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STEVEN SABADOS SOME OF THE DESIGNER’S FAVOURITE SPACES

BATHROOM DESIGN TRENDS The newest fixtures and materials MIXED MEDIA The unusual and whimsical art

of Mark Gleberzon

AUTUMN ISSUE

LOVING THE LAUNDRY ROOM How to design the perfect washing space $5.95

CONTEMPORARY FURNISHINGS PANELLED APPLIANCES NEW STYLES IN LIGHTING

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Display until Dec. 31, 2016

THE

CABBAGETOWN MAKEOVER A Victorian home gets a new life


Floor Art “Great design will forever change your perspective...”

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EDITOR’S LETTER

WHAT IS ONE of the first things we do after checking into a hotel room? After we’ve scoped out the amenities, that is. I reckon most of us unpack, stow our clothes in the closet and bureau drawers, and arrange our toiletries on the bathroom vanity. We might also place a book and cell phone on the bedside table and a laptop or tablet on the desk. In short, we make ourselves at home. We may not consciously realize that we are staking out our space in a room with a neutral, generic decor, a room that has been occupied by a stream of strangers, a room that we will live in only temporarily. But that’s what we do. I believe that humans long for the comforts of home, even when they’re away from home. And they modify and transform the spaces they occupy to create that comfort. This issue is all about transformation that brings comfort. The homes we profile in this issue have all been transformed through renovation and design to suit the people who own them. The transformation of Ann Pikar’s home in Cabbagetown, an area that has been radically transformed from its beginnings as a 19th-century working-class neighbourhood of Irish immigrants, for instance, took 16 months. The result is a stunning structure that, on the outside, is respectful of the historic streetscape

but is absolutely contemporary on the inside. It’s perfect for the family that inhabits it. Also in this issue, we visit designer Steven Sabados’s urban loft, which is in a former industrial building that has been transformed for housing. He shows us two of his favourite spaces, one inside the light-drenched interiors and the other on the patio outside. Steven, who this fall will co-host The Goods, a new program on CBC television, has found solace in his home since the untimely death of his partner, Chris Hyndman, in 2015. As we always do in our Autumn issue, we chronicle current design trends in bathrooms. Talk about transformation! The once-utilitarian bathroom is humble no more. Many of us are creating spa-like oases in our bathrooms, which soothe away the stresses of the workaday world. And finally, we offer you advice on how to transform space in your home into a practical but beautiful laundry room. Creating a comfortable home of ten requires transformation. Whether you’ve bought a house that desperately needs renovation or you just want to upgrade the home you have, change is necessary. May you find inspiration on these pages for your own transformative journey.

STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@movatohome.com

There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @leahlipkowitz, @movatohome

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THE AUTUMN ISSUE

@leahlipkowitz, @movatohome


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CONTRIBUTORS

LARRY ARNAL Photographer Larry Arnal, a regular contributor to Toronto Home, says he derived plenty of inspiration and design ideas from the homes he photographed for this issue. “On one hand, there was a beautiful traditional home north of the city, with intricately crafted built-in cabinetry,� he says. “On the other, a contemporary urban home in Cabbagetown, with sleek walnut cabinetry and a metal fireplace surround. Each is inspirational in its own way.�

Volume 6, number 5, Autumn issue 2016 Date of issue: September, 2016 4020 St. Ambroise St. Suite #367 Montreal, Qc. h4c 2c7

Call 1-855-410-4663 movatohome.com sales@movatohome.com

JULIE GEDEON S e a s on e d w r it e r /e d it or Ju l ie Gedeon has a greater appreciation of possible fresh angles and fine details in photographs after profiling the work of mixed-media artist Mark Gleberzon for this issue. She will never look at a Barbie doll with quite the same innocence, and is reminded of how much she dreaded as a child the kind of flowery bathing cap that Gleberzon highlights in a nostalgic pictorial look at his grandmother.

GILLIAN JACKSON Toronto photographer Gillian Jackson has been photographing interiors and exteriors for many of Toronto’s top designers for more than 11 years.  For this issue, Gillian photographed the loft of designer Steven Sabados. “Upon entry, I was struck by the windows, which are massive and provide such even natural lighting,� Gillian says. “I thought that for Steven, as an artist and designer, these creative conditions couldn’t be better. In juxtaposition to the materials used to create the loft, I found that the terrace seamlessly tied the indoors with the outdoors thanks to its multiple seating areas and lush greenery that create privacy and the perfect social gathering space.�

PUBLISHER Leah Lipkowitz ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER Hana Rakovski EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Jennifer Mula

ART DIRECTOR

OPERATIONS MANAGER

Mark Ruzayk

Sheila Toby

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Phillipa Rispin PRODUCTION ARTIST Marieve Gagnon

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wendy Loper ACCOUNTING Valentina Tarantchenko

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

SALES DIRECTOR

Trudy Kerman

Hazel Rapanan

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS Diane Dollisen Carmen Lefebvre CONTRIBUTORS Julie Gedeon Susan Kelly Susan Semenak

LEGAL DEPOSIT issn

1927-324x Toronto Home

Magazine Inc. 2016. All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without the written permission of Toronto Home Magazine is strictly prohibited.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

SUSAN KELLY Contributor Susan Kelly, a writer who specializes in style and decor, tackled two assignments for this issue. In addition to talking to Torontonians about advances in design for that home sanctuary, the bathroom, Susan wrote a profile of the stunning update of a Cabbagetown home. “All concerned reported a high level of cooperation in giving the home a very contemporary-rustic look while still respecting its Victorian roots,� she says.

Larry Arnal Drew Hadley Mark Hemmings Gillian Jackson STYLISTS Rose Barroso Megan Breese Kim Jacobsen Erin Jones Shiva Khalilnia Jean Monet

THE AUTUMN ISSUE

  

Vanessa Suppa Rhonda Thornton

24

Printed in Canada

    

 


So beautiful, you may never leave the room again. Since 1963, Binns kitchen + bath design has been creating rooms of distinction and functionality that are a seamless blend of high style and world-renowned quality featuring the world’s leading brands. And now that we’re celebrating our 50th Anniversary that commitment has never been stronger. From design to completed construction, and everything in between, a Binns kitchen and bath is a better kitchen and bath.

C E L E B R AT I N G

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CONTENTS

60 ON THE COVER

Steven Sabados loves the beautiful simplicity of the spaces he uses most at home.

WARM AND LUXURIOUS

Bathroom design continues to skew to spa-like sanctuaries

74

THIS JUST IN

26

BARBIE AND BUBBIE

An array of new products for your home

The whimsical art of Mark Gleberzon embraces an eclectic array of subjects

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Two locations to serve you better: 409 Brant Street Burlington, ON 1 (905) 333-6670 1 (888) 846-7845

2269 Fairview Street Burlington, ON 1 (905) 631-6000 www.lizathome.ca

New Flagship Store Opening soon


CONTENTS

INTO THE LIGHT

New lighting technologies and fixtures are ready to warm up winter

94 20

EDITOR’S LETTER

54

ALL IN THE FAMILY An established furniture company engages the talents of all family members

102 TIMELY RENO

A major overhaul of a Humber Valley Village home is done expertly and fast

114

ONE-STOP SHOPPING A mega-mall opens in Vaughan dedicated to home renovation and design

118

DOING IT FOR HIMSELF A cabinetmaker applies his professional skills when building his own home

128

DISHING THE DIRT ON AN IMPORTANT ROOM Laundry rooms are no longer relegated to dank corners in basements

130

SPA SPACE How to transform a bathroom into a luxurious sanctuary

134

GLITTER AND GLOW The latest in exquisite jewelry

136

BEDAZZLED AND BEJEWELLED Why fine coloured gemstones are as coveted as diamonds

142

WORK ON YOUR WORK-OUT SCHEDULE Careful planning can build exercise time into each day

146

DOWNSIZING TO THE RIGHT SIZE A designer transforms a modest-sized bungalow into his perfect home

162

CAPE ESCAPE A Nova Scotia home is a blissful getaway with wrap-around views

176

THEIR STYLE A designer adapts her style to that of her clients

182

THE PERSONAL TOUCH A furniture and design showroom gives customers exactly what they need

A Victorian home is renovated for a modern family

184

PANEL DISCUSSION Advice on how to integrate kitchen appliances into panelled cabinets

48

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CABBAGETOWN RENEWAL


DESIGN

1. THE RIGHT CONNECTIONS The Connection Collection table features clear tempered glass atop a metal base in a choice of 11 finishes. Offered in four lengths (76", 84", 98", 108"), the table is supported on legs available in solid white oak (eight finishes) or solid American black walnut (8 finishes). We show it with the Wolfgang chair, created by designer Luca Nichetto. Huppé brings the 100-per cent solid white oak frame from Italy and finishes and upholsters it in Quebec. Table: $2,790; armchair: $990; side chair: $870. ——— Barrymore Furniture 1168 Caledonia Rd., Toronto 416-532-2891 www.barrymorefurniture.com

2. ADORABLE DORA The Dora console table pairs polished concrete with the hazy tint of recycled glass, upcycling conventional materials to create an eyecatching look. Bubbles of flattened glass disks line the curves of the bronzed wrought-iron frame, giving this contemporary table a fresh and fanciful feel. 58.5" W x 22" D x 34" H. $7,642. ——— Accents For Living 8 Brock Rd. N., Guelph ~ 519-822-2929 243 Speers Rd., Oakville ~ 905-849-8537 www.accentsforliving.ca

3. EASTERN ALLURE The three-drawer Macau chest offers contemporary styling with an Oriental influence. Its symmetrical mirrored front will be emphasized by any one of the numerous finish choices available. ——— Creative Avenues 378 Fairlawn Ave., Toronto 416-783-0220 www.creative-avenues.ca

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Inspiring Extraordinary Design Verona Floors, Terra Collection, Latte

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DESIGN

1. EDGY STYLE The rustic look of a live-edge dining table brings it firmly into contemporary style. These Canadianmade tables are available in cherry, maple and walnut in four finishes: gunstock, light brown, dark brown and Autumn Blush. They feature 1.75" tops and three base options. The tables are 42" wide and come in standard lengths (72", 84", 92") but can be customized to suit a particular space. ——— Almira Fine Furniture 4747 Highway #7 E., Unionville 905-477-5524 www.almira.com

2. SARIS AS ART The Steven & Chris Collection offers gorgeously coloured and patterned silk rugs. They’re created from authentic saris, becoming ecologically responsible pieces in a modern design that complements most decors. Available in various colours and sizes. ——— Allan Rug 103 Miranda Ave., Toronto 416-787-1707 www.allanrug.com

4. DINE IN STYLE The Chatillon dining table is an intriguing mix of modern and classic design elements. Crafted from hardwoods into elegant curves and straight lines, with gold-coloured ferrule accents, it features flecks of gold suspended within its brilliant grain finish. Two 22-inch extension leaves are included. ——— Decorium Furniture 363 Supertest Rd., Toronto ~ 416-736-6120 1212 Yonge St., Toronto ~ 416-515-1212 www.decorium.com

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3. ELEGANT FOXTROT An accomplished sculptor from Lladró has captured the spirit of the foxtrot, a smooth progressive dance characterized by long, continuous flowing movements. The moment depicted, with the legs of both dancers stretched out behind them, makes the balance of the piece very difficult. Porcelain, 14.75" x 14.25", hand made in Spain. Limited edition of 3,000 introduced in 2012. ——— Treasures & Co. 8108 Yonge St., Thornhill 905-763-0349 www.treasuresco.com


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DESIGN

1. FLORAL FEATURE With elegant simplicity, the Flora cabinet in Caviar Black-stained wood is just the right backdrop for the impressively oversized solid cast-brass flower pull that steals the show. 48" W x 18.5" D x 34.5" H. $5,086. ——— Accents For Living 8 Brock Rd. N., Guelph ~ 519-822-2929 243 Speers Rd., Oakville ~ 905-849-8537 www.accentsforliving.ca

2. TERRIFIC TRIO These occasional tables generate visual interest whether they’re nested or used separately. They’re functional as well as decorative, each with its own design, and supported by sleek nickel legs. ——— Creative Avenues 378 Fairlawn Ave., Toronto 416-783-0220 www.creative-avenues.ca

4. LOUNGE WITH LIAM Style and comfort meet in the Liam sofa. It stands on metal-finished feet and is upholstered in supple Campania dove leather. Available in 102-inch width, and also as a love seat and a sofa chair, Liam can be ordered in a variety of leather covers and foot finishes. ——— Decorium Furniture 363 Supertest Rd., Toronto ~ 416-736-6120 1212 Yonge St., Toronto ~ 416-515-1212 www.decorium.com

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3. PASSIONATE TANGO The sensuality, passion and feeling of the tango (once described as “a sad thought that dances”) are captured to perfection in this piece from Lladró, which shows the couple executing one of the dance’s most spectacular steps. Porcelain, 14.5" x 12.5", handmade in Spain. Limited edition of 3,000 introduced in 2014. ——— Treasures & Co. 8108 Yonge St., Thornhill 905-763-0349 www.treasuresco.com


480 EGLINTON AVENUE WEST TORONTO 416 256 5229 9033 LESLIE STREET RICHMOND HILL 905 881 5229 MARKLASH.COM 1 866 881 5229


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DESIGN

1. VANITY VARIETY Architectural lines, spiral handturned legs and lush wood define GODI’s 2016 North American line of single and double vanities. They boast marble or quartz countertops, and the finish options include a dark natural teak or whitewash with optional decorative door panels. In widths of 35", 47" and 54". ——— GODI Bathroom presented by Dezign Market 1641 Langstaff Rd., Unit 8, Vaughan 1-888-398-8380 www.godibathroom.com

2. EVOCATIVE EVAIN Evain is a collection of hand-knotted, flatwoven rugs, most of which are reversible. Wool, silks and metallic yarns are combined in muted tones of grey and brown, giving these rugs a unique look and texture. Custom sizes available. ——— Dominion Rug & Home 52 Samor Rd., Toronto 416-485-9488 www.dominionrug.com

4. FINE FRETWORK AND CELTIC KNOTS This cabinet features a stylish black and white finish, accented with a mirror and a Celtic knot design. Antique brass pulls and beautifully crafted fretwork give the piece a traditional feel. Perfect for a stylish media room. 15.7" L x 47.2" W x 37" H. ——— Litemode 8355 Jane St., Unit 2, Vaughan www.litemode.ca 905-738-8889

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3. TASKED WITH ILLUMINATION Make a sleek design statement while lighting up any room with the Fontaine floor lamp. Its minimalist design is at home in any contemporary setting, and it’s fully adjustable and available in both black and white. $599. ——— Morba 665-667 Queen St. W., Toronto 416-364-5144 www.morba.ca


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DESIGN

1. STEAM DREAM Designed to blend with other appliances, this 24-inch combination steam oven by Porter & Charles enhances the appearance of any kitchen. While it cooks with both steam and convection, it works in the same way as a traditional oven, with the added benefit of steam. It locks moisture in food to create juicy and succulent dishes, from meat, fish and casseroles to vegetables and desserts. ——— Euro-Line Appliances 871 Cranberry Crt., Oakville 905-829-3980 www.euro-line-appliances.com

2. NEPALI KNOTS Himalaya is a collection of handknotted, 100 per cent silk area rugs made in Nepal in contemporary and transitional styles. Available in custom sizes. ——— Dominion Rug & Home 52 Samor Rd., Toronto 416-485-9488 www.dominionrug.com

4. LIGHT THE WAY Stoneware table lamps by Stone and Sawyer are handcrafted in the company’s studio in the Catskill mountains of New York state. Designers and artists Julian Peploe and David Ryan created Stone and Sawyer to satisfy their search for the perfect handmade lamp. These limitededition lamps are made of locally sourced materials and are available in Toronto at Hollace Cluny. ——— Hollace Cluny 160 Pears Ave., Suite 203, Toronto www.hollacecluny.ca 416-968-7894

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3. DECO DELIGHT Add a curvaceous element to any room with this rosewood veneered club chair. Its flared back is upholstered on the interior above a loose seat cushion. Inspired by an Art Deco original, it has square chamfered legs and is reminiscent of the best design of the 1930s. ——— Elizabeth Interiors 409 Brant St., Burlington 905-333-6670 www.elizabethinteriors.com


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DESIGN

1. BLING RING This single-ring LED pendant, with its diamond-cut clear crystals, will add a touch of elegance to any dining table. It reflects light beautifully within its round structure and throughout the surrounding room. ——— Morba 665-667 Queen St. W., Toronto 416-364-5144 www.morba.ca

2. COSMIC CARPET The wonders of the galaxy come to life in the colourful pattern of the Cosmos area rug, which is made of wool and silk. It’s hand-knotted in various warm tones and available at Weavers Art. ——— Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 162 Bedford Rd., Toronto ~ 416-923-7929 www.weaversart.com

4. DECK DESIGN Low-maintenance decking has come a long way since the 1990s, and the latest generation of PVC decking looks better than wood, without wood’s disadvantages. It allows for creative designs and colour combinations to transform your outdoor living space into an enjoyable outdoor room. ——— Royal Decks B10 - 996 Westport Cres., Mississauga 905-901-3560 ~ 1-866-399-4616 www.royaldecks.ca

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3. ANGLES AND LINES This minimalist two-toned geometric fixture comes in two finish combinations: Olde Bronze with natural brass accents, or Classic Pewter with polished nickel accents. With its vintage industrial style, it’s available in two sizes. Available exclusively at Royal Lighting. ——— Royal Lighting 1549 Avenue Rd., Toronto 416-782-1129 www.royallighting.com


Impressive 10,000 square foot showroom. Wide range of quality hardwood floors, wide plank flooring, AC5 laminates, vinyl planks and carpets. 8601 Jane street, Units 1-2, Concord, ON | 905.761.6655 | www.chestnutflooring.ca


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DESIGN

1. FUSION OF STYLES The Othello collection features crystal chandeliers with silk shades. Available in polished chrome with a white silk shade or English bronze with a gilded shimmer shade. The mix of traditional and contemporary styling makes it a perfect accent in any home. Available exclusively at Royal Lighting. ——— Royal Lighting 1549 Avenue Rd., Toronto royallighting.com 416-782-1129

2. GOING FOR THE BOLD Mid-Century Kilim, from Weavers Art’s newest rug collections, features bold patterns and great texture in a unique design. The hand-woven wool pile gives a cozy and casual feel. ——— Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 162 Bedford Rd., Toronto ~ 416-923-7929 www.weaversart.com

4. THE RIGHT SIZE FOR ALL The Junior chair is scaled for both men and women with the perfect arm height for lounging and a smooth seat back. Junior can sit between a kitchen and family room or in front of windows without blocking the view and is also available without a swivel. Made in Toronto with your choice of fabric and colour. ——— Toute Suite Custom Decor 2110 Dundas St. E., Suite 5, Mississauga 905-499-1822 ext. 201 ~ 1-800-499-8752 www.toutesuite.ca

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3. ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION With a nod to the design of the swinging ’60s, the Dior occasional table group includes a 39-inch round coffee table ($999) and a 21-inch round end table ($649). Each item features a glass top and solid stainless steel base in a polished gold finish. ——— Zilli Home Interiors 672 Chrislea Rd., Woodbridge 289-268-0020 www.zillihome.com


TREASURES & CO. TREASURES & CO. ACCESSORIES . GIFT . FURNITURE

8101 Yonge St. (South of 407) Thornhill, Ontario 905.763.0349 www.treasuresco.com


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DESIGN

1. SINUOUS SHAPES The Quatrefoil Collection is a group of elegant tables crafted of a metal base in a pewter finish and a glass top. The oval coffee table’s top measures 48" x 28" ($1099). The end table has a 19-inch round top ($599). The round dining table measures 48 inches across ($1199). ——— Zilli Home Interiors 672 Chrislea Rd., Woodbridge 289-268-0020 www.zillihome.com

2. STREET BEAT Street Art No. 4 is the name of a new addition to one of Weavers Art’s most popular collections. This design features neutral colours with subtle plum accents in a playful pattern that looks as if it were taken from a trendy Queen St. W. alley. ——— Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 162 Bedford Rd., Toronto ~ 416-923-7929 www.weaversart.com

4. GET THE PICTURE? LG OLED TV is a new television technology that boasts extraordinary picture quality. Unlike LED/LCD back-lit TVs, the unique pixels of OLED can produce their own light and colour, switching on or off for the ultimate picture-quality control. ——— Trutone Electronics 980 Dundas St. E., Mississauga 844-980-383 www.trutone.ca

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3. STANDING OUT FROM THE CROWD Make a statement with the stylishly industrial Greer club chair. It features wide, comfortable, top-grain leather seating and a sleek metal frame. With its distinctly cool urban vibe, it’s sure to draw the eye. ——— Stoney Creek Furniture 395 Lewis Rd., Stoney Creek 7979 Weston Rd., Vaughan 905-643-4121 ~ 1-800-263-8575 www.stoneycreekfurniture.com


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A Victorian house in Cabbagetown is transformed into a stylish family home for the present BY SUSAN KELLY // PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL // STYLING: ERIN JONES and MEGAN BREESE

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TODAY, IT’S AN ELEGANTLY updated three-storey house in Cabbagetown. But there was a time when the current homeowner, Ann Pikar, called it “the monstrosity.” What most offended her discerning eye was the original brickwork clad in layers of pink stucco. “I could see the house had amazing Victorian bones,” Ann says. “I knew there was beauty within.”

The prime location was also a plus. Ann and her husband had lived in the family-oriented, diverse and vibrant neighbourhood since 2005. It was exactly where they wanted to raise their two children: Nathan, 9, and Annabelle, 6. They also liked that the home was wider than most around it, and at 3,700 square feet had space for four bedrooms.

Ann, who has a love of art and interior design, remained hands-on throughout the 16-month overhaul, which was completed in March. Open concept was a must, if only because with two children she yearns for less visual clutter. “At the outset, I told the architect I wanted a ‘contemporary rustic’ feel, very clean and modern lines, but also warm, cozy and inviting,” she says. •

(Opposite) A painting by Siobhan Humston served as inspiration for the main-floor colour scheme. The reclaimed-wood dining table was custom-built by Bernard Bieberstein of BeReclaimed. Ostrich leather sideboard: Snob; chandelier: Lambert & Fils; chairs: Comback Sled by Kartell. (Above) The living room fireplace is flanked by custom sofas covered in menswear-grey fabric. Sofas: Silva Custom Upholstery; coffee tables: Costa Marble; navy Risom lounge chairs: Design Within Reach; cowhide rug: Elte.

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(Above) A clutter-free living space was a must-have for this on-the-go family. The architects incorporated plenty of built-in storage and a mix of walnut, matte black and glossy white finishes on the cabinetry. The island is topped with Calacatta marble. Custom counter stools: + tongtong; island lights: Dark Tools; millwork: Woodworking Design Ltd.; island appliances: Miele. In the adjacent family room, an in-floor glass panel allows natural light into the basement’s home gym. Distressed leather chairs: Elte; custom-made leather sofa: Style Garage; table: custom-designed by Erin Jones and Megan Breese of CMID. The main staircase’s walnut treads appear to float behind a glass panel, cantilevered off the wall with raw steel plates. Design: McCormack Architects.

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The architect, Christopher McCormack, principal at McCormack Architects, first addressed the home’s exterior. Because it is in a designated heritage area, he had city-imposed rules to follow. “We recreated the original front facade as closely as possible, using heritage Ontario size clay bricks, traditional woodwork and wood-frame windows, composed in a way that would honour the street,” he says. McCormack was free, however, to open up the interior to a series of progressively more contemporary and light-filled spaces with views onto the garden. The home looks radically different when viewed from the backyard; the back facade is an imposing and highly contemporary aluminum-clad steel structure. It means every room on that side is treated to floor-to-ceiling windows and doors. At first the homeowner found some of the architect’s ideas for maximizing available natural light “a little crazy.” Now she loves how the shower in the master bath is flooded with light, thanks to a frosted glass panel inset in the floor above. Another such panel on the main floor means she gets natural light for her afternoon workout in the basement home gym. “We incorporated a double-sided fireplace for the master bedroom, which can be seen from the tub, enjoyed in the bedroom and appreciated outdoors on their private balcony,” says McCormack. Selecting the soft furnishings and paint colours throughout was a collaborative effort as well. This time, Ann consulted designers Erin Jones and Megan Breese of Carey Mudford Interior Design. “We went with medium walnut finish for the millwork and stairs, and chose a lighter tone for the wide-plank engineered oak floors so it wouldn’t weigh down the space,” says Jones. •

The aluminum-clad steel and ipe wood addition extends the living space at the back of the house and creates an inviting space for entertaining. The upper floors enjoy balcony access as well. Architecture: McCormack Architects.

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found is perfect beneath it,” says Jones, “and we continued the pops of that colour, plus navy and grey in the front living room.” The dining room is central to the main floor, with the living room on one side and kitchen and family area on the other. Selecting the reclaimed-wood dining room table was an important and personal project for Ann; it had to epitomize the rustic contemporary

look she was after. She commissioned it from woodworker Bernard Bieberstein, a Cabbagetown resident who has become a family friend. And as a surprise for her husband, she tracked down the leather-upholstered counter stools he had admired in a resort bar and had them made for the kitchen island. “Ann and her children have so much personal style that it was just a case of helping

A black wall is a dramatic accent in the master bedroom. The double-sided fireplace with its dolomite surround can also be enjoyed from the private balcony. King-sized whitewash linen-upholstered bed and light fixture: Elte; night tables: Style Garage; sconces: Light Form.

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The colour scheme is also intended to serve as a backdrop for Ann’s collection of paintings by Canadian artists. The main floor’s palette was inspired by a work by artist Siobhan Humston, called Stem and Presage No. 1. It has pride of place in the central dining area and great significance for Ann; it was a gift from her husband for her 40th birthday. “The chartreuse ostrich leather sideboard she

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pull it together,” says Jones. In the children’s third-floor bedrooms, for instance, Nathan got his wish for closet doors covered with chalkboard paint with skateboard trucks for handles. Annabelle, then only 5, greatly impressed everyone with her sophisticated choices: hot pink paint on the built-in shelving around the window, accented with a funky birdcage chandelier and brilliant peony-print bedspread.

The designers had more input in the master bed- Ann’s favourite room is the master bath just room where they proposed a black feature wall off it, which boasts dolomite floor tiles and a behind the bed. “We thought they were bold whimsical chandelier. But she continues to people, and pushed them to try it,” says Megan enjoy the entire home with her family. When Breese. It creates drama in the space and serves friends ask if there was anything she would as the perfect backdrop for the king-size, low-pro- do differently, she has no hesitation is saying file bed. The whole family enjoys lounging there “not a thing. The home really turned out to be on Sunday mornings, thanks to its over-stuffed more than I had hoped for,” she says. “We’re upholstery that is not unlike a big pillow. very happy here; we just love it.” •

The homeowner’s daughter already showed flair for decor at age five. She chose most of the furnishings for her bedroom on her own, including the birdcage light fixture and peony-print duvet cover. The designers added touches to match her sense of sophisticated whimsy. Bed, chandelier, pouf and bedding: Elte; rug: CB2. In the master bathroom, a frosted glass ceiling panel illuminates the dolomite-tiled shower with natural light from the third floor. Chandelier: Klaus Moooi.

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FAMILY AFFAIR

An established Canadian custom furniture manufacturer engages the family that owns it BY TRUDY KERMAN

WHEN BROTHERS TOM AND BRIAN Callahan were seeking a joint business venture, Tom’s wife, Sandy, had no idea how involved she and her family would be in the coming years. In fact, that venture – Barrymore Furniture Co. – which they bought in 1982, is a family affair that uses the talents of all the Callahans and is renowned for hand-crafted, custom-upholstered sofas, sectionals and chairs, sold throughout North America.

BARRYMORE FURNITURE www.barrymorefurniture.com 416-532-2891

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“We have thousands of fabrics to choose from. Our logo says it all: ‘Made for you.’ ” Barrymore traces its history back almost a century and has, for generations, specialized in quality, style and comfort. “The quality is always with us,” says Sandy Callahan. “I have a small rattan sofa (produced by the company’s forerunner, Toronto Rattan Company, which was established in 1919), still beautiful and still in great condition.” Toronto Rattan became the Barrymore Furniture Company in the 1930s and quickly became known for excellence. “No one is quite sure where the name Barrymore came from, but it may simply be that the Barrymores were popular actors at the time,” Sandy says. Brian and Tom Callahan brought their business acumen and craftsmanship to the venture. “My husband really knows wood; he is a woodworker and has built beautiful pieces of furniture himself,” Sandy says. “This was his hobby, not his profession or regular job. He just loves furniture.” Brother Brian Callahan brought sales experience he’d garnered working at George Weston Ltd.

The Callahans grew up in a home filled with fine furnishings. “Their mother has exquisite taste,” says Sandy. Tom and Sandy’s son, Liam, joined the business in 2007, and learned about every aspect of it: materials, sourcing and pricing. Although Liam is vice-president of contract sales, resource and development, he can usually be found on the factory floor. It’s a natural step for Liam who, his mother says, remembers going to the three-storey factory on King St. W. as a small child when his dad visited on Saturdays. Later, “he started getting involved in labour relations as part of the family management (team) and was closely involved in all aspects of running the business. He had to learn what happens, what are the issues, problems.” In 2005, the company moved to the heart of Toronto’s Design District. The former King St. location, although lovely, was impractical. The new Caledonia Rd. building is on one floor and has space to display Barrymore’s entire collection. Sandy says it was Tom’s idea to install a window in the showroom overlooking the factory

floor, “because people want to see how pieces are made.” Walking through the showroom, visitors can see the factory floor, the cutters and sewers at work. Barrymore is Canadian, which is rare in the furniture world, and it employs Canadians. Sandy says the company’s styling has evolved. Contemporary and transitional styles have largely replaced traditional designs. But the fusion of traditional styles with contemporary fabrics is currently fashionable. “We have many custom options, so you get exactly what you want,” she says. “We have thousands of fabrics to choose from. Our logo says it all: ‘Made for you.’ ” In creating custom pieces, says Sandy, “we can increase seat depth, decrease length so a sofa (for example) will fit a particular space. That is what custom-made is. We’ve spent years making our seating exceptionally comfortable and durable. There are three or four elements just within the seat cushion.” Barrymore is available at the Toronto showroom and from high-end furniture stores across Canada. In addition to upholstered lines created in the factory, the showroom offers collections of dining, bedroom, and living room furniture from such designers as Dinec, Huppe, Fine Furniture Design, Stressless, Ferguson Copeland, Decorative Crafts, John-Richard, Carvers Guild and Rho Mobili d’Epoca, among others. Sandy joined the team after retiring from running her own business, which she sold in 2005. “I said to Tom, ‘I don’t like the Barrymore website.’ And he said: ‘Well, you figure it out,’ ” she recalls. And after working part time on the website, she took on the role of handling media and public relations in a venture that engages the family. •

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DESIGN

WORK  A ND PLAY Steven Sabados loves the beautiful simplicity of the spaces he uses most at home BY PHILLIPA RISPIN // PHOTOGRAPHY: GILLIAN JACKSON // STYLING: VANESSA SUPPA

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You can tell a lot about a person by which rooms he inhabits most when he’s at home. This past summer, Steven Sabados was most often to be found in his studio (which doubles as an office) or out on the patio. Both spaces, which he shared for eight years with Chris Hyndman – his partner in life and business until Chris’s untimely death in 2015 – are a haven for the designer and media personality. “The patio, I spend all my time out there,” Steven says. “It’s summer; why wouldn’t you – right? You don’t want to be indoors. And I’m working in the studio a lot, painting.” Like most visually oriented people, Steven hates clutter. This shows particularly in the studio, where a wall of storage units in the space keeps distractions out of sight. “There’s computers and printers and things – all that stuff is behind there – plus the thousands of fabric swatches and all sorts of design materials and colour charts and everything,” he says. “Once it’s all open, it becomes a whole resource library. It’s nice to know that it can be sealed off. It becomes neutral ground. It’s a very minimal space, and you can really focus on the task at hand and not be distracted.” Steven did a degree in fine art when he was young, but he hasn’t always had enough time to devote to painting. “I haven’t been doing as much of it over the past few years; I’ve been so busy,” he says. “I guess now that, in light of everything that has happened, I’ve sort of gone back to painting as a form of therapy, if you will. It’s my own inner therapy. I kind of get lost in my world, and I put my headphones on and sort of get lost in the work. It’s nice.” Contemplating the studio and his paintings, he says, “This is my own personal journey. It’s almost like a scrapbook for me.” Scrapbook is a concept mirrored in the large vision board full of notes, pictures, fabric swatches and other types of aides-mémoire, occupying a partial wall at one end of the studio. Steven spurns the contemporary practice of storing everything in a smartphone. “I used to literally carry a huge Day-Timer around with me, that I used to have little sticky notes and things in, so every day when I opened it up I would be ‘Oh, yes: that,’ ” he says. “I could go back and ‘remember that day?’ when I had a little idea about something. •

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A hotel in Thailand, with a fountain as a focal point, was the inspiration for the clean-lined decor of the well-appointed patio. “The whole outdoors is basically built around entertaining, so we can have great flow and lots of open space for people to mill around,” Steven says. “It faces east. You can see the lake from there, and the sunrise every day, which is beautiful.”


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“I kind of get lost in my world, and I put my headphones on and sort of get lost in the work. It’s nice.”

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“Now you go into your phone, and go into your notes, and it’s all the same. I don’t know what the heck’s in there. It’s not visual for me; it’s just type.” Ergo the vision board, even though it comes perilously close to being the kind of cluttered object that Steven finds off-putting. “It’s nice that it’s contained in a big strong frame so, although there’s a ton of visual clutter going on, it’s contained,” he says. “It feels curated in a sense, even though it’s not. If I had that stuff sprawled all over the table, which when I’m working I do, I get overwhelmed and antsy because I don’t like clutter. I also lose things everywhere too. Out of sight, out of mind, and maybe it could have been a great idea, but it’s gone.”

One great idea that’s come, not gone, is The Goods, a new daytime show debuting on October 3 on CBC. Steven is one of four hosts of differing expertise who will explore among themselves and with guest experts how to live a healthy, happy and stylish life. “It’s fun that we’ll get to teach each other, and we can sort of have the journey with the viewer,” he says. “And our studio [which he did not design] is spectacular,” he adds with relish. Steven has also been busy with the launch of a website and a new line of items for the S&C home furnishings collection that he and Chris launched in 2007. Steven characterizes the new line’s furniture, area rugs, lighting, bed and bath textiles, and decorative items as reflecting both his taste for edgy accents as well as Chris’s penchant for classic style. •

“It’s fun that we’ll get to teach each other, and we can sort of have the journey with the viewer. And our studio is spectacular.”

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An arbour at one end of the patio shelters the dining area. The nuts-and-bolts section, with cooking equipment and controls for the lighting, sound and watering systems, is hidden behind a partial wall with mirrored French doors.

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Steven says he keeps the studio “quite minimal, in the sense that nothing is distracting.” But he loves the vision board: “I guess because I’m a visual person I need to see it; otherwise it just doesn’t happen. If it gets put in the file and the file ends up in a cabinet, then it’s gone.”

All this activity makes the 600-square-foot patio a welcome place when respite is needed. It’s large, running the width of the apartment, and is divided into several “pockets,” as Steven calls them: the main area, with seating and a fountain, that first greets visitors; places for lounging; a dining area; and, hidden behind a partial wall, the barbecue and other important but not necessarily decorative necessities (including electronic controls for the lighting) for gracious and comfortable outdoor living and entertaining. True to the tastes of Steven and Chris, the patio decor is relatively subdued, somewhat reminiscent of a hotel garden. “It’s not overwhelming with different types of plants in pots and things,” Steven says. “That was always Christopher’s vision: he’d like no more than three colours. Just grey, black and green – that’s it. Then you get the colour of the sky, blue, and there you go: four colours. “And he always liked the simplicity of not a lot of types of plants. We’d have two types of plants – just the hostas, just the ferns. And we’d have two cedars, so it was very minimal in that sense. Especially since you’re looking out over buildings and trees, and there’s a lot of visual clutter.” Steven concludes quietly, “Simplicity and repetition, I think, is the most calming.” •

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WARM AND LUXURIOUS

From heated towels to open showers – bathrooms are individual expressions of our creativity

Photos courtesy of Kohler

BY SUSAN KELLY

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“The main difference I see is that people are willing to be bolder when it comes to bathroom design. They want to make a statement.”

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THE BATHROOM: a private retreat in which we seek sanctuary from the pressures of modern life. And as 2016 wanes, individual expression is on the upswing in bathroom design. No more generic Zen serenity; it’s all about personality now. Bathrooms have become places in which to push the envelope with design choices. While it’s difficult to pin down overall trends these days, eclecticism seems to rule, according to Dustin Hanco, co-owner of Concept Kitchen and Bath in Burlington. “The main difference I see is that people are willing to be bolder when it comes to bathroom design,” he says. “They want to make a statement.” They might do it through one striking element, perhaps a one-of-a-kind vanity, a work of art, decorative tiles or a chandelier. Some are even venturing into rich saturated colours in their porcelain tiles or vanities. “The mentality of decorating for resale seems to be fading,” Hanco says. “People aren’t afraid to go for their personal taste instead of thinking of the next person.” Hanco, who studied architecture before going into the kitchen and bath business, understands not everyone is ready to go all-out audacious. Still, even an insert can instantly add the wow factor to a feature wall: think on-trend reclaimed wood planks, exotic stone tiles, a single piece of richly veined marble, or a busy mosaic. “An insert or whole wall covered in backlit onyx can be really beautiful if done right,” he says. And an elaborate ceiling feature, such as coffering or a decorative element with inset lighting, is an often-overlooked way to add sophistication. A distinctive vanity will continue to be a big trend, says Ekaterina Zherinova, president of Dezign Market in Vaughan, which specializes in luxury bathroom furniture and accessories. “This year we collaborated with many interior designers, such as Heather Segreti and Evelyn Eshun, to select key design trends for 2017,” she says. “Our designers chose vanities from our Ornate Gold collection all the way to our geometric Elegant collection.” •

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“It’s about calm and timelessness in the bathroom, seeking the complete oasis.”

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Geometric shapes will continue to be a trend in 2017. The line of solid-oak floating vanities features relief designs, angular ridges and raised geometric shapes that mimic diamond cuts on the doors, a 3d effect with a brilliant high-gloss finish. Zherinova also thinks a subdued colour palette and serene finishes will prevail in the year ahead. “It’s about calm and timelessness in the bathroom, seeking the complete oasis.” she says. There will be more matte, in shades of

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white and dark grey. The latter shade, she says, will be an “it” shade and one of the top trends ahead, whether it’s on the walls, vanity or tiles. It’s modern, and harmonizes beautifully with other light neutrals and the natural-looking wood finishes that are so popular now, she says. Patricia Ee, sales and marketing director for Canaroma Bath & Tile in Woodbridge, agrees that geometric patterns are a big trend now, especially in tiles. “There are so many creative tile patterns, from very colourful

and fun to highly sophisticated,” she says. Once found only on walls and backsplashes, geometric designs have moved into flooring. Candy-coloured hexagons or octagons, black and white Escher-like patterns, raised trapezoids rendered in bronze – the list goes on. What’s newest: patterned tiles with Old World flair reinterpreted, says Ee. They emulate the pattern found in a villa on the Amalfi coast, but look very modern interpreted in gray tones instead of warm terracotta. •

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Photo courtesy of Kohler

“The urban-rustic look, a blend of uptown sophistication with raw or unfinished elements, is taking over from the streamlined Zen look.”

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There are many options for people who want the natural look but the practicality of porcelain. Thanks to advances in technology, it’s almost impossible to tell the difference between real wood or stone and porcelain, even after touching it, Ee says. Most popular now are porcelains that emulate wood, especially in walnut or a weathered driftwood-like gray. Another hot trend: 10-by-five-foot large-format tiles that resemble slabs of Carrara marble, slate or other trendy stone. “Like the real thing, it can be cut

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to size, and used on the floor or walls, even an entire tub or shower surround,” she says. Using those large-format tiles in the shower area now is possible thanks to linear drain systems, according to Dinu Filip, president of ACO Canada, a company that specializes in linear surface drainage systems. “With something like our QuARTz shower drain line, you no longer have to put the drain in the middle of the floor,” Filip says. “This one aspect alone opens up all kinds of design

possibilities.” Most homeowners place it at the periphery or entrance to the shower, allowing for a barrier-free or curbless shower. Perfect for anyone in a wheelchair or who has trouble stepping over a raised threshold. And because they can handle a lot of water, linear drains also make it possible to create a wet room in your master bath. “You basically have an open-concept shower, with no shower door. They’re very big in Europe and in spas and are coming here,” Filip says. They will also work •


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towel racks are a luxury touch borrowed from top European hotels,” he says. “A warm towel is something to which people can treat themselves every day. My wife uses hers in the summer, too.” Depending on the size and heat output of the unit, the towel radiator can be the sole or supplemental source of heat for the bathroom, which in some cases might be necessary, as infloor heating as a primary heat source in some settings can prove inadequate. Runtal “towel radiators” as De Bellis calls them, provide both

a heat source and the means to warm and dry towels. They’re available in two versions: a hydronic variety that attaches to a central closed-loop hot water system, and an electric one that is independent of the heating system and usable in four seasons. “They’re meant to enhance the bathroom decor, too,” he says. There are seven designs, which range from simple racks of round stainless steel bars to wood-framed flat metal panels that come in more than 100 colours. •

Photos courtesy of Kohler

with any kind of material, including porcelain, natural stone, concrete or river rocks. There are eight grate styles made of stainless steel in either a polished-stainless or oiled-bronze finish. Some drains have water-activated led lighting as an option, which means you can add floorlight effects to the shower ambience. In-floor heating is quickly becoming de rigeur for today’s bathrooms. But it doesn’t stop at the floors, says Dominic De Bellis, Canadian sales manager at Runtal Radiators. “Heated

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(Below) Photo courtesy of Atlantis Bath Centre

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wood features. She is fielding more requests to incorporate vintage or repurposed items, too. While shades of grey and white continue to predominate in tile, vanities and finishes, warm neutral shades are also gaining ground. Perfetto’s customers are leaning toward the brown tones of walnut, flax and dark brown in vanities and flooring. In faucets and accessories, trend forecasters long have predicted that gold, along with other warmer metals such as brass

and bronze, were on the upswing, yet consumers in Canada resisted. “No more; gold taps are everywhere heading into 2017,” Perfetto says. “We like the look of gold taps with a black vanity with cast-iron top. Very bold, very chic.” Copper, which is being pushed in many design circles, is starting to catch on in Toronto, she says. But both shiny and brushed gold, along with polished brass are having a day. Looks like a warming trend this fall. •

(Right) Photo courtesy of Runtal Radiators

(Left) Photos courtesy of Dezign Market

There’s no getting away from the importance of natural materials in bathroom design today. It’s a trend that shows no signs of waning, says Vanessa Perfetto, showroom manager at Atlantis Bath Centre in Toronto. “The urban-rustic look, a blend of uptown sophistication with raw or unfinished elements, is taking over from the streamlined Zen look,” she says. Look for raw or unfinished elements – roughhewn marble, slate or granite, and reclaimed


(Left) Photo courtesy of ACO Systems

Photo courtesy of Runtal Radiators

Photo courtesy of Concept Kitchen & Bath

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“Heated towel racks are a luxury touch borrowed from top European hotels.”

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ART

DIVERSE AND DIFFERENT Mixed-media artist Mark Gleberzon taps into an unusual range of concepts for his works BY JULIE GEDEON

MARK GLEBERZON enjoys the distinction of having had his work appear on all seven continents.  An ornithologist purchased one of his paintings of a penguin a few years ago before heading off to Antarctica to study the flightless birds. 88

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“She fell in love with the painting, which was small enough to take with her,” Gleberzon recalls. Penguins, Barbie dolls and Chinese lanterns are part of the eclectic subject matter that the mixed-media artist explores with experimental zest. By incorporating paint and/or collage elements, he gives his already intriguing photographs added oomph. “I’m always seeking to elicit an emotional response, or a nostalgic one, as seems to be happening more often lately,” he says. Lily @ Lido features a photograph of his grandmother holidaying at the famous Miami hotel in 1968. “She was a tough old bird, finally enjoying life after surviving the Holocaust 20 years earlier,” he says with affection. “Nostalgically futuristic, the photo almost begged for me to work with it,” he adds. “So I tweaked and printed a digital version to mount on wood and then hand-painted her organza bathing cap, embroidered handbag and striped lounge chairs to highlight their importance to her, as opposed to the people I washed out a bit in the back.” The piece has inspired admirers to commission Gleberzon to work his magic on their favourite photos. “People like something old being new again,” he says. Red is among the series of photographs he took at the world’s largest Barbie museum in Montreal. His cropped angles capture a dark, come-hither quality or a sleepy ’60s drug haze. “I used acrylics to line the lips and give the hair texture to emphasize the beauty that people would admire in magazines,” he says. Gleberzon’s interest in art began in childhood and was just about the only thing that retained his attention. “I was a bit hyper, but always fascinated by the creative process,” he says. Always supportive, his parents encouraged him to seek out after-school art classes and summer camps with creative programs. After high school, he attended the Ontario College of Art where he focused on graphic design on three-dimensional objects, such as packaging. He easily obtained a job as a graphic designer but his lust for artistic experimentation soon lured him back to fine art. “I love blurring the lines between photography and painting to take each beyond its traditional boundaries and limitations,” he says. “I love not knowing whether I can do something until I actually try it.” Unwilling to limit himself to one style, he jumps from one series of works to another, only later noticing their commonalities. •


ART TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

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ART

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His latest series of abstracts is inspired by real and imagined travels. “A city always came to mind as these pieces developed,” he says. The depiction of sedate roses and colourful lanterns in Singapore is a reminder that even the world’s busiest cities have quiet retreats. Gleberzon’s extensive knowledge of art comes from owning MJG Gallery in Toronto for almost four years, and he continues to represent himself and others in an online gallery. His 25 years of work has been shown throughout Canada and in New York; Westport, Conn.; Chicago; Philadelphia; Paris; and Fukuoka, Japan, where galleries have featured his work. He aims primarily to capture feeling in such paintings as Polar Migration, with its turquoise swirls of melted icebergs. Magnolias is a whimsical ode to Nature whose colours and shapes have always fascinated this artist. Then again, most everything does. Gleberzon was flooded with orders when a New York designer posted a blog in admiration of his painted series of chairs inspired by a particular chair in his parents’ home. Everything is fodder for his art. •

“I love blurring the lines between photography and painting to take each beyond its traditional boundaries and limitations.”

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ART TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

Artist Mark Gleberzon. Photo by Shelagh Howard.

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LIGHTEN UP!

How to use the right lighting to warm up the winter ahead AUTUMN’S EARLY SUNSETS tell homeowners that it’s time to prepare the interiors of their homes for cocooning during the dark days of winter. From putting duvets on beds and firewood in hearths to installing the right lighting, it’s time to get ready to spend time indoors. What do lighting specialists recommend as we head into the cold months? Claudio Selvaggi, owner of Litemode, a showroom in Vaughan that specializes in lighting, says that the right kind of illumination can create a cozy ambience. And there are several trends in the field that he and his staff are tracking. The key to getting the right lighting in any room, he says, is “layering.” In a kitchen,

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for instance, light layering would work something like this: “You start with recessed pot lights, which provide an intensity of lighting,” Selvaggi says. “Then the decorative hanging fixture, over the work area, usually the island, is chosen. It doesn’t have to be intense light. These fixtures are like a piece of art. You can use vintage-style bulbs for a softer effect. The third layer is under-counter lighting.” Sylvia Arena, a sales associate at Litemode, says customers often arrive at the showroom with their designers’ suggestions in mind. “They come in with what their designer envisions and we help them find the right product to meet their budget,” she says.

BY TRUDY KERMAN

She says differing tastes in fixtures can lead to disagreements among couples. “We help them sort everything out.” Assistant store manager Andrew Martelli has observed the trend to change all lighting inside and outside the house to leds. “I can’t keep the 4000 Kelvin (a measure of colour temperatures) bulbs in stock. It’s the best choice for a majority of our customers, whether it’s for a crystal chandelier or under-cabinet lighting because it’s a good balance between bulbs that are too warm or too cool in colour.” Martelli says a 6000k bulb is too white and casts a bluish light. “Most people don’t like it; it’s cold,” he says. “Those bulbs are favoured in


“The trend in chandeliers is moving toward a more modern, distressed look, including forged iron, or artisan-style fixtures.” commercial areas to highlight products but I caution homeowners to stay away from using the brighter, cold lighting in a residential setting.” He says customers are “comfortable with bulbs ranging from 2700k to 4000k because they cast a warm, yellow colour. The soft, warm light of the 3000k bulbs is similar to the old incandescent light, but they have a whiter, bright punch.” And 4000k bulbs, he says, approximate natural light. leds are gaining in popularity for outdoor areas, too, Selvaggi says, and lighting manufacturers are producing fixtures with that trend in mind. “The good thing about leds is that they come in many styles,” he says. “If

your fixture outside is clear glass, there is a chandeliers, ” she says. “The trend in chandeliers clear bulb for inside it that shows the filament.” is moving toward a more modern, distressed look, For her clients switching to leds, the good including forged iron, or artisan style fixtures.” news is that prices have decreased in the past The Litemode crew is in agreement that four years, says Arena. “I had a guy come in homeowners who want sparkle with a contemhere a couple weeks ago and he’s buying leds, of porary look prefer polished nickel to chrome. course. He reminded me that I introduced him “People want a touch of crystal without the to leds a couple of years ago and said he saved bling,” says Martelli. $1,500 on his electricity bill in one year. He had “Some people are moving away from silver 20 pot lights and six other light fixtures, and and chrome to polished nickel or to a twohe’s got kids; they always leave the lights on.” toned finish in their fixtures – gold and black, The consumer glow for crystal chandeliers is for instance,” Grenci adds, saying that more dimming, says Stefanie Grenci, marketing and homeowners are going for the gold. operations support specialist at Litemode. “We Whatever the choice, the right lighting is definitely noticed a drop in the demand for crystal the perfect antidote to dark winter days. •

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DESIGN

Gone with the wind –

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

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RADICAL TRANSFORMATION TURNS FUSSY HOUSE INTO AIRY HOME

and that’s a good thing BY PHILLIPA RISPIN // PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL // STYLING: ROSE BARROSO

“Anything that had doors, I deleted. Everything is arches, open; everything flows; everything is white except for two feature walls that are grey.”

IF ONE WERE TO MAKE A MOVIE of Rose Barroso’s life, the title would be “I love what I do.” The owner of Barroso Homes is enthusiastically hands-on, whether it’s during the design of a new house, the renovation of an existing home, or the creation of an interior. She has a zest for contemporary design and a practised eye that’s alert to hidden possibilities. All these talents came into play in the renovation and interior design of this house in Humber Valley Village. You’d never know from the pictures, but this house had what Barroso calls “a Scarlett O’Hara” interior. Like Vivien Leigh, who portrayed Scarlett O’Hara in the film version of Margaret Mitchell’s beloved book, “the house has amazing bones,” Barroso says. However, like Scarlett’s over-the-top outfits, the house’s interior was overdone, fussy and outdated. It consisted of many small and rather dark rooms. There was an overwhelming array of window shapes: round, square, and rectangular, not to mention oddly placed skylights – and sometimes all these in one room. Bathroom faucets and knobs were gold-coloured and shaped like swans. Anyone entering by the front door was immediately confronted with what Barroso calls butterfly stairs: mirror-image staircases that swept up to the second floor and obscured sightlines throughout the house. •

(Opposite) The family room gives access to the back deck and features a wine cellar. The light fixture was custom-made to designer Rose Barroso’s specifications. In every home she designs, Barroso likes to have one light fixture “that you don’t forget.”

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DESIGN

Why on Earth did her clients buy the house? They wanted it because it’s situated in a protected ravine through which the Humber River creek runs. It’s surrounded by trees, with only one other neighbour in the immediate vicinity. “It’s 100 per cent private,” Barroso says. She recounts how, just before the new owners moved in, the clean-up crew sent her photos of deer and, to her children’s delight, “bunnies” in the backyard. The incoming homeowners tasked Barroso with completely redesigning the interior,

including sourcing some of the furnishings and art. And they wanted it done in a hurry because they had recently received “an offer they couldn’t refuse” on the home they were currently inhabiting and had to vacate the premises in 11 weeks. There was no time for leisurely planning. The incoming owners were familiar with Barroso’s contemporary style and essentially gave her carte blanche. “They said ‘We want the interior to match what you would do if you were building the home from the ground up,’ ”

says Barroso. Decisions often had to be made on the fly, and during the process “time was so limited that I told the crew to call me with any and all suggestions.” The original interior is now gone with the wind. Walls have been blown out, doors removed, windows and skylights covered, elaborate staircases replaced with a single open-risers staircase in a streamlined style. A small balcony at the back has been extended to become a covered deck of 600 square feet. •


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(Opposite) Where once stood two staircases, obscuring sightlines, there is now a spacious hall affording a view from the front door all the way to the ravine behind the house. (This page, top) The black sculpture is “Suburbia” by Toronto artist Elisabeth van Duffelen.

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(This page) Outdoor living at its finest: the covered back deck allows lounging and entertaining even on chilly evenings, thanks to an openflame fireplace. (Opposite) In the kitchen, a freestanding table in solid oak hovers over the island. Appliances by Miele are unobtrusive, including the pop-up extractor fan that retreats below the island when the cooktop is not in use.

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And the just-a-swath-of-grass backyard now has a 35-foot-long pool and a six-person hot tub, with rugged hardscaping along the edge and that glorious backdrop of trees. Not a square inch of this 8,300-square-foot home was left unchanged, but Barroso is especially fond of certain transformations – the basement, for instance. “It was boxy, with rooms resembling prison cells, “ she says. “It was frightening, dark.” There was only one window. There was, inexplicably, a vast and nearly empty

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mechanical room. But there was also a nine-foot Immediately beyond the gym and benefitting ceiling, unusually high for many basements. from the light pouring in through the massive Down came many walls. Barroso moved window is a playroom with an Olympic-size some equipment to make the mechanical snooker table and sports simulator. Barroso room compact, which left space for a large also had a load-bearing wall removed so that mudroom with a sitting area leading to the “the basement not only became open but also garage entrance and a second laundry. She looked doubled in space,” she says. “It transgreatly enlarged the solitary window, then formed the entire basement.” installed a glassed-in gym next to it, with a On the ground floor, “anything that had dressing room and bathroom across from doors, I deleted,” Barroso says. “Everything is the gym and accessible from the pool area. arches, open; everything flows; everything •

Sara Peck Colby is represented by Gemst (www.gemst.com). Her work will be the focus of a solo show between June 5 and July 24 at the Uplands Cultural Centre, 9 Speid St., Sherbrooke. 819-564-0409 www.uplands.ca

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(This page) The master bathroom (top) is open to the dressing room, which in turn leads to the sitting area of the master bedroom (bottom). The shoe shelves are one continuous piece made, as is most cabinetry in the home, by Perola Kitchens & Interiors. The red tub is from Alcove.

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is white except for two feature walls that are grey.” Perhaps the biggest change is the disappearance of the butterfly stairs. There is now a single floating stairway with open risers on one side, affording an uninterrupted view from the front, down the central hallway and through the family room to the ravine beyond. Locating the wine cellar gave Barroso pause. She decided against putting it in the basement, because she wanted that level to be as open as possible. So the wine cellar, glassed

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in on two sides, occupies a corner of the family room. It’s a feature in its own right, boasting a back wall that’s a Barroso original: a mosaic of wooden fronts, backs, and sides from boxes in which vintage wines were shipped. “I took the boxes apart and picked all of the pieces that had writing,” she says. Then she had to arrange them to fit. “It took three days. I created a puzzle on the floor.” And all that happened after she’d had the sunken floor of the family room raised to the

same grade as the rest of the ground floor and installed extensive windows and French doors that give access to the deck. “I got a huge sense of accomplishment,” Barroso says. “I love it!” The deck is another favourite aspect of this radical makeover. It runs the width of the house, can also be reached from the breakfast area in the kitchen, and gives access to the backyard. In summer, the family and their guests can dine, lounge, converse, or watch television, with sculptural ceiling fans •

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The master bedroom (this page) features a wall that is 10 feet high, 17 feet long and upholstered in velour; it acts as a headboard. The daughter’s bedroom (opposite) is one of four bedrooms on the upper floor, all of which have ensuite bathrooms.

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overhead to ensure it’s breezy. If the weather gets chilly, an open-flame fireplace in one wall makes things comfortable. Of course, the upstairs of the house was also transformed. Puzzlingly large closets were divided to enlarge puzzlingly small bedrooms. Other walls came down to open up spaces. Some windows and skylights were covered. The two children’s bedrooms were given ensuite bathrooms so that they were not required to walk through a laundry room to reach the shared former main bathroom.

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The master suite was converted from a few small rooms into an airy bedroom with a seating area that gives on to a large dressing room, which in turn opens to a bright and white bathroom with a spectacular red tub under the window. “I absolutely love the transformation of the entire master area,” says Barroso. Some tasks of daily living were revamped too. Barroso installed a Control4 Technology system that has turned the Scarlett O’Hara home into a smart home. Using an iPad, an Apple watch or a smart phone, the homeowners can control

such elements as the curtains, lighting, sound system, security cameras, hvac system, pool heat, lights, deck jets and Jacuzzi, security system, garage door – even the children’s televisions. It took some long nights and hard weekends of work to meet the new homeowners’ deadline, but Barroso and her team did it. She looks back at the speedy renovation and its results with immense satisfaction, but this dynamic woman did not rest long on her laurels; she was on to new projects. As Scarlett O’Hara said: “After all, tomorrow is another day.” •

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DESIGN

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF

A new mega-mall puts 401 home improvement stores in one location BY SUSAN SEMENAK

IMPROVE www.improvecanada.com 416-417-7507

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

“The idea is to have as much variety as possible, so that there is something here for everybody in terms of tastes and styles but also budgets.”

Oleg Chekher and Kirill Soloviev

OLEG CHEKHTER has built a $147-million project based on his belief that home renovation doesn’t have to be an exhausting ordeal. The Toronto entrepreneur is the founder and co-owner of Improve, a mega home-improvement mall in Vaughan, which is currently open on weekends and is set to be fully open by the end of October. Checkhter describes his new business – promoted as Canada’s largest home-improvement centre – as a “permanent home show,” featuring 401 stores that showcase and sell supplies, materials, services and accessories for every aspect of home design and renovation. It is, he says, a first of its kind in North America, a pioneering effort to bring home -renovation suppliers and buyers together in an attractive 320,000-square-foot space under a single roof. The Improve stores feature everything from kitchen cabinets, plumbing supplies

and major appliances to tiles, design services and even art galleries, along with furniture and bathroom showrooms. The concept also features meeting rooms where architects and designers can meet with customers to look over plans. Chekhter and his team have attracted some of the biggest names in the business, from local designers and custom home builders to well-known international brand names. For example, shoppers can compare kitchen cabinet styles at German-made Leicht and Italian Castagna Cucine before heading to Best Brand for appliances or Calligaris or Artemano for furniture and decor accessories. Improve also features art galleries, furniture designers and landscaping suppliers. The idea for the enterprise was born, Chekhter says, of his own home-renovation aggravations and his careful study of the fast-growing home-renovation market – with

more than 30,000 related businesses spread across the greater Toronto area alone. “The worst part of a renovation is all the time it takes running around, looking for products and services,” says Chekhter, a civil aviation engineer. “Just to re-do a kitchen, it can take a month or two of shopping, going from one place to another looking for cabinets, flooring, appliances, faucets, tiles for backsplash, countertops.” Chekhter says Improve works because of its large scale and the broad spectrum of suppliers represented. “The idea is to have as much variety as possible, so that there is something here for everybody in terms of tastes and styles but also budgets,” he says. “You’ll find something here if you are looking for a deal or if you want the very best of what’s available. And even if you are just browsing, looking for ideas about what’s new on the market, this is the place.” •

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DESIGN

Built-in Benefits Owners of cabinet-making company live with and love their own handiwork BY PHILLIPA RISPIN // PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL // STYLING: RHONDA THORNTON

THERE’S AN OLD SAYING that the cobbler’s children are the last to get shoes; that is, when someone has a business, customers are more likely to get taken care of than relatives are. Here’s a house that puts the lie to the saying: this cabinetmaker’s home got the cabinets and drawers and everything else that he and his spouse wanted and needed. He is Robert Thornton, master cabinetmaker and co-owner of Bloomsbury Fine Cabinetry. His spouse is Rhonda Thornton, co-owner and creative director of the company in Newmarket. Of course, their home is about more than cabinetry. For instance, start with the location: it’s north of Newmarket in a tranquil spot, surrounded by trees. “We can’t really see any other houses,” says Rhonda. “It feels like we’re by ourselves, but two minutes down the road is all the amenities of town. We’d always looked at that site . . . . We wanted a little bit of acreage but we didn’t want to have to go too far. When that site came up, we were ready to jump on it. It was nice and close but felt very secluded.”

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Rhonda and Robert designed and built their house and moved in 10 years ago with their three children. The two-storey home is in a style reminiscent of French country, characterized by Rhonda as “grand but still liveable and comfortable, and a little bit casual.” It features 10-foot ceilings throughout its 5,000 square feet. “We like the high ceilings and the expansive volume of space, but we didn’t want it to feel too empty and imposing, so we have a lot of woodwork,” Rhonda says. “It’s very warm,” she adds, citing the wood floors in most rooms. As might be expected, there is a plethora of wood detail in the home, including carefully wrought trim: crown moldings, window and door casings, wainscotting and, in the living room, ceiling beams. There is also a great deal of built-in furniture, obviating the need for and taking up less space than separate pieces. The dining room features a Welsh dresser to display fine china and to store tableware and flatware. The lounging area of the •

The kitchen is full of such clever details as a niche for tea towels next to the sink. The room’s cabinetry design makes maximum use of all opportunities for storage space.


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“IT’S A RETREAT. I BREATHE A SIGH OF RELIEF WHEN I COME UP THE DRIVEWAY. THE REST OF THE DAY IS LEFT BEHIND.”

keeping room boasts a fireplace with a handsome alder chimneypiece that also houses a television. The mudroom is highly functional, with a wall of built-in closets, drawers, cubbyholes and a bench. Ingenuity and style are combined most effectively in the kitchen and in the master suite. In the kitchen, which is open to the keeping room, what looks like an armoire is actually an artfully cased-in refrigerator. A tall, slim niche under the counter next to the sink holds three rods to keep tea towels close at hand. In what Rhonda calls “a fun nod to French country,” two maple drawers in the white kitchen have been left unpainted, with the words Bread and Patisserie inscribed on their fronts. In the nearby island is what looks like a vertical drawer, also in unpainted maple, that’s actually a pull-out serving tray. Both the drawers and the tray show off their fine finger joints, examples of accomplished cabinetmaking. Crowning it all is a coffered ceiling. •

The side door leads into the mudroom and is the home’s most-used entrance, receiving family and visitors alike. The mudroom floor is tiled for easy cleaning. Each unpainted maple drawer has the name of a family member on the front, for personalized storage.

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(Below) The lounging area of the keeping room is generously windowed to reveal the bucolic scene outside, and the TV is unobtrusive in the alder-wood chimneypiece. An area rug over the practical tile floor softens the room’s ambience.

(Right) The ground-floor powder room shows a fine example of what appears to be freestanding furniture that is actually built in.

One can enter the master suite from either the bedroom (above) or the office. The suite’s enfilade of rooms leads from the bedroom through the bathroom and the dressing room and then on to the office.

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The ground-floor master suite is an enfilade of rooms. Starting at one end, an office leads to a dressing room, which opens to the bathroom (with an enclosed water closet), which in turn gives on to the bedroom. The office and bedroom also have doors into a hallway, but all doors can be closed to ensure peace and quiet in the master suite. Each room features custom-made cabinetry with numerous details for decorative but functional decor. There’s also a charming element of play in the office, where one wall

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is covered with built-in cherrywood shelves, drawers and what appear to be closets; however, the double doors of the central “closet” open to reveal the dressing room. The dressing room is a dream, full of cupboards and drawers of various sizes to accommodate pretty much any type of clothing. The lengthy twin vanities in the bathroom, one end of each abutting a makeup table, offer yet more storage. Throughout the home, pale walls and even paler trim provide an elegant but relaxed

background for the cabinetmaker’s artistry. This is a home, not a showroom. Says Rhonda: “Trends come and go, but the style we chose is warm and inviting. I still really like it. “It’s a retreat. I breathe a sigh of relief when I come up the driveway. The rest of the day is left behind.” •

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DESIGN

THE DIRTY LOWDOWN ON WASHING How to create the perfect laundry room

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GONE ARE THE DAYS when laundry rooms occupied a neglected corner in a dank basement. Today’s laundry rooms are high-tech spaces on a home’s first or second storey. Toronto Home asked Gene Maida, owner of Georgian Custom Renovations, to tell us about the latest trends in laundry rooms.

“The untold truth about the laundry room is that it’s the command centre and hub of activity in a modern household.” Georgian Custom Renovations 1175 Meyerside Dr. #2, Mississauga 905-405-7276 www.georgianreno.com

Q: Gene, if a homeowner wants to update the laundry room, what changes do you recommend? A: I recommend that homeowners supercharge their laundry rooms by making them beautiful, organized and functional in a way that transcends their role for washing and drying dirty clothes. Ideally, there is a large work area for folding clothes, and plenty of storage. A laundry room should be full of cabinets. One trend now is for built-in ironing boards and floor-to-ceiling cabinets with compartments for everything. A clothes drying rack is a must; it’s best to place it over a dog grooming shower pan with its own spray nozzle and a drain. Durable 12-by-24-inch porcelain tiles in neutral colours hide dirt and are easy to clean. Subway tiles in glossy white on the backsplash can complement a granite countertop in grey or taupe. And a state-of-the-art, energy-efficient, quiet, front-loading washer and dryer should be included. Do add a quiet exhaust fan to handle moisture and task lighting: under-cabinet fluorescents and recessed lights.

it requires multiple trips up and down the stairs. Where to locate your laundry room is a function of your lifestyle, how much laundry you do, and whether you care if guests can see piles of dirty laundry. My favorite place for the laundry room is off the kitchen. People spend the bulk of their time in the kitchen, so having the washer and dryer nearby makes sense. You can orchestrate cooking, cleaning, entertaining, watching tv or helping your children with their homework while staying on top of the laundry.

Q: What role does the laundry room play in our homes? A: The untold truth about the laundry room is that it’s the command centre and hub of activity in a modern household.

Q: Appliances are high-tech now. How do we integrate that technology into a space that is traditionally about washing and drying clothes? A: Appliances now run more quietly than before and have many options for energy conservation. I recommend installing a tv and heated floors in the laundry room for comfort.

Q: Should the laundry room be moved up from the basement? A: Basement laundry rooms are usually spacious, away from high-traffic areas and out of sight of guests. But if your basement is dark and dingy, it’s not somewhere in which you will want to spend a lot of time. Moreover,

Q: Is it ideal to situate a laundry room adjacent to a mudroom? A: This location is popular with families who have young children. Wet snowsuits and dirty clothes can be dealt with easily when the laundry room is there. Mudrooms are usually close enough to the kitchen that the appliance buzzer is audible. This kind of laundry room is best when the mudroom can be separated by a door or hallway.

Q: What other functions are being built into laundry rooms now? A: Multiple sorting bins, laundry chutes, hanging racks, pet grooming sinks and storage lockers among other things. •

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DESIGN

UTILITARIAN NO MORE Today’s bathrooms are luxurious extensions of our living space THERE WAS A TIME when bathrooms were strictly utilitarian spaces. No longer. Today’s bathrooms are highly designed rooms that invite repose and rejuvenation. Some even boast furniture-like fixtures. Samantha Sannella, an architecture and design specialist who consults to Dezign Market, a Toronto company that imports and distributes fine bathroom products, discusses why our bathrooms have evolved into spa-like rooms and how to get that design in your home.

Q: Samantha, what are we installing in our bathrooms to transform them into inviting spaces? A: Bathrooms are extensions of the living space of a home. In an increasingly stressful world, the bathroom is seen as an oasis. Bathrooms that incorporate such furniture features as freestanding vanities, tubs and luxury toilets make the space comfortable and inviting. Also in vogue are his and her toilet rooms, extra-large digitally controlled showers, combination toilet/bidet fixtures, and luxury faucets that look like pieces of art.

Q: As installations in bathrooms are becoming increasingly furniture-like, what has happened to vanities? A: We have seen a return to vanities as feature furniture pieces. Historically, vanities and dressing tables were elegant additions to bedrooms. They featured such details as handhewn wood inlays and mother-of-pearl accents. They were meant to be extravagant areas in which ladies and gentlemen groomed themselves. With the proliferation of indoor plumbing, vanities moved into the bathroom and became more utilitarian. We are now seeing a return to elegance in vanities that are customized and reflective of the overall home decor.

Dezign Market 1641 Langstaff Rd. #8, Vaughan 888-398-8380 www.dezignmarket.com

“We are now seeing a return to elegance in vanities that are customized and reflective of the overall home decor.”

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“Bathrooms are extensions of the living space of a home. In an increasingly stressful world, the bathroom is seen as an oasis.”

Q: What materials are we now seeing in bathroom installations? A: There is nothing more beautiful than natural stone and/or marble in the bathroom. Full stone slabs in bathroom showers make a wonderful focal point. Luxury lighting features including pendants over tubs and specialty lighting under vanities add sparkle to bathrooms.

Q: What styles are we seeing in bathroom vanities? A: Bathroom vanities reflect of the home decor and owner’s style. We are no longer tied to the utilitarian box for the vanity. Instead, we’re seeing architectural panelling and geometric shapes. Godi Bathroom’s Elegant Collection is a case in point. We’re also seeing more relaxed designs with a focus on such high-end materials as natural marble and solid wood. In 2017, we will see a calm colour palette with matte whites and a focus on greys.

Q: Sustainability is important to many homeowners. How can we renovate our bathrooms in sustainable ways? A: By using timeless materials and styles, and renovating infrequently, we are making longterm sustainable choices. Forest Stewardship Council-certified wood or Rainforest Alliance-sourced wood, quartz countertops, low volatile organic compounds in finishes, led lighting, and low-flow plumbing fixtures are all good choices that are sustainable. •

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Inspire…Create…Perform

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LIFESTYLE

1. DROP-DEAD GORGEOUS ——— These drop earrings combine the cool elegance of Labradorite and the brilliance of diamonds. The stones (36.9 ct) are set into caps adorned with pavé diamonds (0.20 ct) and embellished with rose-cut diamonds (1.71 ct) in white gold settings (14 kt). $5,500.

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LIFESTYLE

HAPPY HUES Coloured gemstones are an excellent choice for gorgeous and stylish jewelry IT HAS BEEN SAID that diamonds are a girl’s Q: Jeff, what is a fine coloured gemstone? Which best friend. But when it comes to beautiful stones are we referring to? What colour are they? gems, they’re not the only game in town. A: Fine coloured gemstones come in just about In fact, coloured gems are just as exciting. every colour. We all imagine these gems as But how do we navigate the vast field of brilliant jewel tones such as ruby red, emerald coloured gemstones to find just the right ones? green and sapphire blue. There are, however, We asked Jeff Buzbuzian, owner of Knar many different hues in every variety of gem Jewellery, for his expert advice. – from pastel tones to muted darker colours as seen in amethysts and garnets. These precious treasures are mined and polished all over the world and are valued based on industry standards of clarity, colour, quality of cutting and rarity. The rarer the gem, the higher the cost per carat. Three decades ago, we heard coloured gems described as “precious and semi-precious.” These days the majority of coloured gems fall exclusively into the precious category. It’s important to note that these gemstones are naturally mined and not manmade.

“These days the majority of coloured gems fall exclusively into the precious category.”

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Q: What makes coloured gems so fascinating? What is their attraction? A: These colourful gems become signature pieces, fashion accessories and even good-luck charms. And people tell me they are mood changers. In a world where diamonds are dominant, many people love coloured gemstones because they add uniqueness and vibrancy to their jewelry wardrobe. They’re also very affordable and they rapidly increase in value.


LIFESTYLE TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

Q: How do they compare to diamonds? A: In many cases, coloured gems are rarer than diamonds and often found in remote areas. One of the main appeals of diamonds is their hardness and durability compared with most coloured gems. As an example, on the Mohs hardness scale from one to 10, diamonds score a 10 as the hardest; sapphires and rubies score a nine; and most others fall between five and seven. Diamonds are known worldwide as brilliant and sparkly, while most coloured gems have a high colour saturation and the brilliance is lower. Brilliance however is always in the eyes of the beholder.

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Q: Can they be used in jewelry remodeling projects? A: This is one of the fastest-growing segments in our business today. If someone has an old ring with 10 very small diamonds that isn’t being worn, a simple and cost-effective way of creating a stunning custom design is to choose a sizeable coloured stone such as an amethyst, aquamarine, topaz or garnet, which are reasonably priced. Sometimes, coloured stones that are well worn and well loved require the top surface facets be replaced to revitalize their lustre. Repolishing facets is not expensive and well worth it before resetting the design.

“In many cases, coloured gems are rarer than diamonds and often found in remote areas.”

Q: We often hear about healing gemstones. What are they and what healing or wellness properties do they have? A: There are many ancient beliefs that gemstones have healing powers, protect from worldly evils, and are offerings of peace and tranquility. Almost every gemstone has a story behind it and a legendary history. Natural-form crystals are quite popular today as well as decorative. Many people say they create calmness in a home or office. Q: How can a person go about choosing a finequality coloured gem? A: It is always best to have an idea of what you might like and have some understanding of what questions to ask about durability, investment, options for colours, etc. Choose a knowledgeable jeweller who is helpful and has a good understanding of style and fashion. Most jewellers have a selection of gems that are curated over time and they will source special sizes and shapes to suit individual tastes. •

Knar Jewellery www.knar.com

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LIFESTYLE

NEVER TOO BUSY FOR

EXERCISE

A personal trainer explains how to integrate a workout regimen into a busy schedule

WE’RE ALL SO BUSY. As life exerts its demands on our schedules, we prioritize the use of our time. And once all the urgent tasks are done, there is often no time left in our packed schedules for daily exercise. Is it possible for busy people to stay fit? Can we build time in our day for exercise? We asked Anikó Kaszás, a personal fitness trainer and working actress in Toronto, for her advice on how to stay fit even when you’re really busy.

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Q: Anikó, regular exercise is the path to fitness. But many people have difficulty squeezing regular exercise regimens into their daily schedules. How can they work out when their schedules are already full? A: I recommend that, if possible, work out first thing in the morning, before the demands of the day overwhelm you. Set aside a morning routine a few times a week and get it done before you can talk yourself out of it. Q: How often do we need to exercise to maintain an optimal fitness level? A: It’s entirely dependent on how sedentary your lifestyle is. Ideally, you move throughout your day, whether you walk with the family or cycle to work instead of driving. On top of that, between two and five workouts a week can be a great complement. Q: What kind of exercise do we need to engage in to get fit? A: We benefit differently from cardio, strength-training and mobility work. Incorporating all of these elements is important. Q: With family responsibilities, it is often difficult for parents of young children to exercise. What advice do you have for parents who want to get fit? A: Involve your children. My five-year-old nephew lives with me. His favourite activity is to run around me while I work out. He runs in circles the entire time I am training. The boundless energy children have can overwhelm us at times, but by including them in our exercise program, we can bond with them while teaching them the value of regular physical activity.

Q: One component of a healthy life is sleep. How can busy people get enough sleep? A: This is tough because our society has put a premium on productivity. “Rest” has become a four-letter word. Prioritizing sleep can be difficult, but recognizing that you’re at your best when you’re rested may help you learn to say no to demands that will deprive you of sleep. It’s difficult, but sacrificing social events and refraining from over-programming yourself will benefit you in the long run, and you’ll see results from your training. Q: What else do we need to do to ensure that we are successful with our exercise regimens? A: Stick to it even if it’s not perfect. I see people skipping workouts because they can’t commit to a full hour at the gym. Instead of giving up on those days, you can be proud of completing 20 minutes of conditioning at home. Some days, I run the flights of stairs in my condo building if I’m pressed for time. Commit to the long-term accumulation of minutes spent moving. It adds up. Q: We are surrounded by influences that urge us to strive for perfect bodies. How can we withstand those pressures while working to get fit? A: Companies make money from your dissatisfaction with yourself, which is why they tell you their product can “fix” you. Affirming to yourself that you are not broken can alleviate the pressure to be perfect. Work hard, eat well, and allow yourself time for rest and relaxation. The rest is gravy. •


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DESIGN

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

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SMALL IS

BEAUTIFUL

A designer downsizes his home into a bungalow filled with serenity and joy BY STEPHANIE WHITTAKER · PHOTOGRAPHY: DREW HADLEY · STYLING: JEAN MONET Floral arrangements: Le marché aux Fleurs du Village

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DESIGN

THE OLD ADAGE ABOUT SMALL BEING BEAUTIFUL often resonates with people who downsize from large homes. Interior designer Jean Monet decided it was time to move to a small and beautiful home when he realized that the upkeep on his capacious two-storey house in Boucherville was demanding an inordinate amount of his time and energy. “The catalyst for downsizing was my elderly mother’s illness,” Jean says. “I don’t

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have children, and as I was looking after my mother, I began to wonder who would care for me in my old age.” Negotiating stairs and taking care of his 37,000-square-foot garden – complete with swimming pool and fish pond – would become increasingly difficult, even overwhelming, he surmised. So in March of this year, Jean bought a bungalow in a new development in Longueuil that has allowed him to scale back his living space

to 2,300 square feet from 4,900. He redesigned the house and had it renovated to suit his lifestyle. And as a man who has a strong need to be surrounded by beauty and harmony, he affirms that “small is indeed beautiful.” The challenge he faced was a tight timeline for the renovation. “We had 15 days to completely transform the bungalow into my custom home,” Jean says. To do that, he engaged architectural


DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

designer Nataly Houle and Entreprise de Construction Gonzalez (ECG Inc.), with whom he often collaborates on design projects. “I carefully chose my team and planned every last detail. I was on site day and night during the renovations. I think the key ingredient is to find the perfect contractor,” he says. Because the bungalow was built in 2008, only one minor structural change was needed, and most of the renovation was focused

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on creating the aesthetic that Jean wanted. “The only structural change I made was to alter the laundry room, which had been open to the master bedroom’s closet,” he says. “I had a wall built to separate the two spaces; it turned the laundry room into a utilitarian space and created more room in the closet.” The house originally had three bedrooms. Jean transformed one of them into a formal dining room and the other into a home •

The polished chrome chandelier from Art Craft Lighting adds a touch of whimsy to the front vestibule.

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DESIGN

“I carefully chose my team and planned every last detail. I was on site day and night during the renovations. I think the key ingredient is to find the perfect contractor.”

The powder room was once a full bathroom. In the space formerly occupied by a bathtub, a custom-built acrylic shelving unit, backlit by a window, displays exquisite objets d’arts.

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office/library. The electrical system was also changed to accommodate the addition of led lighting throughout the house. He also converted the second bathroom into a powder room. “As a designer, I’ve always said that the powder room is the most important room when you’re entertaining,” he says. “It should be incredible.” The inspiration for the powder room occurred at one point during the design process. “I awoke during the middle

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of the night; I had had an outrageous vision and, the next morning, I called Nataly Houle to explain what I wanted. At first she wasn’t getting it, but eventually she understood.” Jean’s vision resulted in a set of custom-built, suspended acrylic shelves in the space once occupied by a bathtub. They’re used to display a collection of objets d’art. The other major transformation was the kitchen. Jean hired Cuisines Beaucage to •

A collection of Versace vases tops the custom-built shelving in the home office. The paintings on the wall behind the desk are part of the cities collection by Canadian artist John Hartman.

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DESIGN

Cuisines Beaucage built the Acrylux cabinets that are edged in stainless steel. One of the many elements that Jean loves in his new kitchen is the new-to-the-market Urban Cultivator, an undercounter unit designed for the indoor cultivation of fresh herbs. The counters are topped by glass that is manufactured to resemble marble and is sold at Ciot. Stainless steel hardware: Rocheleau.

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

create a functional and beautiful space. “The old kitchen had been poorly designed,” he says. “The stove door almost hit the island when it was opened, the storage space was limited, and the dark wood cabinets looked dated.” The first task was to banish the dark cabinetry. “The space had to be happy,” says Jean. “I was emerging from stormy days in my life and I wanted to return to sunny days.”

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The cabinets are white Acrylux, edged with stainless steel. “I wanted it to be ultramodern but I also wanted it to age gracefully,” Jean says. “The first concern was colour; I wanted the kitchen to be bright but not stark. In an open-plan house, the kitchen is the focus and it has to be the draw.” To prevent monotony, the cabinetry is in two colours: white on the bank of wall cupboards and a shade of

taupe on the island. And the backsplash of randomly patterned tiny round ceramic tiles is in both those tones. There are luxurious touches, too. The island is topped in a vitrified glass that resembles marble. The formal dining room is reserved for cool-weather dining. “In the summer, we eat outside or at the kitchen island,” Jean says. •

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DESIGN

One room that Jean didn’t want in his new home was a formal living room. “People don’t use them anymore,” he says. The openplan floor layout connects the kitchen to a comfortable family room space, where the focal point is a gas fireplace flanked by builtin maple bookshelves that display statuary and sculptural artworks. Here, a sectional sofa and two armchairs are sensual invitations to relax and gaze upon the backyard garden through large picture windows.

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The adjacent master bedroom also boasts large windows with a garden view. “I didn’t want the decor in the bedroom to be overpowering because the backyard is like a painting, a work of art through the windows,” he says. The whole house was designed to be an elegant backdrop for a vast collection of art. The little corridor space leading from the family room to the master bedroom is dedicated exclusively to the work of the late Quebec painter Bruno Côté; here, 14 of the

artist’s paintings are artfully hung. “I think Bruno Côté is one of the greatest painting talents we have in Quebec,” Jean says. One room that has become something of a sanctuary is the home office/library. “It’s located on the sunniest side of the house,” Jean says. “Because it’s so bright, I could afford to restrict the decor colours to black and white.” That includes a custom-built desk topped with Nero Assoluto granite. A wall of built-in shelves, topped by a collection


DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

of Versace vases, holds a collection of art books. “I spend a lot of time in here,” Jean says. “Moving from a larger home, I realize that human beings are creatures of habit. We use the same space over and over again.” That habitual use is different in the new bungalow where every room is used to its maximum. “I have never been so happy in a home as I am here,” Jean says. “This is a happy place. I’ve closed one book and opened a new chapter in my life.” •

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“This is a happy place. I’ve closed one book and opened a new chapter in my life.”

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DESIGN

CAPE ESCAPE A home on a Nova Scotia peninsula is a blissful getaway with spectacular views BY JULIE GEDEON · PHOTOGRAPHY: MARK HEMMINGS · STYLING: KIM JACOBSEN

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The house is situated to take advantage of ocean views and to allow the structure to be sun-drenched from dawn to dusk. “We chose a Cape Cod style for the exterior with wood shakes to blend into the landscape as much as possible,” Bernardine Moore says. The 12,000-square-foot home boasts seven bathrooms, seven bedrooms and two guesthouses.

“I INVESTIGATED BUYING THE PROPERTY EVEN THOUGH IT WASN’T UP FOR SALE, AND THE OWNER EVENTUALLY AGREED.”

BERNARDINE AND TIM MOORE’S SEASIDE HOME in Chester, Nova Scotia is idyllically situated at the end of a peninsula that gives the couple oceanfront views on three sides to enjoy the sun from dawn to dusk. “I have an affinity for being near water,” Tim Moore says. “So I instantly fell in love with these three and a half acres overlooking the Atlantic. I investigated buying the property even though it wasn’t up for sale, and the owner eventually agreed.” The couple has significantly expanded and embellished the originally modest Cape Cod-style abode they built in 1989 when they had two young boys. The result is an exquisite waterfront manor.

“It’s really been a labour of love for us,” says Bernardine. “Tim always looked for ideas while travelling on business or vacation with me and had a new project slated for every summer.” When their kitchen required updating, they called upon Mary MacDougall, an interior designer who was based in Toronto for many years before returning to her Maritime roots. She and Bernardine have been friends since university. “The exterior of their cedar-shake-clad home and landscaped gardens all presented beautifully,” MacDougall says, “but I found the interior dark for a place on the ocean.” Bernardine welcomed her friend’s suggestions to lighten up the house, but Tim •

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DESIGN

Bernardine doesn’t know what she would do without the AGA stove that the couple bought almost 30 years ago. “The constant heat is not only great for cooking but warms up the kitchen wonderfully all winter,” she says. “It’s also nice to gather around it in the summer when there’s a cooler ocean breeze.”

initially opposed the approach. “I hated the idea of painting over wood, but have to admit that it transformed our home marvellously.” Light-coloured custom cabinetry replaced the cherry-stained cabinets and the new coffered ceiling was painted a light colour. “We also enlarged the window seating area to open up their spectacular view of the ocean,” MacDougall says. “And we further brightened up the space with various tints of yellow paint that Bernardine loved.” Likewise pleased, Tim finally agreed to have the foyer’s dark wainscotting and the home’s trim painted in white. “It made such a big difference in terms of lightening up their home and gave it the simple elegance of an established seaside residence,” MacDougall says. The home’s west wing has some family politics behind it. The wing came about when Bernardine decided to reclaim the almost one third of the dining room that Tim had occupied as office space for years. “It would have been easiest to convert an upstairs bedroom into an office, but I wanted my office to remain at ground level,” Tim says. So an office space was built •

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Tim Moore couldn’t be happier with his cherrywood panelled office. He particularly likes the secret passage to the bathroom and the way a painting automatically lifts at the touch of another button to reveal a flat-screen TV.

“I LOVE IT. THERE’S EVEN A BUTTON THAT OPENS A PANEL TO AN OTHERWISE INCOGNITO BATHROOM.”

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Bernardine fell in love with the many hydrangeas bordering Lake Como during a vacation in Italy and now has blue and white blooms planted throughout her garden all summer.

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Several decks have been reinforced to overhang the cliff for better oceanfront views. All of the outdoor furniture and umbrellas are in neutral tones to make the landscaping the star attraction. All walkways are made of slate or granite.

“WE’VE MADE SO MANY GOOD MEMORIES OVER DINNER WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS.”

perpendicular to the house, attached by a breezeway. MacDougall then created a courtyard at the front of the house that has since been paved with stones, reminding the owners of Italian-style courtyards. The designer indulged Tim’s preference by panelling the entire office in cherrywood. “It was only fair, given how much Tim had compromised,” she laughs. “Plus an office is an ideal space for this panel treatment.” “I love it,” Tim says. “There’s even a button that opens a panel to an otherwise incognito bathroom.” Once they had planned the office, it made sense to add an upstairs guestroom. “The structure balances out the east wing where we had built a gym, sauna, bathroom and a second-floor bedroom a few years earlier,” Tim says. •

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DESIGN

The silk drapes and other gold fabrics add just a hint of glamour to the bedroom decor, while the yellow in the reupholstered chairs and cushions echoes the bright yellows found in the kitchen.

“IT’S REALLY BEEN A LABOUR OF LOVE FOR US.”

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The couple adores the beauty and ease of the limestone wall tiles in their master bathroom.

Bernardine appreciates being able to comfortably seat 12 at the dinner table, as well as having a smaller table for when the couple entertains fewer guests. “We’ve made so many good memories over dinner with family and friends,” she says. While MacDougall didn’t dare touch the B.C. fir beams and wood ceiling that Tim adores in the family room, she did replace the brick surround on the living room fireplace with marble to add a touch more of the traditional elegance that Bernardine favours. MacDougall suggested reconfiguring the master bedroom quarters from a series of

small rooms into a more open space. “That allowed us to replace a tiny walk-in closet with a large one featuring a central island, as well as to create a larger and more luxurious bathroom space,” she says. The reconfiguration still left space for a seating area in the master bedroom beside a window that overlooks the ocean. “We reupholstered the sofa and chairs in a lighter floral pattern, which brightened up the room, coupled with the freshly painted white trim,” MacDougall says. The overall result for the Moores is an idyllic home in their idyllic location. •

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CONTEMPORARY COOL

A family opts for a modern ambience in their new York Mills home BY SUSAN SEMENAK // PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL // STYLING: SHIVA KHALILNIA

SHIVA KHALILNIA prides herself in not having a particular style. Rather, she tailors her designs to each client’s needs and wants. As the lead designer at Import Temptations, a furniture and accessories retailer with a showroom in Toronto and customers across North America, Europe, the Middle East and Asia, she’s got plenty of opportunity to tailor her designs. A former furniture designer who worked in Milan, Khalilnia now specializes in designing and coordinating furniture, lighting and accessories for large homes, working with clientele at Import Temptations, which was founded by her mother Lili Khalilnia. In one of her recent projects, Khalilnia designed a home for an entrepreneur and his family in York Mills. The family wanted a

home in a contemporary style, with generous spaces for entertaining. Their previous home was more traditional; this time they wanted a modern touch. To marry traditional and contemporary styles, the designer chose classic furniture – but updated it. For instance, in the living room, a sofa and a chair from designer Christopher Guy in the Louis XV style were “re-invented” for a contemporary look. “We upholstered them in Valentino red and did away with the ornate carving; we made these pieces smooth and sleek, the curvy legs finished in black lacquer,” says Khalilnia. The room is decorated in black and gold, with six-foot-tall lamps, for what Khalilnia calls a “bold and sexy” atmosphere. •

The living room’s sofa and chairs by Christopher Guy add a shot of strong colour; Khalilnia had them upholstered in a Valentino red fabric.

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“It’s a very special house, filled with very special things.”

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The kitchen’s table is from Italy; its scalloped surface sits atop a black chrome base. Creamy colours predominate in the lightfilled space.

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A black and white coffered ceiling is a dramatic design element above the dining room’s black maple table. The Murano glass chandelier is from Italy.

The homeowners love to entertain. The drinks area in the basement features an onyx bar that can be lit up; the wall behind it is upholstered.


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Gold elements create a luxe ambience in the room that the homeowners use for entertaining. A white onyx fireplace surround makes a strong design statement. Polished-brass and matteblack sculptural birds take flight across one wall.

Another focal point in the 7,500-square-foot home is the basement. Indeed, the space is so airy, the word seems like a misnomer. With double doors leading out to the garden and extra-high ceilings, it is probably better referred to as a “party room or reception area,” Khalilnia says. Her clients use it often for parties and get-togethers. There’s a wine room here and a drinks area with an onyx bar that can be lit up; the wall behind it is upholstered. The owner, a cigar aficionado, keeps his cigar collection here and guests often retire to the outdoor sitting area for a smoke after dinner. The homeowners worked hand in hand with her to find unique pieces of art and furniture. They ordered fabric and furnishings from Turkey, Italy and Germany. “It’s a very special house,” Khalilnia says. “Filled with very special things.” •

Shiva Khalilnia used the same colour scheme outdoors as indoors for a cohesive look. Sunbrella fabrics on the poolside furnishings are UV-resistant. Fire table: Brown Jordan. THE AUTUMN ISSUE

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THE PERSONAL TOUCH A furniture and design showroom gives customers exactly what they need BY TRUDY KERMAN

TOUTE SUITE CUSTOM DECOR 2110 Dundas St. E, Missassauga 905-499-1822 www.toutesuite.ca

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“Customers choose wood – maple or oak – the stain, and select handles and knobs.”

VISH JOSHI IS A BUSINESSMAN without a title on his business card. “I purposely have no title on my business card, as I don’t believe in titles,” Joshi says. “I’m known as Vish and I can be whatever my client deems me to be: sales guy, manager, owner, partner.” Joshi is the founder and owner of Toute Suite Custom Decor, a Mississauga showroom and design centre that specializes in customizable Canadian-made furniture and accessories. Styles include modern, contemporary, transitional and traditional. Joshi says he likes to give his customers the personal touch and he has a soft spot for seniors. “The other day, this woman came in looking for a comfortable chair. She is moving to a retirement home,” he says. She’d shopped around in several nearby stores before crossing the street and walking into Toute Suite. “She found not one, but two chairs at $879 each and got an upgraded fabric, a $270 value. I felt it was important that we go above and beyond for this dear lady. I wanted her furniture and decor to be spectacular.” Joshi also threw in his decorating services, which the company offers in its design centre, along with free delivery.

Ultimately, the client bought a small, imported dining room set and plans to return for a rug and accessories. “She said that we came in well below her budget when compared with the other stores,” he says. Joshi says he educates his clients about where products are manufactured and how they’re made. “If something is assembled (on an assembly line), it’s a production process. One guy puts on the arms, another then staples on the fabric. If it’s bench-made, two upholsterers build a product (together) from start to finish. “We explain to customers what ‘made in Canada’ truly means: bench-made products manufactured by skilled labourers from start to finish; all wood frames made of Canadian hardwood,” he says. Toute Suite opened in 2011 and got its distinctive name from a conversation Joshi had had in his car with someone from an advertising agency while he was en route to his office. “He asked me for something and I said to him ‘I’ll get it to you tout suite.’ Then we both paused.” It was his eureka moment that gave him the store’s name. Shoppers who sip espresso and listen to

jazz while navigating the showroom can narrow down their colour selections and fabric choices from more than 1,000 designer fabrics in the design centre within the 5,000-squarefoot showroom. Custom-crafted dining room, kitchen, bedroom and living room furniture, manufactured by Handstone Furniture, a Mennonite furniture manufacturer in Wallenstein, is also available. “Customers choose wood – maple or oak – the stain, and select handles and knobs,” Joshi says. Or they can consult the company catalogue for more styles. Joshi’s formula for success has led to a Best of Toronto 2016 award from HomeStars.com, a home-improvement ratings site similar to the customer ratings site Angie’s list. Toute Suite recently added a kitchen cabinet division under the JustWhiteKitchens.ca brand name. “I had a customer who spent $1,895 on a sofa and then noticed our amazing white kitchens and fell in love with what she saw. ‘Do you do kitchens, knock out walls, hardwood?’ she asked me. She just signed a $30,000 new kitchen installation and renovation contract with us.” Toute Suite also offers commercial decor goods, the kind of chic but sturdy furniture found in hotels and commercial buildings. One bonus customers may not find at big box stores is the design, manufacturing and delivery service the company offers. “And the ability to work with a customer’s budget,” Joshi says. •

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CABINET MEETING Panelling kitchen appliances hides them from view for an integrated look

EVERY KITCHEN NEEDS APPLIANCES – from fridges and freezers to stoves and dishwashers. But those appliances don’t need to look utilitarian. One kitchen design trend that has gained in popularity is the practice of concealing appliances behind cabinetry. Toronto Home asked Rhonda Thornton, owner of Bloomsbury Kitchens and Fine Cabinetry, to discuss how to make the most of panelled appliances.

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Bloomsbury Fine Cabinetry

416-782-7900

1142 Castlefield Ave., Toronto

www.bloomsburykitchens.com

Q: Rhonda, when did the trend toward panelling appliances begin and what is the advantage of concealing appliances in cabinetry? A: The trend toward panelling has been around for at least 10 years and, I believe, is here to stay. As the kitchen has evolved into an all-purpose family space for cooking, entertaining, lounging, eating and doing homework, people are spending most of their time in that room now. They have a preference for hiding appliances to make the space cozy. There is a trend in the high-end market for cabinetry to be of furniture quality and the appliances to be hidden. We are often asked to design these elements in new kitchens and renovation projects.

Q: Which appliances can be fully integrated into cabinetry? A: Any type of fridge, wine fridge, dishwasher, warming drawer, garbage compactor and ice maker can be integrated, and there are various levels of fit. The higher-end models offer a level of fit called integration, which is more costly and requires more attention to detail during installation. They also require a specialized appliance installer. This look is very desirable because it is a streamlined fit in the cabinets. Our clients love it when we create custom cabinets for refrigeration that complement the kitchen but don’t look like fridges at all. One of our favorites for integration is the Miele MasterCool.


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“The hardware is the jewelry of the kitchen, so it makes sense to match it to the cabinetry.”

Q: What kind of hardware do you recommend for integrated appliances? A: You can keep the industrial look of the appliance by buying the manufacturer’s appliance model handles and mounting them on the cabinet panels. Alternately, for a customized look, there is a wide array of beautiful hardware lines that offer products to complete a fully integrated look. The hardware is the jewelry of the kitchen, so it makes sense to match it to the cabinetry.

Q: Appliances do break down and that can be a problem when they’re integrated. How do homeowners deal with that? A: In homes that have panelled appliances that are outdated and dysfunctional, it’s best to replace them with new models of the same size in a stainless steel finish. This is the most practical option that guarantees a great look. In an older home, it can really modernize the look of the kitchen and save a homeowner from having to try to match older finishes.

Q: What alternatives are there for homeowners who love the look of panelled appliances but have homes in which this design is not feasible? A: If the panelled look is not feasible, stainless steel is still a great option, and it is a look that is here to stay. Stainless is modern and practical, and it works well with the transitional look that is very popular. •

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IN OUR NEXT ISSUE

Get your duvet out of the blanket box and stock up on firewood for your hearth. Winter is on its way. The Winter issue of Toronto Home will feature our annual gift guide to make your choices so much easier, and plenty of design ideas to cozy up your home for the cold months ahead. On sale in early December.


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We’ve all asked that question before at some point when walking by a street kid. Why can’t they just get off the street? Why can’t they grow up and take some responsibility by going to school and getting a job? Well, imagine being that street kid for a second. Getting a life is not a simple snap of the fingers. It isn’t easy to just get a job or an education. And they can’t always just go home. For street kids, every day is survival. Their life is based on simply getting through it. Finding food and shelter is their job, and even overcoming that doesn’t put them in any kind of position to find stability in their lives. Getting off the street is just the beginning. So let’s start from the beginning. We’ll call this kid Steve. Steve’s day starts at sunrise in a public park. The sun hits him dead in the eye and he wakes up shivering. Steve springs up from the bench that he slept on to make sure his stuff is still under it. It’s almost nothing, a backpack with a couple of sweaters and a thermos in it, but two nights ago he almost got beat up for it. He was walking through a different park across town when three guys sitting on a bench asked him if he had a cigarette. Steve ignored them and kept walking, but he knew they weren’t through with him yet. After verbally harassing him, they stood up and moved to surround Steve. He began to shake with fear. Steve told them again that he didn’t have anything, but they didn’t care anymore. They weren’t going to leave without something. They began to step closer to Steve. And closer. One pulled out a knife from his back pocket. Just as another guy tried to grab Steve’s backpack, Steve darted through an opening just out of their reach. They chased him for a few steps, but Steve was already far away, his backpack still in his possession. This morning, Steve’s exhausted and he needs to get out of the wind. He picks up his backpack and spends the next two hours looking for an alleyway. Hopefully he can find one that’s quiet, and, if possible, has boxes or newspapers that he can use to protect himself from the biting chill. Steve scours the alleyways in his area and finally settles on one. It seems perfect and he can’t remember why he doesn’t sleep there more often. He finds a spot, puts his head down and begins to doze off. The sounds of the city fade. He falls asleep. He dreams. In this fleeting moment, everything is OK. He’s in his old home, in a warm bed, everyone’s calm and there’s breakfast waiting for him when he decides to – “Get up, kid,” says the police officer standing over Steve. Steve opens his eyes as the officer informs him that he needs to clear out immediately. Steve rubs his eyes. Now he remembers the problem with this alleyway. He stands, picks up his things and starts his day again. Steve can’t stop thinking about his dream. But that’s all it was. Nothing like his actual life at home. He can still feel the pain from his father’s fists. Hear his mother’s screams. Things had been getting worse and worse at home since his father lost his job. It all started when his father came home drunk from the bar one night. Steve remembers the red mark on his mother’s face the next morning and refusing to believe what was unfolding around him. But that refusal only made things worse, because Steve could never convince his father that he needed help. So it continued, one incident after another until one night, it wasn’t just Steve’s mother that was on the receiving end of it. It was him. His mother screamed louder when Steve was being beaten than when she was, and those are the sounds that haunt Steve every single day. The bruises are gone now, but the mental scarring never will be. Steve manages to snap back into reality, but reality isn’t any better. Steve has not only had very little sleep in the past couple days, but also very little food. He really doesn’t feel like rummaging through a garbage can this morning. That means it’s time to go onto the street and beg for change. He’ll never get used to doing this, but he’s had to learn fast. Having to decide which street corner to sit on and beg strangers for change isn’t something he ever envisioned doing. He decides on a busy corner downtown and begins the hike in that direction. He hopes that the long walk is worth the extra money he’ll receive for being in a busier area. At least it isn’t winter yet. The very thought of spending all winter on the street sends chills down Steve’s spine. He’s felt a Canadian winter before. He can’t still be out here by then…can he? When Steve finally arrives, he sits down on the street corner and takes off his toque. He eyes the people walking by and begins to beg. “Change please?” is what he usually says, but today he’s a little more desperate. He’s painfully hungry and it shows in the anguish in his voice. Steve always tries his best to not worry about what other people are thinking, but it’s hard. He can see the way they look at him. People are either scared of him, disgusted by him or they ignore him altogether. He’s not sure which one is worse, but sometimes it feels like everyone hates him for one reason or another. Today, one person in particular is very aggressive when Steve asks him for change. He tells him that he’s a loser and that he should get a job. After a few hours and thousands of passersby later, Steve has $7.24, just enough for a burger combo. After waiting for a few moments, Steve slowly picks up the change in his toque. He stares at it, scared of what he might do with it. It takes him all the strength he has to not use the money for something else. Two weeks ago, someone else on the street started giving him free “samples.” When you’re in a dark enough place, sometimes you’ll do whatever people tell you will make you feel better. It doesn’t matter who that person is. It doesn’t matter if deep down you know that what they’re offering isn’t a way out at all, but another anchor to keep you drowning. On these dark days, hope is replaced by distraction. Steve is constantly tempted to just let go and get away, but today he somehow fights that temptation off. He gets up and makes his way towards the restaurant. When he gets to the front of the line, Steve dumps the change on the counter before ordering. The annoyed cashier counts it as the people in line behind start to get restless. Steve tries to recall the last time he didn’t have to pay for something in change, but can’t. It’s always embarrassing, especially when the line is as long as this. He asks the cashier if she can unlock the bathroom for him and she hesitates. Steve is rarely allowed to use a public bathroom, even as a paying customer. But today, the cashier doesn’t want to keep the other customers waiting so she unlocks the door. Steve splashes water onto his dirty face inside the bathroom. He studies his reflection in the mirror. How long can he keep doing this for? When will this nightmare end? No kid should have to live like this. As he rinses, he begins to daydream. He thinks about the feeling of having a nice, long shower in a real bathroom. He steps out onto the cool floor and dries himself off with a soft, fresh towel. Steve is snapped out of his daydream by the sound of a knock. He opens the door to find the manager. He has to leave now. Steve puts his head down, grabs his food and heads outside. Later, with his hunger temporarily gone, Steve is back in his only home – the street. Back where he has no hope. There have been days when the shame has been too much, when Steve tried to find a way out. Steve recalls a time a few months earlier when he first started living on the street. He had woken up with a sense of hope that day he never felt before. He had slept in an abandoned warehouse another guy told him about and managed to split some breakfast with someone else staying there. That day, Steve was allowed to have something on his mind besides finding food, finding somewhere to sleep and trying not to get mugged. So, he wanted to do what so many strangers have told him to do before – get a job. Steve was walking down the street when he noticed a convenience store with a “Help Wanted” sign in front of it. Steve took a deep breath and walked into the store. He went straight to the cashier at the front and asked about the sign. But all he got back were insults. The owner told Steve that he sees him on the streets every day. He told him his clothes were a mess. That he must have been insane to think anyone would hire a stupid, lazy homeless kid. Steve slunk out and glanced back behind him at the “Help Wanted” sign. This had happened before. He didn’t understand why no one would give him a chance. He doubted himself to the point where he began to wonder if he would even be able to trust the person who did. That was the day that Steve realized that the hill he had to climb was actually a mountain. Steve hears a car’s honk that snaps him back to an all too familiar reality. He’s out of money again. He has no place to go. He feels physically and mentally beaten. And soon it will be nightfall. Soon he’ll be back at the bottom of the mountain once again. This is just a glimpse into Steve’s struggle and the struggle that so many homeless youth face. There is no living, only surviving. And when you’re trying to survive on the street, every little thing is an obstacle. Every time you beg for change, every time you go to the bathroom, every time you want to sleep, eat or drink – nothing comes easy. For many kids like Steve who want a way out, the struggle to meet basic needs is only the beginning. The coming days, weeks and months provide hurdles even harder to overcome. The physical pain may lessen in leaving the street behind but the mental anguish is constant when trying to forge a new life. Getting an education, applying for a job, admitting that you need counselling – these are hard for anyone. When you have to do all these things from scratch, the frustration can mount as fast as the confidence can fade. From learning how to stay warm in that first winter on the street, to the first day back at school, from deciding whether to steal food or pass out from hunger, to deciding where to get a shirt to wear for that first job interview, there are endless obstacles for homeless youth.

It’s also why we exist. Please visit CovenantHouseToronto.ca to donate.


AD LIST TORONTO AUTUMN 2016

BUYER’S GUIDE

DIVERSE AND DIFFERENT Mark Gleberzon, MJG Gallery www.mjggallery 416-319-9844 NEVER TOO BUSY FOR EXERCISE Anikó Kaszás www.anikokaszas.com UTILITARIAN NO MORE Dezign Market www.dezignmarket.com 888-398-8380 CABINET MEETING Bloomsbury Kitchens Fine Cabinetry www.bloomsburykitchens.com 905-853-7700 ~ 416-782-7900 THE DIRTY LOWDOWN ON WASHING Georgian Custom Renovations www.georgianreno.com 905-405-7276

BUILT-IN BENEFITS Bloomsbury Fine Cabinetry www.bloomsburykitchens.com 416-782-7900 (Toronto) 905-853-7700 (Newmarket) FAMILY AFFAIR Barrymore Furniture www.barrymorefurniture.com 416-532-2891 THE PERSONAL TOUCH Toute Suite Custom Decor www.toutesuite.ca 905-499-1822 WARM AND LUXURIOUS ACO Canada www.acocan.ca 905-829-0665 Dezign Market www.dezignmarket.com 888-398-8380

HAPPY HUES Knar Jewellery www.knar.com

Atlantis Bath Centre www.atlantisbathcentre.ca 416-307-2570

CONTEMPORARY COOL Import Temptations www.import-temptations.com 416-256-3150

Concept Kitchen and Bath www.conceptkandb.com 905-335-0808

WORK AND PLAY Steven Sabados www.stevensabados.com ALL UNDER ONE ROOF Improve Canada www.improvecanada.com 416-417-7507 BEAUTIFULLY UPDATED Carey Mudford Interior Design www.cmidesign.ca 416-362-3305 McCormack Architects www.mccormackarchitects.com 416-599-9800 GONE WITH THE WIND – AND IT’S A GOOD THING Barroso Homes www.barrosohomes.com 416-723-9984 Alcove www.alcove.ca 855-774-7526 Perola Kitchens & Interiors perolakitchens.com 416-766-8202

Runtal Radiators www.runtalnorthamerica.com 888-829-4901 LIGHTEN UP! Litemode www.litemode.ca 905-738-8889 CAPE ESCAPE Mary MacDougall Interior Design 902-464-0465 SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL Monet Interiors 514-213-2354 Nataly Houle Art Zone 514-456-8048 ECG Construction 514-953-3784 Cuisines Beaucage www.cuisinesbeaucage.com 450-589-6412 Le Marché aux Fleurs du Village 450-672-5554

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Accents for Living ACO Systems Allan Rug Co. Almira Fine Furniture APT Custom Carpets Atelier Cachet Atlantis Bath Centre Barroso Homes Barrymore Binns Kitchen + Bath Design Bloomsbury Fine Cabinetry Bone Structure Cairo Glitz California Closets Canaroma Chateau Window & Door Systems Cheney Window & Door Specialists Chestnut Flooring Concept Flooring Concept Kitchen & Bath Cosentino Surfaces Covenant House Creative Avenues Decorium Dezign Market Dominion Rug & Home Elizabeth Interiors Euro-Line Appliances European Flooring Executive Yacht Fairlawn Medical Centre Fiber & Cloth Georgian Custom Renovations H2o2 Wine Cellar Design Hide House Hollace Cluny HRH Custom Creations Ideal Mantels iidex Canada Import Temptations Interstone Jura Knar Jewellery Komandor Litemode Mahzad Homes Mark Lash Martin Daniel Interiors Modern Weave Morba Morelli Fine Cabinetry Nortesco Omega Mantels & Mouldings Papro Wine Cellars & Consulting Patterned Concrete Roche Bobois Royal Decks Royal Lighting Runtal Radiators Simply Closets Southport Outdoor Living Stoney Creek Furniture Sutcliffe Kitchens and Renovations Toute Suite Treasures & Co. Trutone Electronics Village Paint Walkers Wine Bar & Grill Weavers Art X-Tile Canada Zilli Home

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EXTRAORDINARY CUSTOM HOMES YOUR CUSTOM DREAM HOME Have you dreamed of someday owning a home with a walk-in boudoir, home gym or custom wine cellar? BUILDING A CUSTOM HOME may be your best option to making those dreams come true. Building your home gives you the ability to customize every detail to suit your specific needs. There are truly no limits to what can be achieved with a fully qualified team of designers and craftsmen intent on making your home building experience fully satisfying and personal.

LET GEORGIAN BUILD YOUR CUSTOM DREAM HOME!

“Working with Georgian was truly a blessing! From our very first Meeting they eliminated any apprehension we had about building a New home and took every negative notion out of the equation. With their attention to detail and skilled guidance we now have a beautiful and unique home. As an added bonus to having the home of our dreams we have gained a life-long friendship with Georgian” — JEFF & CAROLINE —

SCHEDULE YOUR COMPLIMENTARY CONSULTATION

(905) 405-7276 | WWW.GEORGIANRENO.COM


WINNER OF THE 2015

TORONTO HOME SHOW O F E XC E L L E N C E

& 2016 NATIONAL

HOME SHOW


Toronto Home - Autumn 2016  
Toronto Home - Autumn 2016