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Just Research? Jo Vearey Associate Professor and co-coordinator of the MoVE Project, African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS)

The work shared in this publication reflects the combined and collective efforts of many individuals, in very different ways: people who sell sex; migrants; sex workers; researchers; students; activists; allies; facilitators; artists; advocates; funders; writers; curators; editors. These are not discrete, stand-alone labels—all involved in the project represent different combinations of these diverse, intersecting, and everchanging categories. Regardless of how we do (or don’t) identify, our roles are fluid, continuously shifting across both time and place. We are constantly moving between our public and private lives—both physically and emotionally; from our respective workplaces, into a zine workshop, across to a policy dialogue, onto a funding meeting, through to an international conference, over to an artist’s studio, back to—and often between—our homes. We are continuously engaging in different ways with, and for, different audiences: writing for a sex worker newsletter, talking to a client, supporting a bail application, updating social media, sending money home, creating an art work, drafting a submission to parliament, recording police abuses, curating an exhibition for an international conference, phoning family,

getting ready for work, producing a blog post, revising a journal article, ‘whatsapping’ a friend, co-creating an opinion piece, responding to enquiries from the media, paying our rent. We do not physically share the same spaces at all times, and we do not share the same lived experiences; we’re all—necessarily—different. What does unify us, however, is a shared commitment to addressing social justice. In this case, justice for South African and cross-border migrants who are engaged in the selling of sex. This is an important livelihood strategy that—due to its criminalisation in South Africa—is associated with multiple, intersecting injustices resulting from both direct and structural violence. Whether direct violence—at the hands of the police, a client, or a family member—or structural violence—resulting from the policies and attitudes that criminalise and stigmatise sex work—these experiences are bravely and carefully articulated in the zines shared here. Those who are engaging with this work will, like those of us involved in its production, reflect many different views and experiences. 90

Profile for MoVE methods:visual:explore

The Sex Worker Zine Project Ebook  

"Featuring the zines produced by 24 men, women, and transgender persons who live and sell sex in the Gauteng, Limpopo, and Mpumalanga provin...

The Sex Worker Zine Project Ebook  

"Featuring the zines produced by 24 men, women, and transgender persons who live and sell sex in the Gauteng, Limpopo, and Mpumalanga provin...