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AUTUMN ISSUE

CANADA’S COTTAGE COUNTRY Colin and Justin on their new TV show

THIS OLD HOUSE MADE NEW

Century-old homes upgraded for today’s lifestyle

A TASTE OF TOFINO

BATHROOMS

The latest design trends

Where to eat now

$5.95

ABOUT FACE

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Tina Cartier’s fascinating figurative art

SOFAS AND ARMCHAIRS

BATHROOM FIXTURES

STUNNING STAIRCASES


“Great design will forever change your perspective...” – Michael Pourvakil, President

New Arrival - Christopher Guy Collection Weavers Art’s latest rug introduction by world renowned international designer Christopher Guy has arrived and being showcased in our artistic gallery. These timeless designs are expertly hand-knotted in New Zealand Wool & Silk. Its neutral colour palette speaks to all discerning style preferences. Visit our flagship showroom located in the heart of the Castlefield Design District to view the full collection and many other designer rugs that have been artistically envisioned.


Top left to bottom right: CG Tribeca, CG Art Deco, CG Lexington, CG Deco, CG Manhattan, CG Nova

Special Offer for Toronto Home Subscribers! Mention this ad and pay no taxes on your purchase.

1400 Castlefield Avenue

Toronto, ON

416.929.7929

www.weaversart.com


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EDITOR’S LETTER

I AM FASCINATED BY CREATIVE PEOPLE – the folks who appear to effortlessly manifest innovation and beauty. Of course, many creative endeavours are anything but effortless. They require hard work and a lot of planning, and they can be accompanied by plenty of frustration. In my position as editor, I have the pleasure of encountering many creative people. They’re interior designers and architects who can visualize the transformation of a derelict building into a cozy, welcoming home. Artists who can convert a tube of oil paint into a captivating canvas that is enjoyed for years. Landscape architects who can transmute a patch of weeds into a horticultural oasis. Where there was once nothing, there is suddenly beauty. These are the people I am privileged to meet in my work. There is no shortage of creative people profiled in this issue. West Coast fashion designer Dorothy Grant comes to mind. She uses the symbols of her Haida culture – orcas, ravens, hummingbirds – in the clothing she designs. There is also artist Tina Cartier. She paints portraits of women who are reminiscent of famous people. They’re not famous, she tells us, but they are powerful and swashbuckling. We also take you into some creatively designed homes in this issue. Interior designer Kirsten Marshall and contractor Nuno Teixeira were able to visualize how a 1910 house in Toronto’s Little Italy neighbourhood

could be transformed into an open-plan home for contemporary life. Ditto for the design-construction team that performed the same transformative miracle in a 1915 Moore Park house. Heather Lewis, a designer who turned her creativity on her own home in the Junction Triangle neighbourhood, breathed life into a house with good bones that needed just a few cosmetic touch-ups. Of course, creativity is manifested in many ways. Writer Julie Gedeon shows us how creative the chefs of Tofino are in her feature about where to eat in the Vancouver Island town, which welcomes hordes of foodies every year. If you’re planning to travel this autumn, Tofino might just be the destination your taste buds are craving. We also focus on trends in bathroom design in this issue. Prepare to be wowed by the impressive work being done by some very creative interior designers. Men At Work Design Build’s creation of a third-storey ensuite bathroom in the Bathurst and Queen area is testament to the firm’s creativity. Finally, the creativity of the many British Columbians who work in the burgeoning wine industry is celebrated on these pages. These folks are turning the Okanagan into a magnet for visitors who want to sip great wines, eat great food, and stare at great views. Creative people make the world a better – and more beautiful – place for the rest of us.

STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@movatohome.com There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @movatohome @movatohome @movatohome

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THE AUTUMN ISSUE


NEW

2 SIDED SHOWER DOOR ALSO FEATURING: LUNA SUNRIZE LIGHTED MIRROR / LUNA MERIDIAN PETITE VANITY

A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES FOR YOUR BATHROOM

www.fleurco.com


CONTRIBUTORS

JIM TOBLER Jim Tobler is a writer, editor and industry consultant. He was the editor of NUVO magazine from 2000 to 2006 and of MONTECRISTO magazine from 2008 to 2017. He was also senior editor of Wine Access, and has written, with chefs, four cookbooks. His feature for this issue about the Okanagan Valley’s wineries is based on his almost two decades of tours and interviews in the region, which is fast becoming a world-class wine-tourism destination. JULIE GEDEON Writer Julie Gedeon yearns to return to Tofino, on Vancouver Island, after spending a week not only hiking the lush Pacific rainforest trails, but indulging in the resort town’s fabulous farm- and dock-to-table food. A staunch fan of West Coast fare, Julie notes that Tofino – thanks in large part to the now iconic Wickaninnish Inn – has cultivated extraordinary culinary talent and is redefining West Coast cuisine. KAREN SEIDMAN It all started with a wish to relocate the main door from the side of the house to the front. That’s how architect Christopher Walker explained the transformation of the dated house in the Moore Park area of Toronto to veteran news reporter Karen Seidman. “That resulted in the new front bay window and the rest of the architecture sprang from there,” he explains. In this case, there wasn’t merely an aesthetic transformation, but a life transformation, as the family of five living in the gorgeous new home can now congregate in their open-concept house and enjoy each other’s company. As Walker says: “Good clients make good architecture.”   SUSAN KELLY The power of myth was brought home to regular contributor Susan Kelly in the two features she wrote for this issue. “It was such an honour to interview Haida fabric artist and designer Dorothy Grant,” she says, “and learn more about how this highly revered artist weaves such empowering symbols into her work.” As well, the very private designer provided some insight into her personal journey in becoming an artist. Switching gears for her regular horoscope feature, Susan explores how the ancient imagery of the zodiac might be reflected in current home decor trends. “They are, after all, the signs that decorate the walls of our universe, each deeply rooted in myth,” she says.

Volume 8, Number 5, Autumn Issue 2018 Date of Issue: September, 2018

6100 TransCanada Highway Suite 100, Pointe-Claire Quebec H9R 1B9

PUBLISHER Dr. Sharon Azrieli CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stanley Kirsh

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker ART DIRECTOR Randy Laybourne EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Carmen Lefebvre ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Neve Foltz CONTRIBUTORS Cheryl Cornacchia Julie Gedeon Elisabeth Kalbfuss Susan Kelly Tracey MacKenzie Colin McAllister Brenda O’Farrell Phillipa Rispin Justin Ryan Karen Seidman Jim Tobler PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Arnal Donna Griffith Joshua Lawrence Sacha Leclair Sandy MacKay Jeff McNeill Assaf Pinchuk Valerie Wilcox STYLING Ashley Barrey Nicola Hockin Rania Ismail-Cherry Kirsten Marshall Leanne McKeachie Natalie Venalainen

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CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Matthew Azrieli PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wendy Loper CONTROLLER Jenny Marques DIRECTOR OF SALES - NATIONAL Kelly Chicoine DIRECTOR OF REGIONAL SALES - ONTARIO Grant Wells FOUNDER Leah Lipkowitz For sales inquiries, please email Grant Wells: gwells@movatohome.com

LEGAL DEPOSIT 1927-324x Toronto Home Magazine Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without the written permission of Toronto Home Magazine is strictly prohibited. issn


Céline Chair

1168 Caledonia Road Toronto North of Lawrence Avenue 416-532-2891 barrymorefurniture.com Handmade in Toronto 有中文服务


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CONTENTS

28 ON THE COVER GREAT CANADIAN COTTAGES Colin and Justin’s new TV show takes viewers inside unique vacation homes in Canada’s cottage country Photo: Jeremy Kohm

UNDERSTATED LANDSCAPE DESIGN

A lakefront bungalow in St. Catharines gets new gardens and hardscapes that marry well with its architecture

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BON APPÉTIT

Tofino is a magnet for foodies thanks to its excellent restaurants that are creating a new West Coast cuisine

68 HOME FROM THE HIGHLANDS

A builder borrows an ancient Scottish-longhouse design when designing a home for his family

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CONTENTS

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EDITOR’S LETTER

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THIS JUST IN A selection of new items for your home

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ABOUT FACE Tina Cartier’s figurative art depicts strong, swashbuckling women

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THE SUITE LIFE The third floor of a Toronto rowhouse is transformed into an ensuite bathroom and bedroom

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HEAVEN KNOWS As stars and planets align and misalign this season, our decor choices are influenced by their movements

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VERY VICTORIAN A bathroom in a historic home in Victoria is restored in its original style

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IN SEARCH OF THE RIGHT PIECE This Oakville company customizes furnishings to ensure customers get perfect items for their homes

100

GETTING OUR FIXTURES FIX Toronto Home’s guide to the latest bathroom fixtures on the market

120

RAISE YOUR GLASS The Okanagan Valley’s wineries beckon as a destination for oenophiles

136

CURTAIN CALL How to choose window treatments that deserve applause

138

CHILL OUT AND CURL UP A guide to the latest in sofas and armchairs

148

TURNING 60 A Toronto company that specializes in rugs and flooring celebrates six decades in business

150

CHANGE OF LIFESTYLE A family leaves Toronto for a quieter life in a shoreline home on Constance Bay

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WARM ALL OVER Radiant heating methods offer efficient and aesthetic ways to warm up a home

160

THE POWER OF LEGEND Fashion designer Dorothy Grant creates clothing that interprets Haida culture

164

A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING Adding a custom-built walk-in closet to your home is easier than you may think

166

WATER WORKS Today’s bathrooms are sophisticated sanctuaries thanks to new technologies, materials and fixtures

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HOT TWIST ON A COOL IDEA Fire bowls extend the outdoor living experience beyond summer

184

A STEP AHEAD OF THE TRENDS Bättig Design creates avant-garde staircases for commercial and residential interiors

186

COSMETIC CHANGES Designer Heather Lewis beautifies her own home without making major structural alterations

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SWEET DREAMS Contemporary sleeper sofas don’t give you nightmares like the old ones

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FINDING THE FOREVER HOME A 1910 house is redesigned as a perfect long-term abode for a young family

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PUT A RING ON IT How to buy an engagement ring that is an enduring symbol of love

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FROM CRAMPED TO CONTEMPORARY

A 1915 Moore Park home is reimagined and revamped to meet a family’s needs

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HONEYMOON HAVEN A designer decorates her newlywed clients’ apartment while they’re away

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176 NEW HOTEL IN AN ANCIENT LAND The Orient Jerusalem Hotel offers luxe accommodations in a historic, sacred place


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DESIGN

1. BEAR HUG Stay warm and toasty this autumn. Enjoy a hot beverage and keep your hands cozy by wrapping them around this delightful bear-shaped mug. You can nestle your hand inside the glove-like handle for extra warmth. Stoneware with 14-ounce capacity. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com 1 2

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3. LUSH LIFE Floral decor accents are on trend

Barrymore Furniture

right now. We present Dutch

1168 Caledonia Rd., Toronto

Blooms by Jackie von Tobel, a still

416-532-2891

life of lush flowers against a moody

www.barrymorefurniture.com

dark background. Unframed canvas, 50Ë? W x 60Ë? H.

2. COME TO A CONCLUSION Enjoy some comfortable down time in the Conclusion chair. Framed in maple wood, the chair has an urban vibe and ultra-comfortable seat and back cushions. Available in a range of wood finishes and fabrics/leathers. Cocoon Furnishings 2695 Bristol Cir., Unit 2, Oakville 905-829-2780 www.cocoonfurnishings.ca

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Expression of excellence

WHEN INTRODUCING THE "X" FACTOR INTO A PREDOMINANT "Y" BUSINESS WORLD, THE RESULTS ARE BOUNDLESS. The build is no longer just a build. It is a creation that is born with endless possibilities. All senses are considered. All possibilities are taken and the true essence of your vision is born.

"I take pride in being a strong woman in a traditionally male dominated industry."

C: (416) 723.9984 | barroso@bell.net

barrosohomes.com


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DESIGN

1. CONFIDENT CURVES This elegant chest of drawers would work equally well as a sideboard and would complement any of several design aesthetics. The top and drawer veneers are Louro Preto wood, the legs are mahogany, and the whole piece is set off with smart brass accents. Barrymore Furniture 1168 Caledonia Rd., Toronto 416-532-2891 www.barrymorefurniture.com

2. RUSTIC ALLURE Step back in time with this engineered Appalachian white oak, from the Old World collection. The visual effect is earthy and gently time-worn. Wider and longer planks are ideal for open floor plans. Create added richness on any floor or wall by staggering planks or installing them in a herringbone pattern. Allan Rug 103 Miranda Ave., Toronto 416-787-1707 www.allanrug.com 1

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3. GO WITH THE FLOW In collaboration with OCAD University, Weavers Art offers Fish by Amanda, a rug designed by a Swedish design student taking inspiration from Toronto’s ever-changing weather. Like a flood, the shapes flow out over the rug and create a dynamic midpoint in the room. Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 255 Bass Pro Mills Dr., Vaughan ~ 905-660-7929 www.weaversart.com

4. A FLAIR FOR COMFORT With a gentle push, the Flair armchair reclines

Hide House

to create the perfect spot for reading, napping

49 Eastern Ave., Acton

or watching television. LeatherCraft of Eto-

519-853-1031

bicoke offers this Canadian-made top-grain

www.hidehouse.ca

leather recliner in a large selection of leather grades and colours. Â 16

THE AUTUMN ISSUE


CLASSIC IN A NEW COMPOSITION Kitchen Interior Design www.siematic.com

available at 1055 Bay Street, Toronto 416-286-2222 www.binnskitchens.com


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DESIGN

1. SLEEK SOPHISTICATION Here’s an elegant sofa that is sophisticated by itself, but not so much that it wouldn’t suit all but the most casual decor. It features a modern cut-out frame. We show it in Tobacco, but optional fabrics are available. 75˝ W x 35.5˝ D x 30.75˝ H. Union Lighting & Furnishings 1491 Castlefield Ave., Toronto 416-652-2200 www.unionlf.com

2. GLOW GENTLE INTO THAT GOOD NIGHT The Everly chandelier casts a soft glow both upwards and downwards with four 40-watt candelabra bulbs, providing a warm ambience. It’s crafted with abaca rope woven over a powder-coated metal frame. Cocoon Furnishings 2695 Bristol Cir., Unit 2, Oakville 905-829-2780 www.cocoonfurnishings.ca 1

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4. BRING THE OUTDOORS INSIDE Maximize your view and create a fluid living space (up to an impressive 24 feet wide in seconds) with Lepage chic and practical bi-fold doors. The stylish handle activates the multi-point lock effortlessly so you can enjoy a refreshing breeze in one quick turn. Chateau Window & Door Systems 90 Tycos Dr., Suite 1, Toronto 416-783-3916 x 235 www.chateauwindows.com

3. TASTEFUL AND TRANSITIONAL Concrete Blossom is a timeless rug design in a warm, neutral palette featuring highlights of soft coral hues. It’s hand-knotted with hand-spun wool and silk, and is the perfect bridge between traditional and contemporary design. Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 255 Bass Pro Mills Dr., Vaughan ~ 905-660-7929 www.weaversart.com

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

5. YOU’VE GOT IT MADE IN THE SHADE

6. TOASTY TOOTSIES, TOASTY TOWELS

The Ocean Master Crescent umbrella is the culmination of

The Omnipanel II towel radiator offers a large surface area and is

durable engineering, stylish profile and functional shade

available in three heights and three voltages: 120, 208 and 240. One

design. Made with marine-grade materials, the umbrella

colour-matched towel bar is included with each radiator and may be

features a polished aluminum frame and a canopy with

snapped on anywhere desired. Additional towel bars and three-knob

reinforced stitching that is available in any custom colour.

accents may be ordered. The Omnipanel II is offered in 100 finishes; we show it in matte black.

Southern Living Design 844 Southdown Rd., Mississauga

Runtal North America

905-823-3036

2861 Sherwood Heights Dr., Unit 21, Oakville

www.southernlivingdesign.ca

1-905-829-4941 www.runtalnorthamerica.com 5

6 7

7. ANGLING FOR COMPLIMENTS Two pieces sold separately — a mirror and a dimensional shelf – match handily for a wall-hung design element. The storage space is practical for small objects and decorative trinkets. Made of wood. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

THE AUTUMN ISSUE

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DESIGN

1. FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY The Papillon 72 dining table from the Disegno collection appears ready to soar. It is offered in a selection of finishes: an iron base in Graphite or with a finish of satin brass, dark brass, titanium, or dark titanium. The top is available in transparent or extra-clear glass, smoke glass, or marble glass (shown). 98.43˝ W x 47.24˝ D x 29.72˝ H. Import Temptations 188 Bentworth Ave., Toronto 416-256-3150 www.import-temptations.com

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2. VERSATILE VALET This side-mount valet rod can be placed almost anywhere in a closet. It extends to 10 inches, can support as much as 50 pounds, and slides out for easy use. Most closets benefit from at least two valet rods, especially if you share the space with a significant other. Simply Closets 71 Marycroft Ave., Unit 27, Woodbridge 416-385-8855 www.simplyclosets.ca

3. COMFY CURVES The stylish Amari armchair by Janus Et Cie is a unique statement piece for any seating area, indoors or out. The curved design offers as much comfort as it does style. Made with a powder-coated aluminum frame and a handwoven Janusfiber sling, this lounger is available in an assortment of colours. Like all items in the Amari line, it’s sure to leave a lasting impression. Southern Living Design 844 Southdown Rd., Mississauga 905-823-3036 www.southernlivingdesign.ca

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4. BLOOMING LOVELY This sofa’s dramatic floral cut-velvet fabric makes a bold statement. From the Osborne & Little textile collection, the pattern easily becomes a focal point with its black background and magnificent peony floral print featured in three colourways. The durable fabric blend is polyester, viscose

5. STYLE AND FUNCTION, BAR NONE

and cotton, and is suitable for drapery, upholstery, pillows and bedding.

We call it a bar cart, but this retro-

Union Lighting & Furnishings

inspired two-tier cart on wheels could

1491 Castlefield Ave., Toronto

Maple Drapery & Carpet

serve various functions in your home. It

416-652-2200

8481 Keele St., Unit 11A, Concord ~ 905-660-7290

has two tiers in acrylic, and we show it

www.unionlf.com

12967 Keele St., King City ~ 905-833-5464

with bronze accents, but a nickel finish is

www.mapledrapery.com

also available. 36˝ W x 21˝ D x 34˝ H. 4

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6. GO FOR THE GLAM The Emilio chair is a contemporary take on Art Deco design that adds an aura of luxury to any room. We show black velvet upholstery and a gold frame; also available with ecru velvet upholstery and a polished-silver stainless steel frame. 29.92˝ W x 29.5˝ D x 27.56˝ H; seat is 21.26˝ D x 14.57˝ H; arm height is 22.83˝. Import Temptations 188 Bentworth Ave., Toronto 416-256-3150 www.import-temptations.com

7. PRACTICALITY ON A PEDESTAL Runtal electric baseboard models now have a pedestal accessory, enabling the wall-mounted baseboard to be converted into a freestanding unit. With this accessory, the radiator is perfect for floor-to-ceiling windows, presenting a finished look on both front and back. The pedestal accessory is available in more than 100 colours and in lengths from three to 10 feet, in one-foot increments, to match Runtal baseboard radiators. Runtal North America 2861 Sherwood Heights Dr., Unit 21, Oakville 1-905-829-4941 www.runtalnorthamerica.com

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DESIGN

1. ALL THE RIGHT ANGLES Contemporary or retro, several decor aesthetics would welcome this low-back accent chair with T-shape metal frame and Giotto shale-grey fabric. It’s also available in an antique brass finish. 28˝ W x 28˝ D x 29˝ H. Union Lighting & Furnishings 1491 Castlefield Ave., Toronto 416-652-2200 www.unionlf.com

2. FASHION AND FUNCTIONALITY This striking vessel sink is made by the Italian art-glass firm Glass Design. The firm uses technologically advanced materials, such as silicone or stainless steel, and also crafts items with such traditional materials as 24 per cent PbO crystal and artisan glass to produce striking items that expertly marry good looks with practicality. Canaroma is the exclusive Canadian dealer for Glass Design. Canaroma Bath & Tile 7979 Weston Rd., Vaughan 905-856-7979 www.canaroma.com 1

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4. CELESTIAL INFLUENCE Designed by Juan Montoya, the Moon Rocks rug has raised circular motifs and interlocking patterns. It was inspired by Montoya’s fascination with the starry sky in the countryside, and it just might inspire you to decorating heights. Weavers Art 1400 Castlefield Ave., Toronto ~ 416-929-7929 255 Bass Pro Mills Dr., Vaughan ~ 905-660-7929 www.weaversart.com

3. SHOWER SHOWPIECE The Industria series of custom glass shower enclosures gives the impression of an industrial window. Industria is a proprietary matte black polymer that’s applied to the face of the shower enclosure, making cleaning the glass on the inside a breeze. Customizable as to pattern and thickness of strip. Exclusive to Doors & More. Doors & More 905-532-9223 www.doorsandmore.ca

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Designer Screen Shades with Powerview ® Motorization

drapery, blinds, carpet, upholstery, bedding, wallpaper

Nantucket ™ with LiteRise ®

Silhouette ® Bon Soir ™

Designer Banded Shades with Powerview ® Motorization

8481 Keele St. Concord 905.660.7290 & 12967 Keele St. King City 905.833.5464 mapledrapery.com


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DESIGN

1. LONG AND LEAN A river of diamonds (106, for a total of 2.33ct) runs down each drop earring, flashing in the sunlight or candlelight – pretty much any light,

GLITTER

for that matter. Each river is nestled into an 18-kt white gold setting. MARK LASH 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229

&

9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 www.marklash.com

GLOW 1 2

3

3. THE RIGHT CHANNELS Stripes are in this year, as is this on-trend men’s wedding ring. The band is 18-kt white gold with “stripes” of channel-set diamonds, 32 in all for a total of 0.95 carats. MARK LASH 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 www.marklash.com

2. SLIDE INTO SOMETHING SPARKLY The adjustable slider clasp is an interesting feature of this 14-kt white gold bracelet. Chances are, though, that it’ll be hard to ignore its centrepiece: a sparkling line of 30 baguette diamonds flanked by 56 round diamonds (0.69 carats in all). MARK LASH 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 www.marklash.com

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Canada’s Ultimate Destination Today’s Finest Contemporary & Most Up-to-Date Collections

Bedding Bath Decor Kitchen Gifts Electrics Tabletop Glass & Barware Mattress

28 stores

linenchest.com

Canadian owned

Leaside Village (Toronto) 416-425-0533 • Richmond (Toronto) 416-260-2158 • Stockyards (Toronto) 416-760-9704 • Erin Mills Power Centre (Mississauga) 905-828-4449 Heartland Town Centre (Mississauga) 905-502-5399 • Colossus Power Centre (Vaughan) 905-856-6430 • Westwood Power Center (London) 519-680-2615


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DESIGN

Photo: Discovery Dream Homes

ICONIC HOMES IN THE GREAT WHITE NORTH

Colin and Justin’s new TV show takes viewers inside some unique vacation homes in Canada’s cottage country BY COLIN MCALLISTER AND JUSTIN RYAN

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Photo: Jeremy Kohm

DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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DESIGN

(Previous left page) A modernist retreat designed by Peterborough-based Discovery Dream Homes,

(Previous right page) Opening doors all over cottage country: Colin and Justin

sits proudly atop a heavily veined granite outcropping overlooking Stoney Lake. The wood-and-glass

survey the landscape from the breezeway at the lakeside home of architect

structure reinterprets the traditional post-and-beam architectural style in a modern idiom.

Vanessa Fong and her husband, Ryan Taylor.

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Photos: Sandy MacKay

DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

(Left) A “Scottish Longhouse,” the Ontario home of Scott and Lynn Young references a traditional style found in remote parts of Scotland. Wood-clad and roofed with steel, the vernacular has been updated for a contemporary lifestyle. (Above) The metal backsplash and integrated appliances bring a “heavy metal” edge to this contemporary kitchen.

FOR AS LONG AS WE CAN REMEMBER, we’ve been inspired by beautiful homes. Whether we are designing and subsequently writing about or filming gorgeous abodes, home - as we see it – is where the heart resides. And it’s that heartbeat that propels us. During our 20-year career, we’ve crafted dream nests for politicians and rock stars, rejigged homes across Australia, fashioned grand villas in the Middle East, and catalogued, for fine shelter publications, dozens of domestic spaces in North America, Britain, France, Spain, and elsewhere. And, as we write, our style passport awaits its next stamp; this time, we’re en route to South Africa, where we’ll kick off

a large residential project. We relish every minute of our multi-continental journey. It’s seldom a chore. But can we whisper something, sotto voce? Our latest show, Great Canadian Cottages, isn’t actually a makeover series. For once, we won’t be rolling up our sleeves in an attempt to erase the decorative misadventures of others. For once, we can breathe. Our all-new docu-series positively groans with glossy inspiration, but this series is all about the “after.” In short, it chases the socalled money shot without the time-consuming reno run-up. Great Canadian Cottages takes viewers into 24 homes, each of which boasts fascinating architecture. •

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DESIGN

Acres of glass and pristine white lines make the live/work space of

One such domicile is the live/work space of photographer Larry Williams. A spectacle of glass and metal, it’s not typical of Peterborough’s architectural vernacular. The Stoney Lake “box,” envisioned by architects GH3, sits stealth-like atop the ubiquitous granite of this robust landscape. The blizzard-white cottage has excellent flow thanks to its open-concept design, and is bathed in natural light, courtesy of large window blinds that open and close at the touch of a button. In the living room, a leather sectional sofa is perpendicular: one arm faces the lake and the other the white kitchen. Flat kitchen cabinet doors ensure the aesthetic remains uncomplicated, while seamless (virtually indestructible) Corian clads the island. Art and sculpture bestow shots of colour and the view of Mother Nature adds more. “It’s a constant evolution,” says the homeowner. “The marriage of climate and landscape with water and sky, provides endless interest. No two days are the same.”

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Photos: Larry Williams

photographer Larry Williams a temple of style and practicality.

All white on the night: a house that boasts “get up and glow.” As darkness settles in, the studio becomes a beacon against the night sky.


DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

Blackbirch is the dramatic Haliburton hideaway of Chris and Susan Meiorin. A square indoor table meets year-round dining needs, while a second dining table, in the screened porch area, is used for

Photos: Stamp Architecture

semi-alfresco meals in warm weather. A pale wood floor, grey-washed wall cladding, and industrial lighting bestow a cozy ambience on the hallway at Blackbirch; a wall-hung HBC blanket adds texture.

Another cabin featured in the series is Blackbirch, the black-roofed retreat of Chris and Susan Meiorin, their daughters Rachel and Taylor, and the family’s beloved dog, a Vizsla called Mia. Chris and Susan are owners of Euro Vinyl Windows; little wonder, then, that the fenestration is so on point. Overlooking Drag Lake, Haliburton’s finest body of water, the 2,400-square-foot, tri-level rectilinear home boasts three ground floor

bedrooms, a cavernous living/dining/kitchen area, and a master suite accessed via glasssided stairs that appear to float against a barn board wall. Nothing feels contrived in this home, designed by Toronto’s STAMP Architecture. Every object within the post-and-beam structure was chosen by the family or is a gift from friends. This is where the Meiorin clan decompresses.

“We adore Toronto,” explains Chris as our film crew bustles around, “but when we travel north, that’s when the magic happens.” Susan adds: “This place is our sanctuary. Chris rarely stops working, but coming here lets him recharge.” Blackbirch is a magical environment, a thoroughly cool world. Tune in to explore further when our new show launches. •

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DESIGN

At one with nature – The Georgian Bay vacation retreat of architect Charles Gane and his wife Robin.

Next on our extensive cottage tour is the Georgian Bay retreat of architect Charles Gane. Wandering the space with its passionate creator, we learn a little of the project’s history. Charles, his wife Robin and their family, spent the first season camping on the rock face, as the build progressed. Safe under canvas, they dreamed of the majesty that would emerge from the softly undulating typography. And boy, has it emerged. But this wasn’t an easy build. Given the cottage’s remote location, all materials, Charles explains, had to be shipped by barge. “When you’re working on the mainland and suddenly need an ancillary component, it’s easy to grab what you need. But when you have only water access, the rules are different: you can’t simply dash to a supplier on a whim. Planning is critical.”

Photos: Paul Orenstein

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Like a spirit level measuring nature, the stretched lines of this stunning home are a counterpoint to the undulating granite shoreline.

Photos: Paul Orenstein

blur the lines between indoors and out.

Colin and Justin’s new docu-series airs on Cottage Life beginning in October. Check listings for details.

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Photo: Jeremy Kohm

Measuring 2,125 square feet, the cottage was built on a framework of Douglas fir. All timbers were prefabricated off-site, with most interior finishes left untreated to enrich the patina. Exterior surfaces, on the other hand, were protected with a clear, penetrating sealer to add visual warmth. As viewed from the lake, the rectilinear cottage – for all its drama and scale – appears to recede, thanks to a combination of honey and grey tones that ensure it doesn’t dominate the landscape. Now you’ve glimpsed a few of the vacation retreats we visited, we hope you’ll tune in. Bear in mind that while each home we profile is different from the others, they all share one aspect in common: they’re all Great Canadian Cottages. •

Floor-to-ceiling fenestration and acres of Douglas fir


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DESIGN

CREATING THE WOW EFFECT IN A LOW-KEY GARDEN DESIGN

A lakeside St. Catharines bungalow is given a streamlined, elegant landscape BY SUSAN KELLY PHOTOGRAPHY: JEFF MCNEILL

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DESIGN

THE UNDERSTATED AND CLASSICALLY contemporary exterior of this newly built bungalow shows a certain Frank Lloyd Wright influence. Like those designed by that pioneer of organic architecture, the home appears to be at one with its lakefront surroundings in the Port Dalhousie community in St. Catharines, Ontario.

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“Our main challenge was to enhance the home’s best qualities and modern style through the landscaping and, of course, make the most of the lake views the area is known for,” says Doug Glancy, landscape designer and owner of Kiva Architectural Design in Fonthill, whose company was responsible for the transformation.


DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

When it came to choosing materials, the designer believed the home’s aesthetic called for a minimal approach. For a touch of urban sophistication, he liberally used polished concrete aggregate slabs to complement the home’s facade. They cover not only terraces but raised planters and outdoor kitchen areas.

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As well, large slabs inset into the ground form walkways near the rear deck and side pool area. Outlined with artificial turf — to ensure the “grass” stays green and requires no maintenance — they become features that lead the eye as well as the feet. •

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DESIGN

To punctuate this understated scheme, Glancy strategically placed large metal panels to form bold and striking privacy screens. One shields the side pool zone, the other the firepit area at the rear. As well, they add an architectural, almost sculptural, element and are made of Corten, often called “weathering” steel. “It develops a rusted, highly textured surface over time, yet remains strong and stable,” says the designer. “And its warm orange-brown colour harmonizes with the ipe wood used on the decks and shade features.”

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For consistency, minimalism extends to the plant palette. Glancy relied heavily on the subtle shades of greens and varied textures found in ornamental grasses. Switch grass (Panicum virgatum ‘Heavy Metal’), maiden grass (Miscanthus ‘Gracillimus’) and tufted hairgrass (Deschampsia cespitosa ‘Goldtau’) feature strongly in raised beds and those at ground level. For a contemporary look, only two types of grass were planted in each, separately in blocks rather than mixed or in alternating rows. Colour was

added judiciously in touches of blue salvia, geraniums, and white hydrangeas. The homeowners, a couple with three school-aged children, were keen to preserve two large mature maple trees. Standing at the back of the home, they shade a seating area with a raised flower box that also contains a modern linear fire feature. As well, a row of four ornamental pear trees were added to the front, and flowering dogwood by the separate pool area. •

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DESIGN

The back area facing Lake Ontario was designed to provide several areas from which the homeowners and their guests might enjoy the backyard and revel in the fine view. A wide covered terrace contains spacious and separate dining and lounge areas. Two steps lead down to the lower seating area and the lake beyond. One of the home’s two outdoor kitchens is set off to the side. It is seamlessly set in a long divider with a double concrete counter. A top-of-the-line barbecue and hidden storage make it as functional as it is stylish.

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The kitchen also serves to visually define the entertaining area while concealing a basement walkout beyond. The latter proved problematic for the owners, who couldn’t see how it could have not only function but a distinctive style, Glancy says. His solution was to add planters with stone surrounds, offset the stairs and place ipe wood accent panels to the walls. Inset LED lighting creates ambience at night and ensures safety.


DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

The couple had originally planned to put the pool on the lake side of the home. But after living there for a year, they realized the occasional high winds off Lake Ontario might pose a problem. “I generally recommend that people live in their home for at least that long before taking on an extensive landscaping project,” Glancy says. “I think it takes a while to know how you really will use the space.” The family now enjoys the 18-by-38-foot rectangular pool on the

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more-sheltered south side of the property, between the detached garage and the house. The home’s second outdoor kitchen is located there, as is a second dining area. “In the end, I think we were able to provide a variety of living spaces and complement the home’s best features without making the landscaping obvious or intrusive,” says Glancy. “The overall design is elegant and low key, like the house.” •

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ART

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ART TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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ABOUT FACE Mixed-media portraits by Montreal artist Tina Cartier depict strong, defiant women BY JULIE GEDEON

TINA CARTIER’S PORTRAITS OF WOMEN reflect the seductive boldness of defying traditional norms. “I want to affirm strong women possessing loads of character and redefining what it is to be female,” says Cartier, a Montrealarea mixed-media artist. Cartier’s solo exhibition, titled The Theory of “She,” opened at Galerie le 1040 in Montreal’s Plateau-Mont-Royal neighbourhood this past spring. More recently, the artist participated in the Mtl en Arts 2018 festival, and won the coup de coeur (public choice award). Her works are also featured on ARTBOMB, the Canadian subscriber-based daily online art auction. •

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ART

Each portrait is brought to life through vivid colours and three-dimensional elements. “I use costume jewelry, spikes, beading, feathers and other things to give each portrait texture and depth,” Cartier says. “I also feature aspects of the culture that informed them.” A lifelong artist, Cartier studied art at l’Université du Québec à Montréal and spent a subsequent year studying fine arts at Concordia University. “I’ve been doing the strong female portraits for about a year,” she says. “They’re my way of saying: it’s my time now as an artist. See me. I’m here, with a bang.”

Many of her subjects appear to be famous women but are rarely so. “I take the photographs of regular models or my girlfriends or even Barbie dolls and show how adding specific fashion elements transform them into Marilyn Monroe, Janice Joplin or Blondie,” Cartier says. “At the same time, I’m showing how each of these icons dating all the way back to Marie Antoinette have advanced the evolution of women.” •

(Above) Tina Cartier’s beloved grandmother, along with her personal love of boxing, inspired “She’s simply a badass fighting another badass” (48 by 72 inches). The canvas aims to uncover the fighting spirit of women in an age when they were pressured to behave like ladies. King Kong and Godzilla remind us that male monsters belong to a past era while the faint words “Fight Like A Girl” across the top of the canvas convey a rosier future.

(Opposite) Viewers assume that “She’s the wild, the free, the beautiful” is Cartier’s tribute to Mexican artist Frida Kahlo de Rivera, but the resemblance is at most a subconscious manifestation. “I just wanted a strong Latin American woman whose power shows through the artificial flowers in her hair and the exotic birds that I stitched with sequins on her shoulders,” Cartier says. “And I guess Frida emerged.” The adorned epaulets imply how each generation of women in some way lifts the next.

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ART

(Above) “She came, she saw, she loved” is a modern interpretation of Marie Antoinette that emphasizes that women can be all floral and fine lace and yet strong of character. The real 3D lenses and media images are to remind today’s feminine queen that any prescribed look for women is an illusion and they should dress as they please.

Always informed by street art, Cartier’s pieces incorporate spray-paint graffiti and other urban elements that are part of the mainstream art scene. In one piece, street posters used as papier-mâché create a three-dimensional Asian gown. Cartier, who adores martial arts, wanted to convey that delicate women can still be street-savvy. Her clients tend to be people in their thirties and forties. “I touch on their youth by featuring a Black Sabbath hoodie, bejeweled epaulets from the punk era, and other aspects of the 1980s,” she says.

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ART TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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Music from the 1980s figures prominently in a piece titled “She was a waitress in a cocktail bar when she saw you,” a work that was sold quickly. Cartier has us singing The Human League’s Don’t You Want Me, Baby, with the song’s lyrics in neon lights as part of the work. The Blondie lookalike’s garb is made of black-and-white photocopies of ’80s jackets along with recycled studs from the same era. The tape cassettes and boombox background give a nod to the lingering influence of the decade’s music in encouraging women to break with past stereotypes. •

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ART

“She knows nothing of borders and cares nothing for rules” (48 by 48 inches) features a punk rock queen with a spiked crown and furred and feathered epaulets adorned with pearls and necklaces. The message “I suppose it will make sense someday” suggests there’s no reason for her to explain herself to anyone – not even to herself.

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ART TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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Photo: Alfredo Ziano

A Barbie doll in the work titled “She’s having breakfast at Tiffany’s” underscores the plastic public nature of the early 1960s female icons. Marilyn Monroe’s dominance over Audrey Hepburn also emphasizes the idea that blondes indeed had more fun or at least supposed power and influence.

Cartier’s edgy images always portray women pushing aside societal boundaries, whether they’re stepping out of the supposedly idyllic 1950s into a boxing ring or into a sequined disco jacket and sunglasses, inspired by celebrity icons. Her subjects ooze attitude with their “I’m not budging” stance and typically pink or ruby pout. The work titled “She knows nothing of borders and cares nothing for rules,” for example, reflects a young woman who reigns

over her own life. Her power derives from punk rock culture. “She’s a trashy queen, rather than a princess,” Cartier says. “Someone who knows her own mind and does what she wants.” Cartier is currently working on The Theory of “She” Part II, which will pay tribute to Amelia Earhart, Coco Chanel and other notable women. The exhibit will be held at Galerie 1040 in June, 2019. Her work can be viewed on her website: www.tinacartier.com. •

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DESIGN

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A SUITE OF ONE’S OWN The expanded top floor of a rowhouse becomes the parents’ realm BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: VALERIE WILCOX STYLING: NATALIE VENALAINEN

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DESIGN

LIFE IN THE CITY USUALLY MEANS living in proximity – often very close proximity – to one’s neighbours. If you need more space but like your home and don’t want to move, what do you do? You build up – which is exactly what the owners of this rowhouse in the Bathurst and Queen area did. In their two-storey house, which had two small rooms making up a tiny third storey, the owners didn’t have a true master suite, so that was on their wish list. The husband

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also worked at home, with his office in one of those two rooms. A better office was definitely on the list. Designer Keith O’Brien provided the couple with an expanded third floor that now covers the same area as the floor below. It contains the master bedroom (11 feet by 16 feet) and bathroom (9.5 feet by 10.5 feet), two walk-in closets, and an office. In short, the entire third floor is a suite for husband and wife.

When it came to interior details, “the aesthetic was decided from the get-go. The floor tile was the major driving factor in the bathroom design,” says Natalie Venalainen, senior designer in the interior design department of Men At Work Design Build, which oversaw the transformation of the space. “The husband and wife are in creative fields,” Venalainen says. “They are pretty decisive. They made decisions quickly and they knew what they wanted.” •


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DESIGN

With the concrete f loor tiles being such a strong presence, homeowners and designer dialed down the impact of the furnishings for both the bathroom and bedroom. The long bathroom vanity and the linen tower were custom-made by Allwood Carpentry Manufacturing and finished in walnut veneer. The countertop and backsplash were clad with Caesarstone quartz in the Fresh Concrete colour. The sleek furniture, an intriguingly shaped mirror above the vanity, and the globe sconce lights on each side give the room a hint of a Mid-century Modern aesthetic. “I think the mirror plays off well with the globes and the pendant lights,” Venalainen says. “There’s a bit of tension happening.” The mid-century vibe is carried into the bedroom, too. The handmade bed and pair of night tables in walnut were custom-made by Objets Mécaniques. They are clean-lined, unfussy. Since the bedside tables have a relatively small top surface, Venalainen opted to use wall sconces rather than tabletop lamps for lighting. A rug with a subdued geometric pattern doesn’t clash with the bathroom tiles visible from the bedroom. The rug’s subtle orange tones reference the walnut furniture, and the bedding in purple and mauve is a quiet colour complement. A comfortable chair in a neutral beige colour makes for a reading nook by the large window.

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

“That reading nook is about bringing light in,” says Venalainen. Because the row house has no windows on either side, except in a jog down the wall against which the bed is placed, the back window is as large as possible. There is a transom window above the bathroom mirror that captures light from the hallway skylight. A similar transom above the bed provides light from the jog while ensuring privacy.

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The number-one element at the top of her clients’ wish lists was “We need more light,” Venalainen says. “Natural light affects daily mood so much. One common thread throughout all our projects is natural light. It makes this space so much better.” •

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LIFESTYLE

MAKE A PLANETARY PLAN FOR YOUR DECOR Let astrology guide you in interior design choices that will take you into 2019 BY SUSAN KELLY

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LIFESTYLE TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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AUTUMN CAN BE AN AWKWARD TIME, decor trend-wise. With more time spent indoors, it’s natural to crave an interior refresh. And yet the trend reports for 2019 won’t be out for months. How to know which will have staying power? Will those funky fringed lampshades that are the darlings of Instagram now be next year’s chevron print (RIP)? I believe astrology may help us to make future-proof design choices. Home decor trends go through cycles, after all. And astrology is the study of cycles, as signified by the planets as they orbit and switch signs. A planet is said to be “in a sign” if, when viewed from earth, the orb appears to line up with it in the zodiac. Each planet proceeds at its own pace, sometimes spending years in a given sign. And every time one enters a new sign, it’s as if it embraces a whole new colour scheme, fresh upholstery and flooring. When it comes to trends, astrologers look to the slower moving planets, the pack from Jupiter on out. Those planets indicate what resonates with the collective consciousness, the zeitgeist. Just for fun, let’s look at Pluto (which astrologers stubbornly still call a planet) and colour. From the late 1990s and for a dozen years, it was in the warmth-craving fire sign of Sagittarius. Then most decorators would

MOODY VERSUS BOLD COLOUR SCHEMES: Countering the sombre Capricorn palette is an emerging trend for very bright, in-your-face colours. This one seems to belong to Jupiter, now in the extreme and intense sign of Scorpio. It never does anything by halves, and I find clients of that sign prefer lots of black with punches of red — colours trending strongly for late 2018. And on November 9, Jupiter will enter the rollicking and exuberant sign of Sagittarius for a year. I find historically this sign brings a riotous circus of colour, pure primary shades of yellow, red and blue. MAXIMALISM AND SUPERSIZING: Thanks also to two planets in ascetic Capricorn, minimalism will be around for a while, I think. But some of us find it boring, and a growing “maximalist” trend is emerging. This movement towards a return to lots of colour, pattern and personality I put squarely on the aforesaid Jupiter. That planet is all about “more is more.” It also likes exaggeration, and so statement sofas are in, the bigger the better. Chandeliers, likewise, are taking on epic proportions. I believe these trends will continue through 2019.

have advised “warm neutral colours, shades of beige” as the way to go. But by 2008, every colour expert I interviewed said grey would be the new neutral. I scoffed — then I checked my ephemeris. That same year, Pluto moved to Capricorn, a sober sign traditionally associated with the colour grey — which lo, has been the neutral du jour since. This sign tends to view things in black and white, which may also associate it with the ongoing trend for all-white interior colour schemes. Now Saturn has joined Pluto in the sign of the Goat. Given its reputation for a brooding moodiness, I find it not surprising that forecasters talk of how subdued or even sombre today’s colour choices are. Even everyone’s new favourite material, marble, is going from white to dark grey or black. This pairing lasts another two years, so painting the walls charcoal, dark grey or purple, or any deep shade of blue, especially navy, should feel right. Many find these shades give a sense of safety and stability in an uncertain world, a very Capricornian attribute. So what do the planets have to say about other major trends for 2018? Here is a look at six through the lens of astrology.

TEXTURE AND MORE TEXTURE: Last May, the planet Uranus packed up the moving truck and moved into Taurus for a seven-year stay. This is the most sensual of signs, so going forward, homes must appeal not only to the eye. Ambient sounds and scents will take on new significance. And de rigueur will be things that give tactile delight: woods with distressed surfaces, tiles with extreme 3D effects, furniture with a handmade feel or of rattan, and so on. And you can blame this planet for touchable velvet being the “it” fabric now.

CONTEMPORARY FARMHOUSE: The down-home look just might be the new black. This trend will have long-term traction, I think, due to the earth sign concentration and especially Uranus in Taurus. Uranus is about being forward-looking, inventive, even revolutionary, while Taurus loves tradition and authenticity. Several pundits feel this look works best when edited, stripped down to the essence. Apron sinks, warm wood Shaker-style cabinetry, and such details as handmade tiles played against antique white walls.

GREENERY: Uranus in Taurus joins two planets in Capricorn, making it an earth-sign troika for the next two years and a bit. These signs aim to be the salt of terra firma. Practical, grounded and dependable, they value nature. And so, houseplants — so long banished from contemporary schemes — have made a huge comeback in interiors of all styles. Especially trendy are colourful and hardy plants or those with intriguing patterned leaves. As well, some people green their spaces by applying olive green or chartreuse paint colour to walls, or perhaps a bold botanical-print wallpaper or fabric.

GO GLOBAL: People have always brought back treasures from their travels and have looked for ways to display them. But this trend calls for building an interior around that impulse, incorporating shapes, textures and designs from other cultures. This approach seems to work best in informal, even eclectic interiors. Think clay and terracotta tiles and global-inspired prints such as ikat. Accessories might be of rattan, shells or jute. This is one trend that might pick up steam as the year progresses, really taking off when Jupiter enters the sign of the traveller, Sagittarius, come November.

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BORROWED FROM THE

HIGHLANDS Builder Scott Young adapts the traditional Scottish longhouse to create his own home and offers its design concept to others. BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: SANDY MACKAY

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DESIGN

THERE ARE T WO CLOCKS in Scott and Lynn Young’s kitchen/dining area: one tells the local time; the other is set to the time in Scotland. “It’s so that when you’re phoning home, you know what time it is, and you’re not waking the mother-in-law,” Scott Young jokes. Scottish time isn’t the only thing Scott has imported to Canada. The owner/builder of Scot-Build Developments Inc. has started building a line of homes modelled on traditional Scottish longhouses in the Collingwood area north of Toronto, including one for himself and his wife in Clarksburg, The Blue Mountains. For hundreds of years, longhouses were built in the Highlands as farm

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homes, single-storey stone buildings with an earthen floor, thatched roof, and a fire pit and chimney in the middle for cooking and warmth. In the harsh winter months, the family would even bring their cattle inside to keep them warm and healthy. That long, low, practical building was the inspiration for what Scott calls the “modern longhouse,” which his company builds in six different models and floor plans. Instead of very small or even no windows in the traditional building, this new version has huge windows, an open floor plan with a modern, minimalist straight-line design and northern European styling. •


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Scott and Lynn have nicknamed their chandelier “the exploding Death Star” from the Star Wars movies; it’s from Union Lighting in Toronto. Table: IKEA; Langley Street chairs: Wayfair.

A dropped ceiling defines the kitchen area. The cabinetry is by Kitchen Craft from Knights Building Supplies. The upper cabinets are flush with the lower units to give the kitchen a clean line that Scott particularly likes. A stainless-steel backsplash reflects light. Appliances: Fisher & Paykel; white pendant lights over the island: Home Depot; stools: Structube.

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Scott’s home, the Longhouse model, has a main-floor open living space, two bedrooms, two bathrooms and a powder room, an office and a garage in an area of just over 1,800 square feet. There’s a large deck off the back of the house. The finished basement has two more bedrooms, a full bathroom, and an entertainment space with a bar area. The living room has a corner wood stove, with floor-to-ceiling windows on both sides. “It’s nice and bright and airy,” Scott says. “The baseboards are white, the walls are white, there are orange, blue, green and hot pink pops of colour. The light bounces all over the place.” Instead of the historic building materials of earth and wood, construction starts with NUDURA ICF (insulated concrete forms) foundations. “It’s like Lego blocks, and it’s just highly insulated,” Scott says. Hydronic heat is installed in the floors. Outside, the front door entrance area is recessed, with the bottom stair flush with the main exterior walls. In another nod to the Canadian climate, large black barn-type doors on the outside walls can slide over that recess to shade the front door in summer. In winter, Scott and Lynn close them if they’re expecting heavy snow. “When they’re closed, it looks like a cow shed or an agricultural building,” Scott says, in a look that’s reminiscent of the traditional longhouse. The house is topped with a metal roof, with no overhang or soffits.

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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Just like in the kitchen, a dropped ceiling defines the bar area in the basement. The bar is made of rolled steel, which was also used to make the headboard in the master bedroom. Its laquered surface easily wipes clean. Pendant lights: Home Depot; bar stools: McDonald’s Home Furniture.

“In cottage country, some folks like the stone look and dark f looring,” Scott says. While those homes can be quite cozy, he says, the longhouse models, “are made to be light and airy. These are a very different look.” Part of that airiness is achieved through the use of light-coloured wood. The floors are blond oak engineered flooring; the doors are eight-feethigh white oak. The lines are clean, without heavy or ornate moldings. Combined with the home’s large windows, the materials seem to invite the outdoors inside. Appreciation of an outdoor lifestyle is part of the reason Scott emigrated from Scotland almost a dozen years ago, when his two children were in their teens. The family first lived in Thornbury and Mississauga, but he always felt it was too much like the urban environment they had left behind. So, finally, they built their new home in Clarksburg. •

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The view is so great and the neighbours are far enough away that the Youngs don’t bother with window coverings. The huge windows are by Tiltco Fenestration, and the wood-burning stove is from Chantico fireplaces. Corbusier chair: Mobilia; Grampian coffee table by Wade Logan: Wayfair.

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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He says his favourite part of the house is the kitchen, mostly because of the clean lines. Lynn, he says, was keen for him to finish the basement to have an entertainment and bar area. He was reluctant at first, thinking there would be time to do it later, but finally concluded that she was right. “If we didn’t do it now, it would probably never get done,” he concedes, adding that it definitely adds to their enjoyment of the home. Scott says his longhouses have been generating a lot of interest and he often shows off his own home to clients or people interested in the style that he loves. “A house is a major part of your lifestyle,” he says. “When I go home, it’s a happy place to be in, the colours, the light coming in. I still have to pinch myself to think it’s mine.” •

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TRAVEL

The Vancouver Island town is a magnet for foodies thanks to restaurants that are creating a new West Coast cuisine

Photos: Ramdy Laybourne

BY JULIE GEDEON

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TRAVEL TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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TRAVEL

I KNEW A COUPLE OF SPECIAL RESTAURANTS awaited me in Tofino, but expected to eat fish and chips most days while visiting the Vancouver Island community. Boy, was I wrong! Tofino, nestled among lush rainforests, pristine beaches, and hiking trails overlooking the Pacific Ocean, is a culinary magnet where I never ate the same dish twice or anything deep-fried during the entire week.

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The exquisite food is increasingly why Tofino, with its population of 1,876, welcomes an estimated million visitors annually, according to Nancy Cameron, Tourism Tofino’s executive director. “People are treated to phenomenal culinary experiences by renowned chefs excited by the farm-, forest- and dock-to-table opportunities here,” she says.


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Photos courtesy of The Pointe Restaurant

TRAVEL TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

Everything I’d read and heard about The Pointe Restaurant at the Wickaninnish Inn made it a dinner must and it surpassed expectations. I don’t remember the last time an establishment bothered to learn every guest’s name. Our window seats overlooking the waves pounding The Pointe’s rocks and the evening’s surfers farther on Chesterman Beach made for a superb view. Every dish has Chef Warren Barr’s signature elements, such as Nootka rose with the dressed beets, strawberries and nasturtium accompanying the salmon tartare, and the sea asparagus in the chicken mole.

“We strive to offer the best of what is uniquely West Coast,” says Charles McDiarmid, the “Wick Inn’s” managing director. “For instance, our chef achieves a citrusy f lavour with the spruce and hemlock tips gathered every spring.” The Pointe offers diners such haute-degamme options as the Northern Divine caviar service and a memorable bottle from its renowned wine cellar. A new tasting menu with wine pairings is set every Saturday. Yet there are choices for a special family dinner, too. The Wickaninnish Cookbook documents how the resort put Tofino on the culinary map.

Out of necessity as much as commitment to excellence, the Wickaninnish has always made its own bread, croissants, butter, desserts and even ginger beer. “When we opened this location in 1996, we were lucky to get one city delivery a week,” McDiarmid recalls. “As a result, we’ve attracted young people who know they can learn everything about the restaurant/hotel business at our relatively small operation.” •

The Wickaninnish Inn has celebrated its contribution to the farm-, forest- and boat-to-table cuisine with a cookbook outlining the first 20 years of its culinary history.

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Nicholas Nutting and Jorge Barandiaran worked several years at “The Wick” before they opened the Wolf in the Fog as the chef and manager respectively; they promptly won enRoute magazine’s Best New Restaurant in Canada award in 2014. They serve everything from vacation brunch, to quick lunchtime burgers and salads, after-school desserts, all the way to fine dining. “You choose your experience here,” says Barandiaran. Everything receives chef Nutting’s Tofino touch, whether it’s the rhubarb granola or seaweed salad for brunch, chili squid and pork jowl for dinner, or Dark Chocolate Blackout dessert.

The Wolf in the Fog has done a modern take on traditional longhouse inspirations with several different wood textures including the magnificent chandeliers fashioned from Douglas fir shavings.

Photos courtesy of Wolf in the Fog

“Nick loves big f lavours,” Barandiaran says. “He borrows from global cultures to showcase local harvests and constantly push the boundaries of West Coast cuisine.” The restaurant’s strong relationship with the Tofino Ucluelet Culinary Guild has led to such dishes as Hakurei Turnips and Perogies when turnips are harvested. “And when the chanterelles pop up in fall, we feature them as much as possible because they’re so aromatic,” Barandiaran adds. “The Guild are food artisans who want the best showcase for their produce.” Always innovating, the Wolf’s kitchen has prepared a different Green Soul vegetarian plate every day since the place opened. And a block from the docks, the restaurant serves fish caught earlier the same day.

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Photos courtesy of SoBo

TRAVEL TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

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Chef Lisa Ahier at nearby SoBo (short for sophisticated bohemian) has also caused a culinary buzz with her minimalist approach to fresh ingredients to balance tastes above all else. “I want people to remember our fewer choices deliciously, creatively put together, so they can’t wait to have that dish again,” she says. Her “taste the love: fresh food from here and there” mission is emphasized by her suppliers being credited on SoBo’s website. Those long-term relationships result in black garlic, seasonal pickles, Nostrala cheese and other special ingredients figuring into SoBo’s vegetarian, meat and fish selections. Ahier’s inventive but accessible dishes are featured in The SoBo Cookbook. “I wanted people to actually use it,” she says. Its popularity has led to SoBo Specials being slated for a 2020 publication. SoBo’s cookie/pie counter and freezer stocked with chowders and ice cream sandwiches make it difficult to leave without getting something to go. •

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TRAVEL

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The Ice House Oyster Bar is still one of the two remaining ice houses in Tofino and a fish buying station, making the restaurant’s produce as

Location, location turned Alan Beesley into the Ice House Oyster Bar’s owner. “Initially, I just planned to modernize the ice house and fish-buying station, but then I realized the cold storage room had one of the best West Coast views I’d ever seen and it would be magical for a restaurant,” he says. The Ice House has Tofino’s best sunset-watching but even on dreary days, the inlet’s tranquil waters and frolicking seals make it idyllic. Shucker Paul Bradley couldn’t be more knowledgeable about oysters, while Chef David Provençale knowingly applies French-style techniques to bring out the best in sustainable dock-to-dish fare. The locally caught halibut wrapped in seaweed is divine.

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Photos courtesy of Ice House Oyster Bar

fresh as possible.


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Photos courtesy of Kuma

A nightly lineup outside Kuma lured us to its Japanese comfort food. Mitsumi Kawai and Rob Leadley opened it three years ago with recipes from her restaurateur parents and culinary inventions by Chef Simon Burch. The mound of “Bear” Tuna featuring local albacore with ponzu, ginger, garlic, green onion and crackers makes it difficult not to return. The Goma Eggplant tempura with sesame dressing is likewise delicious. “Everyone is encouraged to taste different things by sharing the small and large plates,” Kawai says. •

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We actually planned one day around lunch at the Sea Monster Noodle Bar when I saw how packed it was and learned it closed at 6:30 p.m. The place is obviously a local favourite. “There wasn’t really a lunch spot when we opened in May 2016,” says owner Cam Young. “I wanted to fill that niche but still have personal time.” He and sous chef Thor Magnusson created their menu based on Magnusson’s extensive Asian palette and what Tofino residents sought as food when out of town. While experimentation continues, there are some constants. “There’d be a revolt if we removed the Dan Dan,” Young says, referencing the Szechuan ground pork, gai lan, wheat noodle, peanut, green onion and cilantro combo. I personally adored the fish curry while regulars at other tables consumed the Pork Udon Soup or the Sticky Buns filled with pork or tuna.

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Photos courtesy of Sea Monster Noodle Bar

TRAVEL


TRAVEL TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

Even Industrial Way is an epicurean adventure with smoked, candied or tartare salmon at The Fish Store, hand-crafted loaves from the new Summit Bread Company, and a popular blonde ale or the kelp stout from the Tofino Brewing Company. Back in or near town, there’s the Tofino Coffee Roasting Company, Chocolate Tofino, The Candy Jar, and other eateries. So little time, so much to sample … Oh, Tofino, I hope to return soon.

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To avoid disappointment, check the hours and seating/reservation policy of each restaurant ahead of time. Some take only online reservations, while others have a first-come, first-served policy. •

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FURNITURE & DESIGN

85 Navy Street, Oakville 905.849.8537 8 Brock Road, Guelph 519.822.2929 accentsforliving.ca


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DESIGN

TIME TRAVEL Century-old bathroom is lovingly restored

BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: JOSHUA LAWRENCE STYLING: LEANNE MCKEACHIE

THERE ARE REALLY ONLY two ways to update heritage homes: Use contemporary materials and products that keep to the spirit of the original design, or be totally anarchic by ignoring tradition and going with an aesthetic that suits your fancy. The worst approach is a pastiche of old style with a few jarring contemporary or wrong-period or poorly done, quaint items. •

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This bathroom in a heritage house in Victoria, B.C. on the edge of Oak Bay is a fine example of the first approach. Indeed, interior designer Leanne McKeachie of Leanne McKeachie Design even used brand new floor tiles that almost exactly replicate the original hex-anddot pattern. The 115-square-foot bathroom is part of a luxury rental apartment on the top floor of a two-storey house. The ground floor is commercial space, and the basement contains another rental apartment. “Originally, we were going to make this into a more functional bathroom by just adding a shower,” McKeachie says. “But as happens with a lot of renovations, it blossomed.” The bathroom update turned into a complete gut job.

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“The owner said ‘If we’re going to do it, let’s do it right. Make it a showpiece,’ ” McKeachie recalls. “He wanted to be true to the original architect’s design intent. In fact, when years ago he had painted the house, he chose colours from a historical palette from that era to be sure the colours were on point. “Our biggest challenge was trying to figure out how to refurbish the cast iron tub,” she says. “It had lived a long life, being salvaged from the Empress Hotel years ago.” The contractor on the project searched diligently to find trades that could re-enamel the tub, replate the brass feet, and cover old holes and drill new ones for the plumbing fixtures. •

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DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

People were shorter a century ago, and the original pedestal sink was rather low. It too was refurbished, and then it was given an addition to the base to raise it. “These are beautiful antique pieces, part of the character of the house,” McKeachie says.

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One of the room’s very welcome features is a heated floor that extends into the curbless shower. There was no shower in the bathroom’s original incarnation, and the enclosure itself is about as contemporary as you can get. However, being glass and frameless, it lets the shower recede in prominence and the room keep its sense of spaciousness.

The major architectural change in the room was the annexation of an area about two feet by two feet from an adjacent hallway to make space for built-in storage and a pullout laundry-sorting shelf. No matter how charming a traditional century-old bathroom can be, we don’t want to live without our modern conveniences, do we? •

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Inspire…Create…Perform

Please visit our new Showroom: 90 Tycos Dr., Suite #1 Toronto, ON M6B 1V9 416.783.3916 | chateauwindows.com


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IN SEARCH OF THE RIGHT PIECE

This Oakville company customizes furnishings to ensure customers get perfect items for their homes

SOMETIMES, IT’S DIFFICULT to find just the right piece of furniture: that console table is gorgeous, but six inches too long; the comfortable sofa is to die for, but the fabric choices leave you cold and, really, you would have preferred a different style of leg. That’s where Cocoon Furnishings has made its name. Owned and run by a husbandand-wife team, David and Glyn Austin – he’s in charge of the business side of things; she’s the creative influence who curates the collections – Cocoon specializes in custom pieces. The company’s new, expanded Oakville showroom, Glyn says, is often a jumping-off point. If customers find the perfect piece there, great; if not, no problem. Sometimes they’re moving and need pieces they can have right away; other times they’re planning a whole new look. “Our design team will sit down with them and really go over their floor plans and what they’re doing and put together a whole home,” says David. “We’re not just trying to sell them what we have on the floor. We always say, ‘Try our chair for how it fits.’ Once you figure out what you’re looking for, it’s easy to pick the arms, the legs, the fabric. “Sometimes, people are scaling down. They may have room for only a 21-inch side table and they can’t find it. We’ll make it for them in any size, wood species, or finish.” Their custom-made pieces are produced locally.

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The company also boasts a vast selection of items for every room, including chairs and sofas, tables, beds and linens, lighting, area rugs, and outdoor furniture. Special collections – including those of Kelly Wearstler, Daryll Carter, Suzanne Kasler, Barbara Barry and Michael Weiss, among others – are also a magnet for those who love great design. Glyn started the business after she and David moved back from Vancouver in 2000. A designer, she was always heading to downtown Toronto to Designers’ Walk at Dupont and Davenport Avenues to source things for her clients. She saw an opportunity to open a business in Oakville. “It really took off. We got very big, very quickly,” Glyn says. “My husband said he would give me a year (of his time and business expertise) to launch it. Now, 15 years later, we have a new building and he’s still here.”

At first, Cocoon was open exclusively to the design trade, but it was later expanded to serve the public, too. Because consumers are getting more sophisticated, Glyn says, they seek out Cocoon’s staff that has specialized expertise, for example in lighting or upholstery or rugs. Especially gratifying, the couple say, is when clients refer family and friends, and are so happy with what they’ve done for their city home, they return to have Cocoon do their cottage and again for their winter home in Florida or the Caribbean. “It’s a long-term relationship,” David says. “It’s more than someone coming in and buying a lamp. We’re trying to sell products that work for them.” •

Cocoon Furnishings 2695 Bristol Circle, Unit 2, Oakville 905-829-2780 www.cocoonfurnishings.ca

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE

Photo courtesy of Batimat

If a bathroom or powder room renovation is in your immediate future, you’ll want to explore products that are on the market: faucets, tubs, vanities and toilets. Here is a guide to help you find the right products for your bathroom.

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018 A FRESH IDEA The Fresk FR08 is a new bathroom faucet with push drain by Riobel. Eight inches high, this faucet is also available in single hole, single hole lavatory and single hole lavatory without drain. Available finishes are brushed nickel and chrome. Available at Riobel www.riobel.ca

SHUI SWAY Rustic style meets modern sleekness in the Shui Comfort collection, designed by Paolo d’Arrigo for Cielo. The harmonious, soft shapes of the washbasins, bathtub and sanitary wares combined with the natural warmth of the wood and black accessories make for a winning combination. Available at Batimat www.batimat.net

SPACE SAVER The Barcelona 2 from Victoria + Albert Baths is compact and easy to install in bathrooms in which space is at a premium. A void space under the tub conceals waste plumbing, making it a smart choice for remodeling projects in which you do not want to disturb the existing flooring. Still roomy enough to relax in, this tub has plenty of wow factor. Shown in Anthracite colour. Available at Victoria + Albert Baths www.vandabaths.com

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018

PAINT A KANVAS Part of the Aquabrass Kanvas Collection, the Graffiti free-standing bathtub is handpainted stone resin. The interior has a glossy white finish with press pop-up drains. Sure to be a conversation starter, this bathtub is a work of art in the bathroom. Available at Batimat www.batimat.net

FUNCTION AND FASHION The Hutton extra-wide vanity from Restoration Hardware can be sold with your choice of a honed-marble or quartz countertop or without the countertop. The top centre drawer is decorative, while all other drawers and cabinet doors are functional and adorned with brass hardware. Available at Restoration Hardware www.restorationhardware.com

FASHIONABLE FAUCET The 1Art lavatory is a contemporary faucet set that’s available in a myriad of finishes and accents. Mix and match the finishes online to view all the possibilities. Shown here in a red finish with antique matte brass accents. Available at The Rubinet Faucet Company www.rubinet.com

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018 GET A HANDLE The high-end Ikon single-handle bathroom faucet from MaestroBath is a masterpiece of Spanish design. Complete with complex geometric lines, it has been manufactured with the utmost attention to detail. It has a fixed height to accommodate integrated or drop-in sinks. Shown in polished gold, this faucet also comes in polished chrome, black and white. Available at Wayfair www.wayfair.ca

STAINLESS AND STUNNING The Soriano collection from Victoria + Albert Baths is a new line of stainless steel fixtures. Italian-made, these contemporary-style fixtures have a sleek silhouette and a simple design. Available in four configurations to complement sinks, tubs and vanities. Available at Victoria + Albert Baths www.vandabaths.com

TUBULAR BRASS The Metallo washstand from Victoria + Albert Baths has a tubular brass construction with a practical towel bar and a shelf for storage. Equally at home in a traditional or industrial-inspired bathroom, it’s available in two sizes. Shown here is the Metallo 113 in black. Available at Victoria + Albert Baths www.vandabaths.com

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018

GOLD GLEAM The clean lines of the elegant Caso wall-mount bathroom faucet from MaestroBath were inspired by the abstract designs of modern architecture. Combining rectangle and circle shapes, this faucet has an easy-to-use single handle

A CUT ABOVE THE REST

control. Shown here in a brushed gold colour but also

The hand-made crystal Xeni countertop washbasin by Glass Design has

available in polished chrome and polished gold.

a bevelled surface and gently inclined cut, which reveals the natural

Available at Wayfair

crystal under the black or white colour. Perfect for the powder room, this

www.wayfair.ca

washbasin is a cut above the rest. Available at Canaroma www.canaroma.com

SIMPLE STYLING Simple geometric shapes define the Scavolini Juno Collection (Design by Vuesse), which balances design and functionality. Superior quality, a wide range of accessories, and enhanced modularity guarantee style and originality in the bathroom. Available at Scavolini www.scavolinitoronto.com

MINIMAL AND MODERN The Giotto 54 bathtub and/or shower set by CEADESIGN is perfect for those who like the minimalist aesthetic. Manufactured in the CEA factory in Pianezze, Italy, this set is made of stainless steel and comes in a satin or polished finish. Available at Canaroma www.canaroma.com

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018

RECLINE AND UNWIND The freestanding Pearl tub by Knief has an elongated classic form, allowing you to recline in comfort. Perfect for reading or simply relaxing, it lets you enjoy the water’s embrace as you unwind. Available at Canaroma www.canaroma.com

WORK OUT AND WASH Perfect for doing a quick workout, this small-space combo called Gym Space, designed for Scavolini by Mattia Pareschi Design, merges the gym with the bathroom. A reinterpretation of the gymnastics bars is used as a base onto which such sports equipment as benches, elastic training bands and TRX systems may be added. Use the bars also to secure bathroom accessories such as lights, soap dishes, shelves, storage elements and a mirror. Available at Scavolini www.scavolinitoronto.com

BRASS BLING Channeling the aesthetic of the 1950s, the Hudson metal double washstand was created with an open-back sink and matching storage space. The washstand is sold as a set with your choice of a honed-marble or quartz countertop. Many finish options are available, and the Hudson also comes in single, extra-wide single and powder room washstand models. Available at Restoration Hardware www.restorationhardware.com

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018

GRANDLY GLAMOROUS Soak up the glamour of the Glam bathtub by Knief. Rounded edges and gentle curves soften its rectangular shape. Available at Canaroma www.canaroma.com

LEAD-FREE LUXURY This two-piece Italian-made waterfall bathroom faucet by MaestroBath is a focal point in any bathroom. It has an adjustable height to accommodate any type of sink and is easy to install. Made of lead-free brass, this faucet will be at home in both traditional and contemporary decor. Available at Wayfair www.wayfair.ca

LUXE LIFE The Daphne luxury collection of bathroom furniture by Oasis was inspired by the Art Deco era. Modular units come in four finishes and various lengths and depths. Drawers feature cushioned closing and can be fitted on request with inner dividers lined in burgundy flocked velvet. Available in both suspended and stacked versions. Available at Canaroma www.canaroma.com

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BATHROOM FIXTURE GUIDE 2018 FEEL THE QI The Scavolini Qi bathroom line (Design by Nendo) offers a spare, contemporary aesthetic. The Qi Cristalplant floor-standing washbasin, along with slanted, backlit mirror, large shelves in decorative melamine, and white containers create a simple but strong visual impact. Available at Scavolini www.scavolinitoronto.com

SHOWER POWER The Momenti three-way system by Riobel has a hand shower rail, shower head and spout. It comes in chrome, chrome/black, brushed nickel, brushed nickel/black, polished nickel and polished nickel/black finishes. Available at Riobel www.riobel.ca

STREAMLINED SILHOUETTE A combination of neutral colours and textures defines Scavolini’s DeLinea vanity (Design by Vuesse). The cabinetry has a streamlined silhouette thanks to doors with a recessed profile. The base is wall-mounted and the unit features a dedicated line of accessories, including matching faucets, shelves and towel rails. Available in white, brass or aluminum finish. Available at Scavolini www.scavolinitoronto.com

ADD COLOUR TO THE BATHROOM This pressure-balance shower valve with stops and two-way diverter was designed by Matthew Quinn and is available in various finishes and accent finishes. Mix and match the finishes online to see the possibilities. We show it here in Blu Jean finish with red accents. Available at The Rubinet Faucet Company www.rubinet.com

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DESIGN

FROM CRAMPED TO C ONTEMP O R A RY A 1915 Moore Park home is reimagined and revamped to meet a family’s needs

BY KAREN SEIDMAN PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL

TUCKED AWAY ON A NICE STREET in the Moore Park area of Toronto, this circa 1915 house was dated and dysfunctional when interior designer Kate Zeidler first saw it. It lacked light and was inconveniently partitioned into a warren of rooms for the family of five living there. Zeidler, principal at Kate Zeidler Interior Design, felt some trepidation about transforming it into the open, modern haven the homeowners envisioned – until the couple pulled out a gorgeous silk rug they had purchased abroad that they wanted to use in the redesign. •

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“They have beautiful taste,” Zeidler recalls thinking. “They liked beautiful, simple, elegant, high design.” And, suddenly, the project took on the promise of a true transformation, and Zeidler became excited about getting on board with contractor Dave Evans, a partner at project and construction-management firm Cliff & Evans Ltd. Along with architect Christopher Walker and landscape architects John Lloyd and Associates, the team began by listening to the couple’s requirements. “The house was starting to fall apart at the time. Plaster was cracking, cupboards were falling off. But we liked the house and wanted to stay,” says the homeowner. “I wanted to open it up and clean-line it.”

The homeowners wanted a large island for both preparing and eating meals. Designer Kate Zeidler made it special by choosing a shade of light grey to complement the veins in the marble top.

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Her three children, young when they first moved in – now 22, 19 and 16 – required more space. Above all, she wanted it to be open-concept to allow the family to have gathering places that promoted family time. To achieve those goals, the house was gutted down to the studs, and the team installed nine inset steel beams, hidden in ceilings and floors, according to Evans. •

Zeidler kept the feeling of the limestone fireplaces light with variations of off-white and touches of blue, such as the custom-made ottoman in the den, covered in Theo fabric in “Blaze.”

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The renovation added 1,000 square feet of space, bringing the square footage to 4,150. The basement was also upgraded to make the low ceilings 10 feet high, transforming it into a functional space. “We underpinned the foundation and dug down deeper,” says Evans. “Using every inch of the property is a big deal with Toronto home prices being what they are.”

Zeidler calls her approach to the Moore Park home “Scandinavian Modernist.” It was meant for efficient living, she says. “When you have limited space, you have to be very precise.”

The master bedroom and spa-like ensuite bathroom are a soothing retreat for the homeowners. The Pollack curtains in Heathered Flannel blend seamlessly with the walls, while the Monroe bed from Elte is a stunning focal point in the bedroom.

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“THE FA BRICS AND PAT TERNS ALSO WARM IT UP AND PROVIDE INTEREST.”

Zeidler agrees that space management was one of the challenges of the project. “It was a fairly narrow house and they wanted a living room, den and kitchen with a large island on the main level. We had to measure it out so every inch was used properly,” she says. “When you have limited space, you have to be very precise.” They put a walnut table next to the kitchen that is large enough for both daily needs and entertaining. The homeowners’ indulgence in the contemporary white kitchen, with custom-made cabinetry, was putting marble on the pale

grey island, painted in Benjamin Moore’s “Escarpment.” Zeidler loves the way the grey veins of the marble pick up on the colour and make the island a focal point of the room. When they gutted the house, the one thing that was supposed to remain was the staircase. But as the project proceeded and the modernist look of the house began to take shape, the homeowners realized the old staircase just didn’t fit anymore. It was ripped out and moved, along with the front door, which was originally at the side of the house, to make better use of the space and allow for the open concept. •

The new basement, with its 10-foot-high ceilings, houses the home theatre and gym. The Marimekko patterned fabric wall panels block light from coming into the home theatre, while the basement has sound absorption insulation to reduce the noise upstairs.

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DESIGN

What the homeowners most wanted was to “cleanline� the home. They wanted a contemporary design with ample living space for a family of five, renovated bathrooms and an open-concept floor plan that would bring the family together.

There were other challenges in creating a contemporary look. All of the windows and doors are frameless. Without moldings to encase them, a small quarter-inch reveal, or indentation, was used to define them. The one-and-a-half-storey-high glassed-in foyer at the rear of the house, leading to the garden, was meant to bring the outdoors inside. However, Evans says, that meant using special windows imported from Denmark, to create the glass joints at the corners that the architect and owners wanted. The one-and-a-half storey glass foyer at the back of the house is a spectacular addition. Imported from Denmark, the generously proportioned windows make the space seem like an extension of the backyard.

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The result is a fabulous, airy space that brightens the home immeasurably. Nothing was left to chance to achieve the cohesive look, Zeidler says. Some interior trim and doors were done to match the European white oak engineered floors, which have a commercial grade finish for durability. Only the dark mahogany front door was designed to stand out from the rest. The floors provide warmth, and Zeidler stuck to a subtle colour scheme, using variations of off-white rather than white to keep the homey ambience. “The fabrics and patterns also warm it up and provide interest,” she says.

Some of the upgrades cannot be seen. For example, says Evans, there was virtually no insulation in the 100-year-old home. Sound panels were used in the basement’s home theatre to provide sound absorption and reduce the noise upstairs. The homeowner says she loves the openness of the renovated space. “It really brings the family together,” she says. The clean simplicity of the design is due to the genius of the team behind the project. It’s exactly the result the homeowner desired: “It went from dark and dysfunctional and segregated,” she says, “to open and clean and bright.” •

The homeowners are thrilled with their new outdoor space, which didn’t previously have the beautiful deck or patio. “The landscaping was important to the whole project,” the homeowner says. “It’s given us a whole new way of enjoying the property.”

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DESIGN VANCOUVER KITCHENS 2017

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LIFESTYLE

MANY REASONS TO RAISE A GLASS A fast-developing wine-producing region, the Okanagan Valley is a magnet for those who love the grape BY JIM TOBLER

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PHIL MCGAHAN WANDERS AMONG orderly rows of vines, showing a visitor his vineyard. One side of the vineyard is nestled against a 15-metrehigh rocky bank, ref lecting summer heat onto the plants. Above the bank is a pasture, home to a herd of wild horses. “They come down here for a visit once in a while, usually in the early morning,” says McGahan, winemaker and general manager of CheckMate Artisanal Winery in Oliver, B.C. “This really is a spiritual place.” Spiritual, yes. But also, a place that is fast developing as an attractive tourism destination, thanks to its burgeoning wine industry. Four hours by automobile, 50 minutes by airplane, but seemingly a world away from Vancouver, the Okanagan Valley is a small but formidable wine-producing region in a rain shadow between the Coastal and Monashee mountain ranges, carved out by receding Ice Age glaciers. The region drew 3.5 million visitors last year, and tourism here employs 15,000 people.

Photo courtesy of Painted Rock by Jon Adrian

“The diversity of microclimates in this area is really remarkable,” says McGahan. “It means we can make some completely distinctive, high-quality wines.” The region’s wineries now number almost 200; many have restaurants to accompany the nearly ubiquitous tasting rooms, and accommodations for visitors who want to stay. From Kelowna in the north to Osoyoos in the south, vast stretches of finely groomed vineyards are evidence of an industry in full bloom.

Photo courtesy of Painted Rock by Jon Adrian

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Photo courtesy of Summerhill by Kevin Trowbridge

Drew MacIntyre, who owns Lake Breeze Winery and MacIntyre Heritage Reserve, agrees that the region is evolving. “We probably could not have made our Heritage wines a few years ago,” he says. “But as we learn more about the soils and what the fruit can be, we can really elevate the quality.” MacIntyre is not afraid to pour Okanagan wines in tastings with iconic vintages from Bordeaux, Tuscany, or Sonoma. “We are not competing against those guys. We’re just saying there is pretty fantastic wine here in the Okanagan,” he says. The climate is predominantly cool, which is an advantage in an era of global warming that is affecting wine regions around the world. Microclimates abound and are a distinguishing feature of the region.

In the north, where Mission Hill Family Estate forged a reputation for quality, there is plenty of Chardonnay, Riesling and Pinot Noir. Such establishments as Quails’ Gate Estate Winery, CedarCreek Estate Winery and Summerhill Pyramid Winery offer dining as well as tasting rooms that boast magnificent views to savour as you sip and swirl. Summerhill’s proprietor Ezra Cipes notes that when his father, Stephen, first considered making high-end sparkling wines here, “most people thought he was crazy. But over time, and with fully sustainable practices, the wines now are even better than we thought they could be.” •

Photo courtesy of Summerhill by Kevin Trowbridge

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Farther south, in Penticton and Naramata Bench, with its cluster of high-quality wineries, the region’s climatic diversity is obvious. Here, Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Franc, even Syrah have started to appear in tasting rooms, such as those at Poplar Grove Winery, where house-made cheeses win awards alongside the wines. Lake Breeze Vineyards, Hillside Winery, Serendipity Winery, Van Westen Vineyards, and even an extraordinary fruit-wine establishment – Elephant Island Winery – are all part of the neighbourhood.

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In nearby Summerland, the innovative Haywire, with its custom-made egg-shaped fermenting tanks, foudres, and organic farming principles, is turning heads. Farther south is first Okanagan Falls, then Oliver. Here, the northern tip of the Sonora Desert, which begins in Mexico and stretches into B.C., shows another aspect of how this wine-producing region has developed so quickly, going from good to great. Features of the climate include low rainfall, more daylight in June and July than in the Napa Valley, and large diurnal swings in temperature, especially in the crucial autumn growing season.

Photos courtesy of Poplar Grove Winery

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Photos courtesy of Burrowing Owl Estate by Gord Wylie

This means that such grapes as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah can achieve maturity with soft tannins and sumptuous fruit to produce wines that are enjoyable at a young age, while there is still potential for aging. The Black Sage Bench is gaining more international acclaim for its microclimate that makes Bordeaux-style wines a reality. In Oliver, nestled against a stark, heat-distributing rock face, is Burrowing Owl Estate Winery, long a leader in quality and, along with Mission Hill Family Estate, one of the first to gain international recognition. Yes, real burrowing owls live in the nearby hills, beneficiaries of an ecological stewardship program funded by the winery. Big red wines are the specialty; and as vines mature and techniques evolve, these are sought after and often sold out far in advance of September. The tasting room is augmented by the splendid Sonora Room, a restaurant known for fine dining. There are eight sumptuous guest bedrooms as well, so this is a place to take a leisurely stroll under the stars as you make your way from dinner to bed. •

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Photo courtesy of Liquidity by Lionel Trudel Bottom photos courtesy of Painted Rock by Jon Adrian

In Okanagan Falls is Liquidity Wines, where founder and owner Ian McDonald has decorated his winery, restaurant, and serene guest room with fine art. “I wanted to make it clear that this region belongs on the world stage for quality of wine but also for wine and food experiences,” MacDonald says. “We are situated in the midst of some of the most beautiful scenery in the world. Our winery should reflect that.” Painted Rock Estate Winery, also in this area, offers a beautiful tasting room, event facility, and bountiful red wines. At a recent dinner in Stockholm, King Olaf of Sweden rose from his seat and proclaimed that he loved the Painted Rock Merlot, and hoped it was available for purchase in Sweden. Owner John Skinner explains the king’s enthusiasm: “That Merlot really started to take off in the 2009 vintage. It has got better with each vintage, and I believe as a region, we are breaking through.”

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Middle photos courtesy of Liquidity by Jon Adrian

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Photos courtesy of Le Vieux Pin Winery

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Following the sale of his first winery business, Canadian wine industry icon Don Triggs started Culmina Family Estate Winery in the province’s first sub-appellation, located south of Oliver on the valley’s west side. The land here features ancient riverbed soils unique to the new “Golden Mile Bench” sub-appellation. Culmina is a boutique winery dedicated to making highest-quality wines. “We could have built a winery almost anywhere in the world,” says Triggs. “But I knew this was the place – the place where we could grow the exceptional fruit required to make distinctive, great wines.”

Finally, Osoyoos: the southernmost part of the valley ends at the 49th parallel. Significantly warmer than in the north, this is where the red varieties can achieve full ripeness consistently, and over a wide swath of territory. It underscores the diversity of the Okanagan’s climate, with microclimates giving winemakers many options. At Le Vieux Pin Winery in Oliver, Rasoul Salehi says “it took us some time to really understand these soils, but over time, with plenty of experimenting and study, we are now able to make wines that express the place they are grown in. We are proud to pour our wines at any table, anywhere in the world.”

As grape varieties improve and are matched to ideal soil types, or terroirs, the wines will continue to improve. The recreational opportunities in the Okanagan – from golf through cycling and water sports on the lakes – mean visitors can find a range of activities in addition to wining and dining. And those who prefer to cook for themselves will find local produce to create their own haute cuisine. This is a region in which to explore and expand your wine palate in breath-taking scenery, where attention to detail and passion for wine promise visitors a memorable stay. •

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DESIGN

e m o c l e W Home A designer is given free rein to decorate her clients’ apartment while they’re away on honeymoon BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL

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WHEN STEPHANIE AND TIMOTHY QUINN took over the two-bedroom condo that would be their first home together as a married couple, they handed the keys to their designer and didn’t see it completed until they returned from their honeymoon. “I wanted that element of surprise,” says Stephanie. “We gave her a chance to do a big reveal when we came back.” The couple came home, dropped their suitcases, and moved in.

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They brought none of their old furniture, but created a whole new space for their lives together. “You don’t get jobs like that very often, where you have complete and utter freedom,” says Yvonne Whelan, principal designer and owner at Yvonne Whelan Design, who oversaw the transformation. Located in a newly built 26-storey building in Yorkville with 24-hour concierge service and such amenities as a pet spa, the condo

To maximize seating, the living room sectional sofa was custom-made to fit the space by Future Fine Furniture. It has a Crypton fabric that’s stain- and odourresistant. Coffee table: Wayfair; credenza: Restoration Hardware; pillows, accessories, rug, standing light: Elte Market.


DESIGN TORONTO AUTUMN 2018

has a central living space with kitchen, dining and bar areas. On each side of that living area there is a bedroom and a full bathroom, for a total of about 1,350 square feet. Whelan says that when she first saw the condo, it was a blank canvas - white walls, no light fixtures. But there were some constraints. “It is a small space, so you’re limited in what you can do,” the designer says. “You know where to put the sofa and TV.”

The Quinns wanted to make it a space in which to entertain their friends. So they built a wine fridge into the kitchen cabinetry and turned a wall nook into a bar area with built-in shelves. “It’s a tight space, so when we do have guests, it’s important that it all flows together,” Stephanie says. There’s also an outdoor patio area with seating and a dining table. •

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DESIGN

The furniture wasn’t a complete surprise. The Quinns did give the go-ahead for a lot of the large pieces. “There were many emails going back and forth: ‘Do you like this chandelier?’ That sort of thing,” Stephanie says. “I sent her some of my inspirations, some ideas from Pinterest, things I like.”

She wanted a masculine feel for the condo, for its decor to be a little darker than her previous homes, and “not too girly,” but still wanted some sparkle and shine. To get just the right bling factor, she wanted to use a variety of mixed metals in the detailing and accent pieces. Her new husband left most of the decisions to her. “If something was missing or not right, he would speak up,” she says. “I knew he didn’t want any yellow!”

By the time the Quinns approved Whelan’s pick for the dining room chandelier, it had sold out at the shop where the designer had sourced it. Luckily, she was able to find the same one on Wayfair. The bar area was added for easier entertaining. The dining table’s top is quartz in a marble pattern; its black powder-coated stainless-steel base was made by MGS Metal & Wire. Custom-made shelving: Greystone Custom Cabinets; dining chairs: Wayfair; tray, glassware, accessories: Crate & Barrel; mirror: Renwil.

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“It’s a tight space, so when we do have guests, it’s important that it all flows together.”

Whelan did a layout, planned the furniture, then started finalizing the plan and ordering the pieces. As they arrived, she put them into storage, though she kept some of the more delicate pieces in her own home to make sure they wouldn’t get damaged. She custom-designed the bar, dining table and sofa. Then, with the Quinns safely out of town, she moved it all in and staged the apartment for their arrival home. •

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The result, Stephanie says, was everything they’d hoped it would be. “When she saw the master bedroom, Stephanie was in tears,” Whelan says. “It’s completely her style.” The guest bedroom was a complete surprise, as were so many of the accessories and other finishings Whelan had selected for them. “When it came down to the towels, sheets and soaps, I basically bought everything. They moved their suitcases into the bedroom,” Whelan says.

The bedroom is Stephanie Quinn’s favourite part of designer Yvonne Whelan’s design. “She nailed it. I think I just want to hang out in there. I love it,” Stephanie says. Bed: Gus; dresser and night tables: Geovin; mirrors: PI Fine Art; rug: West Elm; bedding and accessories: CB2; lamps: Renwil.

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She even bought art, on spec, so the walls wouldn’t be bare and to ensure the space would look completed for the big reveal. “That was really difficult; art is so subjective to the person. I was crossing my fingers they would like it,” Whelan says. It wasn’t too big a risk, she adds, since she had the option of returning it if it didn’t suit them. “If they had not wanted a particular piece of art, I wouldn’t have been offended.” The result, however, was a “turnkey” home and a delightful, welcome surprise for the newlyweds. •

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CURTAIN CALL

How to choose window treatments that deserve applause

The curtain: It can be a purely functional item, or it can be a window dressing, something that serves a purpose and adds to a room’s decor at the same time. But there are so many things to consider – types of fabric, colours and patterns, styles, hardware – that making a choice can be difficult. We asked Agata Olivieri, lead designer and showroom manager for Maple Drapery & Carpet, to walk us through the decision process. QUESTION: Agata, what is the first thing that someone should be thinking about when choosing window dressings? ANSWER: It’s important to consider whether the drapery is meant to be decorative (e.g., side panels) or fully functional to provide privacy and light control. With decorative side panels, I typically recommend blinds as a backdrop, creating a layered and complete look.

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Q: Once the functionality is settled, how does one find the fabric that will complement the rest of the room? A: There are many factors to consider: privacy, sun control, paint colour, wallpaper pattern, existing furniture and the client’s style and taste. The options are virtually endless when selecting a fabric: silk, cotton, linen, polyester, satin, and synthetic blends. A good designer will help select a solid, textured or patterned fabric, or a combination of these to complement the other decor in your space, bringing together a few design options without overwhelming you. Q: Why line a curtain? Should all curtains be lined? A: There are two main categories of linings: blackout for total opacity, and light-filtering,

letting some light through the face fabric. Drapery panels are almost always lined. Lining protects drapery from sun exposure, giving the fabric longevity. It also adds weight and body for a customized, polished look. In some cases, panels are self-lined – for example, a room divider, where the face fabric is exposed on both sides. Delicate fabrics such as silk typically require added protection from the sun, such as interlining or heavier-weight lining. Q: The choice of fabric is important, but the style of curtain can have a big impact, too. What are the possibilities there? A: What to choose – contemporary, traditional, modern, transitional? The header or pleating style of drapery depends mainly on the fabric itself and on the design style of


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functional panels. Hidden hardware is behind the drapery header pleat, usually an I-beam or KS track with glides or runners. Motorized hardware is also an option for oversized windows or those that are difficult to open and close because they are out of reach. Budget is a main consideration when selecting hardware, as decorative rods are more costly than hidden hardware.

the space it occupies. For example, a triple pinch pleat would definitely suit traditional decor but wouldn’t look appropriate in an ultra-modern space. But sewing a triple pinch pleat on heavyweight velvet panels is not ideal, and is sometimes technically impossible; conversely, a lightweight, airy sheer will do well. Drapery length and orientation are also important: will the panels touch, drag or puddle on the floor? This should also reflect the space’s design style and the client’s preference. For transitional decor, the panels

might touch the floor, as opposed to puddling, which is a very traditional look. Q: What role does drapery hardware play in how the window dressing looks? A: There are two types of drapery hardware categories: exposed and hidden. Exposed hardware – rod, brackets, rings and finials – is decorative. Decorative hardware also reflects the design style of the drapery panels. Decorative drapery can be hand-drawn, or on a traversing pulley system for fully

Q: Some rooms have unusually shaped windows, such as round, bow, Palladian. What’s your advice about them? A: Will the unusual window be the ugly duckling or the design spectacle? Unusually shaped windows can be a challenge to cover. Get sound advice from a professional. The main consideration is whether the window treatment will be fully functional or stationary. A buyer’s beware for these types of windows: it is typically costlier to cover unusually shaped windows, because the coverings are labour-intensive to manufacture and the installation time is greater. •

Maple Drapery & Carpet 8481 Keele St., Unit 11A, Concord ~ 905-660-7290 12967 Keele St., King City ~ 905-833-5464 www.mapledrapery.com

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COME AND SIT A SPELL

LO F T L I FE The Udine modular couch brings whimsical design to loft living. The modules come in a choice of fabrics and can be configured as you wish so you can create your own unique look. Available at Maison Corbeil. www.maisoncorbeil.com

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This season’s sofas and armchairs encourage you to put your feet up and relax BY TRACEY MACKENZIE

K

ick off your shoes and plunk yourself down into a comfortable sofa or armchair. The great indoors beckons as cool weather sets in. Here is our guide on where to find some of the most attractive sofas and comfy chairs on the market that will make your living room or den the go-to spot in which to chill.


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S O FA A N D A R M C H A I R G U I D E 2018

C O O L A N D C O N T EM P O R A R Y Designed by Michel Ducaroy, the famous Togo sofa from Ligne Roset is still the company’s most popular sofa since its debut in 1973. With an ergonomic design, foam construction and quilted covers, it stands the test of time. Available at Ligne Roset. www.ligneroset.com

O U T S I D E T H E B OX The low-profile Bowen chair from Anthropologie has a plush seat, T-shaped cushions and brass-finished legs. A less-is-more, understated design is sure to be popular with minimalists. Available from Anthropologie in nine fabrics and two leathers. www.anthropologie.com

R E T R O R E V ER I E The Reverie sofa is an EQ3 spin on Mid-century Modern style. Featuring tapered legs and a button-tufted seat and back, this tailored sofa is available in both fabric and leather upholstery and a variety of colours. Available at Decorium. www.decorium.com

P LU M P P ER FEC T I O N A re-edition of the iconic Plumy Collection, originally designed by Annie HiĂŠronimus in 1980, will beckon to the couch potato in you. With seat and back cushions filled with goose feathers, which can be unfolded to facilitate various seating positions, the Plumy adapts to its environment. Comes in various sizes for both chair and settee. Available at Ligne Roset. www.ligneroset.com

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S O FA A N D A R M C H A I R G U I D E 2018

M O D ER N A N D M O D U L A R The LC3 Grand Modèle armchair, designed by Le Corbusier, was a modernist response to the traditional club chair.

G R EEN W I C H T I M E

With its externalized tubular frame and thick pillows, it’s

The Greenwich modular sofa features grey patterned fabric with caramel-

as relevant today as it was almost 90 years ago. Each chair

coloured leather to create the sofa that’s perfect for you. Choice of

is signed and numbered. Manufactured by Cassina and

configurations available to suit any room. Available at Maison Corbeil.

available at Design Within Reach.

www.maisoncorbeil.com

www.dwr.com

C O O L C O N T EM P O R A R Y The contemporary Como sectional sofa, designed by Timothy Oulton, is as versatile as it is sleek. Chunky cushions are perfectly proportioned for maximum comfort and support. The modular components allow you to create the configuration best suited to your room. Available at Restoration Hardware in two depths and 42 colours. www.restorationhardware.com

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LO U N G E O N L E AT H ER The Library Leather chair from Restoration Hardware is a take on those found in the great reading rooms and libraries of Europe. Boasting antiqued-brass nailhead trim, a low-slung profile, and a deep seat with down-feather fill, this chair comes in a variety of colours and fabrics. www.restorationhardware.com

U N D ER S TAT ED EL EGA N C E Available in a variety of fabrics and metal colours, the Sara armchair boasts an understated, elegant shape. Shown here in velour, this chair is perfect for a tête-à-tête with a friend, and is made in Quebec. Available at Maison Corbeil. www.maisoncorbeil.com

S ER P EN T I N E S EC T I O N A L The Grace serpentine sectional sofa pays homage to

B LU E V ELV E T

one of Vladimir Kagan’s most iconic designs. Soft and

The Sven tufted velvet sofa is a modern take on a mid-century

sinuous, the feminine curves of this sofa offer ample

classic. Featuring crisp lines, luxuriously stuffed back cushions,

seating for ease of conversation and solid metal legs in

and a tufted bench seat, it has two matching round bolster

brass for a touch of luxe. Various colours available.

cushions to complete the look. Available in both loveseat and

www.anthropologie.com

sectional sizes, it’s also available from Article in four colours. www.article.com

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R EC L I N E A N D R EL A X The Milo Baughman Recliner 74 is a simple design with a lasting impact. First designed in 1966, this chair has now been brought back into production. It has three positions from upright, to feet up, to full recline. Available from Design Within Reach in both fabric and leather upholstery, and in a variety of colours. www.dwr.com

B EN C H B E AU T Y The minimalist Edlyn bench with its velour upholstery and brass legs adds glamour to your decor. Perfect for taking a much-needed break or for donning shoes, this bench is perfect in an entry foyer or bedroom and is available from Anthropologie in a variety of colours. www.anthropologie.com

C O N T EM P O R A R Y C U R V ES Inspired by mid-century design, the Jacqui sofa has a timeless style that is perfect for a house or condo. Meticulous tailoring, a kiln-dried hardwood frame, and high-density soy-based seating foam are just a few of this handcrafted sofa’s attributes. Available in a myriad of fabrics, it’s also customizable. Available at Barrymore. www.barrymorefurniture.com

S I X T I ES S EN S I B I L I T Y The Worthington sofa is Mid-Century Modern luxe at its best. Stately proportions and vintage leather with natural colour variations and creases make it a stand-out piece. Available in Oxford-black and brown at Article. www.article.com

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T R U E B LU E William Birch arms, luxurious seating and turned Barwick legs make this classically styled sofa a mainstay in traditional decor. It’s also available with a bench-style seat for a more relaxed, contemporary look. Includes two 22-inch knife-edge toss pillows. Available in many fabrics and customizable. Available at Barrymore. www.barrymorefurniture.com

CL ASSIC CHAISE Classic features combined with clean lines makes the Sven daybed a popular choice. Natural leather that weathers over time makes this tufted chaise with its matching bolster a beautiful addition to any room. Available at Article. www.article.com

S C A L LO PED S E AT I N G Popular in the 1940s, the scalloped-shaped chair is making a comeback. The sinuous contours and brass legs of the Tulip chair add a touch of feminine flair to a boudoir or office. Available from Anthropologie in seven fabrics. www.anthropologie.com

FA S H I O N A B L E A N D FR EE - F O R M The Ploum sofa from the Ligne Roset Collection is a conversation starter. An asymmetrical construction and ample dimensions allow for comfort and visual interest. Available from Ligne Roset in a variety of dimensions and fabrics. www.ligneroset.com

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B L AC K B E AU T Y The soft curves of the sloped cushion are in sharp contrast to the upright stainless-steel frame of the Burnham chair, which offers an interesting blend of style and design. It’s an eye-catching statement piece for a contemporary decor. Available at Accents for Living. www.accentsforliving.ca

S M O OT H S W I V EL A dissatisfaction with the quality and functionality of products on the market drove Niels Bendtsen to create smart and thoughtful designs, as shown in this U-Turn swivel chair (2013). Featuring a discreet tapered base and smooth swiveling mechanism, it comes in both fabric and leather upholstery and in a variety of colours. Available at www.bensen.ca and in Vancouver at Inform Interiors www.informinteriors.com.

S I N U O U S S E AT I N G This classically designed chaise with button tufting, French seams, and naturalLee cushion fill is perfect for the office or boudoir. Grab a book, relax and unwind. Available at Cocoon. www.cocoonfurnishings.ca

FR I N G E B EN EFI T S This Boucheron slipper chair with its fringed base can be an accent chair in the living room or an elegant bedroom chair. Also available in red and blue at Import Temptations. www.import-temptations.com

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C H A N N EL I N G C L EO PAT R A Get in touch with your inner Cleopatra while relaxing on the plush Gunner Daybed. Enjoy daydreaming or reading on this daybed, which comes with two end pillows for added comfort. Available at Cocoon. www.cocoonfurnishings.ca

C I R C L I N G B AC K The rich blue hue of this chair will add the perfect splash of colour in your living room. The semi-circular back, finished in Cavalli royal blue leather, frames the seat, which rests on a bronze base. Customization available. Available at Import Temptations. www.import-temptations.com

AV I AT I O N A PPE A L Restoration Hardware’s Aviator swivel chair is reminiscent of Second World War fighter planes. With a leather seat surrounded by aluminum, and dotted with exposed steel screws, it’s the perfect addition to any fly boy’s or fly girl’s home. Also available in non-swivel format. www.restorationhardware.com

OVA L O P U L EN C E The distinct oval shape of the Regent sofa adds a touch of originality to a room. Low-backed, this sofa takes up little visual space, and is adorned with French gold accents. Add some rectangular throw pillows to match your decor. Available at Import Temptations. www.import-temptations.com

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T H E L A I D B AC K L I FE The Cloud modular sofa is both versatile and comfortable. With its relaxed silhouette, low back, and sink-in cushions, this sofa is perfect for lounging. It’s also easy to customize with three slipcovered cubes – corner, armless and ottoman – and is available in a choice of three depths, 23 stocked fabrics and 161 special-order fabrics. From Restoration Hardware. www.restorationhardware.com

TA S T EFU L T U R Q U O I S E The handcrafted Matteo chair is as luxurious as it is beautiful. Top-stitching, tapered legs and straight lines are just a few of the qualities that give it a contemporary feel with a hint of Art Deco. Customizable and available in many fabrics. Available at Barrymore. www.barrymorefurniture.com

T I M EL ES S A N D T U F T ED Add soft colour to your living space with the Parmelee wingback chair. Its design is timeless and elegant, and its nailhead trim and button-tufted upholstery make it an excellent piece for both living room and bedroom. In a variety of colours. Available at Wayfair. www.wayfair.ca

C O M F O R TA B L E C LO U D Hit the hay in style on the Cloud sofa bed with its luxuriously tufted pillow and simple design. Easy to use, just lower the back and you’re good to go. Comes in red or charcoalcoloured fabric. Available at Maison Corbeil. www.maisoncorbeil.com

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R EL A X ED R EC L I N ER The Stressless Metro recliner with matching ottoman makes a bold statement. The high back and headrest pillow offer both comfort and neck support. Casual but elegant, this recliner may be custom-ordered in either high or low back and in a variety of fabrics and leathers. Available at Decorium www.decorium.com

C L A S S I C C H ES T ER FI EL D The Kensington sofa, designed by Timothy Oulton, is a reproduction of the classic chesterfield design. Deep hand-tufting, rolled arms and solid oak feet fitted with antique brass casters accentuate the look. Available in a variety of depths, lengths and fabric colours, cushions come in both standard or down-feather fill. www.restorationhardware.com

N OT F O R T H E FA I N T O F H E A R T A weathered finish highlights the hand-carved detailing on this 19th century-style French Empire fainting chaise. Originally designed for Victorian women wearing restrictive corsets, this chaise is now better used for relaxing and reading. Available in 142 special-order fabrics, it comes with two square pillows and a bolster. From Restoration Hardware. www.restorationhardware.com

LIVING L ARGE Boxy back cushions and luxuriously deep seating will make you want to grab a book and spend all day in the Kerr chair. Classic lines make this handcrafted chair an elegant fit for living room, bedroom or den. Many fabric choices available, and customizable. Available at Barrymore. www.barrymorefurniture.com

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CELEBRATING A MILESTONE This Toronto purveyor of rugs and flooring turns 60 this year with many celebrations planned BY SUSAN KELLY

HAND-KNOTTED RUGS often become precious heirlooms, passed down from generation to generation. But at Allan Rug Company on Miranda Avenue, it’s the experience of shopping for floor coverings of all sorts that has become a treasured tradition. “Well, we have been in business for 60 years,” explains company co-director Alan Montekio, “So many of our shoppers today are the children or grandchildren of our first customers. It goes back that far.” For more than 25 of those years, Allan Rug Compa ny has occupied the sa me 14,000-square-foot showroom. As such, it was a pioneer in creating what is now the Castlefield Design District. Being ahead of the trend extends to its offerings as well. The store, for instance, was quick to respond to the drift away from wall-to-wall carpeting and to include hardwood and laminate flooring. Today, it also provides the latest must-have, vinyl planks, as well as top-of-the-line window coverings. Carpets, from traditional to contemporary, still form the core of its business. A growing number of designers and contractors bring their custom carpet orders here. And homeowners can draw upon the services of two on-staff interior designers for assistance in getting a rug that’s a cut above.

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What really puts the company ahead of the pack, this co-director says, is exceptional customer service with a highly personal touch. This tradition was started by Montekio père. Now retired, he handed over the reins to Alan and his brother Robert, who serves as president and co-director respectively. Both have worked full-time in the business for more than 30 years. They have fond memories of helping out in the store as soon as they were old enough, learning the ropes from the shop floor up. To celebrate its diamond jubilee, Allan Rug Company remodeled its showroom, and until the end of the year, will roll out a special sale or promotion each month. Customers can learn about the latest through the company’s website. And champagne corks will pop at several special gatherings to which many of the loyal designers, clients and suppliers who have supported the company over the years are invited. Customers old and new are welcome to drop by any time during store hours for an espresso or cappuccino, says Alan Montekio. “We appreciate everyone who has made our store and our floor coverings a part of their lives. We would not be celebrating this milestone without them,” he says. •

“We appreciate everyone who has made our store and our floor coverings a part of their lives.”

Allan Rug Co. 103 Miranda Ave., Toronto 416-639-2545 www.allanrug.com

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A NEW HOME IN SERENE SURROUNDINGS After seeking a quiet life in Constance Bay, a homeowner has her new house redesigned and refreshed BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: SACHA LECLAIR

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AFTER LIVING IN TORONTO for almost 20 years, Kimberley Dixon and her family left to seek a less hectic lifestyle in a small community near Ottawa. “We had something huge in life that made us take a pause and decide that we wanted a better quality of life,” Kimberley says. “We moved from Toronto when the market was hot, and found this little paradise.”

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The family’s Toronto home had been a traditional city house; their new one is contemporary, built in 2009 on Constance Bay on the Ottawa River. It’s right on the waterfront, with its own beach, surrounded by gardens in the front and back, with large windows and water views. It has high, vaulted ceilings over the living and dining space, and a secondfloor loft area over the kitchen, for a total of about 2,500 square feet of living space.


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The corrugated steel surrounding the fireplace creates the living room’s focal point. It’s original to the home, and the same material is used on the outside of the house. The Kitsilano armchairs and Adelaide sectional sofa covered in Leaside Driftwood fabric by Gus Modern are both

That change in style, combined with their new, open floor plan, meant that their old furniture would be all wrong and left Kimberley uncertain of how to define this new space to make it fit their new lives. “I love to decorate,” she says. “But I found this space quite overwhelming.” As a birthday treat to herself, she called in the team from Leclair Decor in Ottawa. •

from the LD Shoppe. The faux cowhide rug is Grand Canyon Camel, which Gutierrez has layered atop a natural jute rug. All are from the LD Shoppe, as are the vases. Accent pillows are from Tonic Living.

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Kimberley says she wanted a “modern-century” style that would be chic without being fussy. “We’re constantly having parties so I didn’t want it to be a space where everything looks nice but you can’t touch it,” she says. Marcela Gutierrez, senior designer at Leclair Decor, created a look that she calls rustic-contemporary. “That’s something we like to do, to combine different styles and make it more personal for the client,” Gutierrez says. One of the ways she achieved that was by mixing various materials. She

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combined a wood coffee table with a metallic side table, and chose upholstery, rugs and accessories in a mix of textures. She sourced most of the pieces through her firm’s furniture store in Ottawa, LD Shoppe. “We combined wood, fabrics, texture and metals so they would go together but weren’t the same,” she says. “At the end, it all works together.” Large area rugs help to define the living and dining areas. “We usually go with bigger sizes so it defines the spaces and we

place the furniture around it,” Gutierrez says. She also placed a faux cowhide rug on top of a larger jute run in the living room as a way to add more of the rustic flair that her client wanted. Kimberley didn’t want a lot of colour, so all of the tones are neutral beiges, browns and golds, with just a few blue touches added in the accent cushions. “We wanted that area to be cozy; that’s their main living space,” Gutierrez says. “It was important that it felt like a place where they could gather.” •

(Opposite) The homeowner spotted the white, wooden sphere dining room light fixture at the LD Shoppe, and decided it was the perfect look. But its 40-inch-diameter frame won’t fit through standard door openings; luckily Kimberley has double doors. Designer Gutierrez says some previous clients have been disappointed to learn they didn’t have large enough doors or windows to accommodate it. The large patterned Emory Stone rug helps to define the dining space and adds texture. It’s from LD Shoppe, as is the table. Eiffel chairs: Structube.

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The kitchen was painted green and the backsplash bright red when Kimberley bought the house. Gutierrez brightened the space by choosing a white paint and replacing the backsplash with two-inch hexagonal Calacatta marble tiles from Saltillo Tile & Stone. Burrage counter stools: LD Shoppe.

They also put care into choosing art for the dining room. The pieces the family had purchased for their previous home didn’t seem to fit. Then Kimberley and Gutierrez found an abstract work that incorporated the feel and gold tones the family favoured. In the kitchen, the updates were all cosmetic. None of the cabinetry needed to be replaced, but the room’s colours didn’t please Kimberley. To freshen up the space, the design

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team painted the green walls white and replaced the red backsplash with hexagonal marble tiles that fit into the neutral palette and rustic theme. The final result exceeded the family’s expectations, Kimberley says. “They did a great job with the ideas I had in my head, and exploring the different options.” The family’s little slice of paradise on Constance Bay is now home. •


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HOT NEWS ABOUT RADIANT HEATING

There are many efficient and aesthetic ways to warm up your home

Radiators have come a long way from the chunky objects that tended to hiss and clank as they kept us warm during the winter. Sleek and sculpted, today’s radiators not only provide gentle warmth throughout a room, but they’re also aesthetically pleasing design elements. In the same way, baseboard heaters and wall panels can be unobtrusive or can make striking additions to home decor, and they add a luxurious touch to life when installed, for instance, as towel warmers. Dominic DeBellis, Canadian sales manager for Runtal North America Inc., gives us the hot news on contemporary radiant heating. QUESTION: Dominic, what kinds of radiant heating are available? ANSWER: Radiant heating comes in a few forms: It can be installed in a floor, or in the case of radiators, on a wall, and it can be even used as a ceiling panel. All these applications produce radiant heating, the most comfortable form of heating known. The radiators are heated by hot water, which is circulated through a closed-loop system using a boiler or alternative energy such as solar, heat pumps, geothermal, or stand-alone electric units. 158

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can be used in tight spots. Depending on the manufacturer, a range of standard colours are offered in a powder-coat finish without additional cost. Optional colours are also available at a slight cost increase. Q: In what ways can radiant heating products work as deliberate design elements in the home? A: The most popular design element is the towel radiator, which has become a standard feature in many homes. With some imagination, you can incorporate these radiators into other features, such as room dividers, stair railings, coat racks, bench-style radiators and more.

Q: What makes radiant heating desirable? What are its advantages? A: There are many advantages: It maintains a constant temperature throughout a space. It can be controlled by an individual room control. It is a clean system that doesn’t blow dust particles throughout the house, so people with allergies benefit. With radiant heating, objects, rather than the surrounding air, warm up directly in the space (as they do in sunlight). Systems that use radiant heating are favorable to human thermal comfort levels. You can lower your room thermostat by two or three degrees Celsius and maintain

the same comfort level as you would have with a forced-air convective system. Also, it’s quiet and, unlike a forced-air system, does not dry the air. Q: Radiators in the classic style are still available, but there’s also a large selection of other shapes and colours. What are some choices now offered? A: Arrangements include horizontal, f lat wall-mounted panels. And some models can be pedestal-mounted, either installed under a window or have more of a wall-to-wall appearance. A segmented radiator can even be placed under a bay window. Vertical panels

Q: Is radiant heating suitable for any size or style of home? A: The radiators can be easily incorporated into any new design or renovation project. With the introduction of electric radiators, they can offer additional heating or increase comfort levels in existing systems. Q: Are any special construction or installation methods required? A: Installation is simple. Radiators are supplied with appropriate mounting brackets. These get secured to a wall or floor, depending on the application. The radiator is then mounted to the bracket; once the unit is piped or wired into place, it becomes a fixed object. Piping or wiring is important and the installer needs to take some time to ensure the amount of exposed piping or wiring is minimized and installed in a neat fashion. Every hot-water radiator should be installed with isolation valves. The valves should complement the radiator in design; they’re normally available in a nickel-plated or chrome-finish look. For individual room control, thermostatic radiator valves can also be installed in the unit. Electric radiators need wiring and are operated by a remote thermostat or controller. •

Runtal North America www.runtalnorthamerica.com 905-829-4941

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THE POWER OF LEGEND Fashion designer Dorothy Grant creates clothing that interprets Haida culture BY SUSAN KELLY

VANCOUVER FASHION DESIGNER DOROTHY GRANT has been interpreting Haida legends through haute couture — and was the first to do so — for more than three decades. And she seems to be on the way to becoming a legend herself. Surviving in the ultra-competitive world of fashion for that long might be enough to qualify her. But how many designers can say their unique pieces are found not only heading down major fashion runways but also on display at 16 museums around the world, including the National Gallery of Canada? Among the many awards on her wall is a 2015 Order of Canada for her “contributions to the fashion industry as an artist, designer and mentor.”

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The symbols that appear on her work — ravens, hummingbirds, orcas — may be particular to the Haida culture. Yet Grant has discovered that they have universal power. “I call my work’s appeal multinational,” she says, “because it’s not just about the First Nations. I always talk about Yaagudaang, a Haida word for having respect for all things

and, more importantly, yourself. It’s something I want people to feel when they wear my work or see it in a show or museum.” It’s a feeling many celebrities have resonated with over the years. Grant designed the tuxedo that Duane Howard, an actor in The Revenant, wore to the 2016 Oscars ceremony: an impeccably tailored form-skimming suit


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“But sometimes you have to stand in your power and proclaim: ‘I was born to do this.’ ”

with raven and eagle motifs embroidered in silk on the lapels. “I remember vividly the great pride I felt when wearing it,” he says. “Everyone backstage kept asking who designed it. It had even more meaning for me because she worked in my family crest; I’m of the Nuu-chah-nulth nation.” Grant watched from Mexico on the big night, keeping an eye on the online likes and shares, which hit a half-million in one day. Non-celebrities, both women and men, also enjoy the feeling of empowerment her designs give them. The lucky ones go to the

Tsawwassen studio she calls her second home for a final fitting. When we caught up with her, she was completing a bespoke suit for a male client in Alaska who finds it difficult to find clothing that fits his six-foot-nine frame, and a wedding dress for a woman in Hawaii. Grant was also putting the finishing touches on five dresses to be shown at the Santa Fe Indian Market. That major showcase for indigenous fashion is but one of many shows she participates in each year. And yet the designer’s life might have taken a very different turn. She was reminded

of this fact while preparing a speech accepting an honorary doctorate from Simon Fraser University last June. She thought of the students who would hear her, and the many choices before them. And how when she was their age in the early 1970s she was determined to become a computer programmer in a secure and lucrative career. Yet she abruptly walked away from that path to pursue a passion for Haida art. “I have sacrificed a lot to get to where I am today,” Grant says. “But sometimes you have to stand in your power and proclaim: ‘I was born to do this.’ ” •

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She went on to study at the Helen Lefeaux School of Fashion Design, dabbling with fabric art and designing dance costumes. She fell in with a group of artists, including the renowned Bill Reid, who provided the seed idea. She had a vision of how Haida art might translate into fashion. But it couldn’t be static; it had to fit the body and flow with it as it moves. Today, Grant continues to work in her own way. She remains aloof to fashion trends, preferring to follow her own artistic instincts, and unlike other designers, does not produce collections. Every garment in her Feastwear and Gold Label lines of womenswear and the men’s suits is made to measure for clients who approach her, usually through her dorothygrant.com website; only the handbags, shawls and scarves are off-the-rack. She designs her own fabrics; a New York City company has them printed for her overseas. And she uses the fabrics exclusively for

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her garments. The trouble with legends is they are often open to embellishment. To ensure her own story gets a true telling, she has started working on an autobiography. The need to get her life and work on paper was brought home to her two years ago while she was at a National Art Gallery exhibit in Ottawa. A young student asked for her autograph, saying she was studying Grant and her work in a course at Carleton University. The designer suddenly realized that, since she has

turned down numerous offers to write her story over the decades, they likely had scant information to fill the curriculum. With three chapters completed so far, she has found the writing process an introspective one. “It has made me think about my cause and effect,” Grant says. “What I do, my art, is my cause. Until now, I never really realized the effect it has on thousands of people who are watching. And that gives me more incentive to continue with the book. Because it’s my story, my history.” •

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A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING Adding a custom-built walk-in closet to your home is easier than you may think

Have you decided that you need a custom-built walk-in closet in your home? If so, you probably have questions about how it can be seamlessly retrofitted into your home’s existing space. We asked Daniel Wilkinson, owner of Simply Closets in Woodbridge, for his advice on how to get the best custom closet. QUESTION: Daniel, what is the first step a homeowner must take to get a seamlessly integrated closet in his or her house? ANSWER: The first step is to ask yourself a few questions: What is working and what is not working in my existing closet? What are my needs? Whom is the closet for? – Me? Two people? Children? Guests? Usually it’s a case of what’s not working. I find that people’s wardrobes vary and the way they store their belongings varies. Whereas some people like to hang most of their clothing, others prefer to fold their things, and some want most of their items hidden in drawers or behind doors. So, homeowners need to question their needs. The next step is to set up a design consultation with us.

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Q: How much space is needed to accommodate a custom-built walk-in closet? Does it rob space from an existing room? A: The amazing thing about customizing a closet is that you don’t need a lot of space to get organized. By using the vertical height of a closet, we can store a lot more items and also relieve space in an existing room by adding drawers in the design to eliminate dressers. I’ve been in a lot of older homes in Toronto with young couples expanding their

families. Usually, the husband has to move his clothing out of the guest closet because it’s now going to be a nursery. So where does he put his clothes? By reorganizing the master closet, we can make room for his and her belongings. We can even build a wardrobe on an existing wall in a bedroom if there is space. So, homeowners needn’t spend a lot more money on a bigger house because they don’t have enough space for all their stuff.


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Q: There are many styles of walk-in closets. How does a homeowner choose the right style for his/ her home? A: A few things to consider are the size of the closet and the decor that is already in the house or near the closet that is going to be customized. I usually try to complement the home’s existing style or theme. You may be in an older home and want a traditional feel with Shaker drawer fronts and doors or crown moldings as accent pieces. Or maybe your style is modern and you want crisp, clean lines. A lot of colours can also complement a home’s existing style.

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Q: Please describe the process of planning and installing custom-built walk-in closets. A: Planning and installing a custom closet is really a simple process. I focus on the functionality of the closet, while trying to make everything accessible. We meet with clients to create designs that work for them. Once the closet plan is finalized, it goes to our factory where everything is cut and prepared. From there, our team of installers do the installation, which usually takes only one day, depending on the size of the job.

Q: How long does the overall process take? A: I would recommend allowing between three and six weeks turnaround time once the order is placed. Most of the time, a design can be created on the spot, so from the time of the consultation, you could potentially have a custom closet installed in three weeks. Q: How much money should homeowners budget for custom-built walk-ins? A: The budget varies depending on the style, finishes and size of the closet. To make the most out of a walk-in closet, I would suggest budgeting at least $1,500 and up. If you have a small reach-in closet, you could be starting from the $550 range. •

Simply Closets 71 Marycroft Ave., Unit 27, Woodbridge 416-385-8855 www.simplyclosets.ca

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WATER WORKS Today’s bathrooms are sophisticated sanctuaries thanks to new technologies, materials and fixtures BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA

TORONTO INTERIOR DESIGNER DVIRA OVADIA recently designed a Toronto home with seven bathrooms, and to each of them she gave its own distinct style. The current vast range of materials and fixtures makes that task easier than it would have been a few decades ago. The bathroom, once an afterthought in interior design, is now as much a showpiece as any other room in the house. New materials and the introduction of technology have helped to transform this once-humble space into a sanctuary. •

Photo courtesy of Fleurco

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From new composite materials such as marble-like porcelain to such fixtures as wall-mounted toilets, technological advances are making their mark on the emerging 21st century bathroom. Then, there’s marble. An engineered porcelain alternative to this venerable, old stone is less expensive, more versatile and requires no maintenance. It comes in standard tile sizes, such as 12-by-12 inches or 12-by-24 inches, as well as in large sheets measuring three-by-five feet or even six-by-five. Large sheets allow for a seamless look, an aesthetic now in vogue that once was possible only with standard marble slabs. Especially popular in the large sheets are porcelain substitutes for Calacatta Oro marble as well as Statuario Venato, says Anthony Gaudio, general manager of Amati Canada, a bathroom and kitchen design shop in Thornhill, Ont. “You can’t tell the difference from the real McCoy,” he says. Technology has also had an impact on the design of toilets, showers and bathtubs, opening up new possibilities for customization. There are new digital shower systems that can be preprogrammed for each member of the family and controlled remotely with an app; toilets with built-in bidet functions; and wall-mounted toilets that look positively space-age. The Geberit in-wall carrier system allows for the hanging of a toilet bowl on the wall at one’s desired height. The tank is concealed in the wall, creating a minimalist look that’s ideal for small bathrooms. (The average toilet tank measures 12 inches from the wall, bringing the fixture out 28 to 30 inches). European-style bidets have always been a niche market in North America but technology is changing that, too. The Toto Neorest and the Duravit SensoWash are among the new cutting-edge toilets with washing and drying functions – even heating functions built into the seat.

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Photo courtesy of Cantu

“Some people find it a little much when they see it,” says Francesca Pietrobon, showroom manager at Muti Kitchen and Bath in Toronto. “They joke ‘Will it make my coffee, too?’ ” However, travellers passing through Tokyo’s Narita International Airport will see Toto’s smart toilet installed there in the public washrooms.


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Photo courtesy of Cantu

Even showers are multi-tasking fixtures. Digital technology means that showers can now double as steam rooms, Turkish baths, hammams and saunas – all of which can be controlled from a panel on a wall or remotely. Some systems even offer aromatherapy, chromatherapy and music functions. Mr. Steam, Steamist, Effegibi of Italy and Kohler are among the manufacturers of these digital-control steam and shower systems. Ashley Watson, assistant showroom manager at Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware in Vancouver, says having technology in your home is a must-have. “Health and wellness is of great importance on the West Coast,” Watson says. “Incorporating a steam shower in your home is a great way to provide self-care in our oftenbusy lives. The combination of steam with aromatherapy allows you to relax after a long day at the office by adding some lavender, and can help you fight off a cold with eucalyptus. After playing soccer in the rain, from the convenience of an app, you can remotely set your steam shower to be ready when you arrive home. It’s an incredible health benefit.”

Photo courtesy of Batimat

The fact that they can be pre-programmed for different users is especially appealing, adds Karine Perreault of Batimat, a high-end plumbing supply shop serving the Montreal market.

Another factor influencing shower design is new linear drains, such as those offered by ACO Canada. These shower-floor drains allow designers to create unique shower rooms and spaces. There’s no longer a need for a shower base or curb. •

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Not surprisingly, as the shower has become the preferred way to wash, bathtubs have declined in regular use. But, like landline telephones, many people assume they need one. This has repurposed the bathtub from a functional item to a showcase piece, a work of sculptural art. Built-in or drop-in tubs have given way to standalone soaker tubs in a vast array of styles. They are often installed as a focus of the bathroom.

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Photo courtesy of Amati

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Photo courtesy of Dvira Ovadia

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Photo courtesy of Muti Kitchen & Bath

Innovative accessories are also available. Vanity lighting has moved away from wall sconces and bar lights to pendant lighting, although chandeliers continue to be popular when paired with ornate vanity mirrors. Va n it ies a re now more f requently wall-mounted and off the floor. And small is big. Rather than an 80-inch vanity of yesteryear, the norm is now two smaller vanities, often placed side-by-side but not exclusively. Erin Brick, marketing manager at Fleurco, a Montreal-based manufacturer of high-end shower doors, tubs and other bathroom fixtures, says floating vanities are especially popular because they make a bathroom feel more spacious. And while bathrooms may be shrinking in size, the need for storage has stayed constant. For that reason, Brick says, Fleurco has brought back the medicine cabinet. The company’s updated version is mirrored, and can be mounted or recessed, bevelled or flat-edged. “Functionality is required for smaller bathrooms,” says Brick. “It has a modern, clean look.” •

Photo courtesy of Muti Kitchen & Bath

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Photo courtesy of Dvira Ovadia

Photo courtesy of Fleurco

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Photo courtesy of Fleurco

Recessed shelving remains in fashion, too, especially in the shower where it keeps things looking clean. And cocktail tables are the new cool thing, usually placed beside a soaker tub. The colour palette hasn’t changed much; neutral and natural greys, whites and beiges continue to dominate. Espresso-coloured millwork is out; lacquered white and neutral tones are being used on bathroom cabinetry. Muted earth tones are slowly bringing colour back into style. Simas of Italy has unveiled a collection of coloured ceramic bathroom fixtures in browns, blacks, greens and blues.


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Photo courtesy of Amati

Photo courtesy of Cantu

After years of chrome faucets, rain heads and slide bars, brass and gold-tone plumbing fixtures are making a comeback alongside the stalwart matte black. Totally new is textured finishes on chrome plumbing fixtures, an engineered 3D-look we will likely see more of in the next few years. To be sure, many changes in the bathroom are being driven by technology but demographics is also exerting its influence. Higher toilets, such as Kohler’s comfort-height versions, cater to anyone with back problems or bad knees. Showers without curbs, meanwhile, are an offspring of the U.S. federal Americans with Disability Act (ADA).

All in all, there has never been a better time to make over and personalize the bathroom, says Ovadia, of the eponymously named Dvira Interiors. “Today’s design fits with today’s culture. People want things cheap, low maintenance, carefree and to look luxurious,” she says. Whether a bathroom is large or small, Ovadia says, she likes to take the wall behind the vanity and make it a design feature. “It’s one of my signatures,” she says. “It adds another layer. That’s the wall you are facing all the time. It should be special.”

Photo courtesy of Batimat

Photo courtesy of Cantu

Ovadia says a pearlized mosaic accent wall behind a white lacquered vanity was one she recently designed that she particularly loved. She says it showed off everything in the room, especially the mix of brushed brass, crystal and chrome plumbing fixtures, lighting accessories and vanity pulls and knobs. “The all-over look was both modern and classic,” she says. And it garnered a NKBA (National Kitchen and Bath Association) award for her design company. •

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A HOT TWIST ON A COOL IDEA Fire bowls extend the outdoor living experience beyond summer

There’s a reason that the ancients called fire one of the four elements that make up our world. At its most basic level, it provided light in the dark and warmth in the cold. It’s possibly even more important to civilization and culture than the invention of the wheel. Although our use of fire has evolved into technologically intricate applications, we humans still find few things more elementally satisfying than gathering around an open flame. In this autumn season, Carol Edick, co-owner of Southern Living Design, tells us about fire bowls (also known as firepits) and how they help us enjoy outdoor living beyond summertime.

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QUESTION: How do fire bowls work, Carol? ANSWER: The bowls are made of non-f lammable material. At Southern Living, we sell ones made of Fibrecrete, which looks like concrete. The flame is generated from either propane or natural gas from within the bowl, making it very easy to use without the mess of wood and ash. Q: What goes inside a fire bowl? A: We usually sell them with Peruvian lava stone in charcoal grey or Peruvian beach stone in creamy white. The flame then comes through these stones from underneath. There are a lot of stone colour options to complement any exterior decor. Q: Can they be used in any outdoor setting? A: The fire bowls are commonly installed on concrete or stone patios, but because of their non-flammable construction, they are safe enough to be used on wooden decks and

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grass. The propane versions can be moved if desired to accommodate large gatherings, renovations and more. Q: What about safety? A: Unlike with wood-burning firepits, you have the option of adjusting the flame height. You can also get a glass wind guard for added safety and blocking breezes. Natural gas units are always installed by a certified plumber/ gas fitter. Q: Looks are important, too. How can a fire bowl fit into garden decor? A: They come in a variety of different sizes and shapes, all very modern with a crisp, clean look. The corresponding cover keeps out blowing leaves and debris when the fire bowl is not in use. Because they are so compact, they can be placed in any setting, making them perfect accent or statement pieces.

Q: Are there any other features that fire bowls offer? A: Some units have wider ledges, giving them a multi-purpose use like a coffee table. Propane tanks can even be disguised as a side table or footstool with a custom-fitting cover and extension hoses so they can be moved around whenever desired. •

Southern Living Design 844 Southdown Rd., Mississauga 905-823-3036 www.southernlivingdesign.ca

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TRAVEL

A NEW HOTEL IN AN ANCIENT LAND The Orient Jerusalem Hotel offers luxe modern accommodations in a historic, sacred place BY SHARON AZRIELI • PHOTOGRAPHY: ASSAF PINCHUK

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WEDDINGS, CONFERENCES, ANCIENT HISTORY, and all the politics you’d ever want to discuss. They all meet here. These are some of the elements you will find at the Orient Jerusalem Hotel. During my stay there, some of the world’s greatest thinkers and Nobel Prize winners were convening on one of the subterranean floors for a conference on neuroscience with the health sciences branch of the government of Israel. At the same time, a wedding was taking place on the hotel’s roof, affording guests a spectacular view of the old and new cities of Jerusalem.

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This juxtaposition is a metaphor that captures well the diversity of this tiny country and the lovely Orient Jerusalem Hotel itself. The hotel is the newest of Isrotel’s chain of 19 across the country, including those in the Ramon crater, the Dead Sea, the Royal Beach Tel Aviv, Eilat, Carmel Forest, and Mitzpe Hayamim. This one recently opened after four years of construction. Located in the heart of Emek Refaim, the old German Colony, it is across the street from Israel’s first train station, built by the British in 1892. The huge hangar-like space has been transformed into a cool hang-out for shows, ice cream stores and food trucks. •

Photo by Ori Ackerma

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Photos by Ori Ackerma

Because the Orient had to fit into such a compact urban area in West Jerusalem and is within walking distance of the Old City and main tourist sites, hotel staff offer a high-quality “Jerusalem experience” for their guests. The typical lavish Israeli breakfast, served for a wonderfully longer time than usual to allow guests to sleep in, and representing foods from the city’s various neighbourhoods, is served on an underground f loor called “minus two,” and outside in a lovely, sunny and airy courtyard. The hotel’s main building descends two storeys below-ground and is 11 storeys aboveground in a relatively narrow space that permits it to fit in with the surrounding urban landscape. It’s a marvel of architectural complexity and beautiful interior design choices. The design’s oriental theme features a Moroccan look in tiles and fixtures, a rooftop infinity pool overlooking the old and new cities, underground conference centres and an indoor spa, which has another pool.


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The lobby and the bar (which is an extension of the lobby and open to the public) feature the colours, materials and crafts of Jerusalem. The drama of the building’s grand atrium of glass and Jerusalem stone is amplified by accents of mosaic tiles. The 243 guest rooms feel American. They’re not as small as their European counterparts, and each has a balcony.

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The furnishings are attractive and include huge studded headboards and colourful ceramic lamps, olive-wood table tops and original Israeli art. The copper sinks and tiled floors in the Orient’s bathrooms are luxurious by Israeli standards; original ceramic pieces are incorporated as holders for soap and toothbrushes. There are also separate shower stalls and bathtubs. •

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Photo by Ori Ackerma

IF YOU GO: • Take a pair of sturdy closed walking shoes (the streets are cobblestone and it is hot). • For spa treatments, book in advance. • Choose a season other than summer, which is very hot. • Pack water and fruit for sightseeing.

For visitors seeking accommodations in historic structures, there are the 39 rooms in the two 19th-century Templer buildings just outside the hotel, where families can reserve entire f loors and be treated to the arched windows, wrought-iron bed frames, copper-clad bathtubs and blue-and-ivory palette that harken back to Templer times. Members of the Templer sect – Christians who broke from the Protestant church and settled in the Holy Land to prepare for Messianic salvation – came to Jerusalem in 1873 from Württemberg, Germany. They bought a tract of land in the Refaim Valley – hence the name of the main street of the German Colony – Emek Refaim, or Valley of the Spirits – where the hotel is located.

The Isrotel chain wanted to connect the new hotel to the German Colony neighborhood, notable for the historic Templer buildings. The company was meticulous in its preservation of original facades, says Eyal Ziv, the architect who oversaw the project’s preservation and restoration details. No efforts were spared in the construction and design here of the new and the preservation of the old. The Orient Jerusalem feels like a fine hotel in Europe or the U.S. •

Orient Jerusalem Hotel www.isrotel.com/orient

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DESIGN

ONE STEP AHEAD OF THE TRENDS Bättig Design creates avant-garde staircases for commercial and residential interiors

BY SUSAN KELLY

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A STAIRCASE PAS COMME LES AUTRES, even extraordinaire is the dream of many a homeowner. And it is exactly the effect Martin Bättig, founder and president of Bättig Design in Trois-Rivières, Quebec, is after. “While we can’t completely reinvent the staircase, I’m all about pushing the design envelope as far as possible,” he says. The look of Bättig’s company’s staircases is cutting-edge contemporary, although it still turns a hand to traditional wroughtiron versions on occasion. Perhaps the most dramatic examples of the Bättig team’s work are on display in the multi-million-dollar revamp of the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in downtown Montreal. The majestic black glass-and-steel main staircase was manufactured and installed by Bättig Design, who

also consulted with architect Pascal Beauchemin of Sid Lee Architecture. Marin Bättig started out 24 years ago designing furniture for himself and a few friends while completing an MBA. Word of his unique design approach spread until it became a lucrative sideline. He soon started tinkering with stairs, intrigued by the combination of form and structural function. Today, his company produces staircases, railings and fencing. A showroom, offices and production are housed in a 14,000-square-foot facility in Trois-Rivières. When he founded the company in 1998, 90 per cent of staircases were constructed of steel. Today, he reckons only 30 percent are purely of that material; the rest integrate wood, tempered glass, acrylic or concrete.


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Bättig’s approach has won him a loyal following among homeowners, architects, designers and builders. And word is spreading fast. The client list now includes people based outside of the province of Quebec, largely in New York City and Toronto. Home ow ner s anywhere can select an existing design from an idea book or commission a completely custom look. The Bättig Design team then assists with design choices and logistics such as measuring, sending quotations and 3D drawings via email. And though Bättig never shies away from a design challenge, he insists that the result appear effortless. Take what is called a central- or mono-stringer staircase, which has a single ‘beam–like’ support in the centre of the treads. Bättig Design’s variations are

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invariably seamless and clean. The company works in scrupulously laser-cut metals with welding that is virtually invisible to the eye. “Our focus has always been on simplicity,” he says. “The fewer details you see, the better. That’s what gives a contemporary edge.” What’s on the drawing board now? Bättig’s team is looking at updated versions of all-glass staircases that appear to float in the air. And the coming months will see brainstorming among the team with an eye to embedding not only lighting but television and other technology into a staircase. “We want to be ahead of the trend on this one,” Bättig says,” and ready to offer something truly different.” •

Bättig Design 1383 Laviolette St. Trois-Rivières, Quebec 1-800-818-4434 ~ 819-374-4434 www.battigdesign.com

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A FEW COSMETIC CHANGES

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Designer Heather Lewis beautifies her own home without making any major structural alterations BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: VALERIE WILCOX STYLING: RANIA ISMAIL-CHERRY


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DESIGN

THE JUNCTION TRIANGLE HOME Heather Lewis bought with her husband was pretty much move-in ready when they got it, but even so, she was keen to put her own stamp on it. “I love neutral black-and-white spaces,” says Heather, a principal designer and co-owner of Fohr Design Studio. So she started with paint. The semi-detached home is small, just 1,600 square feet, and has an open floor plan with windows in the front and back but none on the sides, so light was important. “The most drastic change (to the house) was just painting it,” she says. The original taupe/beige wall colour was replaced with Benjamin Moore’s Oxford White. Both Heather and her husband grew up in the west end of the GTA, and say they wouldn’t choose to live anywhere else. So they jumped at the chance to buy a home that had been in their family, in this neighbourhood. They love the sense of community and being within walking distance to green space, restaurants and shopping. They also both share a similar design aesthetic, making it easy to match their styles. •

As part of the kitchen facelift, Heather had the cabinets painted, replaced the fixtures and hardware, and changed the backsplash and countertops (Caesarstone from Twins Marble & Granite Inc.) Rug: H&M Home.

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Friends are always surprised to hear that Heather got her dining table and chairs from Ikea. She also bought the credenza there, then added a custom marble slab top from Crystal Tile & Marble to make it look like a Much of the furniture came from the apartment Heather and her husband shared before they bought the house, including the

more expensive piece. Accessories are from HomeSense, Anthropologie and Hopson Grace.

artwork of the bubble-gum girl. They got it from YellowKorner soon after their wedding. Furniture and accent pieces are from CB2, HomeSense, Ikea, West Elm and The Bay. Rania Ismail Cherry, Heather’s colleague and co-owner of Fohr Design, worked on the styling with her.

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DESIGN

Throughout the house, but especially in the living and dining areas, Heather mixed furniture and accents, and included some older pieces, some second-hand, with finds from stores such as Ikea, The Bay, HomeSense and Home Depot that didn’t break the bank. “If you don’t have a huge budget,” she says, “you can mix things up, just like your wardrobe.” The result is a style she calls modern eclectic, with a monochromatic palette. The couple kept most of their furniture from their previous apartment, including the sofa, which dates to her husband’s former townhouse. “We didn’t have to buy a lot of furniture, we wanted to work on the house, on the accessories and final details,” she says.

Heather liked the footprint of the kitchen; it was practical, and easy for both her and her husband to share the space while cooking and entertaining. Replacing the cabinetry wasn’t in their plan or budget, especially since it was in such good condition, so they had it painted, and replaced the backsplash with classic, white subway tile. “It was inexpensive, but we used contrasting grout that gave it a bit of a bistro effect,” she says. As well, they added new, lighter countertops so the room wouldn’t be too dark, and changed out the fixtures and hardware, choosing gold to accent the white and black. She even kept the appliances. The window, which directly faces the neighbours, was given a roman blind for privacy.

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The stairs were a reddish colour when the owners bought the house, but Heather had them redone with a darker stain. Rug: HomeSense; gold plant pot: West Elm; wall hook: Eames Hang-It-All; artwork: an original sign from Honest Ed’s.


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The master bedroom, guest room and office were located upstairs, but that changed when Heather got pregnant. To clear the way for a nursery, the couple moved the office downstairs into an addition that had been built previously at the back of the house. “We didn’t really use that space before,” Heather says. Now, in addition to being her work room, it’s becoming daughter Clara’s play space, so the room will probably be reconfigured again soon to make it more flexible and add storage for toys. •

Heather loves that the office chandelier is visible from the main living area. She found it at The Singing Lady Consignment Emporium. The gold bookshelves are DIY; she bought them at Ikea and spray-painted them.

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DESIGN

Since Heather didn’t know the sex of her baby, she wanted to keep the nursery’s design neutral. She avoided pastels, sticking to her black-and-white theme, knowing she could always add colour later. She chose the animal-print wallpaper because she found it fun and unusual. Because it’s peel-and-stick, it can be replaced easily if they get tired of it or want to change it in case they have a second child.

Because it’s a small space, Heather wanted to make a statement in the powder room and chose St-Barth floor tiles from Céragrès. Her brother, Kyle, of Lewis Woodworking, laid them out to his sister’s specifications, and helped her carry out all her redesign. Faucet and towel bar: Wayfair.

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“When Clara was born, I wanted to add some girly elements; that’s where the gold pouf (footstool) came in,” Heather says. “Since then, I’ve added a few pink things here and there.” Designing one’s own home is a little different from working with a client, she says. “I understand the uncertainty clients face. When you’re designing for a client, it’s easy to see what the best decision is,” Heather says. “Designing for myself, it’s a lot harder to make those decisions. But it’s fun.” •

Heather didn’t know if she was having a boy or girl when she designed the nursery, so wanted the design to be neutral. The animal wallpaper is peel-and-stick by Chasing Paper, which made it easy to install. Moroccan gold pouf: Baba Souk; crib: DaVinci Jenny Lind from Wayfair.

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DESIGN

SWEET DREAMS

Contemporary sleeper sofas don’t give you nightmares like the old ones

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Remember staying overnight at the homes of relatives or friends when you were a child? Remember the sleeper sofa (maybe you called it a sofa bed or a hide-a-bed) that fought back when you tried to open it, and pinched your fingers as it thudded down, and ripped your sheets, and clanked and squeaked when you tried to get comfortable on it? Those days are gone. Mark Naimer, owner of Union Lighting and Furnishings, tells us about the newest generation of sleeper sofas and how they improve your sleep and your decor.

QUESTION: Mark, can you tell us what makes the latest generation of sleeper sofas a pleasure to look at and use? ANSWER: The Comfort Sleeper line looks like a regular sofa and is available in several styles – some with steel legs. They also have a cleaner, contemporary styling. Q: Sounds good! Tell us more about the mechanisms and what makes them easy to manipulate. A: Comfort Sleeper sofas by American Leather have no bars, and no springs. They are built to take a lot of weight and are very sturdy when opened. The mattress is in three connecting pockets that fold out of both the base and

the back; so it is very balanced and more manageable to pull out. The back cushions are removed to provide maximum length for sleeping. Q: What mattress options are available and what are their benefits? A: There are three mattress types. There’s a premium regular mattress. There is also a gel top, which makes for fewer pressure points and a cooler surface; it’s our most popular right now. There’s also a full Tempur-Pedic mattress for maximum conformity to one’s body; it’s the top of the line.

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Q: What are the choices in upholstery fabrics and colours? A: We offer a wide selection of leather and fabric, although upholstered fabric is most popular. Linens and chenille-like textures are available in several colour ways.

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Q: What if you want a cot size, or a king size? Are there choices? A: A sleeper chair is cot size; with sofa sizes all the way up to king. There are also sectional configurations.

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Union Lighting & Furnishings 1491 Castlefield Ave., Toronto 416-652-2200 www.unionlf.com

Q: Does a sleeper sofa cost more than an ordinary sofa of comparable size and style? A: Pricing is similar to a better-quality domestically made sofa. Of course, the mattress and fabric grades can make it a little pricier but that depends on how you want to customize it. •

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FINDING THE FOREVER HOME A 1910 house is redesigned as a perfect long-term abode for a young family

BY BRENDA O’FARRELL PHOTOGRAPHY: DONNA GRIFFITH STYLING: KIRSTEN MARSHALL, ASHLEY BARREY AND NICOLA HOCKIN

IN A HOME RENOVATION PROJECT, there are many moving parts, but only two fundamental elements: planning and design. Each is a separate, yet dependent activity. And neither should be given short shrift, for when they come together flawlessly, as in a symphony, perfectly performed, they reveal themselves to be what they truly are – sister arts. These two sibling crafts are at the centre of the story of the re-imagining of this three-storey house in Toronto’s Little Italy district. This tale begins with a young couple who were planning to start a family, but before they did, they set out in search of what they called their “forever home.” •

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The fireplace surround in the living room is a black powder-coated steel sheet framed by a thick slab of black honed granite.

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“We were looking for a house that felt like home,” explains Nicola Hockin. It was a simple objective, yet one that was difficult to quantify. That is, of course, until they found it. “It was dated and mish-mashy, but it felt like home,” Nicola says. “The spaces were good. We could see the potential. It had all the right bits and pieces.” What it didn’t have was a functional basement, nor the right layout and look on the main and upper floors. Perhaps to some, these hurdles may have proven too cumbersome to overcome. But not for these two. They had a plan. And they had a team. That is where designer Kirsten Marshall and contractor Nuno Teixeira came in. So the planning and designing began.

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Built around 1910 on a prominent old street in Toronto’s Bathurst and Bloor area, the house had already undergone a major renovation in the 1990s. “A lot of the ornate character had been removed,” says Marshall, the principal at Palmerston Design. The first order of business was digging out the basement because no one taller than 5-foot-6 could stand upright in the space. In the basement, they then installed a gym, and a laundry area and now have space for a den. Then, they turned their attention to the main living areas.

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Despite the earlier renovations, the space was still separated into individual rooms, Marshall explains. “They wanted to open it up.” “We re-planned the main floor and we re-planned the second floor,” Marshall says. “It was a complete gut. The only thing that we maintained was the front door, and even that was not original.” Removing several walls necessitated reframing much of the structure with large steel beams, says general contractor Teixeira, the owner of Caliber Group, which oversaw all the work. •

The main-floor family room is a few steps below the dining room. It boasts wide sliding glass doors, custom-made storage space and a gas fireplace set in a concrete floor-to-ceiling surround.

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White oak floors extend into the dining room, which has a steel-framed table finished with white oak, purchased at Calligaris. The Nelson Bubble Light above the table is from DWR.

(Opposite) The window in the kitchen was changed to accommodate a new linear configuration, giving the space a sleek look. The countertop and waterfall island are clad in Caesarstone quartz. Black faucet: Brizo; stools: Urban Mode.

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On the list of must-haves were an open main floor space to give the house a good flow, a walk-in closet for each of the owners, a master ensuite bathroom, and a nursery. What they ended up with is a clean-lined modern home with a unique timeless charm, and a stately exterior. It is a place that now not only feels like home, but looks the part, too. With more than 3,500 square feet of living space, the new look offers plenty of room for everyone to have a different favourite spot. “I love the living room,” says Marshall, who then gets more specific: “The elevated fireplace.” The old brick fireplace, which had been painted in a previous renovation, was replaced with an elevated hearth made of honed granite, suspended off the firebox. The hearth also doubles as a bench. The surround is a stunning to-the-ceiling sheet of matte-black powder-coated steel. •

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(Left and right) The third-floor guest bedroom features a small sunroom and skylight. This space was simply reframed and carpeted.

“I like the drama it gives the room,” she continues. “I also like the fact it’s functional. You can sit in front of the fire, and it gave our client space to display some stuff. It’s a gracious living room.” For Nicola, who has given birth to their first child since moving in, she is oddly torn between the back family room and the thirdfloor bathroom when asked to cite her favourite spot. “The back family room really came together,” she says. “We opened the back wall with these gorgeous sliding doors. It’s where we spend so much time as a family.” Those “gorgeous doors” are nothing short of spectacular. They are custom-built 10-foothigh panes that run the complete 20-foot width of the back wall. Teixeira describes them simply as “epic.” And the third-floor bathroom? It has the look that Nicola has wanted for years. In fact, the theatre stage manager who describes herself as the kind of person who “redecorated her bedroom 30,000 times as a child,” had an image of what she wanted her bathroom to look like, which she had saved on Pinterest. “I had it pinned for years,” she says, “an image of a beautiful tub like this against a wall of dark tile.”

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The office features an antique banker’s desk that is a family heirloom and a spectacular floor-to-ceiling bookcase that was custom-made by Norcab.

(Above) The bathroom on the second floor features a pure white Caeserstone countertop, gold light fixtures from West Elm and Cercan floor tiles. The black plumbing fixtures are by Baril, from Roman Bath.

The man of the house is not without his favourite spot, too. The upstairs office, with its custom floor-to-ceiling showpiece bookcase is designed to almost exact specifications to how Nicola’s husband, Mark, envisioned it. “He came to us with an image of a bookcase that he loved,” Marshall says. And that is how it was designed, right down to how each shelf should be subdivided. The makeover of the house, from beginning to end, took about 10 months to complete. “It has this old Victorian-style presence with a modern feel as soon as you walk in,” Teixeira says.

“It’s beautiful,” Nicola adds, reflecting on how it all turned out. “It’s our dream home. And we got to get it pretty early, which is pretty great for us. We certainly think of this as a 20-plus-year home.” When they moved in, Nicola was five months pregnant with their son. “The timing was perfect,” she says, explaining how that gave them time to settle in and set up the nursery. “And be here for his whole life,” she says before quickly adding, “which is the plan.” Planning and design: sister arts that flawlessly work together. •

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PUT A RING ON IT

The engagement ring is an enduring symbol of love

Giving one’s beloved a ring to signify the promise of marriage has been a tradition from time immemorial, and the engagement rings of such celebrities as Kim Kardashian have received plenty of notice in the news and entertainment media. Although various metals, gems and designs have been favoured by different societies, in Canada the most popular contemporary choice of gems is the diamond. Dalia Lash, the director for jeweller MARK LASH, tells us how to find the perfect diamond ring for your sweetheart. QUESTION: Dalia, what’s the first thing someone should consider when buying a diamond ring? ANSWER: The first thing to consider when embarking on such a special purchase is what type of ring your significant other would love, cherish and enjoy wearing for years to come. It is important to choose a ring that suits their lifestyle, since an engagement ring is meant to be worn daily and not reserved for special occasions. The desired shape of the diamond should be decided upon first, as this is the focal point of the ring. Once the centre diamond has been selected according to the four Cs (cut, colour, clarity, carats) and, of course budget, the design of the ring follows. A custom-made and designed ring can be brought to life by expert jewellers, with specific

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attention to detail and fine craftsmanship. Diamonds are unique in their characteristics, and therefore no two rings are the same. If the purchaser has little or no idea of what they are looking for in an engagement ring, qualified gemologists and designers can guide them through this special process.

Q: Could you briefly explain the four Cs? A: The four Cs is the universal method for defining the quality of diamonds. It is important to consider all four Cs as factors, as they determine a diamond’s beauty, appeal and value.


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Q: What are the trends in choices of metal? A: Diamonds present beautifully in platinum or white gold, which are always popular choices. Yellow gold is contemporary and making a comeback, while rose gold is on trend and offers a soft romantic look and compliments most skin tones. Q: Do you recommend choosing a wedding band at the same time as the engagement ring? A: Whenever possible, it is favourable to design the wedding band at the same time. Engagement rings can be designed to be worn alongside a wedding band for a seamless look. The wedding band should be a complement to the engagement ring, creating a beautiful look together. • CUT: Refers to the proportions, symmetry and polish of a diamond, which determines the level of sparkle and scintillation. A diamond’s cut is crucial to the stone’s final beauty. COLOUR: Diamond colour is all about what you can’t see. Diamonds are graded on a scale starting from D-E-F, which is colourless, and G-H-I, which is near-colourless. The colour scale continues down from there. The less colour, the greater the value. Fancy coloured diamonds such as yellow, pink, red, blue and green are extremely rare and valuable and are graded based on their intensity and colour saturation. CARAT: Diamonds are weighed in metric carats. Each carat can be subdivided into 100 points, allowing for precise measurement. CLARITY: Diamond clarity refers to the absence of inclusions and birthmarks that form within a diamond while deep in the earth’s core. Diamonds without birthmarks are rare, and rarity determines the diamond’s beauty and value. Every diamond is unique. Diamond clarity grading ranges from flawless (F) to imperfect (I3). MARK LASH recommends diamonds within the VS-SI range, which are clean to the unaided eye.

Q: What cuts – that is, shapes – of diamonds are popular now? A: Round brilliant-cut diamonds are always desirable as they have the most brilliance. The oval-shaped diamond is very popular and has been gaining admirers over the past few years. The radiant-cut diamond is brilliant and is rectangular in shape. Emerald-cut diamonds are also rectangular and offer an understated, elegant look. The marquise-shaped diamond was favoured in the 1950s and is once again gaining popularity. Baguettes and trapezoids used as side stones enhance and embellish any centre diamond in a ring.

Q: What kinds of settings are available? A: There are so many beautiful settings that truly make the diamond engagement ring the symbol of everlasting love. A solitaire diamond setting is always timeless. Delicate bands set with diamonds is the perfect way to highlight a centre diamond and is a desired look. There are many accent details that contribute to a magnificent setting: diamond halos, drop halos, diamond scarves, bezels and pointed claws are a few popular options. Customizing a setting specifically to one’s taste produces a unique and special ring.

MARK LASH www.marklash.com 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229

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BUYERS’ GUIDE

BORROWED FROM THE HIGHLANDS Scot-Build Developments Inc. www.scot-build.ca 705-888-2759

IN SEARCH OF THE RIGHT PIECE Cocoon Furnishings www.cocoonfurnishings.ca 905-829-2780

CREATING THE WOW EFFECT IN A LOW-KEY GARDEN DESIGN Kiva Architectural Design www.kivalandscape.com 289-897-9620

A FEW COSMETIC CHANGES Fohr Design Studio www.fohrdesign.com 416-670-3047

CURTAIN CALL Maple Drapery & Carpet www.mapledrapery.com 8481 Keele St., Unit 11A, Concord ~ 905-660-7290 12967 Keele St., King City ~ 905-833-5464 PUT A RING ON IT Mark Lash www.marklash.com 480 Eglinton Ave. W., Toronto ~ 416-256-5229 9033 Leslie St., Richmond Hill ~ 905-881-5229 HOT NEWS ABOUT RADIANT HEATING Runtal North America www.runtalnorthamerica.com 905-829-4941 A PLACE FOR EVERYTHING Simply Closets www.simplyclosets.ca 416-385-8855 A HOT TWIST ON A COOL IDEA Southern Living Design www.southernlivingdesign.ca 905-823-3036 A NEW HOME IN SERENE SURROUNDINGS Leclair Décor www.leclairdecor.com 613-808-2213 CELEBRATING A MILESTONE Allan Rug Co. www.allanrug.com 416-639-2545 FINDING THE FOREVER HOME Palmerston Design www.palmerston.ca 416-924-3800 Caliber Group Ltd. www.caliberbuilds.com 416-629-4489 A SUITE OF ONE’S OWN Men At Work Design Build www.menatwork.ca 416-763-0763 WELCOME HOME Yvonne Whelan Design www.yvonnewhelandesign.com 416-602-9303

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THE AUTUMN ISSUE

FROM CRAMPED TO CONTEMPORARY Cliff & Evans Ltd. www.cliffandevans.com 416-628-7186 Christopher Walker, Architect www.christopherwalkerarchitect.com 416-902-3535 John Lloyd and Associates www.johnlloyd.ca 416-778-9363 Kate Zeidler Interior Design www.katezeidlerdesign.com 416-924-3750 ONE STEP AHEAD OF THE TRENDS Bättig Design www.battigdesign.com 800-818-4434 ~ 819-374-4434 TIME TRAVEL Leanne McKeachie Design www.leannemckeachie.com 250-891-3306 ABOUT FACE Tina Cartier www.tinacartier.com 438-887-2410 THE POWER OF LEGEND Dorothy Grant www.dorothygrant.com 604-425-1427 A TASTE OF TOFINO Wickaninnish Inn www.wickinn.com 250-725-3100 Wolf in the Fog www.wolfinthefog.com 250-725-9653 The Ice House Oyster Bar www.icehousetofino.ca 250-725-4239 Kuma Tofino www.kumatofino.com 250-725-2215 Sea Monster Noodle Bar www.seamonsternoodle.com 250-725-1280

Sobo www.sobo.ca 250-725-2341 A NEW HOTEL IN AN ANCIENT LAND Orient Jerusalem Hotel www.isrotel.com/orient MANY REASONS TO RAISE A GLASS Checkmate Artisanal Winery www.checkmatewinery.com 250-707-2299 Lake Breeze Winery www.lakebreeze.ca 250-496-5659 Summerhill Pyramid Winery www.summerhill.bc.ca 250-764-8000 Haywire www.okanagancrushpad.com 250-494-4445 Burrowing Owl Estate Winery www.burrowingowlwine.ca 877-498-0620 Liquidity Wines www.liquiditywines.com 778-515-5500 Painted Rock Estate Winery www.paintedrock.ca 250-493-6809 Culmina Family Estate Winery www.culmina.ca 250-498-0789 Le Vieux Pin Winery www.levieuxpin.ca 250-498-8388 WATER WORKS Dvira Interiors www.dvira.com 416-457-8827 Fleurco www.fleurco.com 514-326-2222 ~ 1-800-993-0033 Amati Canada www.amaticanada.com 905-709-0881 Muti Kitchen and Bath www.mutikb.com 905-844-3773 Cantu Bathrooms and Hardware www.cantubathrooms.com 604-688-1252 Batimat www.batimat.net 514-735-5747


AD LIST

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108 15 9

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Simply Closets Southern Living Design Union Lighting/VMC Weavers Art X-Tile Yorkville Design Centre

IN OUR NEXT ISSUE

The days are getting shorter as we move closer to the winter solstice. While it may be dark and cold outside, we are surrounded by warmth indoors. In our upcoming Winter issue, we’ll show you ways of brightening the interiors of your home for the dark months ahead. And don’t miss our holiday gift guide, which will give you some excellent suggestions on how to find perfect presents for those you love.

THE AUTUMN ISSUE

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DESIGN VANCOUVER KITCHENS 2017

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1


We’ve all asked that question before at some point when walking by a street kid. Why can’t they just get off the street? Why can’t they grow up and take some responsibility by going to school and getting a job? Well, imagine being that street kid for a second. Getting a life is not a simple snap of the fingers. It isn’t easy to just get a job or an education. And they can’t always just go home. For street kids, every day is survival. Their life is based on simply getting through it. Finding food and shelter is their job, and even overcoming that doesn’t put them in any kind of position to find stability in their lives. Getting off the street is just the beginning. So let’s start from the beginning. We’ll call this kid Steve. Steve’s day starts at sunrise in a public park. The sun hits him dead in the eye and he wakes up shivering. Steve springs up from the bench that he slept on to make sure his stuff is still under it. It’s almost nothing, a backpack with a couple of sweaters and a thermos in it, but two nights ago he almost got beat up for it. He was walking through a different park across town when three guys sitting on a bench asked him if he had a cigarette. Steve ignored them and kept walking, but he knew they weren’t through with him yet. After verbally harassing him, they stood up and moved to surround Steve. He began to shake with fear. Steve told them again that he didn’t have anything, but they didn’t care anymore. They weren’t going to leave without something. They began to step closer to Steve. And closer. One pulled out a knife from his back pocket. Just as another guy tried to grab Steve’s backpack, Steve darted through an opening just out of their reach. They chased him for a few steps, but Steve was already far away, his backpack still in his possession. This morning, Steve’s exhausted and he needs to get out of the wind. He picks up his backpack and spends the next two hours looking for an alleyway. Hopefully he can find one that’s quiet, and, if possible, has boxes or newspapers that he can use to protect himself from the biting chill. Steve scours the alleyways in his area and finally settles on one. It seems perfect and he can’t remember why he doesn’t sleep there more often. He finds a spot, puts his head down and begins to doze off. The sounds of the city fade. He falls asleep. He dreams. In this fleeting moment, everything is OK. He’s in his old home, in a warm bed, everyone’s calm and there’s breakfast waiting for him when he decides to – “Get up, kid,” says the police officer standing over Steve. Steve opens his eyes as the officer informs him that he needs to clear out immediately. Steve rubs his eyes. Now he remembers the problem with this alleyway. He stands, picks up his things and starts his day again. Steve can’t stop thinking about his dream. But that’s all it was. Nothing like his actual life at home. He can still feel the pain from his father’s fists. Hear his mother’s screams. Things had been getting worse and worse at home since his father lost his job. It all started when his father came home drunk from the bar one night. Steve remembers the red mark on his mother’s face the next morning and refusing to believe what was unfolding around him. But that refusal only made things worse, because Steve could never convince his father that he needed help. So it continued, one incident after another until one night, it wasn’t just Steve’s mother that was on the receiving end of it. It was him. His mother screamed louder when Steve was being beaten than when she was, and those are the sounds that haunt Steve every single day. The bruises are gone now, but the mental scarring never will be. Steve manages to snap back into reality, but reality isn’t any better. Steve has not only had very little sleep in the past couple days, but also very little food. He really doesn’t feel like rummaging through a garbage can this morning. That means it’s time to go onto the street and beg for change. He’ll never get used to doing this, but he’s had to learn fast. Having to decide which street corner to sit on and beg strangers for change isn’t something he ever envisioned doing. He decides on a busy corner downtown and begins the hike in that direction. He hopes that the long walk is worth the extra money he’ll receive for being in a busier area. At least it isn’t winter yet. The very thought of spending all winter on the street sends chills down Steve’s spine. He’s felt a Canadian winter before. He can’t still be out here by then…can he? When Steve finally arrives, he sits down on the street corner and takes off his toque. He eyes the people walking by and begins to beg. “Change please?” is what he usually says, but today he’s a little more desperate. He’s painfully hungry and it shows in the anguish in his voice. Steve always tries his best to not worry about what other people are thinking, but it’s hard. He can see the way they look at him. People are either scared of him, disgusted by him or they ignore him altogether. He’s not sure which one is worse, but sometimes it feels like everyone hates him for one reason or another. Today, one person in particular is very aggressive when Steve asks him for change. He tells him that he’s a loser and that he should get a job. After a few hours and thousands of passersby later, Steve has $7.24, just enough for a burger combo. After waiting for a few moments, Steve slowly picks up the change in his toque. He stares at it, scared of what he might do with it. It takes him all the strength he has to not use the money for something else. Two weeks ago, someone else on the street started giving him free “samples.” When you’re in a dark enough place, sometimes you’ll do whatever people tell you will make you feel better. It doesn’t matter who that person is. It doesn’t matter if deep down you know that what they’re offering isn’t a way out at all, but another anchor to keep you drowning. On these dark days, hope is replaced by distraction. Steve is constantly tempted to just let go and get away, but today he somehow fights that temptation off. He gets up and makes his way towards the restaurant. When he gets to the front of the line, Steve dumps the change on the counter before ordering. The annoyed cashier counts it as the people in line behind start to get restless. Steve tries to recall the last time he didn’t have to pay for something in change, but can’t. It’s always embarrassing, especially when the line is as long as this. He asks the cashier if she can unlock the bathroom for him and she hesitates. Steve is rarely allowed to use a public bathroom, even as a paying customer. But today, the cashier doesn’t want to keep the other customers waiting so she unlocks the door. Steve splashes water onto his dirty face inside the bathroom. He studies his reflection in the mirror. How long can he keep doing this for? When will this nightmare end? No kid should have to live like this. As he rinses, he begins to daydream. He thinks about the feeling of having a nice, long shower in a real bathroom. He steps out onto the cool floor and dries himself off with a soft, fresh towel. Steve is snapped out of his daydream by the sound of a knock. He opens the door to find the manager. He has to leave now. Steve puts his head down, grabs his food and heads outside. Later, with his hunger temporarily gone, Steve is back in his only home – the street. Back where he has no hope. There have been days when the shame has been too much, when Steve tried to find a way out. Steve recalls a time a few months earlier when he first started living on the street. He had woken up with a sense of hope that day he never felt before. He had slept in an abandoned warehouse another guy told him about and managed to split some breakfast with someone else staying there. That day, Steve was allowed to have something on his mind besides finding food, finding somewhere to sleep and trying not to get mugged. So, he wanted to do what so many strangers have told him to do before – get a job. Steve was walking down the street when he noticed a convenience store with a “Help Wanted” sign in front of it. Steve took a deep breath and walked into the store. He went straight to the cashier at the front and asked about the sign. But all he got back were insults. The owner told Steve that he sees him on the streets every day. He told him his clothes were a mess. That he must have been insane to think anyone would hire a stupid, lazy homeless kid. Steve slunk out and glanced back behind him at the “Help Wanted” sign. This had happened before. He didn’t understand why no one would give him a chance. He doubted himself to the point where he began to wonder if he would even be able to trust the person who did. That was the day that Steve realized that the hill he had to climb was actually a mountain. Steve hears a car’s honk that snaps him back to an all too familiar reality. He’s out of money again. He has no place to go. He feels physically and mentally beaten. And soon it will be nightfall. Soon he’ll be back at the bottom of the mountain once again. This is just a glimpse into Steve’s struggle and the struggle that so many homeless youth face. There is no living, only surviving. And when you’re trying to survive on the street, every little thing is an obstacle. Every time you beg for change, every time you go to the bathroom, every time you want to sleep, eat or drink – nothing comes easy. For many kids like Steve who want a way out, the struggle to meet basic needs is only the beginning. The coming days, weeks and months provide hurdles even harder to overcome. The physical pain may lessen in leaving the street behind but the mental anguish is constant when trying to forge a new life. Getting an education, applying for a job, admitting that you need counselling – these are hard for anyone. When you have to do all these things from scratch, the frustration can mount as fast as the confidence can fade. From learning how to stay warm in that first winter on the street, to the first day back at school, from deciding whether to steal food or pass out from hunger, to deciding where to get a shirt to wear for that first job interview, there are endless obstacles for homeless youth.

It’s also why we exist. Please visit CovenantHouseToronto.ca to donate.


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