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TORONTO

KITCHEN AND BATH

TRENDS KITCHENS

HAPPY HOUR

Designing the heart of the home

How to mix cocktails

BATHROOMS

COOKBOOKS

Sanctuaries for relaxation

This season’s best new recipes

THE YEAR AHEAD

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Design trends in 2020

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PUBLISHER’S LETTER

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Gentle readers, welcome, In the past two decades, the kitchen – that formerly hidden, utilitarian space – has taken centre stage in our homes. No longer just the room in which meal preparation takes place, the kitchen is now the most important room in the house. The nourishment we get from our kitchens transcends the food we ingest to fuel our bodies. It has become the go-to place and because, in many homes, it is now open to adjacent rooms, it has become, of necessity, a place of beauty, too. That’s why kitchen design is now such a major focus. In addition to wanting a functional space where we can cook, we also want that space to be visually appealing. And, aesthete that I am, I needed my kitchen to dish up beauty.   The kitchen of my restored 1847 Regency home was formed out of two rooms: the small galley kitchen that had been created in the 1970s and the butler’s pantry, which was probably made in 1924, the date of its first big renovation. I opened these two rooms up and combined them to create a work space with enough room for a table.  I chose Italian travertine-like ceramic for the floor, and cobalt blue for the lower cabinetry, which of course I designed with all rounded edges. The upper cabinets are the same as the originals both in style and colour as those in the former butler’s pantry, and they are in the exact place where they stood, with all their original copper pulls and hinges. The copper hood above the stove was created out of the remnants of the original roof of the house when it was replaced. In this new kitchen, I installed a double oven, a huge fridge and two sinks, one in the island facing the stove, and one far away on the other side of the kitchen, next to the table. Each has a dishwasher. There is also a “pot filler“ faucet for the stove.   I also (brilliantly) installed, under this extra side cabinetry an extra drawer refrigerator, known as the “drinks” fridge. This is a lifesaver when you have teenage boys, as I did, and now grown kids, (thankfully) who still bring home gaggles of friends, and it is my delight to have them all sit at the table in the kitchen.   When the kitchen is used to gather friends and family around the table, in good times and in bad, in camaraderie and in company or companionship, one understands the meaning of the word “hearth” or in our day: kitchen. Long live the kitchen! DR. SHARON AZRIELI Publisher

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EDITOR’S LETTER

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SHOWER OR BATH? It’s a question I recently put to my colleagues. When it comes to daily ablutions, people fall into one of two categories: those who shower and those who prefer to soak in a bathtub. My poll (which, rest assured, was by no means scientific) revealed that all of the members of the Home in Canada team take showers. Most of us jump into the shower each morning before heading off to work with a coffee in hand. And I suspect that’s how most people bathe. Given the speed of modern life, showers are the most practical. That’s why, for years, I’ve been curious about the trend I’ve seen in bathroom design. All of the bathrooms we’ve featured in our pages over the years are equipped with luxurious showers. No surprise there. But they also all have bathtubs. Beautiful baths. Freestanding, deep soaker tubs, antique-style tubs with claw feet, marble-clad tubs that incorporate showers. Who, I’ve asked myself, is using these bathtubs other than small children, retirees, and people trying to beat the chills of a flu virus? It turns out, according to my non-scientific office poll, that showers are the spots for the morning rush and baths are the go-to destination for evenings. The two members of our Home in Canada team who take baths reserve that luxury for evenings, after the work day

has passed. One member of the team says her soaks in the tub are always accompanied by candlelight, music and bubbles. I believe all design is driven by sociological evolution. In recent decades, we’ve evolved into a people on the go, ’round the clock. Life is fast-moving in our 24/7 world. Hence, the quick morning shower before we head off to our busy work lives. But the accelerated speed of life also necessitates an escape hatch, and for many of us, that escape is the bathtub. This is the place where everything slows down, where we nurture ourselves, where we do our best thinking and – yes! – reading. That’s why – paradoxically – bathroom design now incorporates one fixture that allows us to speed through our daily schedules and another that permits us to mitigate the stresses and strains of said schedules. In this, our annual Kitchen & Bath Trends issue, we show you some well-designed bathrooms that are luxurious spas, far from being the no-frills environments we once knew. And, as always, we take you into kitchens that serve as the centre of the homes they occupy. As families, we gravitate communally to the warmth of our kitchens; as individuals, we retreat to the calming embrace of our bathrooms. Light the candles, turn on the jazz, toss in the bubble bath. It’s time to chill.

STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@homeincanadamagazine.ca There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @homeincanada @athomeincanada @HomeInCanadaMag

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KITCHEN & BATH


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CONTRIBUTORS

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BRENDA O’FARRELL Brenda O’Farrell is a journalist and a recovering renovator. For her, re-imagining the look and feel of living spaces is an exercise in three-dimensional story-telling. In this issue, she outlines the tales of how a kitchen in Winnipeg brings a family together around a luxury island, and how remodelling three bathrooms in a midtown Toronto two-storey was the winning ticket for a family of four, providing a trifecta of trends that resets the look and feel of their entire home. KAREN SEIDMAN As she contemplates a renovation of her own, veteran news reporter Karen Seidman has several takeaways from her profile of a Toronto master-ensuite redesign. One of the main ones is not to be scared of quirky features in a house, but rather to embrace them as the homeowners of this property did, turning an unusual window (that they wanted to scrap) into a fabulous design element that brings a lot of style to the finished product. WENDY HELFENBAUM Wendy Helfenbaum is a journalist and TV producer who covers real estate, architecture, design, DIY, travel, and gardening. Writing about two spectacular kitchens for this issue, Wendy enjoyed seeing how small details make all the difference in large-scale renovations. “I love how designer Dvira Ovadia added tiny jewels, such as a pair of agate knobs to elevate the look of a classic cabinet,” Wendy says. “I also admire how architect Wanda Ely embraced the challenge of adding a modern extension to a Georgian-style home by incorporating some historic features while contrasting others so everything blends perfectly.” BARBARA MILNER Journalist, designer and realtor Barbara Milner has had an extensive career in national broadcast television. She writes about the latest developments in real estate for luxury brokerage Forest Hill Yorkville and reports on a wide scope of design themes for Houzz America. Barbara has covered trends in interior design for more than a decade, and in this issue reveals what’s in store for interiors in 2020. “Nature and sustainability are having a growing influence on interiors,” says Barbara. “It’s a trend that is expected to last beyond a decade.”

Toronto Edition Volume 10, number 1; Kitchen and Bath Trends 2020 Date of Issue: February, 2020 6100 TransCanada Highway Suite 100, Pointe-Claire Quebec H9R 1B9

PUBLISHER Dr. Sharon Azrieli, CQ CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stanley Kirsh EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker ART DIRECTOR Nader Meleika EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Carmen Lefebvre CONTRIBUTORS Cheryl Cornacchia Julie Gedeon Wendy Helfenbaum Elisabeth Kalbfuss Susan Kelly Tracey MacKenzie Barbara Milner Brenda O’Farrell Phillipa Rispin Susan Schwartz Karen Seidman Susan Semenak Nadine Thomson PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Arnal Jody Beck Azen and Kevin Bongard Mike Chajecki Alex Lukey Matthew McMullen Lauren Miller Scott Norsworthy Ema Peters Kiely Ramos Erik Rotter Ariana Tennyson Valerie Wilcox STYLISTS Luca Alves Margot Austin Michelle Berwick Jordy Fagan Ann-Marie Favot Alana Firestone Alana Fletcher Dvira Ovadia Jaclyn Peters Carey Salvador Charlotte Skiba Svetlana Tryaskina

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Call 1-866-846-1640 www.athomeincanada.ca sales@homeincanadamagazine.ca info@homeincanadamagazine.ca

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Matthew Azrieli CONSULTING ART DIRECTOR Kelly Litzenberger CONTROLLER Jenny Marques DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Artur Kozyra ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Neve Foltz DIRECTOR OF SALES NATIONAL (ON LEAVE) Kelly Chicoine DIRECTOR PARTNERSHIPS MARKETING & SALES Liliana DaCosta DIRECTOR OF REGIONAL SALES - ONTARIO Grant Wells For sales inquiries, please email Grant Wells, gwells@movatohome. com To subscribe, go to: www.athomeincanada.ca/ print-subscription LEGAL DEPOSIT 1927-324x Home In Canada Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without the written permission of Home In Canada is strictly prohibited. issn


CONTENTS

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28 ON THE COVER BURNISHED BRONZE

Metallic touches sparkle in this renovated Toronto kitchen

CHEERS!

Classes that teach you how to mix cocktails

38

MID-CENTURY MODERNIZATION

A 1963 home in British Columbia is updated with respect for its origins

46

80

HOLISTIC DESIGN

Consistent materials and colours are used to unify the kitchen and bathrooms in this home

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KITCHEN & BATH


LATITUDE PIVOT CUBE

A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES FOR YOUR BATHROOM

www.fleurco.com


CONTENTS

6

PUBLISHER’S LETTER

8

EDITOR’S LETTER

16

THIS JUST IN A selection of new items for your home

52

FROM CONCRETE TO COZY The shell of a small condo is transformed into an elegant suite that’s perfect for entertaining

60

SUPERB STYLE The newest extraordinary kitchen and bathroom designs from Scavolini

66

RESPECTFUL REMODELLING A Halifax bathroom gets a makeover to better serve a family of four

78

PRACTICAL PORCELAIN Mimicking the look of natural stone, porcelain is a tough and functional alternative

86

THE SUSTAINABLE KITCHEN Designer Rebecca Hay puts green principles to work in creating a kitchen for her clients

96

DESIGN TRIO A family redesigns and renovates all three bathrooms in their Toronto home

102

DAWN OF A NEW DECADE Mother Nature will be in the design spotlight in the years ahead

106

BIG DESIGN IN A SMALL SPACE The redesign of a modest-sized kitchen makes use of every square foot

112

A MESH OF OLD AND NEW A 1925 home gets a contemporary-style kitchen and bathroom

118

THE LOWDOWN ON LEATHER CARE Giving a little TLC to leather furnishings, clothes and accessories keeps them looking pristine

120

BEACH HOUSE AESTHETIC IN A CONDO Several approaches are artfully combined in a Kitsilano Beach condo for a clean look

126

BEFORE AND AFTER A home’s library is transformed into a comfortable place for reading and conversation

128

SCANDINAVIAN INFLUENCE A Toronto couple opts for simplicity in the redesign of their kitchen and bathrooms

134

MORE FUNCTIONAL, MORE BEAUTIFUL A kitchen in Steinbach, Manitoba is redesigned for a family who love to cook and entertain

142

IRRESISTABLE RECIPES The latest cookbooks offer guidance on creative cuisine

146

GATHERING PLACE The island in a Winnipeg kitchen is where the homeowners and their guests love to hang out

152

SPA-LIKE SANCTUARIES Why the bathroom will be an even bigger refuge this year

154

RIGHTSIZING After downsizing to a condo, homeowners create a kitchen that has space for everything

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32

AWKWARD NO MORE

A Toronto designer beautifies architectural elements that her clients initially dismiss

SWING ON BY

A couple integrate playful design elements into their home, including a playground swing

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92

EAT THE RAINBOW

Dining on foods of many colours is a path to good health


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DESIGN

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T H IS JUST IN

THE WELL-LIT BATHROOM CABINET The Luna Halo medicine cabinet is available in several formats: single view, bi-view, tri-view and tall view. It boasts an aluminum body and copper-free mirror, and eight-millimetre-thick glass shelves that are adjustable. It can be wall-mounted or recess-installed, has soft-close Blum hinges, an on-off touch switch with a dimmer, two electrical outlets and two USB ports, interior and exterior mirrors, and energy-efficient LED white light. Available from Fleurco. Fleurco Products Inc. 4575 boul. Poirier, Montreal www.fleurco.com 514-326-2222 ~Â 1-800-993-0033

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the preliminary drawings through to the completion of the installation process.

16

KITCHEN & BATH ISSUE


Cold Outside... Warm Inside New in Electric, the Toasty Comfort of Runtal Radiators Can Now Be Enjoyed by All!

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has long been world-renowned as the premium manufacturer of Euro-style radiators for hot water and steam heating systems. We are pleased to introduce a Runtal Electric line that includes Wall Panel, Towel Radiator and Baseboard designs. Suitable for both retro-fit and new construction, Runtal Electric products provide a very efficient and comfortable radiant heat. They are an excellent source of primary or supplemental heat and a problem-solver for areas needing additional heat. They are attractive (available in over 100 colors), durable, quiet and easy to install. To view Runtal’s complete line of heating products, please visit our showroom in Oakville, Ontario Canada; M-F 9-5 or by appointment and online at: www.runtalnorthamerica.com.

Our Showroom is located at: 2861 Sherwood Heights Drive, Unit 21, Oakville, Ontario Canada. Tel: 905-829-4943


DESIGN

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CHAIN OF LOVE

LOVELY CONTRAST

This necklace by Mark Lash features a 20-inch-long yellow-gold link chain

Fourteen-karat white gold is the perfect foil for tourmaline in this striking

and a fresh-water pearl charm with a bezel-set diamond. The look is elegant

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BAGUETTE BEAUTY

MUSKOKA WITH A TWIST

This 14kt white gold baguette diamond bangle from Mark Lash is the per-

The classic Muskoka chair gets a new lease on life in this version, made

fect accessory for any occasion. The 13 baguettes weigh 0.42ct, while the 182

of 100 per cent recycled HDPE plastic. We show it here in turquoise, but

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it’s also available in other woodgrain colours (red, blue, black, white, slate grey, beige and chocolate). It comes in upright, classic and swivel styles. The

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relaxing, never getting splinters, and never having to paint Muskoka chairs

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KITCHEN & BATH ISSUE


DESIGN

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JUST HANGIN’ OUT The Orbit hanging chair is available with accessories, including umbrellas, side table and ottoman. It boasts a resin-wicker bucket and a rust-free aluminum frame on a stand made of powder-coated steel that supports

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TAKE YOUR BEST SHOT Count down! The Cronometro is here. The Rocket espresso Evoluzione type R and type V machines move to the new shot timer version: the Cronometro. A shot timer measures the machine’s brew time. The Cronometro’s shot timer is discreet but functional and is located above the power switch on the front of the machine, allowing the user to better optimize extraction time. The Cronometro R and Cronometro V machines come with a shot

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timer as a standard feature.

The Terrazo Serveware Collection by LC Studio makes entertaining effortless all while creating a

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KITCHEN & BATH ISSUE


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EASY FRY The Trudeau Heroic frying pan has a high level of durability and is twice as hard as stainless steel. It features Resistech™ technology and an induction base, hard-wearing three-ply nonstick coating that provides quick and easy cooking, long-lasting food release, and easy clean-up.  Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

WINDOW WISDOM The Design Studio family includes four styles: side panels, drapery, and roller or Roman shades. With an exclusive fabric collection, Design Studio products are created to coordinate and layer with Hunter Douglas window treatments. Signature fabrics range from silk blends and sheers to velvets and jacquards. Layer and mix fabric patterns and textures to create a captivating

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complete the look.

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KITCHEN & BATH ISSUE


INTERIOR | EXTERIOR | KITCHENS | BATHROOMS | FULL HOME ARCHITECTURE | DESIGN


DESIGN

BURNISHED

BRONZE Metallic touches bestow a glow on this expanded kitchen in Toronto’s Sherwood Park neighbourhood BY WENDY HELFENBAUM PHOTOGRAPHY: VALERIE WILCOX STYLING: DVIRA OVADIA

WHILE RENOVATING her client’s home, Toronto designer Dvira Ovadia carried the airy, elegant vibe the homeowners were after into each space. For the open-concept kitchen, a new addition provided plenty of extra square footage within which to create a large 18-by15-foot area ideal for cooking and hosting family and friends. “This is the second home we’ve done together in the past six years, and she was inspired by my renovated home,” says Ovadia, who is principal designer at Dvira Interiors in Toronto. “This kitchen straddles part of the old house and part of the new, and the beauty about her addition is that because the home sits on a pie-shaped lot, we were able to go out pretty far and also on an angle, which made for some really large, open spaces. They love making meals with their extended family, so they wanted a very large space that allows many people to work around the island at the same time.” –>

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DESIGN • HOME IN CANADA • KITCHEN & BATH 2020

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KITCHEN & BATH

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DESIGN

To maximize every inch in the corner, Ovadia designed open shelving over an appliance garage. The tall cabinet is extra-deep and is perfect for storing large platters and serving bowls. Quartz countertops: Quartex Surfaces.

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KITCHEN & BATH

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DESIGN • HOME IN CANADA • KITCHEN & BATH 2020

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In addition to the request for lots of storage, the homeowner wanted plenty of natural light to flood the space, adds Ovadia. “The window above the main sink was the main source of the symmetry for this whole kitchen,” she says. White oak engineered wood flooring runs throughout the main living space, warming up the custom wood cabinetry. The perimeter was painted a soft off-white, while the island and the framing on two cabinets flanking the window are dark charcoal with a navy undertone. Classic marbled white quartz countertops provide a refined texture. “When a client wants a white kitchen, I like to take it to the next level,” says Ovadia. “A white kitchen is going to be timeless, but I like layering in additional details to make that kitchen stand out.” –>

As counter-depth refrigerators remain popular, a secondary bar fridge is really practical for large families. “That entire corner works as their coffee and beverage station. Above the counter-depth fridge, the cabinet doors slide back in, and that’s where they keep everything they need for tea and coffee,” says Ovadia.

The oversized brass-trimmed island features turned legs and storage on both sides. The cabinets flanking the triple window have decorative agate knobs.

KITCHEN & BATH

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DESIGN

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The brass and leather bar stools give the room an industrial edge. “It almost feels like a contemporary French bistro, combined with a fresh white palette,� says designer Dvira Ovadia. Stools: 1940 vintage leather Toledo bar chairs from Restoration Hardware; backsplash: bronze subway tile from Surfaces & Co.

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DESIGN • HOME IN CANADA • KITCHEN & BATH 2020

athomeincanada.ca

Flanked by two glass cabinets, the custom range hood takes centre stage with its gleaming brass trim, balancing the metallic bronze backsplash underneath and uplifting the white-on-white kitchen to a sleek space. Range: Monogram.

To add in some sparkle, Ovadia proposed a shimmery bronze subway tile for the backsplash; its look changes depending on the light and angle. “Backsplashes tend to be pretty predictable, but I love to explore different materials,” says Ovadia. “In my home, I did a smoked mirror tile that the homeowner loved, and she was willing to step outside the box with this look. It’s easy to clean and gives you a really nice reflection in the background. She really loves it.” Another commanding feature took shape when the homeowner chose to incorporate satin brass and bronze elements into the kitchen, including hardware and trim on the island. The slightly curved range hood was treated to the same metallic highlights, transforming it into a dramatic focal point. “The hood became a statement piece; it still feels very contemporary, but it also has classic styling,” says Ovadia, who adds that there are many ways to boost the appeal of a standard white kitchen. “I love adding materials or finishes that are a little bit unexpected, whether we’re framing a cabinet, adding brass details, interesting hardware or sourcing a really unique backsplash,” she says.

KITCHEN & BATH

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GENDRON C

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DESIGN

AWKWARD

NO MORE

A Toronto designer beautifies architectural elements that her clients initially view as undesirable BY KAREN SEIDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: LAUREN MILLER STYLING: ALANA FLETCHER AND LUCAS ALVES

FOR AN INTERIOR DESIGNER, turning an awkward or cumbersome feature in a house into a highlight that becomes a defining element is a huge achievement. And that is exactly what Toronto designer Alana Fletcher pulled off in one of her recent projects. The house – in the Yonge Street and Eglinton Avenue district – is a typical three-storey home, built around 1970. It was well laid out except for the top floor, according to Fletcher, who runs the eponymously named Alana Fletcher Interiors design company. “The third floor had a lot of quirky elements which made it hard to enjoy,” Fletcher says. The stairs came up into the bathroom at the rear, which prevented the building of a deck out there. And there was a huge circular window in the bathroom and three triangular windows at the front that were, well, “awkward,” she adds. –>

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DESIGN • HOME IN CANADA • KITCHEN & BATH 2020

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DESIGN

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The couple living there with their two young children, who wanted to convert the third level into a master retreat, didn’t want to keep those features, which they considered undesirable. Fletcher saw it differently. “I saw the triangular windows as a chance to embrace the architecture,” she explains. “They are really such a great, defining feature. I’m just thrilled we were able to retain that element and highlight it.” Indeed, those windows – now accentuated by moldings made of walnut, a wood that is used throughout the third-floor space – truly seem to be the focal point of the master bathroom, bedroom and office, which are connected by sliding doors that can all open to create one enormous, bright and functional space. And Fletcher circumvented any issue with fitting blinds by using Loewen windows for the bathroom, which not only block out the sun but also prevent people from seeing in. Designer Alana Fletcher seized an opportunity to “embrace the architecture” when she saw the triangular windows the owners considered “awkward.” The window seat created a cozy space, and favourite reading spot, with functional space for a hamper and storage below.

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DESIGN • HOME IN CANADA • KITCHEN & BATH 2020

Installing a window seat further proved that the windows were a design element to embrace. Fletcher says the seat is now a favourite reading spot for the couple and their children. The husband wanted a modern, clean look while the wife favoured mid-century. “I kind of married the two,” says Fletcher, who used crisp lines with warm touches to keep them both happy. A navy wall behind the bed, accented by pretty linen window shades that resemble watercolours, adds another layer of warmth to the space to offset the white walls and cabinets. One disappointment for the couple was that Fletcher couldn’t fit a walk-in closet into her plan. But it worked out as she incorporated a wall of custom built-ins into the master bedroom, and the couple has ample storage for clothing, bedding and office supplies. –>

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The bedroom floors are oak, custom stained by Lovewood, a hardwood flooring company in Toronto. The wood helps to marry the contemporary elements with the traditional look the homeowners wanted. Custom cabinets and builtins: Nick Day Design.

KITCHEN & BATH

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The navy accent wall brings both colour and warmth to the master bedroom, and provides a dramatic backdrop for the unique custom shades, made of a linen-like fabric from Tonic Living in Toronto. Tone-on-tone bedding: CB2.

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The walnut desks in the his-and-her office were important features of the third-level retreat for the couple, who wanted a bright space that would be conducive to both relaxing and working. “The place is filled with incredible light,” says Fletcher.

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It was important to the homeowners to have an office with a desk for each of them; Fletcher not only accommodated their request but created a gorgeous office space with walnut desks and cubbies. And the office is right off the deck, which gives the space a

feeling of serenity and being in the trees. “What I strove to give them was a livable space that gives them longevity,” says Fletcher. “It is a solutions-based design with the goal of having everything at their fingertips.”

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HAPPY HOUR

AT HOME Canadians are attending classes that teach them how to mix their own cocktails

BY JULIE GEDEON

COCKTAILS. The mere word denotes the sophistication of any occasion – be it a date night, family celebration, or corporate affair. Cocktail bars have been popping up across the country as more people opt to sip and savour a special drink. Some of these bars, as well as culinary schools, are offering classes so that folks can learn the classics, adding their own twists at home. –>

Photo courtesy of Ateliers et Saveurs

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At Famous Last Words in Toronto’s Junction district, classes are inspired by popular novels. “We started out with James Bond’s drinking habits,” recalls Marlene Thorne, the bar’s founder. Debate continues regarding 007’s preference for martinis “shaken, but not stirred” as the line first appears in Ian Fleming’s 1956 Diamonds Are Forever, and uttered simply as “shaken, not stirred” by Sean Connery six years later in Dr. No. “One theory is that shaken ice would melt and dilute the alcohol faster, so Bond could keep his wits about him,” Thorne says. “But it could also be that he was just asserting his dominance by ordering an incorrect cocktail.” The class begins with champagne cocktails typical of Bond’s high-flying circles, followed by the Negroni (gin, Campari, vermouth, orange peel) mentioned in Fleming’s short story Risico, and the Vesper martini (Gordon’s gin, vodka, Kina Lillet, lemon peel) that Fleming created for Bond to name after his female cohort in Casino Royale.

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Photos courtesy of Famous Last Words


LIFESTYLE • HOME IN CANADA • KITCHEN & BATH 2020

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Photos courtesy of Famous Last Words

Another popular class is the Roaring Twenties, which draws inspiration from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Daisy Buchanan’s Kentucky roots are honoured with a mint julep. Homage is paid to the pre-Prohibition days with a Bronx (martini, orange juice) that most historians agree was first served at the Waldorf Astoria in 1906. The Between the Sheets (rum, brandy, Triple Sec, lemon additions) is believed to have originated at Harry’s New York Bar in Paris. Famous Last Words has other classes inspired by Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (popular for bachelorette parties), and seasonally appropriate beverages stirred up by Charles Dickens in Great Expectations. The Game of Thrones class invents drinks based on the provisions that George R.R. Martin made available to the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros. The Cinnamon Wind ship delivered black strap rum, apple bitters, and lemons. “We use Curaçao rather than Cointreau in a jasmine cocktail to create A Shake of the Evening, whose blue matches the eyes of the White Walkers,” Thorne says. –>

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Photos courtesy of Ateliers et Saveurs

Happy hour classes at the Ateliers & Saveurs institutes in Old Montreal and Quebec City are contributing to an appreciation for cocktails among Quebecers. “In the past, Québécois found them either too strong or too sugary,” says mixologist Fanny Gauthier. “I like to think we’ve democratized cocktails by evolving the tastes.” Gauthier and her team make it easy to duplicate results by featuring only ingredients readily available at liquor outlets and local grocers. “We also remind people to look in their fridge or pantry for juices, fruit and spices,” she adds. “And we teach simple tricks, such as making simple syrup with equal parts sugar and water.” Classes embrace lighter ingredients come spring. “Strawberries go well with basil, lemon or vanilla ice cream,” Fanny Gauthier says. “We also like to work with spring florals such as the St-Germain elderf lower liquor that’s popular with gin.”

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Photos courtesy of Ateliers et Saveurs

Spritzers are popular year-round, with a splash of Prosecco or Compari added to soda water and, of course, gin. “There’s so much you can do to further refine the already wide range of gin, adding a lemony twist, apricots and orange slices, or white cranberry juice,” she says. Achieving balance among sweet (perhaps by adding maple syrup, or jam), the sour (lemons, limes, grapefruit, or Cointreau) and strength (the alcohol), is paramount. Otherwise, possibilities are endless. “That’s why our sangria classes sell out in no time,” Gauthier says. Convenience is key, which is why Amanda Chen, the founder of Salty Paloma, launched classes at Pray Tell bar on Toronto’s College Street to give people a first-hand experience of trying her products. “We show people how to put our all-natural flavoured salts and sugars to best use,” says Chen, who crafted the products because she couldn’t find high-quality flavoured salts to make margaritas at home. –>

Photo courtesy of Salty Paloma

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Photos courtesy of Salty Paloma

Tourists and locals flock to classes held during the bar’s closed hours and often stay for more cocktails once the bar opens. “With a focus on all-natural ingredients, our seasonal menu is planned like a three-course meal, beginning with a herbaceous cocktail, like a Pisco sour with dragon fruit, to a fruity margarita and we finish off with an espresso martini,” Chen says. “We explain all the tools, and what you can get away with not owning.”

In Montreal, Edwin Knight-Vallée is among the instructors at the Institut de tourisme et d’hôtellerie du Québec (ITHQ) that holds workshops at various locations. “The goal is to make it easy for Monsieur ou Madame Tout-le-Monde to enjoy cocktails,” he says. “If there’s overripe fruit in the fridge or a shrivelled piece of ginger, you can use it to make a good drink.”

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The workshops begin with some history. “We talk about Jerry Thomas, who was the first to write down recipes,” Knight-Vallée says, referencing the author of The Bartender’s Guide, published in 1862. “We discuss the good and bad sides of this bartending icon.”


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Photos courtesy of ITHQ

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Everyone gathers around a main bar to see how the ingredients and tools are used. “A three-piece cobbler is the hardest shaker to open so people tend to hit it on the side of a counter, which just makes it harder to open the next time,” Knight-Vallée says. “It’s much simpler to use a two-piece Boston tin instead.” After each demonstration, everyone heads to individual stations to recreate the cocktail. “We guide everyone on how to adjust each beverage to taste,” he adds. If someone finds a margarita too acidic, for instance, its sugar content can be enhanced with agave nectar. “Most of the time, if someone doesn’t like a drink, it’s because it’s not sweet enough,” Knight-Vallée says. Lightening up on the booze is a growing trend. “Responsible consumption has become a part of our social values,” he says. Taking liberties with libations is a fun way to give a nod to the classics. Cheers!

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MID-CENTURY MODERNIZATION A 1963 home in British Columbia is updated with respect for its origins BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: JODY BECK STYLING: CAREY SALVADOR

MID-CENTURY MODERN architecture is having a moment, and this home in Saanich, B.C., shows that thoughtful updates can respect the aesthetic without slavishly copying it. They also ensure that the design suits the way we live now. Designer Bryn Milward, one of the two principals of design firm Ivyhouse, recalls her first walk-through of the structure: “The house was built in 1963, and I don’t think it had been updated since it was built, [but it] was a really interesting U-shape with a central courtyard on a beautiful property,” she says. “The house has such interesting architecture, with vaulted ceiling and beams running throughout. I saw why the homeowners fell in love with it.” The bones were good, but the trappings cried out for rejuvenation. The kitchen and bathrooms were particularly dated. “It was a true ’60s kitchen,” says Milward. “It had dark wood panelling on the walls and matching cabinetry, and yellow laminate countertops.” There was a range installed diagonally in one corner, with an odd-shaped angular island eating up space in the middle of the room. –>

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Homeowners Carey and Erv Salvador were heavily involved in the reno from the beginning; in fact, they and their pre-teen daughter lived on-site in an Airstream trailer while planning and work were under way. Erv, a restaurateur with business in Vancouver, acted as the contractor, and Carey, owner of Pigeonhole Home Store, was responsible for decor. Working with her clients was a pleasure for Milward. “They had a clear idea of what they were looking for, but they were also really open and gave me creative control so I felt trusted and was able to explore some really interesting design plans for them,” she says. Milward made two major changes in the home’s floor plan. The kitchen is in the base of the U, and there was a dining room on one side of it, anchoring the wing that contained the living room and master bedroom. On the other side of the kitchen was a secondary bedroom, anchoring the other wing. Milward switched the location of the living and dining rooms, and demolished several of the kitchen walls so that it is now open to the living room and the main entrance. The homeowners decided to transform the nondescript secondary bedroom with its stunning views of the nearly-two-acre property, into their master suite. Its layout was changed, creating better closet access. With the rooms relocated, anyone can prepare food in the kitchen while being able to talk with family and visitors in the living room. –>

(Right) Benny the dog relaxes in the kitchen, with its Bertazzoni professional appliances picked out by homeowner Erv. Plumbing fixtures are from the goldtoned Brizo Litze line, and the brass Athena wall sconces with unglazed clay shades are from Cedar & Moss. Several walls of the old kitchen were demolished to open it to the relocated living room. This also made way for a larger, rectangular island while leaving ample room for circulation.

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The main bathroom continues the bright and airy aesthetic of the kitchen, including Athena sconces from Cedar & Moss and Litze plumbing fixtures by Brizo. In the shower, the Country Series tiles from Euro Ceramic Tile are stacked for a contemporary look.

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For a clean look in the kitchen, Milward removed all the upper cabinets, “which can be challenging for a lot of clients because it removes quite a bit of storage,” she says. “The homeowners really preferred the look aesthetically, and I think that design decision paid off.” Her “most trusted millworker,” Dave Sheridan at Splinters Millworks, built all the solid-maple face-frame cabinetry according to her plans. It involved a high level of cabinet-making, with dovetail joints and undermounted drawers with soft-close full-extension glides. Door and drawer fronts are slab white oak; they feature recessed pulls inspired by those in the original kitchen. The

contemporary-looking thin (two centimetres) countertops are Carrara marble. Milward used the same white-oak slabframed cabinetry throughout the house in the main bathroom, ensuite bathroom, laundry closet and hallway. The main bathroom was transformed from a rather cramped and bland space into a spacious-feeling and soothing room. The home’s over-all aesthetic is bright and airy. “I love the lines of the home and the light that comes in,” Milward says. “It feels clean, fresh, modern, open, and you feel like you’re in nature with the amazing views of the property.”

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FROM CONCRETE TO COZY The shell of a small Toronto condo is transformed into an elegant hotel-like suite that’s perfect for entertaining BY JULIE GEDEON PHOTOGRAPHY: ERIK ROTTER STYLING: SVETLANA TRYASKINA

MAKING THE MOST OF A SMALL SPACE is a big part of any designer’s challenge, but Svetlana Tryaskina was put to the test with a couple’s 1,000-square-foot condo. “The design had to maximize functionality with the grandeur of a luxury hotel,” says the principal designer at Estee Design, whose project is a finalist for the 2020 National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) Design Awards. Isabella Pearson and Stuart Kirkpatrick had bought the condo in Toronto’s downtown entertainment district for their retirement. They rented it out while they were in Bermuda but weren’t pleased when they returned two years ago to what they perceived as its dysfunctional drabness. –>

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The designer took advantage of the condo’s high ceilings to build a buffet, study area, and loads of cupboard space. The pendant fixtures resemble global lighting from a side glance but are sleek when viewed directly. Cantina LED 1 light pendant: Sonneman.

“Builders sell units as ‘industrial’ but they’re grey concrete shells you have to transform from student housing into a beautiful, functional home,” Isabella says. Avid home cooks, Isabella and Stuart hired Tryaskina after they’d set their hearts on purchasing high-end Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances. “I helped them with the proper size and model selections to accommodate the layout and the style of the design,” Tryaskina recalls.

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Even so, the designer had to expand the kitchen by narrowing the doorway to the guest accommodations. “The bathroom used to open to the kitchen, which just wasn’t acceptable,” she says. “Now the guest bedroom and bathroom are a private suite.” Proper overhead lighting in the new drop and perimeter ceilings eliminates the need for lamps. “I repeated the disc pendant lighting over the peninsula to make a statement without overwhelming the space,” Tryaskina adds.

“In a small area, just a few different textures and shading work to create interest.” She selected unfinished flat-cut veneer of American walnut for all the customized millwork. They capitalized on the ceiling height to accommodate cabinets, shelving and a built-in buffet. “The buffet not only displays our china but stores the tomatoes, peaches and corn that I preserve,” Isabella says. “Svetlana replaced the useless original island with a peninsula where we can seat all our guests so that we don’t need a separate table.” –>

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The homeowners dine at the solid walnut block, which has curved edges for comfort. Always placing functionality at par with aesthetics, Tryaskina chose a high-end porcelain slab that resembles marble as a countertop surface when she learned that Stuart likes to mix his own spices. “I didn’t want the couple to have to deal with turmeric or paprika stains,” she says. Moving the plumbing to the peninsula allows the couple to interact with each other, their guests, the skyline, or television while they’re at the sink. Several ocean-blue touches remind them of Bermuda. The handcrafted backsplash tiles are the kitchen’s jewel with their watery iridescence. “They’re a splurge, but worth it to make this compact area special,” Tryaskina says. “In a small area, just a few different textures and shading work to create interest.”

The homeowners gladly eliminated their kitchen/dining table in favour of a peninsula that can seat a group on comfortable stools, imported from Italy. The blue cushions and backsplash tiles remind the couple of their other favourite place: Bermuda. Tiles: Waterworks; faucet: Brizo.

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By pushing out the peninsula, the designer created ample space for steam and convection ovens, as well as for the couple to be able to cook together and entertain from behind the counter. Steam oven, convection oven and gas cooktop: Wolf; refrigerator: Sub-Zero.

The high-end faux-leather counter stools have a metal base that go with other black grounding elements. Liquid metal spray provided an antique brass finish to the hood and peninsula. “It’s a lighter alternative that’s easier to maintain,” Tryaskina says. Panelling extends into the living area for a library desk that makes Stuart feel at home, and the master suite “disappears” with the simple closing of a secret door. The couple now adore the condo. “Svetlana’s design has improved our quality of life, no question,” Isabella says.

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We’ve all asked that question before at some point when walking by a street kid. Why can’t they just get off the street? Why can’t they grow up and take some responsibility by going to school and getting a job? Well, imagine being that street kid for a second. Getting a life is not a simple snap of the fingers. It isn’t easy to just get a job or an education. And they can’t always just go home. For street kids, every day is survival. Their life is based on simply getting through it. Finding food and shelter is their job, and even overcoming that doesn’t put them in any kind of position to find stability in their lives. Getting off the street is just the beginning. So let’s start from the beginning. We’ll call this kid Steve. Steve’s day starts at sunrise in a public park. The sun hits him dead in the eye and he wakes up shivering. Steve springs up from the bench that he slept on to make sure his stuff is still under it. It’s almost nothing, a backpack with a couple of sweaters and a thermos in it, but two nights ago he almost got beat up for it. He was walking through a different park across town when three guys sitting on a bench asked him if he had a cigarette. Steve ignored them and kept walking, but he knew they weren’t through with him yet. After verbally harassing him, they stood up and moved to surround Steve. He began to shake with fear. Steve told them again that he didn’t have anything, but they didn’t care anymore. They weren’t going to leave without something. They began to step closer to Steve. And closer. One pulled out a knife from his back pocket. Just as another guy tried to grab Steve’s backpack, Steve darted through an opening just out of their reach. They chased him for a few steps, but Steve was already far away, his backpack still in his possession. This morning, Steve’s exhausted and he needs to get out of the wind. He picks up his backpack and spends the next two hours looking for an alleyway. Hopefully he can find one that’s quiet, and, if possible, has boxes or newspapers that he can use to protect himself from the biting chill. Steve scours the alleyways in his area and finally settles on one. It seems perfect and he can’t remember why he doesn’t sleep there more often. He finds a spot, puts his head down and begins to doze off. The sounds of the city fade. He falls asleep. He dreams. In this fleeting moment, everything is OK. He’s in his old home, in a warm bed, everyone’s calm and there’s breakfast waiting for him when he decides to – “Get up, kid,” says the police officer standing over Steve. Steve opens his eyes as the officer informs him that he needs to clear out immediately. Steve rubs his eyes. Now he remembers the problem with this alleyway. He stands, picks up his things and starts his day again. Steve can’t stop thinking about his dream. But that’s all it was. Nothing like his actual life at home. He can still feel the pain from his father’s fists. Hear his mother’s screams. Things had been getting worse and worse at home since his father lost his job. It all started when his father came home drunk from the bar one night. Steve remembers the red mark on his mother’s face the next morning and refusing to believe what was unfolding around him. But that refusal only made things worse, because Steve could never convince his father that he needed help. So it continued, one incident after another until one night, it wasn’t just Steve’s mother that was on the receiving end of it. It was him. His mother screamed louder when Steve was being beaten than when she was, and those are the sounds that haunt Steve every single day. The bruises are gone now, but the mental scarring never will be. Steve manages to snap back into reality, but reality isn’t any better. Steve has not only had very little sleep in the past couple days, but also very little food. He really doesn’t feel like rummaging through a garbage can this morning. That means it’s time to go onto the street and beg for change. He’ll never get used to doing this, but he’s had to learn fast. Having to decide which street corner to sit on and beg strangers for change isn’t something he ever envisioned doing. He decides on a busy corner downtown and begins the hike in that direction. He hopes that the long walk is worth the extra money he’ll receive for being in a busier area. At least it isn’t winter yet. The very thought of spending all winter on the street sends chills down Steve’s spine. He’s felt a Canadian winter before. He can’t still be out here by then…can he? When Steve finally arrives, he sits down on the street corner and takes off his toque. He eyes the people walking by and begins to beg. “Change please?” is what he usually says, but today he’s a little more desperate. He’s painfully hungry and it shows in the anguish in his voice. Steve always tries his best to not worry about what other people are thinking, but it’s hard. He can see the way they look at him. People are either scared of him, disgusted by him or they ignore him altogether. He’s not sure which one is worse, but sometimes it feels like everyone hates him for one reason or another. Today, one person in particular is very aggressive when Steve asks him for change. He tells him that he’s a loser and that he should get a job. After a few hours and thousands of passersby later, Steve has $7.24, just enough for a burger combo. After waiting for a few moments, Steve slowly picks up the change in his toque. He stares at it, scared of what he might do with it. It takes him all the strength he has to not use the money for something else. Two weeks ago, someone else on the street started giving him free “samples.” When you’re in a dark enough place, sometimes you’ll do whatever people tell you will make you feel better. It doesn’t matter who that person is. It doesn’t matter if deep down you know that what they’re offering isn’t a way out at all, but another anchor to keep you drowning. On these dark days, hope is replaced by distraction. Steve is constantly tempted to just let go and get away, but today he somehow fights that temptation off. He gets up and makes his way towards the restaurant. When he gets to the front of the line, Steve dumps the change on the counter before ordering. The annoyed cashier counts it as the people in line behind start to get restless. Steve tries to recall the last time he didn’t have to pay for something in change, but can’t. It’s always embarrassing, especially when the line is as long as this. He asks the cashier if she can unlock the bathroom for him and she hesitates. Steve is rarely allowed to use a public bathroom, even as a paying customer. But today, the cashier doesn’t want to keep the other customers waiting so she unlocks the door. Steve splashes water onto his dirty face inside the bathroom. He studies his reflection in the mirror. How long can he keep doing this for? When will this nightmare end? No kid should have to live like this. As he rinses, he begins to daydream. He thinks about the feeling of having a nice, long shower in a real bathroom. He steps out onto the cool floor and dries himself off with a soft, fresh towel. Steve is snapped out of his daydream by the sound of a knock. He opens the door to find the manager. He has to leave now. Steve puts his head down, grabs his food and heads outside. Later, with his hunger temporarily gone, Steve is back in his only home – the street. Back where he has no hope. There have been days when the shame has been too much, when Steve tried to find a way out. Steve recalls a time a few months earlier when he first started living on the street. He had woken up with a sense of hope that day he never felt before. He had slept in an abandoned warehouse another guy told him about and managed to split some breakfast with someone else staying there. That day, Steve was allowed to have something on his mind besides finding food, finding somewhere to sleep and trying not to get mugged. So, he wanted to do what so many strangers have told him to do before – get a job. Steve was walking down the street when he noticed a convenience store with a “Help Wanted” sign in front of it. Steve took a deep breath and walked into the store. He went straight to the cashier at the front and asked about the sign. But all he got back were insults. The owner told Steve that he sees him on the streets every day. He told him his clothes were a mess. That he must have been insane to think anyone would hire a stupid, lazy homeless kid. Steve slunk out and glanced back behind him at the “Help Wanted” sign. This had happened before. He didn’t understand why no one would give him a chance. He doubted himself to the point where he began to wonder if he would even be able to trust the person who did. That was the day that Steve realized that the hill he had to climb was actually a mountain. Steve hears a car’s honk that snaps him back to an all too familiar reality. He’s out of money again. He has no place to go. He feels physically and mentally beaten. And soon it will be nightfall. Soon he’ll be back at the bottom of the mountain once again. This is just a glimpse into Steve’s struggle and the struggle that so many homeless youth face. There is no living, only surviving. And when you’re trying to survive on the street, every little thing is an obstacle. Every time you beg for change, every time you go to the bathroom, every time you want to sleep, eat or drink – nothing comes easy. For many kids like Steve who want a way out, the struggle to meet basic needs is only the beginning. The coming days, weeks and months provide hurdles even harder to overcome. The physical pain may lessen in leaving the street behind but the mental anguish is constant when trying to forge a new life. Getting an education, applying for a job, admitting that you need counselling – these are hard for anyone. When you have to do all these things from scratch, the frustration can mount as fast as the confidence can fade. From learning how to stay warm in that first winter on the street, to the first day back at school, from deciding whether to steal food or pass out from hunger, to deciding where to get a shirt to wear for that first job interview, there are endless obstacles for homeless youth.

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SUPERB STYLE AND FUNCTIONALITY

Scavolini’s latest collections reflect the company’s long history of designing extraordinary kitchens and bathrooms NEXT YEAR, Scavolini will celebrate its 60th anniversary of delivering sophisticated and distinctive Italian style to the world. The Italian house of design has introduced four striking new modular collections for kitchen and bathroom, all of them boasting the cutting-edge design for which Scavolini is known. Among the latest offerings is the MIA by Carlo Cracco kitchen, a Scavolini collaboration with Carlo Cracco, a big name in Italian cuisine, and the chef and proprietor of the acclaimed eponymous fine dining restaurant

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in Milan. The MIA kitchen is a new interpretation and domestication of the professional kitchen. Distinguishing features include a 10-inch metal recessed handle grip conveniently positioned horizontally along the top of the base units and vertically on the sides of the collection’s tall units. The collection includes a newly created Line System: a wall panelling system embellished with dedicated accessories, such as wall-mounted bottle racks and matching hooks, shelves and racks to keep herbs, spices and kitchen tools at one’s fingertips.


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Also bringing Scavolini into its seventh decade is the DeLinea kitchen line, a sophisticated collection that makes a lifestyle statement with its contemporary modularity and trendy materials. Designed by Vuesse, Scavolini’s own research and development department, DeLinea’s extensive variety of modular units offers numerous composition options, from islands to corner or peninsula configurations, all in the latest engineered materials and finishes. It includes thin metal shelves, available in brass, steel and bronze that can be teamed with cables in matching or alternating finishes. Decorative melamine, glossy and matte lacquered finishes, and laminates are also now available with a new stone effect that adds interesting nuance to the finish. The collection’s base units are two-and-a-half-feet high with three-inch-high plinths or kickboards, enhancing user-friendliness without sacrificing style. –>

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For the bathroom, Scavolini has created Juno, a new collection that stands out for its strikingly simple silhouettes, clear geometric lines, and minimal styling. A game of volumes and perfect functionality make it a natural when it comes to harmonizing with adjoining living space. The range comes with a new system of mirrors and Magneto accessories – soap dishes, tumbler holders, towel racks and open-fronted shelves – that allow users to freely position accessories across the surface of the mirrored panels. An extensive choice of lacquered finishes – glossy or matte – and decorative melamine in various colours make it easy to customize a bathroom. The Juno system can also be incorporated with the company’s existing Fluida wall system to expand bathroom storage.

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Finally, Scavolini’s new Tratto bathroom line, also designed in-house, is a sophisticated offering with a strong scenic presence. Perfect for master ensuites and smaller utility bathrooms, this line plays a skillful game with colours and textures, recessed grip and handle profiles, and brass, bronze and silver

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finishes. Like other Scavolini lines, Tratto also offers the company’s trademark Line System: a modular structure made of wall panels and alternative profiles onto which metal objects can be attached, including storage bowls, shelves, open-fronted elements and hooks. Space-savers all of them.

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A RESPECTFUL REMODELLING A Halifax bathroom gets a makeover to better serve a family of four BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: MATTHEW MCMULLEN STYLING: CHARLOTTE SKIBA

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THE 75-YEAR-OLD HOME that Julie Tompa Wolthausen and her husband Dan bought in west-end Halifax has needed a lot of love, attention and remodelling over the years. It had been renovated by its previous owner for quick resale in what Julie calls “a cheap flip job.” The main bathroom was showing its age and was too small and cramped for the family of four. “We wanted it to be modern but to fit with the age of the house,” Julie says. “I wanted it light and bright.” Because of its location, tucked into a corner of the front of the house, there was no easy way to increase its size. But they could go up, so they removed the cracked ceiling to get extra height and added decorative wood beams and a skylight. To create more space, interior designer Charlotte Skiba removed the small stand-alone shower, substituting a bath/shower combo. To solve the room’s other main problem, a lack of storage, she replaced the pedestal sink with a large vanity, and added shelving and a cabinet in a nook between the new tub and the wall. –>

Though the dimensions of the room could not be increased, the ceiling was removed, allowing the homeowners to install skylights that made the room brighter and more open. Eliminating the separate shower also freed up floor space.

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Before the remodel, the family of four kept most of their bathroom supplies in the hall, so designer Charlotte Skiba replaced their old pedestal sink with a large, custom-built vanity and created shelf space in the nook between the tub and the wall.

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The owners wanted a classic look in the bathroom that would fit in with the style of the 75-year-old home, so they chose subway tiles and hexagonal three-inch Carrara marble tiles for the floor, and a smaller version for the shower nooks. Shower head and other plumbing fixtures: Home Depot; marble tiles: Saltillo Tiles.

“The rest of the home has a classic look, so we went with subway tiles and classic marble,” says Skiba, owner and principal of Charlotte Interiors. She used a three-inch hexagonal Carrara marble tile for the floor, and a smaller, one-inch version for the nooks inset into the shower. To keep it contemporary, she chose accents in mixed metals: gold colour on the mirror frame and vanity pulls, and chrome on the faucets and on both the hanging, sputnik-style light fixture and the wall sconces. “It gives more of a lived-in, comfortable, casual feel than the traditional use of one finish,” Skiba says. “It gives a bit of interest to the space.”

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To add a contemporary touch, Skiba chose modern lighting fixtures: a sputnik-style chandelier and wall sconces; both are from Wayfair.

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Julie says they considered, albeit briefly, more contemporary looks, including some high-pattern floor tiles. “But we felt that in five years it would look very 2019,” she says, “So we stuck with the classic marble tile. Charlotte indulged our desire to explore options, but we came back close to what she originally proposed.” The new space functions beautifully for the family, Julie says, so much so that they’ve put another renovation plan on hold. They had wanted to add a shower to the partial bathroom in their attic master suite, but no more. “After this, we don’t feel like we need another one upstairs,” she says. “It’s so nice, that we didn’t want to leave it just to the kids.”

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SWING BY FOR DINNER A couple integrate playful design elements into their home, including a playground swing

BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY AND STYLING: AZEN AND KEVIN BONGARD

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AT FIRST GLANCE, the kitchen in the home of designers Azen and Kevin Bongard in Toronto’s Beaches neighbourhood looks lovely but fairly typical. It has a cooking zone, an island with counter seating, a dining table …. and then you notice it: the macrame rope and wooden swing that makes up one seat at their table. “We like trying fun, new things,” says Azen, the lead designer for Studio 8 Design. “We wondered, ‘Is anybody going to use it?’ But that’s the seat everybody fights over.” “The kids will come sit on the swing and talk to us while we’re cooking,” says Kevin, the firm’s principal. “If we just had a dining chair there, nobody would sit there. The swing becomes a destination.”

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It can be a good option for children who have a hard time sitting still, Azen says. “It’s not like we’re giving big pushes on it, but it’s amazing what a wonderful feeling it is; almost calming.” Their home serves as both a design incubator and showroom for their firm, and the swing definitely gets noticed. Azen says they happened to find it through one of their regular suppliers, thought it might be cool, and ordered three different types. A larger rope swing and a chair model found their way to upstairs bedrooms, and the playground model ended up in their kitchen.

Designers Azen and Kevin Bongard opted for Scavolini cabinets, with features such as built-in cutouts for cooking accessories and lighting that snaps on when the doors and drawers are opened. The heated, white oak floors by Grebian Flooring Solutions have a natural oiled finish. Swing, table, chairs and accessories are from Studio 8 Design.


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The swing, like finding the home itself, was serendipity. The couple had been house hunting in the neighbourhood for years until one day they spotted a home under construction not 50 steps from where they had parked. The outside shell was built but none of the interior finishes were in yet. Given their design background, this meant they could make it anything and everything they wanted it to be. “We love modern design but like things that are more natural,” Azen says. “Modern can feel cold, and we wanted it to make us feel relaxed and comfortable.” –>

The double-height ceiling over the island that opens to the second floor draws the eye upward. The homeowners bought light fixtures individually from Hollis + Morris, and used 3D software to carefully calculate their placement to get the look they wanted from every angle.

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The vanity’s countertop is a single piece that slopes into the sink. The Caesarstone bench in the shower is mounted into the wall. Brizo faucets: Taps.

For their cabinetry, they chose Scavolini both for the look, and also for what Azen calls “next level features.” Those include such things as custom cutouts in the drawers for cooking utensils as well as integrated lighting that goes on as the drawers are opened. The glossy white and wood-tone cabinets have integrated handles and are accented by a strip of black metal both under the countertops and above the floor.

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The sloping roofline on the third floor left the owners with little ceiling height in part of the master ensuite bathroom, and made it the perfect place to fit the quartz soaker tub. The porcelain floor from Stone Tile mimics the oak floors in the rest of the house.

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Upstairs in the master ensuite bathroom, they again chose Scavolini cabinetry for the vanity, along with a countertop that slopes down into the sink, all in one piece for easy cleaning. “We wanted that exact vanity,” Azen says, “so we needed to make the finishes work around it.” But the main feature of the room is the quartz soaker tub. “We fell in love with that tub when we saw it,” Kevin says. “The contractor didn’t realize how heavy it was.” After trying to figure out how many people it

might take to carry it upstairs and how much damage they might do with it along the way, they got a crane to take it to the third-floor deck and carried it inside from there. There’s also an extra-large shower – 42 inches by six feet 10 inches – with enough room for a Caesarstone bench that’s mounted into the wall. “More and more people want elements that aren’t just nice to look at, but functional as well,” Azen says. “It’s nice when you have a shower big enough that that area is not getting splashed all the time.”

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LIKE STONE, BUT MORE PRACTICAL Porcelain’s popularity has been increasing because of its durability, affordability and beauty

WHEN IT COMES TO COUNTERTOPS, there’s nothing like stone. Or is there? There’s a good chance the marble-like slab you’re considering for your kitchen right now might just be porcelain. Already known as a durable material for floor and wall tiles, porcelain is being manufactured now in much larger, thicker slab sizes, making it a popular choice for everything from walls in bathrooms and showers to kitchen backsplashes and countertops. “Porcelain is great because it doesn’t absorb water, it’s scratch-resistant and it’s heat-resistant because it’s fired at 1,200 degrees Celsius,” says Kristina Panzera, vice-president marketing for Ciot Inc., a company that has seen its sales of porcelain slabs explode since they were introduced a few years ago. “All these characteristics make it great for countertops, floors, walls, exterior walls. The biggest trend we’ve seen this year is in fireplaces.” Known for its durability in small tile sizes, fired porcelain is stronger than fired ceramic. Its chemical makeup is different, it has a lower water content, and it’s fired at higher temperatures. Once cooled, the molecules in porcelain are fused more closely, giving it its strength. With technological advances, including larger, heavier presses, that same durability is now available in larger sizes. When the slabs first came on the market, they were available only in six-millimetre thickness, but

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now they are being manufactured in thicker 12-millimetre slabs, too, making it easier to use for counter tops. Technology has also expanded the range of available patterns and styles, from metallic finishes to the more traditional look of expensive marbles, such as Calacatta. Three-dimensional printing techniques give it great depth, Panzera says, and will continue to expand the range of patterns available. The price can

be lower than similar marbles, she adds, with polished finishes more expensive than natural finishes. Panzera says porcelain is a popular choice for use in showers, “You can have one full piece with no joints. It’s a very clean, modern look,” she says, adding that it is also being used now in furniture, for tabletops, and even door inserts. “It’s much lighter than stone or granite,” she says, making it easier to handle and install.


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The best slabs, Panzera says, are those from Italy. There are other plants in various countries that produce cheaper slabs, but, she says, “the quality is not as reliable. If it’s not fired to 1,200 degrees C, it’s much more brittle and liable to break.” Panzera says she expects the surge in sales that she’s seen in the past few years to continue. “There are more and more colours coming on the market,” she says. That’s good news for homeowners who love the look of natural stone but want fussfree and strong surfaces.

Ciot www.ciot.com

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HARMONY THROUGH HOLISTIC DESI GN Consistent materials and palette are used to unify the design of the kitchen and bathrooms in this home BY SUSAN KELLY PHOTOGRAPHY: KIELY RAMOS

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SEEING THINGS IN BLACK AND WHITE usually means having a stark outlook on life. But though that colour scheme informs the design of this newly built four-bedroom home in North Toronto, the result is surprisingly nuanced and inviting. “The homeowners really love the modern Scandinavian look with light white oak floors and all-white walls, so we used it as a start point,” says interior designer Alana Firestone, co-owner of Collective Studio, the firm charged with the home’s interior design. “But they also wanted some industrial edge.” The overall look gives a nod to Mid-century Modern design as well. It’s somewhat ironic in that the owners razed a 1,000-squarefoot 1950s red brick bungalow to make room for the current home. The postwar house radiated charm, but had only one-and-a-half bathrooms and no tub for the couple’s two sons, now toddlers. The new home has more than triple the square footage, and the layout includes six bathrooms. –>


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The new home provided a blank canvas to create a look very much their own. “They’re a couple who love design and functionality, and wanted their home to reflect that,” says Firestone. “At the same time, it had to work for a growing family.” Such an eclectic design requires a unifying factor. For that reason, the designers ran the same white oak hardwood flooring throughout the home, including the kitchen and powder room. As a complement, every room received judiciously placed wood accents, which suited the homeowners’ preference for natural materials.

Wood flooring and brass hardware add warmth to the blackand-white palette. Kitchen pendant lights: Union Lighting; black matte faucets: Brizo; appliances: Thermador.

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Classic white subway tiles help give the master bathroom a modern industrial look. For a touch of luxe, black marble floor tiles lie underfoot and honed white marble surrounds the tub. Nero Marquina marble floor tiles: Marble Granite Depot; Carrara marble

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In the master bathroom, for instance, the nine-foot-long vanity is made of rift-cut white oak. Beside it, an open shelving unit of the same wood extends from the tub to the ceiling. The tub is surrounded with white Carrara marble in sharp contrast to black rectangular marble floor tiles set in a herringbone pattern. “In all the bathrooms and kitchen, we played with a mix of different textures and patterns to give not only design interest but also a comfortable feel,” says Jordy Fagan, the other half of the Collective Studio design duo. Pattern runs rampant in the main floor powder room, too. All four walls are adorned with wallpaper in a repeating black-and-white leaf motif. It whimsically reflects the homeowners’ love of the outdoor life and is the perfect backdrop for the wall-to-wall black vanity crafted of natural stone. “We toyed with adding some bright colour in there,” says Fagan, “but in the end the owners liked that we were consistent with the scheme.” –>

tub surround: fabricated by Marble Trend.

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“We made design choices based on how they make us feel and suit our lifestyle, not resale value.” Clerestory windows in the breakfast area allow in natural light while keeping plenty of wall space for artwork. Round dining table: Tulip Table; oak-backed dining chairs: Versus by Article.

Black metal accents appear throughout the home as well, including on window and door frames, cabinet hardware and bathroom tiles. And sometimes, they create high drama, as in the kitchen’s imposing textured metal range hood. It boldly captures the eye, and the deep ebony colour balances the black lower cabinetry played against upper cabinets with flat doors in white lacquer. Another on-trend addition to the master bathroom, the black metal grid shower doors, serves as an emphatic focal point for the room. “My wife and I looked at thousands of home images before taking on this project,” says the homeowner. “We just loved the industrial-style loft look of the doors and knew we had to have them.”

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But the kitchen is where the couple spend most of their time. They find the layout ideal for both family meals and entertaining. An unobstructed flow from the kitchen island into the family area makes it easy to keep an eye on the children while they cook. An inviting adjacent breakfast area is flooded with light.

Consistency and comfort were important to the homeowners. The designers used the same black-and-white colour scheme from master bathroom to kitchen. Varying materials and textures give each room a distinct and inviting flair.

A butler’s pantry claims the passageway to the dining room. On one side lies a wine fridge, sink and cabinets for serving pieces, on the other a full walk-in pantry that houses small appliances, food stuffs and such. Even with two children, clutter is rarely an issue in the kitchen or anywhere else. Although the homeowner took a hand in most design decisions, he left storage planning to his wife, a professional organizer. The fact that everything has a home has made life easier for them. More important, the house feels like the “forever” home it was intended to be. “We made design choices based on how they make us feel and suit our lifestyle, not resale value,” says the homeowner. “Our designers did a great job; they really captured our personalities.”

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Having a second sink and bar area for entertaining was at the top of the homeowners’ wish list, and it’s their favourite part of the new kitchen. Hay also created a separate coffee station, with dedicated storage for their coffee pods and teas. Faucets: Moen.

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REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE, REDESIGN AND REMODEL A Toronto designer’s kitchen renovation is done with respect for the environment

BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE CHAJECKI STYLING: ANN-MARIE FAVOT

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ALONG WITH CREATING beautiful spaces for her clients, designer Rebecca Hay now tries to do something else with her remodelling projects – make them more sustainable. “It’s a new mission for my firm,” says Hay, the founder and CEO of Rebecca Hay Designs. “Our industry is wasteful; there are a lot of disposable designs out there.” Her main goal is still to make her clients’ homes beautiful and functional, but now she tries to keep the environmental impact of that in mind as she does it. During a recent kitchen renovation in East Toronto, Hay put that new motto into practice. The homeowners had seen a blue-andwhite kitchen she had designed for a previous client and wanted her to do a similar design that would work for their growing family. They had one young child, a new baby on the way, and an old kitchen in a separate addition that had been built onto their house without ever having been insulated.

To make the home more energy efficient, Hay added insulation, heated flooring and a new door to the backyard. During demolition, when the contractor removed the original cabinets, they were sent to the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, the second-hand shop affiliated with the home-building charity. It also accepts donations of used plumbing fixtures, lighting and other items. “There are lots of opportunities to send things to a new home rather than to landfill,” Hay says. With a little planning, reupholstering or refinishing, she says, furniture can often be repurposed and used in another part of the home or, if not, it can often find a home elsewhere.

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Hay also tries to source products locally whenever possible, or choose those that are made sustainably. The home’s new cabinets were custom-built with Canadian materials by nearby Enrich It Woodworks in Guelph. Instead of adding cheap plastic inserts, the cabinets were customized with built-in storage options. “This kitchen is a perfect example of thoughtful storage,” Hay says. “We always ask clients to take the time to think about how they use the kitchen. It doesn’t matter how most people use it; it matters how you will use it.”

Rebecca Hay designed the cabinets with lots of custom storage features, including racks and bins, as well as a pop-out drawer under the sink to tuck away cleaning supplies, and had them built by Enrich It Woodworks in Guelph. Handles and door pulls: Upper Canada Specialty Hardware.

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In addition to creating more counters for meal preparation, the homeowners also wanted clearly defined entertaining space: a bar area and an island. “It was tricky to figure out the plumbing,” the homeowner says, “But having a dedicated bar zone is perfect for all the entertaining we do.” The island isn’t just a place for guests to gather, it also acts as a barrier to keep them out of the cook’s way. She says they considered a variety of seating options, including bar stools and no table. “Rebecca really encouraged us to go for the table with bench seating. She was right. It’s so wonderful with small kids.”

With two small children, the banquette seating is wonderfully practical, say the homeowners. There’s storage underneath, and the seat covers can be wiped for easy clean-ups. Designer Rebecca Hay found the chairs at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore and had them reupholstered. She often shops in consignment or vintage stores and mixes old items with new.

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The clients also wanted to keep a door between the kitchen and the rest of the house, one that they could close to keep out smells. Hay replaced the old swing door with a pocket door that could be tucked away. “We really wanted to use a vintage door but they were all the wrong size,” she says. “So we got a solid door and put in a window so they could have a sightline to the other room.” For the floor, she chose large light-grey and off-white porcelain tiles, laid in a checkerboard pattern. “It’s classic bistro style,” she says, “It’s a way of giving the look of polished marble at a better price point.”

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COLOURFUL CALORIES The ancient system of Ayurveda posits that eating foods of many hues is a key to good health BY TRACEY MACKENZIE

THERE ARE MANY CRITERIA that we consider when choosing foods for their health-bestowing benefits. Are our meals organic, fat-free, high-fibre, nutritious, locally sourced? The list can get quite long. But do we consider the colours of the foods we ingest as a bridge to good health? Oh sure, chefs know that colourful foods have a visual allure on a plate that makes us want to eat. But if the ancient science of Ayurveda is to be heeded, we should eat foods that represent the colours of the rainbow … and not just for their visual appeal, but for the way the colours interact with the energies in our bodies. With its origins in India more than 5,000 years ago, Ayurveda is the oldest known system of healing. The word Ayurveda is derived from two Sanskrit words: “Ayur,” meaning “life,” and “Veda,” meaning “knowledge” or “science.” Combining the two gives us a “life science” or health system that represents both mind and body. Ayurveda’s essence is all about the connection between mind and body, and achieving physical, emotional and spiritual balance. Nutrition and exercise are key components as are meditation, yoga, daily massage and self-care. So how do we apply this age-old system to our “make every minute of every day count” modern lifestyle? In Ayurvedic practice, we “eat the rainbow,” which means consuming foods of all colours to achieve a balanced diet and, by extension, balanced health.

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According to Ayurvedic philosophy, a rainbow diet balances the chakras – those discs of swirling energy located throughout the body. The seven major chakras are located in the trunk, from the pelvic floor to the crown of the head. They are thought to rule major organs as well as emotional and spiritual states. Starting with the base chakra and moving upward, they are called the root (or muladhara in Sanskrit), sacral (svadhisthana), solar plexus (manipura), heart (anahata), throat (vishuddha), third eye (ajna), and crown (sahasrara) chakras. Each is believed to correspond to specific aspects of physical health and each is associated with a colour. The root chakra is regarded as red, while the sacral is orange, the solar plexus yellow, the heart both pink and green, the throat blue, the third eye indigo, and the crown white. Ayurvedic tenets hold that these energy centres help to keep us vibrant and in good physical condition. When one or more of them is blocked – meaning that there is either too much or too little energy in them – the chakra becomes imbalanced and a physical or emotional ailment can arise. Dr. Deepak Chopra, an Indian-born American author and Ayurvedic-medicine advocate, suggests visualizing a chakra

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as “a swirling wheel of energy where matter and consciousness meet.” When the wheels run smoothly, the body’s life force or “prana” is strong and the energy flows well. When chakras are blocked, the effect is similar to a car that has run out of gas or has a flat tire. Keeping our chakras unblocked is desirable, but the challenges of everyday life

can often stymie our plans. Maintaining a rainbow diet is a good starting point toward creating good health. Here are some foods that correspond to the chakras. Visualize these foods oiling the energy wheel as you would a car’s engine to keep it running smoothly. –>

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Root chakra: Location: Base of the spine by the tailbone. Controls: The bladder and colon. Centre of feeling safe and belonging to a community. Colour: Red Foods: Red foods, including apples, beets, pomegranates and root vegetables. Also, such high-protein foods as beans, eggs and peanut butter.

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Sacral chakra: Location: In the abdomen, below the navel. Controls: Reproductive system. Centre of creativity and sexuality. Colour: Orange Foods: Orange foods, including carrots, oranges, tangerines and papayas.

Heart chakra: Location: Centre of the chest, at the heart. Controls: Heart, lungs. Centre of love and emotions. Colour: Green, pink. Foods: Green and pink foods, including such cruciferous vegetables as broccoli, kale, cabbage, leafy greens and sprouts. Also green tea, foods rich in chlorophyll, and those that are pink (watermelon).

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Solar plexus chakra: Location: Two inches above the navel. Controls: Stomach, pancreas, small intestine, liver, and gallbladder. Centre of personal power. Colour: Yellow Foods: Yellow foods, including corn, yellow peppers, cheese, sunflower seeds, pasta and rice.

Throat chakra: Location: Throat. Controls: Neck, thyroid gland, throat, jaw, mouth, and tongue. Centre of communication and verbal expression. Colour: Aquamarine, light blue. Foods: Quench it with fruit juices, herbal teas, soups, water.


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Third eye chakra: Location: Forehead, between the eyebrows. Controls: The pituitary gland and frontal cortex of the brain. Centre of intuition. Colour: Indigo, violet. Foods: Dark blue fruits, blackberries, grape juice, blueberries, purple grapes, and other foods that are purple-red.

Crown chakra: Location: Top of the head. Controls: Life force, spiritual connection to others and the Divine. Colour: Lavender, white. Foods: Sunlight, time in nature.

A physical difficulty in any part of the body can indicate a blocked chakra. The Ayurvedic advice is to eat more of the foods that correspond to that chakra to balance it. Being in nature is also an antidote to low physical energy. Keep in mind that these food guidelines do not replace proper medical advice. If you have an illness, seek the advice of a medical practitioner. However, eating the rainbow is a first step in achieving a balanced and healthy body. And a balanced body goes a long way to keeping disease at bay.

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THE

TRIFECTA OF BATHROOM DESIGN Toronto homeowners have their home’s three bathrooms remodelled with stunning results BY BRENDA O’FARRELL PHOTOGRAPHY: VALERIE WILCOX STYLING: ALANA FIRESTONE AND JORDY FAGAN

HAVING A BATHROOM that falls out of the pages of a magazine is a dream, but having three, well, that’s the trifecta. And the bonus: the cumulative effect resets the look and feel of an entire home. If you need proof of the phenomenon, look no further than this 1990s two-storey home in the Bedford Park neighbourhood of Toronto, owned by a couple with two young children. The family had lived in the home for a few years when they decided they wanted to rid themselves of the ’90s look. They focused on the bathrooms – the main floor powder room, the children’s upstairs bathroom and the master ensuite. The crisp, modern reimagining of these spaces provided a new lens from which the whole house is viewed. “We wanted a cleaner, modern feel” is how the homeowner described the general aim of the project. The rest was left to designers Alana Firestone and Jordy Fagan, designers and co-owners of Collective Studio in Toronto. –>

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The duo assessed each room, taking size and principle users into consideration. Then, they had a meeting with the owners to thoroughly discuss all their must-haves. They covered a lot of territory, from component parts – such as baths and/or showers and single or double vanities, to colour preferences and specific likes and dislikes. Firestone and Fagan then set off to create looks for each space. “Our main objective was to keep it calm and serene,” Firestone explains, referring to the plan for the master bathroom. “We wanted her (the homeowner) to walk in and feel calm.”

The master bathroom showcases a contemporary edge, with an emphasis on “edge.” Glass surfaces are outlined with black trim, complemented by the black faucets and showerheads, all from the Jason Wu Collection by Brizo. The black-trim theme is picked up with the mirror frame, the hardware on the light grey vanity and the sconce from Union Lighting.

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Fagan describes the master bathroom as “feminine, with a modern edge.” The effect is due largely to the clean lines and the generous use of glass. The porcelain tile on the floors and walls have the distinctive look of marble without the maintenance, Firestone adds. Her favourite part of the new look is the shape of the oval tub and the black borders along all the glass edges. Firestone points to the black faucets and showerheads. “We wanted the boldness of the black,” she says. “We didn’t want chrome or brass.” The matte-finished hardware is from the Jason Wu Collection by Brizo. “I love how the tile is seamless in the bathroom and shower,” the homeowner says. “It doesn’t have that standard step.” One of the major upgrades in the space was the installation of a window in the wall above the tub, replacing the dated glass blocks that merely allowed light to penetrate. The addition then called for a treatment, which resulted in the custom-made off-white Roman shade with a black trim. Firestone cites the thermostatic on-off controls for the shower, which are set off to the side, away from the showerhead. Having the controls – in a matching matte black, which adds to the designer look, also allows the users to set the water temperature without risking getting their hair wet or being hit with water that is not the perfect temperature. –>

A new window was installed above the tub, providing extra light; it’s adorned by a custom-made Roman shade with black trim to echo the room’s style. Tub hardware: Brizo.

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In the children’s bathroom, the biggest challenge was the awkward shape of the room. “We needed to modernize it, get rid of the ’90s and square everything up,” Firestone explains. The steel-blue double vanity with its custom built-in pull-out steps to help the young boys comfortably access the sinks serves to add a unique, useful accessory. It also frees up space in the small room by preventing the need and clutter of step stools. To deal with the odd angles, the designers opted to go with a short vanity. In addition, by mounting the faucets on the wall, they were able to make it narrower, again saving precious inches. Adding to the look is the shiplap wainscotting on the walls. The porcelain floor tiles in a chevron pattern feature various shades with a cement-like finish to complete the look. “Now, it’s a very cute boys’ bathroom,” Fagan says. And there is nothing cuter than when one of the boys pulls out his step before brushing his teeth.

The steel-blue double vanity in the children’s upstairs bathroom not only has custom-built pull-out steps that eliminate the need to clutter the space with step stools, it is actually narrower than a standard installation, making the small space feel more open. There is no lack of space, though, as the faucets were set in the wall. The light fixtures from Union Lighting are given a bit of an industrial spin by fitting them with oversized bulbs, while the white shiplap wainscot completes the look.

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The main floor’s powder room is a tiny space that punches above its weight in large and small ways. The wallpaper and the brass hardware from Brizo’s Litz Collection are elegant attention-getters.

In the main-floor powder room, colour is the prominent feature. A bold wallpaper on the back surface immediately catches attention. “It makes such a statement,” says Firestone. “It feels a little ‘watercolourish.’ ” The brass-coloured hardware, including the Brizo faucets, adds an upscale distinctive look that cannot be overlooked …. because details do matter.

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Photo courtesy of Riobel

NEW DECADE, NEW TRENDS Sustainability, texture, earthy hues and metallic surfaces will define design this year and beyond BY BARBARA MILNER

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IN 2020, MOTHER NATURE will be the mother of all design trends. As sustainability becomes a key focus among architect and designers globally, kitchens and bathrooms will home in on biophilic design. This building concept increases a structure’s connectivity to the environment by, directly or indirectly, incorporating natural elements. And by consciously including Nature in our interiors, we unconsciously reconnect to Nature in our constructed environments. The fresh and forward-thinking kitchen and bathroom design schemes of 2020 will incorporate a combination of organic textures, earthy palettes and warm metallics. Sustainable surfacing materials will also emerge as attractive, healthy alternatives to traditional options for achieving this look.


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Photos courtesy of Neolith

TEXTURE TRIUMPHS In recent years we’ve seen natural elements weave their way into our living rooms and bedrooms. In 2020, kitchens and bathroom design will be heavily influenced by such organic textures as wood and natural stone. Wood cabinetry and cladding make a comeback with fresh interpretations in various design aesthetics, from transitional to modern. The wood grain itself becomes part of the look when such species as walnut or white oak are flat cut or bookmatched. The soft, Zen-like quality of wood also allows more dramatic features, such as natural stone, to stand out. In 2020, stone slabs evolve from surfacing material to works of art in both the kitchen and bathroom. With the planet top of mind, natural stone slabs will give way to more ecologically sound products such as sintered stone. Sintered stone is made of natural minerals and is manufactured in ways that mimic the natural formation of stone.

Natural minerals, including crushed stone, are subjected to high heat and pressure, resulting in a man-made stone slab that’s lightweight and durable. It is free of resins, VOCs, and other potentially harmful substances. Sintered stone products, including Neolith and Lapitec, can be difficult to distinguish from natural stone. Marble Trend, the exclusive distributor of Neolith in Canada, carries an impressive array of natural stone textures, including Bianco Carrara, Calacatta, and Estuatuario. These can be paired with Neolith’s

La Boheme, inspired by the wood trunk of Lebanese cedar, to create additional layers of organic texture in a kitchen and bathroom. Kitchen and bathroom tiles will come to life with a tactile, three-dimensional appearance. Using the centuries-old technique of relief, tiles will add drama by acting as sculptural surfaces. They will combine organic textures with geometric shapes and vice versa for a playful, modern interpretation of the natural look. –>

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D OWN-TO - E ARTH PALE T TE S AN D PIGMENTS An array of natural, eco-influenced hues will be unearthed in 2020 as muted palettes continue to gain popularity and gently permeate our interiors. Drawing inspiration from the sea, sand, forest and sky, subtle shades of terracotta, caramel, sage green, soft floral pink, blue, and burnt yellows will define the naturalist palette. This warm collection of colours will dominate kitchen and bathroom design, lending a look of health and tranquility to these utilitarian spaces. Alternative, sustainable surfacing options will also present innovative ways to introduce nature-based colour into the kitchen and bathroom. Durat Palace is made with up to 28 per cent recycled plastic from the medical and cell phone industries, and is 100 per cent recyclable. This surfacing material can be used for kitchen and bathroom sinks, bathtubs, shower bases, backsplashes, shelves, tables and benches. It comes in 12 “pure earth� colour combinations made from natural pigments that are ground by a 17th century Dutch windmill.

Photo courtesy of Durat Palace

Photo courtesy of Ceramics of Italy

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WARM METALLICS Metals with such warm undertones as brass, copper, gold and rose gold will be sought-after finishes for kitchen and bathrooms in 2020. Gunmetal will also emerge as a softer alternative to matte black. Milwaukee-based Graff has introduced a new portfolio of finishes for bath products that includes rose gold, black onyx, gunmetal, and unfinished brass. The company’s new MOD+ collection of faucets, tub fillers and shower components blend warm metals with a choice of three marble accents: green-forest marble, black-storm marble and smoky-white marble. Living finishes, such as ROHL’s unlacquered brass, will also trend in 2020. These faucets develop a patina over time; the imperfection of this natural oxidization process is the driving force behind its appeal. ROHL is also set to introduce satin English gold and rose gold as new finish options for 2020.

Photo courtesy of Graff

Photo courtesy of ROHL

Photo courtesy of ElementAL

An industrial stainless-steel sink in a copper colour will be available to complement the rose-gold faucet finish. Warm metallics will also add their soft glow to lighting and such accents as cabinet inlays and hardware. Custom fabrication opens up a wide spectrum of possibilities for the creative integration of warm metallics in the kitchen and bathroom. ElementAl heavy is a surfacing material made of up to 83 per cent recycled scrap metal from wires, tools, copper pipes and brass fixtures. The combination of these metals gives this material its authentic

shimmery, metallic quality. It can also be backlit to enhance the sparkle factor. Proving what glitters can be a golden idea, ElementAl heavy presents a fun new option for statement countertops and an unexpected way to infuse metallics into a design scheme. Columnist Barbara Milner is an interior designer and principal at South Hill Interiors, a design firm that serves the Greater Toronto Area and Kawartha Lakes region. The firm’s real estate arm offers realty services with Forest Hill Real Estate Inc.

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MAXIMIZING

A MODEST SPACE A Danforth-area kitchen is renovated to make the best use of every square foot

BY SUSAN SEMENAK PHOTOGRAPHY: ALEX LUKEY STYLING: MARGOT AUSTIN

STEPHANIE LEES HAS MADE a little kitchen do big things. There was hardly room to move when the Toronto designer first visited; the 170-square-foot room was dark, with just a small window and a wall separating it from the dining room. The owners, a couple with two young daughters, wanted to do away with layers and layers of DIY fixes to the kitchen of their 100-year-old home in Toronto’s Danforth neighbourhood. And they wanted a space that would work – really work – despite its small size. What they got is a contemporary kitchen with a bistro vibe, infused with warmth and personality and outfitted with plentiful storage space and ample work surfaces. “I am always trying to create a portrait of the people who will live in the spaces I design,” says Lees, owner and principal of Stephanie Lees Design. “These are laid-back, down-toearth people who really use their kitchen.” One of the first jobs was to take down the wall between the kitchen and dining room and to “borrow” a foot and a half from the dining room to facilitate easier movement in the space. The next priority was to maximize light by replacing a small kitchen window with French doors leading to the backyard deck. –>

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The kitchen cabinets, in an updated Shaker style, were built by Distinctive by Design. There’s a wall of floor-to ceiling cabinetry that houses pantry space, a microwave oven and wine fridge as well as dish storage.

And if the owners were going to get the ample storage they so desired, the existing entrance to the mudroom would have to be reconfigured. Once that was done, Lees found space for a whole wall lined with floor-to-ceiling cabinets to house a microwave, coffee nook, pantry and even a wine fridge, in addition

to storage space for dishes. This cabinetry in an updated Shaker style, painted a classic almost-teal blue, has become a focal point in the room. Lees left the facing wall white, clad in classic subway tiles (even the stove hood). She also had the lower cabinets painted white. –>

(Right) The floor-to-ceiling cabinetry and sides of the counter facing the dining room are painted a deep, rich blue called (confusingly) Newberry Green, a Benjamin Moore historic colour (HC158). Designer Stephanie Lees says it isn’t as dark as navy or as shocking as cobalt, which are trendy these days. “I love how nicely this historic blue plays against black and white,” she says.

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The island, crafted of reclaimed wood with powdercoated black steel details that are echoed elsewhere, was made by 1925Workbench, a custom millwork firm based in Etobicoke. The owners decided to make the island’s countertop wood, too, to add warmth and patina. Wall sconce: Schoolhouse Electric; matte black faucet: Delta Trinsic.

To the owners’ delight, the designer even managed to fit in an island to replace the moving cart they had relied on for years. “They use this island so much, for cooking prep, doing homework and looking through recipes,” she says. The kitchen’s tight dimensions don’t allow for a full-size traditional island. Instead Lees turned to 1925Workbench in Etobicoke to

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build a bespoke small island of reclaimed wood and powder-coated steel with slatted open shelving at the bottom and drawers for storing cutlery. There is even a charging station for phones and other devices. “It has a chunky, industrial feel. It is youthful and interesting, but at the same time it is not imposing,” Lees says.


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Designer Stephanie Lees says she doesn’t often use subway tiles in her kitchen designs. But in this case, they add a unifying – and slightly industrial – effect. She even had the range hood clad in them so that the whole wall appears as an uninterrupted white line. Subway tiles: The Tile Store.

The countertops are Caesarstone, in the pale grey colour called Fresh Concrete. The designer had considered Carrara marble, but the slightly industrial look of this Caesarstone, “like freshly poured cement” seemed more in keeping with the owners’ laid-back aesthetic. The floors are wide-plank oak, oil-finished, purchased from Allan Rugs.

What’s the secret for making a small space with this many elements look so good? The designer says the answer is to add personality while maintaining restraint. “Renovating a kitchen is a big and costly endeavour, and often people want it to be classic so that it doesn’t go out of style. Too often, though, that makes it generic,” Lees says. “Here, we injected blue for personality and reclaimed

wood for warmth. But for continuity, we kept the details all black – from the French doors, the sink faucet and the cabinet handles to the towel bar and cup hooks on the open shelves. Even the legs on the stools are black metal. “We thought about Carrara marble for the island and brass faucets for the sink. But that would have been too much. It’s important to know when to stop mixing.”

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A SEAMLESS MESH OF OLD AND NEW A 1925 home in Toronto gets an addition of a contemporary-style kitchen and bathroom

BY WENDY HELFENBAUM PHOTOGRAPHY: SCOTT NORSWORTHY

VICTORIA BIRKETT AND DAVID CEOLIN were attracted to the home they bought in 2007 because of its amazing view. It sits on an expansive ravine lot in the prestigious Baby Point neighbourhood of Toronto, and has an intriguing provenance as one of the early homes built by renowned developer/ businessman Robert Home Smith in 1925. “We were attracted to this house because we felt that there was a lot of history here, and we liked the layout and overall feel; it was perfect,” Victoria recalls. However, a few rooms – namely the existing dark kitchen and tiny master ensuite bathroom – were decidedly less than perfect. The homeowners wanted to open the house up to the ravine view and fill the space with light, so they turned to architect Wanda Ely to design a contemporary-style two-storey rear extension that would be in keeping with the existing traditional home. Throughout the house, Ely created views that framed the space to thoughtfully link the old and the new. “We were mindful that the renovation was going to be very new and we were tying it into a historic home; we weren’t going to make what we were doing look old,” says Ely, owner of Wanda Ely Architect. “They wanted it to feel modern and fresh while making sure it didn’t look too disjointed from the existing house.” –>

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The six-month renovation in 2018 transformed the stately home into a spacious, airy retreat for the couple and their two daughters. The neutral palette, accented with splashes of watery blues, honours the original blueprints for the property, which the homeowners still have. For the new ensuite bathroom, the couple requested a soaker tub with a separate shower, which Ely laid back to back to allow for a magnificent wall of blue porcelain tile as the room’s focal point. “The tile was designed with tapestry in mind and that shows in the really rich colour and pattern. It almost has a textile quality to it,” says Ely.

The old ensuite bathroom’s tub had an oversized lip that made getting in and out difficult, but it’s easy to get into this clean-lined tub, which backs onto a glass shower. Lighting: Fin Suspension grouping of five bone china pendants from Lightform; cabinetry: Harvest House Millworkers; countertop: Caesarstone (colour: Blizzard).

The show-stopping blue tiled wall was the departure point for the master bathroom “When Wanda showed it to us, we immediately loved it,” says David. Flooring and main wall tile: Stonetile.

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Victoria’s wish for a generous space filled with light was achieved, while David appreciates the streamlined storage in the floating white oak vanity and all the high-end finishes. “You feel like you’re walking into a luxury hotel bathroom,” he says, noting that the white quartz countertops and custom cabinetry carry through to their new kitchen. –>

The homeowners spotted the porcelain pendant lights on a trip to New York City. “We loved them, so we tracked them down and ended up buying them here,” says Victoria.

The floating vanity, crafted from white oak, provides space to store toiletries and contrasts with the cool watery blue tiles on the feature wall. Cabinetry: Harvest House Millworkers; countertop: Caesarstone (colour: Blizzard); wall tile: 24-by-24-inch Nomad porcelain (colour: Turchese) from Stonetile; faucets: Aquabrass Volare wall mount; sink: Kohler Ladena basin.

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In the kitchen, Ely laid the engineered oak flooring in a herringbone design to contrast with the sleek island and cabinets, and to delineate the new space from the original flooring in the dining room. “We didn’t want to match the floors of the old house, because they’re from a different era. They’re quite dark with a lot of grain in the oak, which suits

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the existing house,” explains Ely. “They wanted something quite bright and fresh-looking for the kitchen, so we chose a floor that had a lot of character in it, and the herringbone pattern has a nice richness and a very classic, Old-World feeling to it. So it works in the old home, but it was very clearly a new part of the home.”


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Wanda Ely made the transition area between the original dining room and new kitchen into a design element by building a serving and pantry space that’s ideal for hosting large dinners. Laying the new oak floors in a herringbone motif introduces the contemporary kitchen while keeping the warm wood featured elsewhere in the home.

“There’s a lot of really beautiful morning light coming in here,” says Ely, who also left the space above the white upper cabinets open to let in plenty of sunshine from the windows behind it. Flooring: Kafe Caramel herringbone engineered oak hardwood from Stonetile International; cabinetry: Harvest House Millworkers; countertops: Caesarstone (colour: Blizzard); faucet: Blanco Alta Dual with pull-out.

Between the kitchen and dining room, Ely added a servery and six-by-eight-foot pantry, which serves multiple functions, including storage for china and a space to serve coffee and dessert. “When you have larger gatherings in your dining room, sometimes you need extra space to put platters and other things,” David says. Most important, a wall of black-framed floor-to-ceiling windows allows light to flood the 18-by-20-foot space, giving the couple the gorgeous ravine view they were seeking. “The old version of the house didn’t have a lot of windows, so the ravine was not part of the interior perspective; it felt very closed off,” says David. “Now, every morning we see birds and leaves; the seasonality really comes in.”

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TAKE CARE Leather goods – from fashion to furniture – benefit from a little TLC to keep them looking their best

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Leather: It’s a material that humankind has used for thousands of years. And it never goes out of fashion or loses its appeal. The question is how to take best care of leather, whether it be in furnishings, clothing or accessories, to ensure that it endures a long time and looks its best. We asked Violet Kolasa, manager of Hide House, and Carrie Perkin, an associate furniture design consultant for Hide House for their advice on leather care. Headquartered in Acton, Ontario, Hide House – Canada’s largest purveyor of luxury leather furniture and fashion – occupies a 19th century building that was the largest tannery in the British Empire a century ago. The company specializes in all things leather: furniture, coats, wallets and handbags, hats and gloves, slippers and moccasins.

QUESTION: Carrie, what advice do you have for owners of leather furnishings? How can we keep leather sofas, chairs and recliners looking their best? ANSWER: Our first advice to customers buying leather furniture is to prevent it from fading by keeping it out of direct sunlight. There should be at least two feet of space between the furniture and a heat source (fireplace) to protect the leather surface. Leather furniture accumulates dust and should be dusted weekly with a soft cloth. Also, the protective lotion may be applied to prevent drying and cracking. Never use general household cleaners and waxes as they may break down the integrity of the leather surface. Always check with your retailer for manufacturing directions. We offer care advice with all of our leather furniture products.


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QUESTION: How are leather goods made? Where does Hide House source its leather goods? ANSWER: As hides are a byproduct of the meat industry, using them allows us to create valuable and functional products from the material that otherwise would be wasted. Generally, they are from cattle. The hides go to the auction or wholesaler. There they are sent to the tannery for tanning, dyeing, and finishing. Furniture manufacturers buy the finished hides and produce leather furniture for furniture stores, which sells them to consumers.

The Hide House has only high-grade, top quality leather goods from leading Canadian manufacturers. We also carry leather goods from Europe, especially Italy. Higher-graded leathers are more expensive, but are more buttery, luxurious, and wear the best. For more information about leather and the history of The Hide House, please consult www.hidehouse.ca.

The Hide House 49 Eastern Ave., Acton 519-853-1031 ~ 877-453-2843 www.hidehouse.ca

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LIGHT, BRIGHT, WHITE Several styles are artfully combined in this Kitsilano Beach condo for a clean aesthetic BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA PHOTOGRAPHY: EMA PETERS

START WITH ONE PART beach house, add another part Mid-century Modern, and round it out with one part Scandinavian design. The end result is a clutter-free, contemporary design with a clean look and just the right amount of soul for a couple of empty-nesters downsizing from a 3,000-square-foot suburban home into a two-bedroom condo. The only thing the couple brought from their old house to their new pad in Vancouver’s Kitsilano Beach neighbourhood was their set of white tableware. The two-bedroom penthouse condo and its hybrid style was created by the design team at Shift Interiors in Vancouver, most notably by Jamie Deck, the firm’s owner and creative director. Deck says the penthouse space in the couple’s newly built four-storey boutique condominium building was easy to work with. It had frameless windows and simple window sills and baseboards. Hidden roller blinds were installed so as not to hinder the view of the trees outdoors. Overall, the space was a blank palette, says Deck, especially after the walls, ceilings and window sills were painted Chantilly Lace from Benjamin Moore, a bright white that has blue and grey undertones, but no yellow. It’s a favourite with designers. –>

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Simple but functional furnishings keep this small Kitsilano Beach condo feeling bright and spacious. The open-shelved white metal buffet makes it easy to set the oak dining table, which extends to seat 10. Pendant light: EQ3; buffet: Ikea; table: Bo Concept.

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(Right) Soft pillows, nubby throws, a sculptural wall hanging: all these layers and textures warm up the neutral and natural colour scheme in the open-concept living space.

With just 880 square feet to work with, and an open-concept floor plan in the main living area, which includes the kitchen, a minimalist approach was key. “It’s a small environment,” Deck says. A new kitchen had already been installed in the unit, featuring white quartz countertops, an off-white glass backsplash and white, lacquered kitchen cabinetry with flat panelling and no visible hardware. But since the kitchen flows into the dining area, which in turn adjoins the main living area, Deck chose a white and neutral palette to make the small space appear larger. And then she warmed up the space with textures – a nubby wool rug

in the living room’s seating area, textile wall hangings, leather pillows, cozy throws and woven baskets. The homeowners were accustomed to a large and comfortable family home. And while they had willingly purged their belongings and moved into town for a lifestyle change – to be close to restaurants, shopping and entertainment, as well as the beach – they still wanted their new home to be cozy and inviting. So the furnishings, a mix of custom-made and ready-made pieces, were chosen with comfort in mind as well as the way they complemented the overall design. –>

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(Right) A classic Scandinavian woven chair from Soul House is a warm invitation to relax. There are no moldings around the windows, which creates a clean look and accentuates the natural beauty outdoors.

For example, the designer chose an open-shelf metal buffet in white matte from IKEA for the dining area because it works well with the kitchen’s cabinetry and is functional. A white pendant light hangs over the simple oak dining table. The same light oak wood is repeated in the shelving units used in the living area as well as in a second bedroom that is outfitted as a guest room/exercise room/ home office. New floors – engineered six-inchwide oak floorboards – add to the feeling of spaciousness and flow from room to room. A stand-out piece of furniture is the streamlined Scandinavian chair with a woven seat and back. Then, there are all the plants, their green hues accentuated against white walls.

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(Above) A white lacquered desk (Ikea) and custom-made wall shelving give the study/ exercise room/second bedroom yet another calling as an office.

“This was one of my favourite projects,” says Deck. “It’s very basic design: Scandinavian, classic and timeless. It will look good for years and it’s sustainable.” It’s also versatile. By swapping out the grey, neutral accessories that have been used with black, for example, or a combination of emerald green and navy, the look can be readily changed.

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THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE YONDER The library in this historic home is transformed into a soothing space for family gatherings

TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHY: NADINE THOMSON INTERIOR DESIGNER

The owner of this historic home saw through the years of clutter – left by the previous owner – to transform its library into a warm and inviting space, where family and friends gather to chat, watch movies, and enjoy the warm glow of the original wood-burning fireplace, surrounded by a vast collection of books. The space juxtaposes historic detailing, finishes and furniture with contemporary art and a warm blue hue of Caribbean water. Here’s how the library was transformed from a neglected space to a magnificent and stately room.

1. The homeowner restored the shutters and mouldings by painstakingly removing layers of paint. The wood was revitalized with a warm stain and an oil finish to bring back its original glory. The warmth of the orange-hued wood acts as a complementary colour and works harmoniously with the historic charm of the brass metals and the over-sized gilded mirror.

2. A gilded antique mirror sits to the left of the mantel, revealing my client’s desire for asymmetry. The weight of the mirror on the left is delicately balanced on the right by a collection of paintings grouped together with a composition and refinement that shows the client’s visual sophistication. The space above the mantel is perfect for a contemporary artwork, and because it is “so not like the others,” it succeeds as a standalone piece, bringing its own personality to the room as a focal point.

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3. Painting the walls and bookcases in sever-

al shades of the same family of blues creates harmony across the various sizes and shapes of bookcases while adding mood and drama. This is despite the fact that the finish of the bookcases is slightly glossier than the eggshell walls. Because this is a space for a “visit,” it is

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the perfect setting in which to evoke sentiments that are striking and memorable. With daring and trendsetting vision, the homeowner conceived of this room several years before these hues became a trend in 2020. Wall and bookcase colour: Benjamin Moore Caribbean Blue Water 2055-30.

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in the corners of the bookcase – which she designed – including its doors and mouldings, where such shapes are given prominence. The preference for such detail took the custom

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4. The homeowner’s love of curves is revealed

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woodworking to another level of elegance and sophistication. The custom millwork incurred a slight upcharge but it was more than worthwhile, given the design impact it bestows.

5. The leaded antique glass doors were salvaged from another historic home, restored, painted and incorporated into the design of the bookcases, blending in perfectly with the room and creating a sense of pedigree in what is essentially a new-build space in this historic home.

6. The stunning custom-made 14-inch-deep plaster cornice (in Benjamin Moore’s Simply White OC-117) is positioned to create a niche for cove lighting that casts an upward-focused illumination. The illusion of a slightly lowered ceiling gives an intimate mood in the library while also creating a relationship between the upper mouldings of the bookcases and the palm-branch motif in the plaster cornices. The elements speak to one another. The contrast of the warm white cornice against the blue walls creates a sense of presence without looking contrived or forced.

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SCANDINAVIAN INFLUENCE A Toronto couple opt for simplicity in the redesign of their kitchen and bathrooms BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL STYLING: MICHELLE BERWICK

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ANDY HSU AND RUOBING ZHANG had done their homework before they started renovating the 35-year-old home in Vaughan that they had bought. The couple had spent hours looking at magazines and online, and knew exactly what they wanted: a modern Scandinavian design, very light and quite minimal. “We really liked the simplicity of the Scandinavian feel,” Ruobing says. Then, on a trip to Asia when they were already partway through the remodel, they bought a few vases and other art pieces. When they returned home and showed them to designer Michelle Berwick, they joked that they were creating a whole new style: Scandinavian-Chinese. At first Ruobing worried that the new pieces might clash with the carefully considered look they’d planned. “Scandinavian-Chinese is a bit of an oxymoron,” she says, laughing. “But it really worked.” None of it fazed Berwick, the owner of Michelle Berwick Design, who integrated the art throughout the home; for example, she mixed new green pottery with other accent pieces she found at Elte MKT, showcasing it on black shelves in the kitchen/dining area.

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In addition to creating that shelving, Berwick used black as both a feature and accent colour throughout the home – on light fixtures and the fireplace, for example, so it made sense to bring that into the kitchen as well. She chose black faucets, ceiling lighting with a black base and black island chairs. She also suggested the owners opt for black stainless-steel appliances. “It all lends itself to this look that they were going for,” she says. At first, Andy was a bit skeptical about adding so much black, especially when it came to black appliances. “I love how it turned out,”

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he says. “It adds warmth and sophistication.” The original kitchen was quite small, so they removed a wall to make room for the island. Berwick says she chose a simple light fixture over it so it would not compete with a larger starburst light over the nearby dining table. Because of the position of the back door, the cabinetry needed to be slightly less deep than standard size. “We used lots of lazy Susans and things to maximize every inch,” the designer says. “And we left off using knobs and handles, again to get that sleek, modern look.” –>

The homeowners wanted a modern Scandinavian design, including a light, sleek kitchen. The cabinets are a white-washed, oak-like laminate, and the floors are engineered hardwood, also with a whitewashed look. “The owners really like geometric lines,” designer Michelle Berwick says. She complemented the tiles with a white grout. “It adds a bit of texture without being in your face,” she says. Sink: Blanco; faucet: Riobel, both purchased at Vatero; light fixture: EQ3; backsplash tiles: Saltillo.

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Size was also an issue when it came to renovating the bathrooms. The original master bath was so narrow, Andy says he could stretch out his arms and touch the walls. “The master was definitely the most dramatic change,” he says. By taking space from a walk-in closet that had a window in it, they were able to have both natural light in the new bathroom, as well as enough room to include a free-standing tub and walk-in shower. As in the kitchen, the faucets, other hardware, and light fixture are all black. For access to the bathroom, Berwick installed a barn door, custom-built with a chevron pattern, painted black. It’s a feature that clients ask for in almost every project she works on now, she says. They work well for the master bath, but she cautions that they’re not soundproof and so are a risky option for powder rooms and other guest spaces.

By enlarging the master bathroom, the homeowners were able to get both a tub and separate shower, which are in a cement-coloured grey. Designer Michelle Berwick added a patterned hexagonal tile in three shades of grey for the shower floor, and carried that colour into the bedroom as well. Tiles: MR Tile & Design Inc.; black plumbing fixtures: Rubinet, purchased at Venizzi Kitchen & Bath; light fixture above the tub: Kuzco from Lowe’s; tub: Vanna from Vatero.

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At first, the homeowners thought that having an all-black shower in the guest bathroom was a bold move; now they think it was a brilliant one. Vanity: Venizzi Kitchen & Bath; lighting: Kuzco Lighting, purchased at Vatero. That same black hexagonal shower tile, from Ciot, was used to bring drama to the tiny powder room wall, which boasts a custom-built vanity. Lighting: Kuzco from Vatero.

The home’s other bathroom also has a stand-alone shower, this one clad in black hexagonal tiles. A larger hexagon is used on the walls, a smaller tile on the floor. Because the shower is totally black, Berwick eschewed the use of black faucets in this bathroom. She did carry the same hexagonal tile into the powder room, using it as an accent on the wall, behind the mirror. By “bleeding” it – placing the tiles in a random pattern – it has created a look the homeowners hadn’t chosen when they were doing their research, but it’s one they say they love. “Before that, the bathroom was light and plain,” says Ruobing. “With that added, it looks fantastic. Now it’s a big-impact space.”

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MORE FUNCTIONAL, MORE BEAUTIFUL

A kitchen in Steinbach, Manitoba is redesigned for a family who love to cook and entertain BY SUSAN SCHWARTZ PHOTOGRAPHY: ARIANA TENNYSON STYLING: JACLYN PETERS

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THE KITCHEN OF THE 1970S BUNGALOW was cramped, small and dark, with an impractical layout and upper cabinets obscuring the natural light and the view. An adjoining dining nook had been used by the previous owner “as a sort of TV room” and, to interior designer Jaclyn Peters of Jaclyn Peters Design, it was “just a really poor use of space.” Homeowners Andrea and Cameron Bergen told the designer that they wanted “more

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light, better functionality and beautiful finishes” for the kitchen of the Steinbach, Manitoba home they’d moved into with their young children, Hudson and Aliya. Steinbach is a city about 60 kilometres southeast of Winnipeg. “We wanted something that was easy to entertain in,” says Andrea. “We love to cook and have people over. We wanted a bigger space, one that was functional and bold in colour and contrast.”

(Left and above) Interior designer Jaclyn Peters chose an unusual take on subway tile for the kitchen of the Bergen family’s home by stacking the tiles vertically, not horizontally, and installing them up to the ceiling. The new windows over the sink admit more light than the single window in the original kitchen. Handsome pendant light fixtures over the island look like concrete but they’re made of a composite material. Pendant lights: Robinson Lighting.

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The tiny U-shaped kitchen was original to the house, and the adjoining dining nook had a sliding glass door leading to a patio. Peters’s design called for all the millwork to be removed and the two areas combined into one space measuring about 18 feet by 13 feet. The sliding door would be replaced by a simple door to make room for counter and drawer space beside it.

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“And when we reconfigured the space, we decided to add in a large new nine-foot-long window to bring in more light” along that wall, says Peters. The three-paned horizontal window replaced the single window over the kitchen sink, permitting daylight to stream in.   Vinyl sheet flooring in the kitchen was replaced by seven-inch-wide planks of white oak hardwood, the same wood installed

throughout the main floor. The oak is repeated in floating shelves flanking the stove. The light wood flooring contrasts with the custom-made solid-core MDF cabinets, which are painted in Benjamin Moore’s Onyx (2133-10). –>

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The space has a quiet sleekness, with matte finishes predominating. The appliances are stainless steel; the cabinet and drawer hardware has a satin nickel finish; and the faucets are a matte black.        The room is painted in Benjamin Moore’s Simple White (OC-117) – a flat finish on the ceiling, eggshell on the walls. The white is a fine canvas for the room’s stunning countertops

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and island of white quartz with rich grey veining. The island, which measures about eight by five feet, has space for seating.   Andrea says she is thrilled each time she enters the kitchen. “The countertop makes such a huge statement and we love it,” she says. She also loves that the material is easy to clean and not too shiny.  “You need a bit of shine for it to be wipeable, but I didn’t want it glossy.”

A single door replaced sliding doors to the outside, allowing for increased counter and drawer space. Seven-inch-wide planks of white oak hardwood were laid throughout the home’s main floor, including the kitchen. Dark cabinets, painted Benjamin Moore’s Onyx (213310), stand out against the light walls and floor.


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(Left) The room’s colour scheme is repeated in the black-and-white striped runner from McGee & Co. Cabinet pulls: Top Knobs; flooring: Cosmopolitan collection by Divine Flooring from Steinbach’s Flooring Canada; cabinetry: Kroeker Cabinets; undermount sink: Blanco.

The quartz countertops are white, with a rich grey veining that mimics marble. The eight-by-five-foot island is a gathering space. Countertops: Cambria, colour: Brittanicca; counter stools: Calligaris; matte black faucet: Brizo; stainless steel appliances: Bosch; refrigerator: Fisher & Paykel.

Pendant light fixtures over the island have a concrete look, although they are made of a composite. Their pale grey is picked up in the grout of white two-by-three-inch tile, which is used on two walls in a fresh, novel way. “I wanted a classic look that wasn’t too expensive – so I decided to do a different take on subway tile,” says Peters. “We stacked the tiles vertically and used a really light grey grout. Bringing the tiles up to the ceiling and around the door and window provided some extra interest.” The family is very satisfied with the result, and Andrea has high praise for her designer’s skill. “I just love how she took our vision of what we wanted and was able to do it in our space.”

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ART

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A SEARCH FOR THE MISSING

An exhibition by artist Chaki at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts focuses on those who perished during the Holocaust THE YEAR 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the liberation from the Holocaust. The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts will hold an exhibition of works by Yehouda Chaki, a Jewish artist who has lived in Montreal for the past 58 years. Born in Athens, Greece in 1938, Chaki – as he is simply known – never met his grandparents, aunts, uncles or cousins; all were killed at Auschwitz. He immigrated to Israel in 1945 and settled in Tel Aviv. There, he was traumatized by daily broadcasts called Mi Makir on Kol Israel, the national radio station, in which people appealed for information about the whereabouts of missing family members.

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These 30-to-40-second clips were a source of distress for Chaki and his immediate family who had lost everyone dear to them. The installation Mi Makir, features indistinct portraits of victims who died in concentration camps; they are marked with numbers that correspond to real people who perished. Sculptures made of books recall the infamous book burnings of Kristallnacht on November 9, 1938. This haunting installation is deeply personal for Chaki and a generation of Jews, and others, whose families were killed in the Holocaust. But its significance and poignancy resonate with all of humanity.

Yehouda Chaki (born in 1938), Mi Makir: 30698, 1998-1999. Courtesy of the artist.


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Yehouda Chaki, Mi Makir. Courtesy of the artist.

Yehouda Chaki, Mi Makir: 32031 and 6728, 1998-1999. Courtesy of the artist.

Yehouda Chaki, Mi Makir: 26753 and 37992, 1998-1999. Courtesy of the artist.

“It’s important to know that what happened during the Holocaust can happen anywhere at any time,” Chaki said in an interview. “And it was important to me to express this and bring it to life. We open the newspaper every day to see the awful things that are going on around the world … all the time.” The artist says he began creating the portraits that will be displayed in the installation during the 1990s. “I first exhibited them in 1999,” he says. Others – pen and ink works – are exhibited without frames. “I want to show the roughness of the paper,” he says. The portrait of a single face can illustrate the horror of an entire war, he adds. “If I want to show a war, it’s a huge thing. I cannot put that all down,” Chaki says. “However, if I show the face of a child, I can show the horror of the war in that face.” The exhibition will run from April 22 to August 9 at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Yehouda Chaki: Mi Makir A Search for the Missing April 22 to August 9, 2020 Montreal Museum of Fine Arts Graphic Arts Centre - Level S2 Jean-Noël Desmarais Pavilion 1380 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal www.mbam.qc.ca 514-285-2000

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HOME COOKING The newest cookbooks on the market give Canadians an opportunity to create exciting new dishes BY JULIE GEDEON

BEING TOLD TO EAT OUR VEGETABLES is no longer a childhood dread thanks to a cornucopia of new cookbooks. Once relegated to a single chapter as “sides,” vegetables are springing into the culinary spotlight as folks move toward more plant-based diets. “We’re doing it for health, planetary and financial reasons,” says Jonathan Cheung, who owns Appetite for Books in Montreal. “These new books use fewer ingredients to bring out the best of each featured vegetable rather than just boiling or steaming it as an afterthought.”

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He cites Ruffage: A Practical Guide to Vegetables by Abra Berens and Lucy Engelman as one example. It contains several recipes for 29 vegetables along with advice for buying and storing each one. Seasonality is emphasized by Nigel Slater’s separate editions of Greenfeast to prepare spring/summer and then fall/winter produce. “His minimal homey approach is geared to home cooks, yet packed with flavours,” Cheung says. “It takes a smart chef to stop from adding unnecessary ingredients.”


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Photo courtesy of Appetite by Random House

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want to live more sustainably,” says Amanda Gauthier, Indigo’s Lifestyle category manager. “They’re looking for books that use more of every vegetable.” One Meal a Day for the Planet by Suzy Amis Cameron generated a lot of attention, but other stalwarts, including food writer Mark Bittman and vegetarian recipe guru Deborah Madison, take a more pragmatic approach, as well as offering gluten-free options. There’s also growing interest in books that feature meal preparations for an entire week to not only prevent waste but to save time and money. –>

Photo courtesy of Indigo

published in May, with accomplished food writer Meredith Erickson of Joe Beef fame. Both avid and amateur cooks are flocking to books such as Samin Nosrat’s Salt Fat Acid Heat, on which the Netflix series is based. “Every page teaches us how to better use our taste buds to achieve the perfect balance in dishes,” says Rebecca Lloyd, director of Montreal’s Drawn & Quarterly bookshop. At the same time, a “waste not, want not” approach is being further embraced through various cookbooks that feature zero-waste recipes, especially for plant-based meals. “People

Photo courtesy of Appetite by Random House

Montreal’s Jean-Philippe Cyr is championing plant-based eating as the author of The Buddhist Chef: 100 Vegan Feel-Good Recipes. “His straightforward approach has resonated with nearly a million online followers,” says Robert McCullough, publisher of Appetite by Random House. The city is also home to Mandy’s Gourmet Salads, restaurants that sprouted from a single counter at the back of a clothing store to numerous Montreal and – soon – Toronto locations. Sisters Mandy and Rebecca Wolfe co-authored their book, Mandy’s Gourmet Salads, to be

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Photos courtesy of Appetite by Indigo Photos courtesy of Appetite by Random House Photos courtesy of Appetite by Random House

“We’re also seeing continued interest in guidance on how to best prepare and eat food for improved digestion and other health reasons, such as Dr. Jason Fung’s The Complete Guide to Fasting, and Clean 7: Supercharge the Body’s Natural Ability to Heal Itself by Alejandro Junger, M.D.,” Gauthier adds. Canadians are recognizing their homegrown celebrities by flocking to such cookbooks as the “plant-forward” Fraiche Food, Full Hearts, co-authored by TV personality Jillian Harris (Love It or List It Vancouver) and registered dietician Tori Wesszer. They’ve put a healthier twist on such childhood favourites as beet rolls, perogies and Mom’s chocolate cake. Kitchen Party: Effortless Recipes for Every Occasion by Mary Berg (MasterChef Canada and Mary’s Kitchen Crush) is another star attraction. “Her bubbly personality and genuine love for her family and homestyle cooking is resonating with various ages,” McCullough says. Simplified entertaining is taking off with Lisa Bolton’s On Boards, which brims with platter/cutting board presentations. “People want simpler, affordable and yet still impressive ways to share food with guests,” he says. Folks also love to take souvenirs of their favourite places back home with such books as Giselle Courteau’s Duchess Bake Shop, which features her world-class patisserie in Edmonton, and more recently Duchess at Home with its sweet and savory recipes. “Her Québécois roots and love for French food really come through,” says McCullough. There’s already buzz about this spring’s release of Maenam: A Fresh Approach to Thai Cooking by award-winning Vancouver chef Angus An. “He’s such an expert at layering yet balancing favours,” McCullough says.

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Photo courtesy of Appetite by Random House

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In response to keen interest in new culinary adventures, previously ignored cuisines are receiving deserved attention. Meredith Erickson’s Alpine Cooking: Recipes and Stories from Europe’s Grand Mountaintops not only features recipes from the heights of Italy, Austria, Switzerland and France, but a travelogue of life in the chalets and huts where these rustic dishes are served. “The photographs, travel advice and food are incredible,” says Jonathan Cheung of Appetite for Books in Montreal. Palestinian cuisine is the focus of this spring’s release of Falastin by executive chef Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley. While Alissa

Timoshkina introduces us to Salt & Time: A Modern Russian Kitchen. Jubilee: Recipes from Two Centuries of African-American Cooking is a favourite with Rebecca Lloyd, who also co-manages Drawn & Quarterly’s cookbook club. “We haven’t seen many books showcasing these homey yet special recipes,” she says. The popularity of Maangchi’s Big Book of Korean Cooking is evidence of more people seeking to venture past introductory-level cookbooks. “We don’t mind shopping for one or two special ingredients to create something that really tastes different,” Lloyd says.

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GATHERING P L AC E The island in this Winnipeg kitchen is the feature around which the homeowners and their guests love to hang out BY BRENDA O’FARRELL PHOTOGRAPHY: ARIANA TENNYSON STYLING: JACLYN PETERS

IT IS WIDELY ACCEPTED that no man is an island, but can the same measure be applied to a kitchen? The answer depends on the kitchen – and the island, of course. But before weighing in, walk into the kitchen space re-imagined by Winnipeg designer Jaclyn Peters. Oh, and leave your old yardsticks at the door. They have no use here. Let’s begin with “bold,” “bright” and “big.” These are the descriptors that begin to measure what you see. But as you make your way closer, other words enter the descriptive lexicon, adding breadth and dimension. Let’s just focus on two: “long” and “luxurious.” –>

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“We sit here sometimes and we can’t believe this is our kitchen,” says the owner of this suburban two-storey home that she and her husband purchased in 2000. “I find I have more room. It’s just more spacious. It’s a lot brighter. Everyone likes to sit around the island.” The gravitational pull of the island is undeniable. Made of white oak finished in a custom light stain, it is a stunning 12.5 feet long and 40 inches wide. It stands on tapered bronze veneer feet and has a white quartz countertop. The rows of bronze pull handles along one side give the piece a dazzling finish while offering a clue as to the ample storage space it provides.

With a white quartz countertop by Cambria stretching 12.5 feet, the island, which includes an induction stovetop, is the structural centre of this kitchen. The ceiling beams are wrapped in stained fir. The brass-coloured light fixtures add shine and help reflect light around the room.

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“I wanted something with a bit of shine and sparkle.” The custom-made floating shelves mounted next to the large apron sink are among the homeowner’s favourite features that add character while enhancing secondary spaces.

“I wanted it to read as a piece of furniture,” Peters, owner of Jaclyn Peters Design, says of the island, explaining her decision to put it on a raised footed base. The light oak look not only “pops off the dark floor,” which was part of the original kitchen, Peters says, it contributes to the brightness of the space. –>

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Not taking away from the island’s grandeur, it is oddly not the owner’s favourite feature of her new kitchen. Months after the project’s completion, she still loves her sink. The white apron sink below the window is adorned with a brushed nickel bridge faucet by Brizo. The faucet, with its unique architectural flair, adds a distinctive touch, while playing off the bronzy metal accents that are found throughout the space. “I never envisioned getting something like that,” the owner says of the sink’s hardware. Jaclyn just opened us up to so many things.”

The polished nickel bridge faucet by Brizo dresses up the sink while the custom Roman shade is a textural element against the tiled wall.

The designer describes the faucet as “different and interesting.” “It gives a little character to the kitchen,” she says. “It has a different shape.” Features such as the faucet and brass fixtures also serve a function, Peters suggests, allowing the eye to move around the room, dictating the flow.

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Light floods the room, giving the white surfaces a bright, bold and buoyant quality, while the vintage Turkish runner, purchased on Etsy, grounds the space in understated style.

“I wanted something with a bit of shine and sparkle,” she explains, referring to the metal accents. “They reflect the light around the room and tie in with the feet of the island.” The homeowner acknowledges the design process pulled her out of her comfort zone, a journey she appreciates enormously in retrospect, saying that the results are more than just the sparkle and shine. The redesign added

character to her home, a space that enhances everyday moments and entertaining events. “Everyone hangs out in our kitchen. It’s a very big part of our main floor,” she says. From “the window treatment, the pendants, the brightness, the floating shelves, the long island, the cupboard space – I love it all,” she says. Then she pauses and restates her claim: “I love it all.”

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GIVE ME SANCTUARY

BATHS ARE TRENDY IN 2020. Instagram abounds with celebrities and influencers posting about the lavish petal-strewn, salt-infused baths in which they indulge. Some, such as shaman Deborah Hanekamp take the bath into the realm of healing ritual. All of which prompted a recent article in the New Yorker magazine refering to our era as “the age of bathfluence.” I see this flood of interest in bathing as the planet Neptune at work. And even for die-hard shower people, in 2020 the bathroom is becoming an important place in which to seek solace of the body, mind and spirit. Why we need Neptune As major planetary cycles end and begin

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How Neptune can help you reimagine your bathroom’s design and maybe join the bathfluence movement BY SUSAN KELLY

anew, the pressure is on, globally and personally. What with a gang-up of planets in the hard-working, pragmatic earth signs of Capricorn and Taurus, tangible results are what count. Oh, we’re keeping it real, all right, generally a good thing. But it does get tiring, leading us to sigh with Wordsworth that “The world is too much with us.” Of the solar system’s outer planets, Jupiter on out, the only one not in an earth sign is Neptune. That, plus its current tenancy in its home sign of Pisces, ups its influence exponentially. And there’s no better planet to plan a big breakout from everyday cares and worries, in either a good or bad way. The negative occurs when we overdo it

with, say, way too much Merlot or awareness-blotting recreational substance. On the positive side, the sea god can lead us into the deepest realms of the subconscious mind. And there we can find new sources of creativity. We may even find transcendence, a connection with our very highest selves. And as Neptune’s natural domain, the bathroom seems an optimal spot in which to indulge in the planet’s healing side, too. Since Roman times, “taking the waters” at a spring-fed spa has played a vital role in staying healthy and convalescing. For water is vital to existence: 60 per cent of our bodies is water. We rely on it to regulate temperature, flush out toxins and regenerate cells.


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Get in, tune out I noticed the other day that luxury vacation provider Club Med’s logo is a trident — the astrological glyph for Neptune. And this is perhaps the planet’s greatest gift: If we choose to summon the god, we are granted the boon of a little vacay of the mind, a stroll along new beaches of the imagination. And who knows where that could lead? Invoking Neptune can be as simple as taking a long shower or bath. I once had a Pisces (a sign attuned with the planet) client who used her morning shower as a problem-solving tool. Ninety per cent of the time, the solution to a dilemma she had been wrestling with for a long time would pop into her head when she was focused only on enjoying a few minutes of steamy solitude. Neptune is also associated with sanctuary — also the adjective most often applied to the bathroom. The planet has a lot to do with our aesthetic sense and creative inspiration as well. Ready to revamp your own private retreat? Here are six bathroom-design trends for 2020 that incorporate aspects of Neptune:

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Everyone in the standalone tub: While not a new trend, designers reported previously that homeowners wanted them mostly for the aesthetics, preferring to use the shower. Thanks to the current bathf luence trend, bathtubs are being used for relaxation or therapy. And providing social media photo ops, and an interest in photogenic bathtub designs beyond the white porcelain oval. More elaborate home spa: Emulating the sophisticated look of a world-class spa is a big trend for 2020. Neptune is associated with healing modalities found in spas, too, such as aromatherapy, essential oils, flower essences and hydrotherapy. Consider investing in a steam shower, more elaborate rain head or system that includes aromatherapy. Open-concept bathrooms: Like the sea, Neptune is boundless and knows no borders. A hot trend now: doing away with walls between the master bedroom and its ensuite, so it becomes an integrated whole. Too much openness? Shower spaces free of curbs or even doors have been trending of late. Failing that, unframed glass doors give the illusion of wide, open spaces and make any bathroom appear more spacious.

Get the blues: Trend reports tout black as the “it” hue for bathrooms in 2020. A Capricorn colour, and so fitting for the current concentration of planets in that sign. But to create a Neptunian lair, consider using a colour that will balance and soften this often-harsh influence. Any shade of blue, from deep sea to Mediterranean turquoise to palest pastel will appease the god and be right on trend. Mindful moodiness: Neptune and Pisces are about total ambience. And one of the most powerful ways to set the mood is through lighting. This year’s trend is toward minimal and mindful. Leave all digital devices and their harsh blue light outside. Regulate natural light and when it comes to artificial, real candlelight or as close to the real thing as possible. Don’t forget a sound system, too. The aim is to create an immersive sensory experience to help you leave worries at the door. Reimagined space: Neptune also rules creativity, so 2020 might be the year you look at your bathroom through new eyes. Is it a tranquil oasis but a little bland? Consider hanging a large work of original art or another unexpected feature. Investing in some natural stone tiles or a living wall would be on-trend, while adding a beautiful healing element.

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A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING AND . . .

Everything in its place for downsizing homeowners BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL STYLING: LOREN SMARDA

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BEHIND THIS NEWLY RENOVATED kitchen’s sleek walnut-faced cabinetry with its handsome door pulls lies an extremely organized space. Homeowner Belinda Wong knows exactly where to find any given implement, gadget, utensil and pot. In conjunction with lead designer Viktoriya DaCosta of Yorkville Design Centre, she set up the 435-square-foot kitchen to perfectly suit her needs. “We had lived 15 years in a custom-built home in North York with about 8,000 square feet of living space,” Belinda says. “We were looking to downsize and were lucky to find a condo in the same neighborhood. It’s about 3,200 square feet, with a big kitchen. I love to cook and entertain. In fact, a living room is almost secondary; the kitchen is the hub of our home.”

The kitchen – built by Downsview Kitchens – measures 435 square feet, and features walnut-faced cabinetry in an open-plan floor space.

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(Above) The island counters in the cooking area are a few inches lower than standard to accommodate homeowner Belinda Wong. Island surface, backsplash and ceiling panel: Neolith “Estatuario”; bar area counter: Brown Antique granite; microwave drawer: Sharp; fridge and freezer columns: Thermador; ovens/warming drawer: Wolf; wine fridge: SubZero; dishwasher: Miele; island hood: Faber; sink: Chef Centre by Franke; pull-down faucet: Brizo.

Built by Downsview Kitchens (Yorkville Design Centre is an exclusive dealer of the company), the new kitchen is quite different from the homeowners’ old one, which was done in a traditional style: “Crown moldings, corbels — you name it,” says Belinda. However, she and DaCosta did keep one aspect of her old kitchen: a devotion to function. “Storage needs dictated how to modify the condo’s kitchen,” says DaCosta. “We even counted how many utensils Belinda had, to make sure it all fit.” –>

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The visual show-stopper above the island is the extractor hood, which hangs from a Neolith panel suspended from the ceiling. Because the ceiling is charcoal-grey, it provides a strong contrast. Chandelier, table and chairs: Casa Lucio; stools: Jam from Connubia Calligaris; black handles with rose-gold caps: Pomeli; artwork: Christie Lau.

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The beverage centre was another request that DaCosta fulfilled. Belinda now has an organized cabinet that’s right next to the wine fridge, which is right next to the dining room entrance. It has doors to hide small appliances, such as a coffee maker and toaster, which retract into spaces at the sides so that everything is easily accessible and the open doors don’t impede passage down the narrow hallway that runs by it. Other design details ensured an ergonomic space for Belinda, who describes herself as “short.” The island counters in the cooking area are a few inches lower than usual. The Brown Antique granite bar is also low enough for counter-height stools.

Over the island is the extractor hood, hanging from a porcelain panel suspended from the charcoal-grey ceiling. “The dark ceiling adds contrast, and the panel balances the dark ceiling so that the eye is drawn into the view and the beautiful ravine that the condo faces,” says DaCosta. Likewise, the island and bar accommodate the curve of the dinette’s banquette so that anyone seated on it can enjoy the view. DaCosta’s ingenuity is appreciated by Belinda, who says that after living in her condo for nearly nine months, “I’m really loving the kitchen, especially the banquette facing the ravine.”

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BUYERS’ GUIDE

TAKE CARE The Hide House www.hidehouse.ca 519-853-1031 ~ 877-453-2843 A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING AND . . . Yorkville Design Centre www.yorkvilledesigncentre.ca 416-922-6620 Downsview Kitchens www.downsviewkitchens.com 905-677-9354 GIVE ME SANCTUARY Susan Kelly Astrology www.susankellyastrology.com A SEAMLESS MESH OF OLD AND NEW Wanda Ely Architect www.wandaelyarchitect.com 647-889-3984 THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE YONDER Nadine Thomson Interior Design www.nadinethomson.com 514-775-2259 BURNISHED BRONZE Dvira Interiors www.dvira.com 416-457-8827

Habitat for Humanity ReStore www.habitatrestore.ca 416-755-7353 (main Toronto branch) Upper Canada Specialty Hardware www.ucshshowroom.com 416-696-8358 THE TRIFECTA OF BATHROOM DESIGN Collective Studio www.collective-studio.ca MAXIMIZING A MODEST SPACE Stephanie Lees Design www.stephanieleesdesign.com 416-433-2313 Allan Rug Co. www.allanrug.com 416-787-8799 1925Workbench www.1925workbench.com 416-878-1869 ~ 647-859-0595 Mettro Source Tile www.mettro.ca 416-913-1722

LIGHT, BRIGHT, WHITE Shift Interiors www.shift-interiors.com 778-668-0659 Bo Concept www.boconcept.com Rove Concepts www.roveconcepts.com EQ3 www.eq3.com Ikea www.ikea.com HARMONY THROUGH HOLISTIC DESIGN Collective Studio www.collective-studio.ca SCANDINAVIAN INFLUENCE Michelle Berwick Design www.michelleberwickdesign.com 416-333-9952 Vatero Bath + Kitchen www.vatero.ca 416-282-8376 Kuzco Lighting www.kuzcolighting.com

Distinctive by Design www.distinctivebydesign.ca 416-750-4441

Saltillo Tiles www.saltillo-tiles.com 416-441-2225

Schoolhouse Electric www.schoolhouse.com

Ciot www.ciot.com

Blanco www.blanco.com

MID-CENTURY MODERNIZATION Ivyhouse www.ivyhouse.ca 250-415-0672

EQ3 www.eq3.com

Restoration Hardware www.restorationhardware.com

Bertazzoni ca.bertazzoni.com

Monogram www.monogram.ca

Brizo www.brizo.com

LIKE STONE, BUT MORE PRACTICAL Ciot www.ciot.com

Cedar & Moss www.cedarandmoss.com

Fuzion Flooring www.fuzionflooring.com Quartex Surfaces www.quartex.com Surfaces & Co. www.surfacesco.ca

AWKWARD NO MORE Alana Fletcher Interiors www.alanafletcher.ca HAPPY HOUR AT HOME Famous Last Words www.famouslastwordsbar.com Ateliers & Saveurs www.ateliersetsaveurs.com Salty Paloma www.saltypaloma.com ITHQ www.ithq.qc.ca REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE, REDESIGN AND REMODEL Rebecca Hay Designs Inc. www.rebeccahaydesigns.com 416-479-1515

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Enrich It Woodworks www.enrichit.ca 519-820-8712

KITCHEN & BATH

Euro Ceramic Tile www.eurotile.ca FROM CONCRETE TO COZY Estee Design www.esteedesign.com 416-827-4220 SUPERB STYLE AND FUNCTIONALITY Scavolini www.scavolinitoronto.com 416-961-2929 A RESPECTFUL REMODELLING Charlotte Interiors www.charlotteinteriors.ca 902-471-0059 GATHERING PLACE Jaclyn Peters Design www.jaclynpetersdesign.com

Elte MKT www.eltemkt.com 416-789-0800 MORE FUNCTIONAL, MORE BEAUTIFUL Jaclyn Peters Design www.jaclynpetersdesign.com Steinbach’s Flooring Canada www.steinbachsflooringcanada.ca 204-326-7624. Kroeker Cabinets www.kroekercabinets.ca 204-392-5038 Cambria www.cambriausa.com   Robinson Lighting www.robinsonco.ca   McGee & Co. www.mcgeeandco.com   Top Knobs www.topknobs.com Blanco www.blanco.com Brizo www.brizo.com.  


AD LIST

21 58

Ciot Covenant House

5

Faema

13

Fleurco

30

Gendron Chocolate

162 19 4 164 11 7 31 9

General Products Hicks Design JMD Rugs and Carpets Kolbe Gallery Linen Chest Maple Drapery Mark Lash Neolith

17

Runtal North America

15

Shades of Home

2 23

Simply Closets Yorkville Design

NEXT ISSUE

“Time for bed, kids!” Many parents get resistance from their children when they utter that “bedtime” edict each evening. However, children may welcome bedtime in rooms that have been designed and renovated to meet their particular needs and aesthetic sense. In the Spring issue of Home in Canada, we’ll look at some well-designed children’s bedrooms and nurseries. Of course, we’ll also get you ready for the warm weather ahead with great advice about decluttering and sweeping away winter’s cobwebs. Be sure to get your copy of Home in Canada’s Spring issue, on newsstands in early April.

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WELCOME TO YOUR NEW BACKYARDâ„¢


CELEBRATING

41 Years

160 East Beaver Creek Rd., #26, Richmond Hill, On. L4B 3L4

www.gppatio.com 905-709-1162


1.877.319.0744 www.kolbegalleryontario.ca

Home In Canada - Toronto - Kitchen and Bath Trends 2020  

Our Kitchen & Bath edition of Home in Canada (Toronto) is out now, head inside to find a selection of fabulous profiles on bathrooms and kit...

Home In Canada - Toronto - Kitchen and Bath Trends 2020  

Our Kitchen & Bath edition of Home in Canada (Toronto) is out now, head inside to find a selection of fabulous profiles on bathrooms and kit...