt an instant connection when their eyes met. “Here boy,” she said with a kindness to her voice. He was still very confused, but with darkness coming on, he felt like he had no choice as he did not feel safe outside in the dark with no shelter. Slowly Chip crawled. He was thinking, “oh my, I hope this is not a mistake. I am going to have to trust this lady, no matter how scared I am. I wonder if this is how my MawMaw felt that night we got separated? And I wonder if this lady helped my MawMaw? There is no place for me to go, so I guess this is better than nothing. Maybe at least I will get something to eat and drink.” So Chip let her place the collar and leash over his head and let her walk him to the truck. The first thing the lady did was run a wand like thing over his body. “Darn, he could hear her say, No MicroChip. Now how am I going to find this dog’s owners?” She sighed a deep, tired sigh, put him in one of the crates in the back of the pick-up and he could feel the truck begin to move faster and faster. The trees passed by like a blur and he began to feel dizzy and nauseous, he thought he was going to get sick to his stomach when the truck stopped. The lady got out and lifted the crate from the back of the truck and put it in a wire outside kennel and opened the door. “I am too tired to deal with you tonight,” she said. She set some food and water in the kennel, left the door to the crate open so he could have some shelter, left the kennel and locked the gate. She then got back

A

32 MetroPet Magazine

RECAP FROM EPISODE 2 - 2013 Chip was totally perplexed. It was getting dark, he sat down under a bench and decided to rest a bit when a big pick-up truck came circling around. It had a kennel in the back and big letters that said, ANIMAL CARE and CONTROL with pictures of animals on the sides. A big burly man with a hat got out and started walking towards him. Chip thought to himself, “Should I run away or stay safely under the bench. Maybe he would not see me He does not look like a very kind person. in the truck and drove off. Chip sat there watching the truck drive away and felt very lonely. He was not so scared anymore as he felt the lady meant him no harm, but he was very hungry, thirsty and tired. So he had something to eat, drink and curled up in the crate on the cushion of blankets she had left and went to sleep. April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 33

Chip dreamed of his MawMaw and siblings that night. He somehow felt they had been at this place and felt their presence, or perhaps it was their lingering scent. All night long, Chip could hear dogs barking and a few cats meowing. They did not really sound scared, but the barking kept waking him up. He tried to Quote of the Month cover his ears with “Moral courage is a rare commodity, his paws and fell even more than bravery in battle or great asleep this way. intelligence.” The next thing he Robert F. Kennedy knew it was daylight and the lady was standing at the kennel gate smiling and laughing. She had never seen a dog try to cover it’s ears and he had fallen asleep that way. He was so sound asleep he had not heard the truck drive up. “Well now, little dog, let’s see if we can clean you up and find you a home.” Chip saw the same flag flying with the crimson cross and realized he was in the same state meaning he had not traveled that far, but it seemed like he was a million miles from home. The lady gave him a bath, a clean cute collar and scarf. He heard her tell some people that he had a stay at least five days, but there was no danger of euthanasia. “Now that is a new word,” Chip thought to himself. “I wonder what that means?” It was not long before he found out. Chip smelled that awful smell again, and heard some of the dogs crying in a very scared voice, then he saw someone carry a limp body out to another door, and thought to himself, oh my, that dog is not breathing!!!!! He put it together in his little brain and realized that something made the dog limp and not breathe and the smell must be other dogs like that one as he did not see any of them walk out of the room. He figured out that they stopped breathing, went limp, got placed in the room where the smell came from and never came out, which means they were not ever coming back. Chip had a horrible sick feeling in his stomach and got nauseous all over again. He was so scared they were going to do that to him, he was feeling panicky and frantic to get away. He

DISCUSSION STORY TIPS 1) How did Chip feel when he saw the lady was kind? 2) How do you think Chip felt when he heard the dogs barking in fear? 3) What did the girl do that made Chip feel better? 4) What would you have done? 5) How did the lady in the story indicate her ethics towards the value of life? What did that person say or do to show you ethics or morals? www.metropetmag.com

started to howl, scream, scratch, jump and bark. He just did not know what else to do with his fear. A nice young girl came in and calmed him down, gave him a treat and took him for a walk. Chip began to feel better. He wanted so badly for this nice person to take him away, find his MawMaw, tell him where he was and where his MawMaw was. He wanted to badly to know she was safe and did not end up in that room. The young girl, found another one of those wand things and ran it over his body again. This time the wand beeped. Not only did it beep once, but it beeped twice. The girl smiled with joy, and called for the older lady to come and look at the wand. They talked for a while and put Chip back in his kennel. Chip just did not know what to think. They seemed happy enough, but he did not know why. What he did not know is the lady had made a promise to herself to find him a home. She felt it was not ethical to euthanize healthy dogs, and made a moral commitment to keep him safe and find him a home. He was about to embark on yet another journey. He had a microchip, he heard her say, and she made a promise to the young girl to do her best to find out where he came from and how to get him back home. But what was the second beep — two microchips, what could that possibly mean? Chip felt like it was a good thing he had a microchip. The way both of the people were smiling, for the first time he felt like good things were going to happen for him. Heddie Leger is a Certified Humane Education Specialist (CHES). Her lifelong passion for animal welfare has taken her down the path of rescue, rehabilitation, training and rehoming of many animals through the Missouri Puppies for Parole Program. She is a charter member of the Heartland Positive Dog Training Alliance and KC Representative for Animals and Society Institute through the KC-CAN Link Coalition. She can be reached at pawzone@yahoo.com.

ETHICS/MORALE The discipline dealing with what is good and bad, and with moral duty and obligation.

HUMANE EDUCATION POINT Ethics and morals help us live safely with each other. If we did not have rules of conduct, people would go around doing whatever they wanted, even if it hurt others. A world without rules, ethics and morals would be very chaotic. What ethics and morals do you live by?

ACTIVITY Learn about how the ethic and the value of life keeps our society safe. Discuss ways we enforce those morals of the value of life. MetroPet Magazine

33


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 34

Pet Services Directory Attorney at Law

KELLI COOPER ATTORNEY AT LAW

201 East Loula • Olathe, KS 913-254-7600 www.kellicooperlaw.com Kelli assists clients with family law, criminal defense and animal law. She is a passionate pet advocate and skilled trial attorney.

Adoption Wayside Waifs 816-761-8151

www.waysidewaifs.org Wayside Waifs is Kansas City’s largest and most comprehensive no kill pet adoption campus. It specializes in animal rescue, pet adoption and Humane Education programs and pet memorial services.

Daycare & Boarding Camp Bow Wow, Lee’s Summit 1010 SE Hamblen Road Lee’s Summit, MO 816-246-7833

www.campbowwow.com/us/mo/leess ummit At Camp BowWow your pups reap the benefits of exercise and socialization while having lots of fun romping & playing with their canine friends. Camp Bow Wow, Olathe 1150 W. 151st Street Olathe, KS 913-322-2267

www.campbowwow.com /us/ks/olathe/ Rest assured knowing your camper is well taken care of at all times whether you are gone for one day, overnight or for an extended period. Pooches in Paradise 7200 Wyandotte Kansas City, MO 816-361-3388

www.poochesparadise.com Pooches Paradise was created with your dogs needs in mind. We are dedicated to offering the finest in boarding, daycare, obedience training and spa treatments. New location — one block off Wornall, on 72nd Street. 34 www.metropetmag.com

New Listings in Blue

Grooming Best Friends Pet 13008 State Line Road Leawood, KS • 913.498.1397 Peculiar, MO • 816.984.5481

www.bestfriendspet.us Best Friends Pet is a full service salon including caring and gentle stylists, a licensed pet chiropractor & a professional pet photographer. Call us today!

Pet Food, Supplies, Grooming Treats Unleashed 4209 West 119th St. Leawood, KS 913-451-2000

www.treats-unleashed.com Treats Unleashed is a gourmet pet specialty store with an in-store bakery. It also offers a full line of pet supplies & food, a self-serve bath area & grooming services.

Pet Food Distribution American Midwest Distributors 820 Atlantic Street North Kansas City, MO • 816-842-1905

www.americanmidwestkc.com A local distributor which supplies local stores with Earthborn and ProPac pet food, and various other products.

Pet Memorial Services Rolling Acres Memorial Gardens 12200 NW Crooked Road Kansas City, MO 816-891-8888

www.visitrollingacres.com Our mission is to serve those who think of their pet as one of the family by providing compassionate, dignified, & ethical after-life care for pets.

Veterinarians Arbor Creek Animal Hospital 15971 S. Bradley Rd Olathe, KS • 913-764-9000

www.acanimalhospital.com We believe that every pet has a different set of healthcare needs. Utilizing a blend of traditional medicine and holistic veterinary gives everyone options! Aid Animal Hospital 8343 Wornall Rd Kansas City, MO 816-363-4922

www.aidanimalhospital.com For 37 years, Aid Animal Hospital has provided quality veterinary medical & surgical services to Waldo and entire Kansas City area. We pride ourselves on quality customer service. Cat Clinic of Johnson County 9426 Pflumm Road Lenexa, KS 913-541-0478

www.catclinicofjc.com A feline exclusive clinic! Your cat is an important part of your family and you want the best medical care available. Our team is ready to provide cutting edge care. Quivira Crossing Veterinary Clinic 11770 W. 135th St. Overland Park, KS 913-647-4141

quiviracrossingvetclinic.com Quivira Crossing Veterinary Clinic is a full service companion animal hospital. It is our commitment to provide quality veterinary care throughout the life of your pet.

Veterinary Software Veterinary Pharmacy Reference 1-866-639-3866

www.vpronline.com Interactive, electronic VETERINARY pharmacology software has Interaction Matrix, dosage calculator, client info sheets, etc. Semi-annual medicine database (over 2,488 brand and 864 generic meds) updates.

Pet Friendly Car Dealership Lee’s Summit Subaru 2101 NE. Independence Ave Lee’s Summit, MO 816-251-8600

www.leessummitsubaru.com This pet friendly dealership offers a wide selection of new and used Subaru’s at low prices. Check out our service department.

SHOWCASE YOUR COMPANY OR PRODUCT IN THE METROPET DIRECTORY.

FOR DETAILS CALL 913-548-1433 April 2013


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 35


MetroPet April 13

3/28/13

11:53 PM

Page 36

MetroPet_APRIL_2013  

Pet ownerr's resource PET information and education

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you