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MONTREAL

AUTUMN

Sharon Azrieli presents

CANADIAN BY DESIGN

FRANK GEHRY A RCH ITECT

ISSUE

FIRST NATIONS CUISINE

FABULOUS PREFABS

Restaurants specializing in Indigenous foods

A new way to build luxurious cabins

A LOVE OF LANDSCAPES

CONDO COMFORTS

The art of Frank Lipari

Three beautiful high-rise homes

BUILT FOR ENTERTAINING

$6.95

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An elegant home north of Toronto

SUSTAINABLE KITCHENS

MALA BEADS

VACATION IN A GEODESIC DOME


PRESENTING ART INSPIRED FURNITURE

Where each piece is as functional as it is beautiful. Rethink the role furniture plays in your space.

www.avenuedesigncanada.com | 3425 boul. de la Cote-Vertu | Saint-Laurent | 514-340-9351


PUBLISHER’S LETTER

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Dear readers, In these hot days of summer, I am singing in the seemingly hottest zone in the world: Siracusa, Sicily! Forty-degree days and it cools off to 30 at night. So my publisher‘s letter will be very short. We continue in this issue with my series on brilliant, amazing Canadians: in this instance, architect Frank Gehry, who welcomed us to his studio in Los Angeles on June 3. It was a sweet experience for me because he reminded me a bit of my dad, who would have been 95 this year; the fifth anniversary of his passing was marked in July. My dad was also an architect who designed iconic buildings, and left behind 15 years of work to complete when he passed away. He always said: “if you do what you love, you will never consider it work.” It’s a sentiment with which I know that Frank Gehry completely agrees. And because he, along with these fascinating artists whom I have had the great honour to meet and enjoy talking with, love what they do, they will continue to create and leave us with lots to admire and appreciate for generations after they have left us. They are the great icons of our time. Please enjoy the article about Frank Gehry on page 22. In my small way, I have endeavoured to grasp what makes them tick – how did the first concept that differentiated them from the crowd come to them – so that we can appreciate them all the more. A sweet, cool drink for the mind to us all at the end of a hot day!

SHARON AZRIELI Publisher

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YOUR KEY TO SUCCESS

TINA

BAER REAL

THE ESTATE AGENT

With over 30 years of experience there are few agents who can offer the wealth of knowledge combined with honest and loyal service as Tina Baer.

514.603.9870

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EDITOR’S LETTER

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I AM FASCINATED BY THE CONCEPT of personal preference and its impact on our lives. Our preferences are so deeply embedded in our psyches that we rarely think about them. But they make each of us unique and they define the way we live. Why, for instance, would one person love wearing purple shorts while another opts for hot orange trousers? Why does one person love Brussels sprouts while another gags at the very thought of eating them? Personal preference extends to absolutely everything in our lives: from food and furniture to the cars we drive, the books we read, the exercise we do (I love boot camp but not spinning), the vacations we take (terra firma over sea cruises, thanks), the music we listen to (jazz, not heavy metal), the films and television we watch, and the houses we inhabit (contemporary or Edwardian?). One of the features I love about my job is the opportunity to observe the mind-boggling array of preferences in people’s homes. In this issue, you’ll see profiles of homes that represent the many personal preferences of their owners. From a stream-lined condo in Vancouver and a funky country home in Quebec to a sleek-but-eclectic pied à terre in Toronto and an open-plan mid-century home in Calgary. Each is as unique as its respective owners. Each reflects a distinctive assemblage of personal preferences.

There is, however, something that all of these houses have in common. Despite the variety in design, decor, texture and colour, each space, in its unique way, is home. Each offers its occupants a welcome refuge at day’s end, which is what “home” is all about. I know you’ll appreciate the vast array of interior design styles in this issue. You may even see some of your own preferences displayed in these beautiful spaces. Also in this issue, we profile the growing appetite across Canada for Indigenous foods. To meet the demand, First Nations chefs have opened restaurants that serve traditional Indigenous dishes, which are fast becoming a preference among all who dine there. Finally, if you have a preference for foods that satisfy a sweet tooth, do read Julie Gedeon’s feature about baking classes that are offered across Canada. It seems that home cooks are eager to improve their baking skills, whether their preference is for chocolate layer cakes or meticulously prepared petit fours. When it comes to such sweet treats, many of us have a long list of personal preferences.

There are several ways you can stay in touch with us: @homeincanada @athomeincanada @athomeincanada

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STEPHANIE WHITTAKER Editor-in-Chief stephanie@homeincanadamagazine.ca


INVEST

FOR LIFE

OUR SERVICES Personal and Corporate Insurance Investments Strategies and Concepts Succession

Lowen and Peter invite you to make an appointment: 514 932-2577 4612 Sainte Catherine West, Westmount, Quebec, H3Z 1S3 www.rosenthallifegroup.ca


CONTRIBUTORS

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PHILLIPA RISPIN Phillipa Rispin was intrigued by two condo apartments, both with interior decor by Iman Lalji, that she profiled for this issue. In one, Lalji’s own home, the designer wanted “modern luxury with a hint of tribe.” For the other, Lalji’s client specified “something between street art and chic.” In both cases, says Phillipa, “the designer walked the tightrope between two aesthetics, not necessarily compatible, to arrive at glamour and sophistication without being gaudy – a neat trick.”  SUSAN KELLY Writer and astrologer Susan Kelly avidly follows both the stars and the trends. In one of her assignments for this issue, she profiles a Toronto couple’s home in which designer Neil Jonsohn artfully used the homeowners’ love of architectural arches as inspiration. “It was assigned just as I was looking at the arch-shape trend, one of seven I examine in my regular astrology column,” she says. “I love the synchronicity!” She provides weekly forecasts to her newsletter subscribers and Facebook readers at Susan Kelly Astrology. LARRY ARNAL “From sophisticated-contemporary to boho-chic and any other style that suits her client, Iman Lalji delivers inspirational spaces that we can all draw from,” says Toronto photographer Larry Arnal, who photographed two spaces designed by Lalji. “Iman’s own home features 100 per cent ethically sourced, vegan materials. She also transformed a client’s space into a stunning boho’esque pad,” Larry says. “I hope readers will find as much inspiration for their own projects in these homes as I derived from photographing them.”  JULIE GEDEON Writer/editor Julie Gedeon lives to learn, and she thoroughly enjoyed finding out about Indigenous cuisine as well as some of the issues around food sovereignty for First Nations during her research for a feature about Indigenous restaurants. Already curious about the current popularity of mala jewelry, she developed a greater appreciation for these bracelets and necklaces after learning more about them from an artist in British Columbia who creates them with heartfelt reverence. Julie also pursued her fascination with macarons as part of her assignment to check out the diverse baking classes offered across Canada. CHERYL CORNACCHIA Montreal-based writer Cheryl Cornacchia says she is amazed at how the right decor and a small tweak of the way space is used, can so dramatically change a home’s look and feel. In this issue, Cheryl profiles a stunning high-rise condo with spectacular views of Vancouver’s urban areas and waterscapes. She also takes us inside the newly renovated Ledbury Park home of Toronto designer Svetlana Tryaskina. Both properties illustrate just what a big impact the perfect piece of furniture or a custom wall finish, for example, can have on a room’s ambience, vocation and practical use.

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Montreal Edition Volume 11, number 5, Autumn Issue 2019 Date of Issue: September, 2019 6100 TransCanada Highway Suite 100, Pointe-Claire Quebec H9R 1B9

Call 1-866-846-1640 www.homeincanadamagazine.ca sales@homeincanadamagazine.ca info@homeincanadamagazine.ca

PUBLISHER Dr. Sharon Azrieli CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Stanley Kirsh

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Stephanie Whittaker ART DIRECTOR Randy Laybourne EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Carmen Lefebvre ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT & ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Neve Foltz CONTRIBUTORS Cheryl Cornacchia Julie Gedeon Elisabeth Kalbfuss Susan Kelly Tracey MacKenzie Barbara Milner Brenda O’Farrell Phillipa Rispin Nadine Thomson PHOTOGRAPHY Larry Arnal Maxime Brouillet Anka Buzolitch Luisa G. González Gillian Jackson Joel Klassen James Law Alex Lukey Colin Perry STYLING Laurent Guez Christina Hanlon Neil Jonsohn Iman Lalji Katie Nelson Negar Reihani Svetlana Tryaskina

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Matthew Azrieli CONTROLLER Jenny Marques DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Artur Kozyra DIRECTOR OF SALES - NATIONAL Kelly Chicoine For sales inquiries, please email Kelly Chicoine: kelly@homeincanadamagazine.ca To subscribe go here: www.athomeincanada.ca/ print-subscription LEGAL DEPOSIT 1927-324x Home In Canada Inc. 2019. All rights reserved. Any copying or reproduction of content without the written permission of Home In Canada is strictly prohibited. issn


Hey, Plastic Surgery It’s For Guys Too! Looking great is not only for women, but for men, as well! In past years, men could get away with being complacent with their looks. Although men do not age in the same way as women, they age nonetheless. Looking good projects an aura of pride and confidence in oneself, which translates equally well at home, at work, and at play. For men, a facelift can refresh a tired look by bringing up the loose skin of the jowls and neck. Eyelid surgery can remove droopy skin of the upper eyelids and treat bags on the lower eyelids. Botulin injections are a great way to decrease the lines around the forehead and eyebrows and can be done during a lunchtime visit. Men who may have deeper lines or thin lips can get these plumped up using Hyaluronic Acid. In the end, you want to look as great as you feel inside, and there is no shame in that.

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CONTENTS

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22 ON THE COVER CHANGING THE WORLD – ONE BUILDING AT A TIME

The remarkable creations of architect Frank Gehry make him a game-changer in a league of his own. Portrait: James Law Building: Dronimages

FOR FUN AND FAMILY A new family home north of Toronto is whimsically designed for entertaining large groups

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OUTSIDE IN

Unusual design and building materials create a sense of being outdoors in the interiors of this Quebec home

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90 IN LOVE WITH LANDSCAPE

Frank Lipari’s art is minimalist but deeply significant


CONTENTS

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A BLESSING IN DISGUISE

Losing out on one apartment gives a Toronto designer the opportunity to snap up an even better one 6

PUBLISHER’S LETTER

8

EDITOR’S LETTER

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THIS JUST IN A selection of new items for your home

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HOW SWEET IT IS Canadians are attending classes to learn how to bake everything from macarons to layer cakes

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BENEDICTION THROUGH BEADS Jacqueline Medalye creates mala jewelry on Salt Spring Island

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GREEN KITCHENS A designer urges his clients to pare back their belongings when planning a new kitchen

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A FAMILY TRADITION A home on Lake Champlain is built to honour a mother’s wish for large family gatherings

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NEWER THAN BRAND-NEW A new condo in Vancouver is upgraded by a designer who installs higher-quality materials

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FABULOUS PRE-FABS Up-market prefabricated cabins are changing assumptions about homes that are assembled in factories

124

ALL FIRED UP Montrealers are flocking to pottery classes to reconnect with the Earth

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FALL FOR NEW DECOR Autumn’s astrological alignments inspire us to make our homes stylish and cozy

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STREET MEETS CHIC A synthesis of styles creates the right aesthetic contrast in a downtown pied-à-terre

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BEAUTIFUL BLEND A renovated powder room in a historic home recalls the past while offering modern convenience

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UNDER THE DOME Geodesic structures in Quebec’s Charlevoix region provide cozy vacation accommodations

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CREATIVITY STARTS AT HOME A Toronto designer uses her expertise to create unique interiors in her own family home

156

A GROWING BUSINESS A family creates and expands a full-service landscape company in South Shore Montreal

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FIRST NATIONS CUISINE

Restaurants that specialize in Indigenous cooking are attracting attention across Canada

108

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FROM HODGEPODGE TO HAPPY HOME

A Calgary family transforms a mid-century bungalow into a family-friendly nest


DESIGN

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T H IS JUST IN FULL MOON This lovely necklace dazzles with its multi-coloured moonstones and an 18kt rose gold fastener. Gloria Bass Design 1361-1 Greene Ave., Westmount 514-933-7062 www.gloriabassdesign.com

DINING ON CAVIAR The Caviar Granite dinnerware by Maxwell & Williams is bold and versatile with a focus on style. Made of durable porcelain, it features a unique textured exterior, with smoky borders and a contemporary matte finish. Designed to be a striking addition to any table. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

BENCH BEAUTY Taylor is the name of this bench, which boasts an onyx-finished seat, a metal body and fabric upholstery. The seat cushion is removable. Avenue Design 3425 CĂ´te Vertu Blvd., St. Laurent 514-340-9351 www.avenuedesigncanada.com

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DESIGN

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SHAPELY CURVES The Nouvel small pendant light by Kelly Wearstler is minimal but bold, highlighting the juxtaposition of mixed materials and curvilinear form. This double pendant is available in antique brass, polished nickel or a combination of bronze and brass, each featuring a white glass globe. Celadon Collection 170 Peel St., Montreal 514-932-3306 celadoncollection.com 

FROM LITTLE ACORNS … These 18kt yellow gold earrings, delightfully shaped like acorns, are splendid with diamonds and South Sea pearls. Gloria Bass Design 1361-1 Greene Ave., Westmount 514-933-7062 www.gloriabassdesign.com

ORGANIC AND DELICIOUS Belmio’s master roasters present their line of 100 per cent Arabica organic coffee, produced under sustainable farming practices in South America. No chemical or synthetic pesticides are used. The new Oro and Verde varieties join eight other blends that are available online and through more than 300 retailers. The capsules are made predominantly of recycled aluminum that come in sleeves of 10 capsules. Belmio premium organic coffee capsules are compatible with Nespresso® machines. Distributions Bellucci 8145 St. Laurent Blvd., Montréal 514-334-7441 www.distributionsbellucci.com

GRAB A JAVA Savour your freshly brewed coffee in this collection of Grespresso espresso cups by Costa Nova. They’re made in Portugal of stoneware, which helps maintain the temperature of liquids for a long time. Inspired by the waves of the sea, these beautiful cups are available in eight colours and are durable for everyday use. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

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IMMOBILIER BOUTIQUE

|


DESIGN

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PORTUGUESE TRADITION The sophisticated and vibrant Lisboa serveware collection by Costa Nova draws on the ancestral references of Portugal’s azulejos and plants. Made in Portugal of fine sandstone, these charming pieces will add a touch of European flair to your table setting. Resistant to shock and heat, they’re perfect for daily use. Linen Chest www.linenchest.com

LOVELY LACE This classic black tatted-lace necklace by Lorina Balteanu is adorned with glass beads. The technique of creating tatted lace dates back hundreds of years. Balteanu’s work is available in various colours and styles, and pieces are combined with pearls, beads or gemstones. Viva Vida Art Gallery 278 Lakeshore Rd., Pointe Claire, Quebec 514-694-1110 www.vivavidashop.com www.vivavidaartgallery.com

SLEEK-LINED SOFA The Marcello sofa by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams has modern, sophisticated lines. Its sleek design features a luxurious bowed front. Offered in two sizes and available in a choice of fabric or leather, it sits on square metal legs that are available in two finishes: brass or polished stainless steel. Celadon Collection 170 Peel, St., Montreal 514-932-3306 celadoncollection.com 

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ARCHITECTURE

AN ICON FOR OUR TIME

Architect Frank Gehry has created a new language of buildings, incorporating art and unorthodox use of structure and materials

BY SHARON AZRIELI PHOTOGRAPHY: JAMES LAW

USING THE MOST INNOVATIVE building materials as his paint brushes, and unusual cladding as his brush strokes, Frank Gehry is changing the building landscapes of our world. He is redefining the way we conceive of buildings and the way that we interact with them, as well as the way they impact the world around us. And as he does that, he is changing the way that we see all those spaces: How will we feel about the relationship between architecture and exterior spaces tomorrow? What a marvellous liberation! It’s not just because his buildings defy gravity that one leaves an interview with this globally renowned architect feeling that the world is tilting! –>

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ARCHITECTURE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

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ARCHITECTURE

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Photo courtesy of Falkenpost

When I saw Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles – the home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra – for the first time, I felt as if I was seeing music! I wanted to dance! It made me so happy! The forms of the building, in steel and wood, seemed to leap and soar into the sky in a way I had never seen before. If the effect, as Gehry has said he wants to create, is to: “Transfer feelings through bricks and mortar,” then he has eminently prevailed. Both the building and the garden behind (reminiscent of Park Güell, Gaudi’s curvaceous Barcelona gardens), succeed in creating a haven for music and peace in the middle of a bustling city, where people can go to hear and feel what those spaces were created for.

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Frank Gehry was born in Toronto in 1929 to a New York-born father and a mother who had immigrated from Poland. After the family migrated to California in 1947, Gehry enrolled in Los Angeles City College. He thought about studying chemical engineering, but settled instead on architecture, and graduated from the School of Architecture at the University of Southern California in 1954. He is internationally known for designing striking and original structures: 8 Spruce Street, a 76-storey apartment tower in New York; the Louis Vuitton Foundation building in Paris; the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao in Spain; the Pop Culture Museum in Seattle; the Peter B. Lewis building in Cleveland; the Dancing House in Prague, and the Art Gallery of Ontario, among many other iconic structures.

Photo courtesy of Frank O. Gehry. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles (2017.M.66), Frank Gehry Papers


ARCHITECTURE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

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His was not the quickest rise to fame to become one of the world’s most renowned architects of Canadian origin. But the transformation of his own home – a Dutch colonial style house in Santa Monica, starting in 1978, was the beginning of his own transformation as well. He took his land and house, and with the use of chicken-coop wire and corrugated metal and other metals sure to anger the neighbours, tore down the exterior of the original structure, and extended it with these “modern artifacts.” Depending on point of view, he thus created what is either an abstract study worthy of artist Andy Warhol or a travesty, which has been attracting tour buses for decades. He laughs about the winds of fame telling him how popular he is by how many buses pass the house daily. But it was his design of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, which was so revolutionary, so gorgeous, and came in under cost and on time, (and, as he laughs, “with no leaks”) that changed the city’s very makeup. It caused peace. It caused financial prosperity. It attracted hordes of tourists and put the city on the map. It caused what is now called the “Bilbao effect.” Perhaps this is why his name has become synonymous with great abstract architecture, and he is referred to as the Frank Lloyd Wright of his generation. –>

Photo courtesy of Txemi López

Photo courtesy of ChatridelSevilla

(Above) The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao was opened in 1997 in a city in Spain that was beset by industrial decline. Its controversial design drew global attention to the city and to the architect. The Guggenheim, which draws an estimated one million visitors yearly, brought new life to Bilbao.

“I tried to have the building materials become the water colour, the frame. It’s about what surfaces look like… their colours.”

(Left, and opposite page, Above) The Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, which opened in 2003, is home to the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

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ARCHITECTURE

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Our meeting took place in a brief visit to Gehry’s huge loft-like studio in Los Angeles. We were permitted to take photos only in two small libraries. But as I wandered around, I marvelled at the huge scope and breadth of the work Gehry is doing and has done: whole cities and huge projects around the globe. “I believe architecture can rise to the level of fine art within the constraints of the construction industry,” he says. In 2002, he partnered with Dassault Systèmes, a subsidiary of the French aircraft-design company Dassault Group, to bring 3D computer-aided design to his architecture. Frank Gehry’s office is a visual treat, filled with mementoes, sketches and photos of notable Canadians and celebrities.

Publisher Sharon Azrieli interviewed Frank Gehry in his book-lined office library. The chairs are his own design. Photo: James Law

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The software was originally developed for the aerospace industry and it was the first time an architecture firm had used this technology. Because of advanced quoting and structural engineering capabilities, Gehry’s projects come in under cost every time and are able to be built to exact specifications. This is remarkable in his industry, and especially important for building the complex and visually remarkable structures that he designs. A huge Canadian flag hangs upon a wall as one faces the stairs that come down from his library and private office, and I must have stood for 15 minutes before a magnificent model of his upcoming project in Arles, which made me truly understand how Gehry is an abstract artist in the most three-dimensional art of all: architecture. The Luma Arles complex, an arts centre in France, is breathtaking with its breadth, scope and artistry.


ARCHITECTURE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

athomeincanada.ca

Photo courtesy of Dronimages

The LUMA Arles parc des ateliers in Arles, France is under construction and scheduled for completion in 2020. Once open, this Arts Resource Centre will be a locus for artists, thinkers, scientists and civil-society stakeholders to work together on social issues.

Layers of aluminum tiles clad the building, so that each one resembles a brush stroke. The effect is stunning, ever-changing. Each tile catches the sun at a different angle. Then, as the sun makes its inevitable turn around the building, the structure catches the light and glows, literally! And changes colour. No two minutes of the day are the same. The building itself IS a work of art, but not a static, two-dimensional one; instead, it’s a three-dimensional, living, breathing, almost-moving one, in which people work. It resembles a painting by Vincent Van Gogh.

It is a marvel of modern technology that has been created by a brilliant, artistic talent. This marriage of art and technology is really what Frank Gehry is all about. It seems as if he is to physically standing structures, (that are meant to be lived in) what Van Gogh was to paint and the use of a palette knife. I propose that this places Gehry in a league of his own and ups his own game, even higher than that which we saw from the “Bilbao effect.” “I tried to have that happen naturally,” he says. “I tried to have the building materials become the watercolour, the frame. It’s about what surfaces look like…their colours.” –>

“I saw the picture of the charioteer from 500 B.C. And it was so moving, it made me cry. And I wanted to create architecture that would move people like that piece of art moved me.”

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ARCHITECTURE

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Photo courtesy of Till Niermann

“I thought we should try to create our own language for our own time,” he adds. “How do you do that? Our own time is moving, everything is moving. Planes, cars, everything. So, I was looking for a way to express that with thinner materials, and then I saw the picture of the charioteer from 500 B.C. And it was so moving, it made me cry. And I wanted to create architecture that would move people like that piece of art moved me.” The ancient Greek charioteer paradoxically influenced Gehry to become the most modern of architects. This and other archeological wonders inspired him to draw and create fish forms, such as the fish sculpture in Barcelona for which he used the advanced 3D technology of Dassault. It allowed him to create his buildings “on time, under budget and without leaks.” He is very proud, as well he should be of those facts. Gehry is a true Renaissance artist, designing sets for opera, a sailboat, another house, as well as his many apartment buildings and museums. He says he would love to try a synagogue or other house of worship.

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El Peix is a 52-metre-long fish sculpture, located in front of the Port Olímpic in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Built for the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, its gold-coloured stainless steel glistens in the sun.

A study of fish in Frank Gehry’s office.


ARCHITECTURE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

Photo courtesy of Iva Balk

(Above) The Dancing House is the nickname

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In giving back to his community, Gehry is involved in an organization called Turnaround Arts: California, which works with 27 elementary schools to encourage children through art to engage in school. The program fosters art education by mentoring principals and teachers and by giving students such creative resources as arts supplies, musical instruments, and licensing rights to perform school musicals. Once again, as I do with all these interviews, I ask him if he feels Canadian (he owns a large collection of hockey sweaters that line the upper walls of his office). And he says yes, after all these years of living in the United States, somehow he still feels both protective of and protected by and for his native Canada. I like the sentiment so much, that I don’t push him for what he means. The most important thing, as I continue this series on these extraordinary Canadians, is that I get a sense for us, on how they think, what makes them so fascinating. –>

given to the Nationale-Nederlanden building on the Rašín Embankment in Prague, Czech Republic. Designed by the Croatian-Czech architect Vlado Milunic in cooperation with Frank Gehry on a vacant riverfront plot, it was completed in 1996.

Gehry’s renovation of the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) in 2008 breathed new life into an existing structure. “Instead of tearing apart the old museum, Mr. Gehry carefully threaded new ramps, walkways and stairs through the original,” says the New York Times’s architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff. Images courtesy of the AGO

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ARCHITECTURE

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And once again, at 90, this amazing man says that he has no intention of slowing down. That he adores what he does, so why would he? I say: “You are an artist using new materials to create emotion out of form, exactly as you said you wanted to do when you started out!” He says: “Yes, I like that. I believe in the art of architecture.” I say: “But you’ve pushed the boundaries.” He replies: “Well. you know, Bernini did it. He had a construction industry. He had the popes, he had clients. There were fights over who did what; there was jealousy between the various architects of his time. You know, it’s not changed; but they made great buildings.”

Photo by iwan

(Above) The Louis Vuitton Foundation is adjacent to the Jardin d’Acclimatation in the Bois de Boulogne in Paris, and was completed in 2014.

8 Spruce Street, originally called Beekman Tower, is one of the tallest residential buildings in the world. It is Gehry’s first skyscraper and has been a well-received addition to New York City’s skyline.

Photo courtesy of dfsym

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Photo courtesy of Manolo Franco


ARCHITECTURE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

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(Above) The Museum of Pop Culture, or MoPOP (previously EMP Museum), is a nonprofit establishment dedicated to contemporary popular culture in Seattle, Washington. It opened in 2000, and has been compared to electric guitar equipment used by such artists as Jimi Hendrix.

Photo: James Law

In every generation, and in every time, there will be constraints, but there will always be one or two who rise above them and whose work will be examples for generations to come. I believe that among those is Frank Gehry who has pushed the envelope to reveal the future, which is now, which is here, which is, evidently, quite beautiful, in an unpredictable way. I am so excited to see what he will do next! What a great honour it was to meet this remarkable Canadian architect.

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FALL-WINTER COLLECTION I THE MARCELLO SOFA

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DESIGN

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DESIGN • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

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FOR FUN AND FAMILY LIFE

A newly built home north of Toronto is whimsically designed for entertaining large groups

BY SUSAN KELLY PHOTOGRAPHY: GILLIAN JACKSON STYLING: NEIL JONSOHN

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DESIGN

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ARCHES ARE A MAJOR interior design trend in 2019, according to many forecasters. This classical shape also served as a starting point for a newly built five-bedroom home’s indoor architecture, says the man behind its design, Neil Jonsohn. “But it wasn’t really about being trendy,” says Jonsohn, designer and creative principal at U31 Design in Toronto. “The homeowners loved the look of arched doorways and wanted to incorporate them.” The overarching theme is set at the front door, arched like so many in the home. It lets into a foyer, whose lofty barrel-vaulted 14-foot ceiling echoes and elaborates on the shape. The colour scheme is crisp white with discreet black accents, setting the tone for the home’s style as well: contemporary with a nod to mid-century, chic yet uncomplicated and welcoming. The owners are young professionals with two toddler-age children. They built this two-storey house situated in a rural area north of Toronto to be their “forever home.” With about 12,000 square feet of living space, there is plenty of room for the family to grow. And to accommodate a large extended family that often comes to stay.

Designer Neil Jonsohn created a wide-open and welcoming front foyer, with dramatic black accents and an arched ceiling. Beige floor tiles laid in a random pattern add subtle warmth to the area. Chandelier: Anony. 36

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Wood accents add definition and warmth to the main-floor family room. Walnut wood beams highlight the ceiling, and shelving of the same material flanks the fireplace, enhancing the contemporaryrustic charm.

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Touches of the modern farmhouse or cottage look temper the sophisticated edge of the home’s design. It’s appropriate, as the homeowners use this as both main residence and country home. To get the look, “and because the property is surrounded by farmland, we wanted to bring in natural materials and organic shapes,” says the designer. For instance, flagstone clads the surround of the fireplace in the lower-level lounge, while the one in the family room boasts travertine. Dining chairs have soft, rounded silhouettes. Earthy smoked white oak wideplank flooring runs throughout the home. The exceptions are the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry areas, which have practical, water-resistant porcelain tiles.

The home has a bungalow-like appearance from the front. But because it sits on a sharply sloping lot, the backside has two levels open to the ravine beyond. The lower level is bright and spacious, thanks to sliding floor-to-ceiling doors that let onto the pool area. The interior doubles as a cabana for the family and guests, with change rooms off an outdoor shower, further bringing a soupcon of cottage life to the suburban home. The lower level also is where the homeowners occasionally entertain in a grand and more public way, hosting charity events. Even then, the couple prefers to keep it more informal and welcoming. “We aimed for a kind of Rat Pack, laid-back sophistication here,” says Jonsohn. –>

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DESIGN

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Helping set the tone, a puckish photo of a 1960s beach scene is digitally printed on sliding glass doors. It doubles as a work of art and way to conceal the catering kitchen that lies off the bar area. An adjacent large dining area features a rustic barnwood-top table that comfortably seats 30. An adjacent large lounge area provides additional space for either cocktail hours or family gatherings. On the main f loor, the open-concept kitchen, breakfast area, and family room run along the back of the house. “We also placed large windows strategically to capitalize on the views,� says the designer. He eliminated upper cabinetry to accommodate them, instead flanking the cooktop area with two floor-to-ceiling cabinets.

Ceramic floor tiles laid in a geometric pattern around the bar area help to define the space. Overhead, suspended ceiling panels were back-lit to highlight the gold colour behind, creating a warm glow. 38

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Sophisticated yet relaxed was the effect the designer was after in the lower-level dining room (left) and lounge (below). Custom chandelier over dining table: AM Studios; sectional sofas in lounge: Creative Custom Furnishings; curved coffee tables: Made Goods.

And he had no difficulty getting the homeowners to embrace the current trend toward non-neutral colour palettes for the kitchen. Here, deep teal blue wood cabinetry is accented with walnut on the island and in the cooktop area. A patinaed custom-made brass range hood has pride of place, and is echoed in brass hardware. The backsplash and countertops are made of natural white quartzite slabs. An informal dining area lies off the kitchen. Beyond it, the family room features sliding doors on one side. They ensure ample natural light and can be opened fully to the verandah with its outdoor kitchen. Jonsohn used warm tones of cream and taupe here. When the homeowners entertain, the focus is on comfort and ample seating: a large sectional, ottomans, and built-in banquettes flanking the flagstone fireplace. A console behind the sofa has stools so the children can sit and eat or do crafts, yet still be part of the action. –>

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DESIGN

The more formal dining room lies on the opposite, or street, side of the main floor. It can accommodate up to four couples. “Because it is a more intimate space used only at night, we went all out with a moody colour palette,� Jonsohn says. Taking a cue from the kitchen, walls are predominately teal, this time with a touch of grey. One wall features a custom-made covering with an impressionistic print of trees and birds in harmonizing tones.

The dining room (right) was given a dark and soothing colour palette, in contrast to the light and airy master bathroom (below). Dining room wallcovering: Are & Be; pendant lights: Trianon; master bathroom vanities: Multiflex; freestanding tub: Knief & Co.

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In the master bedroom, a custom-made light fixture over the contemporary four-poster bed provides a touch of whimsy. Custom bed: Creative Custom Furnishings; light fixture: Anony.

Four of the home’s five bedrooms are on the main floor. All enjoy the same 10-foot ceilings as the rest of the house. The exception is the master suite, where, vaulted, it soars to 14 feet. Underneath, the designer placed a dramatic black metal framed contemporary take on a canopy bed facing a slate-clad contemporary fireplace. Not only on trend, the bed’s shape helps to define the sleeping area and create a sense of intimacy. Jonsohn also commissioned a custom chandelier inspired by a Calder mobile to hang overhead. It doubles as a work of art “and adds a touch of whimsy, something we sought to do throughout the home,” he says. “They are a fun couple who wanted to create a look all their own. And I think this home reflects that.”

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A SPOONFUL OF SUGAR

Canadians are learning to bake everything from macarons to layer cakes BY JULIE GEDEON

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MANY OF US ARE FORTUNATE ENOUGH to remember when our mothers or grandmas lovingly baked our favourite cakes or cookies. My favourite cookies are still almond with lemon icing. Yet I’ll admit that when it came to my birthday, I yearned for a fancy cake that a professional baker had evenly frosted and decorated elaborately. I know I’m not alone in longing for that baked sophistication. Perhaps stirred by the TV shows about baking that promise that “yes, we can,” or wanting to win the approval of our children, more of us are signing up for classes across the country to learn the baking and decorating skills and secrets of the professionals.

Photos courtesy of Ollia Macarons & Tea

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Lindsay Rousseau’s instant “love affair” with macarons led her and her husband David to start Ollia Macarons & Tea in Calgary five years ago. “Our wedding, organized by David’s family in France, was the first time I laid eyes on macarons and I thought, ‘I’m totally going to eat that,’ ” Rousseau recalls. “One bite of the tomato and soft chevre and I was hooked – looking for macarons everywhere I went afterwards.” Shor tly a f ter the couple’s return to Lindsay’s native Canada, David worked at a French-run macaron shop in Victoria. Almost two years later, the Rousseaus launched Ollia. “We’d already scheduled the

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opening but it took another three weeks for David to adjust the recipe for 1,042 metres above sea level,” Rousseau recalls. “Macarons are called the grey-hair makers for good reason.” They are finnicky. “If you overmix by two strokes, or the oven is a little too warm for the third of four rows, they won’t come out as desired,” Rousseau explains. “That’s why it’s a good idea to learn techniques from people who’ve baked more than a million.” Every week, between one and four dozen people learn how to make the Goldilocks of French pastries at Ollia. Still others sign up for Edmonton classes. It’s an exercise in patience, taking two-and-a-half hours to prepare a single batch.

The nine steps the Ollia instructors relate include making Italian meringue. “It’s the most forgiving if you’ve added a bit much of something or stirred too little or too long,” Rousseau says. “The batter then has to be put into the pastry bag fast so its temperature won’t drop.” Figuring out how long to rest the piped batter requires being a bit of a meteorologist. “They have to form a slight crust so they don’t rise too quickly in the oven and crack,” Rousseau explains. Students also learn how to create a good chocolate ganache and fruit ratio, as well as a cream cheese filling. –>

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Photos courtesy of High Tea Bakery

At the High Tea Bakery in Winnipeg, the cookie decorating classes sell out within 24 hours. “We teach the same techniques in every basic class, but people return for Mum’s seasonal ideas,” says Belinda Bigold, who co-founded the bakery with her mother, Carol. Here’s where cookies brandish a vibrancy of colours and curlicues. “When you bring a little art into your baking, it makes occasions that much more special,” Bigold says. The number-one lesson is patience: waiting until the cookies fully cool before decorating them, and waiting again for the basecoat to dry, so the icing colours don’t bleed into each other. “We make the most of our time by having six of every dozen of the cookies prepared with the basecoat,” Bigold adds. “But people come to appreciate why a cookie or petit four costs as much as it does.” Students learn how to hold the pastry bag so the icing doesn’t ooze out of the top. They also learn about the many decorations achievable with just a bag, a coupler, two different-sized tips, and imagination.

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Photos courtesy of Pastry Training Centre of Vancouver

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For those seeking a professional calibre, there are institutes such as the Pastry Training Centre of Vancouver, founded by award-winning master pastry chef Marco Röpke a decade ago. “We’ve really seen homemakers wanting to up their skills,” he says. The cake-decorating program consists of eight compulsory courses held over four hours twice weekly. “Students begin by making a cake from scratch, then German buttercream that you cook as a beautiful custard before adding butter to it, followed by a proper royal icing with sugar, egg whites and lemon juice, and so forth,” Röpke says. “We also make our fondant and spend a lot of time showing how to roll it out. And then there’s

chocolate work, gum paste techniques, and learning to pull and blow sugar.” One of the components of the 10-week pastry program is learning how to make delectable bites for afternoon tea. Everything is done with a wooden spoon to draw sugar through a soft butter to create the required air tunnels. Eggs are incorporated at room temperature so they emulsify into that butter prior to the flour and baking soda or powder being slowly added. Every station has a copper bowl. “Copper boosts a meringue’s stability and triples volume,” Röpke explains, imparting one of many trade secrets. –>

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Then again, if you’re simply looking for a more whimsical experience, check out the Lincoln Apartment Bakery classes run by Jessica McGovern in Montreal. “We don’t do ‘perfect’ here,” says the TV host of Flour Power. “We do fun and delicious.” McGovern teaches the rustic baking she began doing with her grandmother and mother when she was a little girl at home in Ireland. “I want to show that baking doesn’t have to take all day or dirty every bowl.” She launched her business as a sideline eight years ago because friends kept asking her to show them how to make the zowie cakes, cookies and cupcakes that she prepared fast. “I do explain how each technique is done so people can work on it at home if they want,” she says, “but the main point in our two-hour classes is to have fun, express our individual styles and, above all, make something yummy.” McGovern says that the current decorating obsession has resulted in some poor-tasting desserts. “We show how to make a moist cake, prepare a buttercream that’s not overly rich, and achieve a nice flavour balance with something like a lemon-curd filling.” Some of the classes, often booked for bachelorette and birthday parties, focus on making the smoothest of red velvet cakes (hint: vinegar and buttermilk) or scrumptious pies. “So many crusts are dense or dry, so I want to share my grandmother’s recipe,” McGovern says.

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Photos courtesy of Lincoln Apartment Bakery

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For those so inclined, the courses build toward certification. Basic classes involve everything from frosting to creating flowers, borders, writing and printing, as well as how to fill cakes and cupcakes to resemble a bakery’s products. At the advanced levels, students learn everything from how to use fondant properly to creating breathtaking gumpaste and royal icing flowers as well as other decorations involving wafer paper, isomalt, chocolate, and rice or bean paste.

Photos courtesy of Ice A Cake Institute

The Ice A Cake Institute in Scarborough, Ontario also emphasizes that anyone can learn to decorate a dessert. Founder Lika Zowmi showcases her students’ creations on Facebook and Instagram. “Some are reserved at first but we encourage everyone to try,” she says. “The amazing cakes our students create show that you don’t have to be an artist or perfectionist to be a decorator.”

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Photo courtesy of Le French Fix

For some of us though, it’s that deceptively simple-looking macaron that we long to master. At Le French Fix in Halifax, award-winning pastry chef Geoffroy Chevallier has been giving his students a taste of Paris for the past seven years. That includes welcoming four people at a time into his small pastry space to learn his macaron techniques. “Everyone has a chance to see and feel the batter’s texture, and how I use inexpensive equipment to make things easier,” Chevallier says. Ninety minutes later, armed with the basics, the four are ready to pursue the quintessential macaron’s infinite flavour possibilities.

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DESIGN

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OUTSIDE Unusual design and building materials create a sense of being outdoors in the interiors of this Quebec home. BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: MAXIME BROUILLET STYLING: LAURENT GUEZ

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LAURENT GUEZ USED TO GET strange reactions when he told people his pet name for the country home he designed and built in Abercorn, Quebec. On the plans and in conversation he called it his “hangar à cochons,” or pig shed. It was an unusual inspiration and title, but it represented the ideas he wanted to evoke: a rural setting and a contemporary, industrial-style building made of basic construction materials in their natural form. “That was the vision,” Laurent says, “The idea behind the name was to create a strong image.” The two-storey, 5,000-square-foot house, in Quebec’s Eastern Townships region, has four interconnected modules, and Laurent describes moving through the home from one module to the next as travelling through “a succession of surprises.” He kept a spirit of playfulness as he designed the new space and wanted to create visual contrast. That starts with the approach to the house itself, which looks small and unassuming. “That was my intention, to look small, and then come inside and see that it’s really big,” he says.

Laurent Guez designed his Eastern Townships home to take advantage of its natural setting. Two raised decks, one on the east side of the home, one on the west, allow people to appreciate the morning and evening light.

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Inside, a variety of construction materials form the interior walls and give the space its industrial look. Many of them are often associated with building exteriors: exposed concrete, black and gold corrugated metal, plywood boards and cedar shingles. Laurent’s objective was to create a sense of being outside looking at the exterior of the building while inside. The black metal walls also recreate the sense of being surrounded by woods. “You have the impression of being in the forest,” he says.

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Because the house is north-facing, getting light into the building was a challenge. Working with architect Guillaume Kukucka, Laurent says the goal was “to follow the sun. Wherever the sun would hit the wall, we wanted to create an opening.” The result is lots of large windows and skylights. Laurent also worked with Luminaire Authentik to create the indoor lighting. Some of it is from the company’s standard line; some he designed with them; and some, he created himself. –>

In addition to large windows, skylights were added in the dining area and the master bathroom. Flow and circulation were important to the homeowner, and while the living and dining spaces are open, the kitchen is in its own connected module at the back of the home, across a footbridge that opens over the downstairs.

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Though Laurent and his partner have a city home, the house in the country was designed as their principal residence, and it was built with family in mind. There are common areas, extra bedrooms for children and grandchildren to come for the weekend and longer stays, and a small outbuilding with a ceramics workshop and a pool. Even though he was doing it for himself, Laurent, an industrial designer by profession, says he approached the design more like a work project than as his own home. His day job is at TUX agency, where he is the chief of retail and experiential design, and spends his time creating spaces for clients.

There are two zones in the kitchen: a galley-style food preparation area and the window counter seating. Windows were placed strategically to give views out to the garden, patio and surrounding areas. A section of the kitchen floor was tiled to provide contrast to the main polished concrete floor. Tile: Stone Tile.

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The main living space is on the upper floor. It includes living and dining rooms, a master suite, a second bedroom and – at the back, slightly separated from the rest of the house – a hallway bridge that straddles the lower level and leads to the kitchen. The kitchen features two main areas: food preparation on one side and an L-shaped eat-in counter that looks a bit like an upscale diner on the other. The counters face large windows that look out onto the trees. Because this module juts out at an angle, there’s a window that overlooks the outside and one that offers a view of the dining room, another of Laurent’s visual surprises. –>

The gold-coloured corrugated metal in the entranceway is a material usually used to clad exterior walls. Laurent used it here and in the dining room to contrast against the black metal he used on the outside of the building and in the kitchen. Light fixtures: Luminaire Authentik. THE AUTUMN ISSUE

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Plywood is used in the guest bedrooms in geometric shapes, both to reflect light and give the space an unfinished feel. Since the rooms are for guests, extra windows were added instead of closets.Â

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A central play area downstairs includes a home theatre and an open space where boulders from the building site have been embedded in the floor. The light fixture here extends 28 feet up through the main-floor living space to the ceiling, and the opening allows light from upstairs to come down. Concrete walls are used to give the space both a contemporary and Brutalist feel. Tiles behind the sink in the guest bathroom: Stone Tile.

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In the master suite, he also challenged tradition. The hallway entrance doesn’t lead to the sleeping area, it opens into the bathroom and walk-in closet. A partial wall, lined with a long vanity, two sinks, mirrors and opaque glass separates this area from the actual bedroom. Downstairs, at garden level, there are two more bedrooms, an office, storage areas, and a big playroom and home theatre. Most of the walls here are exposed concrete with partial wood cladding: plywood in the bedrooms, cedar shingles halfway up the walls in the common areas. There are rocks, large ones,

that poke up through the building’s footings, set into the polished concrete floors in the play area, again pulling the outdoors in. Because the bedrooms are for guests, there are no closets, and plywood has been applied to the walls in sections. “It’s done to have a look that’s unfinished, almost as though you’ve run out of boards,” Laurent says. “It’s accented by the light.” He also played with the doorframes, some of which are 11 feet high, some only six. “The house is my reflection on habitat,” Laurent says. “It’s about creating experiences.”

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BENEDICTION THROUGH BEADS BY JULIE GEDEON

Jacqueline Medalye creates mala jewelry on Salt Spring Island for meditation and contemplation

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GET QUIET ENOUGH and you hear your heartfelt passions, as Jacqueline Medalye, the owner of Salt Spring Malas and Yoga Jewelry, discovered years ago. “The more I practised yoga, the more I desired a simpler life with meditation, yoga, eating well and making beautiful jewelry that helps others to achieve greater clarity,” she says. With its numerous yoga practitioners, Salt Spring Island, B.C., is nicknamed Rishikesh West after the Indian city that is renowned for its study of yoga and meditation. Medalye is one of four mala makers on Salt Spring but the sole designer using semi-precious gemstones. Her work incorporates the beauty of lapis lazuli, fire agate, tiger eye, white tourmaline, zebra jasper and numerous other stones depending on how she’s called to put necklaces or bracelets together. “I love using my artistic and academic mind to create malas that bring people greater peace and happiness by encouraging them to meditate,” she says. Medalye was born to bead. She grew up in Toronto’s fashion district where her mother was a designer in the 1970s and ’80s. “I didn’t want to sew, but liked choosing buttons,” she recalls. She entered her first bead shop at age six and has beaded ever since. “I made jewelry for school friends, and then formed a company that made eyeglass chains to pay for university,” she says. Medalye first learned about malas in India where she went for six months to do her PhD fieldwork on South Asian politics, development and the environment. Once there, she just wanted to do yoga. “I completed the PhD, all but the dissertation, but knew I wouldn’t pursue an academic career when I returned to Toronto,” she says. She moved to Salt Spring Island where she now lives with her husband, Jerry Witmer, and their baby son, Gerald Craig Witmer III.

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Medalye and Witmer, an artist, lived 45 minutes apart in southern Ontario but met in a store within six months of each moving to Salt Spring Island and knew they were soulmates. Medalye’s daily routine encompasses meditation, yoga, long dog walks, and several hours of handcrafting mala jewelry with Witmer before he sets off to paint and she prepares good food (grown by them all summer) for dinner. She believes her lifestyle and location positively energize her creations. Half of their house sits on white quartz that’s believed to refresh all gemstones. “I don’t do anything with stones for at least one lunar cycle,” Medalye says. “For centuries, traditional societies have considered the full moon sacred, a time for planting and harvesting. Aboriginal, pagan, Buddhist and Hindu cultures associate the full moon with changing energy, cleansing, planting, fertility, and transformational energy. Gemstones are believed to require

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cleansing and recharging regularly to restore their healing frequencies. Because we work with gemstones from all over the world, we cleanse them in a traditional way using the moon’s energy. We keep the gemstones here in the studio for at least one lunar cycle, charging them in the light of the moon with our quartz foundation.” Interestingly, the space she knew would be her yoga studio on their rented acreage turned out to be exactly 108 square feet. The mala, which dates back by at least 7,000 years, is a circular strand of 108 beads to keep track of each conscious breath or mantra recited in meditation. Tibetan and yogic teachings suggest that 100,000 breaths or mantras lead to enlightenment within a single lifetime. “You’d have to start at five doing a mala three times daily, and even then, there’s no guarantee,” Medalye laughs, “but the beads help to maintain focus.” –>

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Eight beads account for the mind wandering, so it’s more certain that the remaining 100 are consciously used toward the ultimate goal. A bracelet typically has 27 beads (or 21 in Tibetan tradition), while a marker is placed at set intervals on a full necklace. “It’s hard to do 108 consecutive breaths or mantras without our minds drifting,” Medalye says. Various religious texts consider 108 a special number. Hindus note that it’s among the few numbers divisible by the sum of its parts (i.e. 1+0+8=9 and 108÷9=12). There also happen to be 108 Hindu gods and 54 female and 54 male human aspects in Hindu teachings.

For Buddhists, the number one represents the individual, zero symbolizes nothingness, and eight denotes infinity. “Zen Buddhists also refer to the Buddha writing about 108 human desires, 108 human emotions, 108 human failings,” Medalye says. Most Westerners aren’t yet familiar with the symbolisms even though all religious prayer beads were originally inspired by malas. “My clients have typically practised yoga for a few years and want something to remind them to practice,” she says. “Or they’re starting to deepen their meditative practice.”

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The mala’s North American presence took hold less than a decade ago, after Elizabeth Gilbert’s book Eat, Pray, Love hit movie screens. “Twenty years ago, you had to go to India to find malas the way I did,” Medalye says. Hindu-style malas have tassels whose strands combine to connect us to Divine Oneness. Tibetan malas remind practitioners to incorporate the senses in meditation: by seeing the deity represented by a pendant, feeling the texture of the beads, smelling the beads if they’re made of sandalwood, black lava or rosewood (or burning incense if they’re not), and listening to each breath or mantra. “You just have to add tea for taste,” Medalye says.


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Malas have become more popular for reciting mantras since many Western yoga teachers have added music to classes. “What’s interesting is when you sing a mantra, you have to control your breath like pranayama breathing – a set count of breaths in and out or through alternate nostrils – to maintain some of the sounds, and that has the same positive effects on the brain and body as the slower, deeper breathing,” Medalye says. She has researched the properties attributed to each gemstone through ancient mythologies, sacred texts and cultural folklore. For instance, rose quartz has symbolized love and devotion since Aphrodite purportedly tore her flesh on thorny bushes in her futile attempt to save Adonis, and the Earth absorbed a few drops of her blood. “The historical interpretations have filtered down into general beliefs about what each stone offers energetically,” Medalye says. “For instance, Catholicism has valued amethyst for elevating people towards the Divine and that belief took hold in India when gemstone malas were introduced there from the West.” Medalye works intuitively. “The elements find each other,” she says. “For instance, a lotus pendant reminding us that beauty emerges from even muddied waters goes well with pearls of hope and love.” Her website outlines each gemstone’s metaphysical properties. “But the first item that attracts you is generally what you need,” she says.

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A BLESSING IN DISGUISE Losing out on one apartment gives buyers the opportunity to snap up an even better one BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL STYLING: IMAN LALJI

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Designer Iman Lalji describes the aesthetic in her home, which is also her showroom, as “modern luxury with a hint of tribe.” In the living room (preceding page), she built out a wall to make niches for two African sculptures. Another wall, clad in black stone, adds drama, and downplays the presence of the television.

IMAN LALJI AND HER HUSBAND spent nearly a year looking for a fixer-upper apartment in downtown Toronto. After about six months they had found a building with a floor plan they loved but “because we were out of town we lost out on putting in an offer,” Iman says. However, losing out turned into “a blessing in disguise,” she adds: “I was really disappointed, and I ended up following this floor plan closely. It came up again about six months later. The place was a disaster, so it was the perfect opportunity.”

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This “opportunity” had been tenanted by humans with dogs and was rundown, with holes in the walls and carpet stains. But its 1,700 square feet cover two storeys running the width of the building and offering both north and south exposures. The living room ceiling is 18 feet high. There are three bedrooms and three full bathrooms. And, unlike the other apartment, it has a terrace, which even had a gas line already installed.


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Iman is the owner of Designed By Iman, and her designer’s sense was piqued. She and her husband were the first to see the apartment, and they immediately put in an offer. Iman says that renovating and decorating the place “was a progression. My concept was that not only do I want a beautiful place to live in with my husband, but it has to be something I can also show to clients. It must reflect my skills.” She ended up with decor that suited both herself and her husband, expressing both their personalities. She characterizes it as “glamorous and luxurious but not gaudy.” She and her husband trace their origins to Africa, where their parents were born. African design is a motif repeated throughout the apartment in murals, sculptures and other accessories. –> The double-height living room shows off Iman’s ability to combine luxury and colour without overdoing the bling. The fiddle tree in the corner is affectionately called “Castro” (as in Fidel); Vera the aloe vera plant graces the unusual coffee table.

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Iman describes the decor as “lots of black and white and gold with big pops of colour.” She laments, “Most clients are scared of colour and end up not adding their own personality to their decor.” Her design choices give her the opportunity to show clients how bolder can be better. The black and white scheme is a relatively neutral background for the array of colours used in the apartment, with a different palette for each room. For instance, the guest room is more yellow, the master bedroom is blush pink and burgundy, the main living area is green and pink. Subtle use of Lucite for such items as handrails, candle holders, and cabinetry pulls adds neutral sparkle. White oak floors throughout are a deliberate choice: “A casual f loor allows more bling above,” Iman says. –>

The guest room was originally a second-floor space open to the living room below. Iman replaced its knee wall with floor-to-ceiling glass and blackout draperies to make a unique and more practical room.

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Nearly an entire wall in the master bedroom is devoted to closets and drawers. When the lights are off, concealed lighting provides a moody yet relaxing ambience. THE AUTUMN ISSUE

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The master bathroom continues the bedroom’s streamlined aesthetic and cool black-and-white colour scheme.

The master bedroom’s sleek wall of drawers hides several organizers and includes a vanity. “I really love the magnifying mirror on my vanity,” says Iman. “It lights up and replicates daylight. It makes my makeup application experience so much easier; it’s something I look forward to using.”

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An aesthetic that informs the entire space is less obvious than the bling and the colours: “We’re both vegans; we use no animal products,” says Iman. “Our home is vegan as well. The entire home is cruelty-free, with no leather, suede, silk, etcetera. We use bamboo bedding and organic cotton towels. Two of the rugs contain wool, but it was purchased from a web site with vintage products. We have several pieces – such as a coffee table – with bone inlay, but it’s recycled bones of already-dead animals. We use green cleaning products, too.”

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Various alterations to the original structure demonstrate how changes that are not necessarily obvious can improve the functioning of daily life. For instance, Iman borrowed space from the generously-sized entrance foyer to install a walk-in closet for outerwear that also has a space perfectly sized for storing a double stroller out of sight. In one of the guest bedrooms, she turned a standard-size closet into a closet plus recessed desk with a surface large enough for setting down a suitcase. The master bedroom cabinetry has a built-in jewelry organizer and a hidden clothes hamper. –>

(Left) Iman’s love of bling is manifested in the main-floor guest bathroom’s sink. (Above) The entrance closet’s space-saving sliding door is fitted with a full-length mirror for wardrobe checks.

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Storage space was built in under the stairs, and even the stairs themselves serve a dual purpose: several of the lower risers are actually drawer fronts, and with a pull on a discreet tab, the drawer slides out to offer space for such awkwardly sized items as rolls of wrapping paper. For the ultimate in function, the home is fully automated. “Temperature, music, lights are all controlled with voice commands,” says Iman. “We have even automated our drapery. In the morning we can say ‘good morning, Alexa,’ and the drapes will open, lights will come on, she will tell us the temperature and an interesting fact.”

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As a design professional, Iman sets her goal “to inspire and hope that other people want to do the same, to create beautiful spaces. It’s not so much about the material things that make a space nice but the memories.” As her own designer, Iman says of achieving her aesthetic of “modern luxury with a hint of tribe”: “Oh my, it’s difficult! Up until now it has been so easy to say ‘You need x, y and z,’ but when it comes to yourself you have to dig deep. What was most difficult is that I didn’t have a sounding board. You almost kind of wonder if you’re crazy. It was a difficult process, but I’m happy I went through it.”

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LESS IS SO MUCH MORE

This designer urges his clients to pare back their belongings when planning a new kitchen BY BRENDA O’FARRELL

LIKE ALL STYLE AND FASHION, kitchen design evolves. It is constantly changing, advancing, incorporating innovation. Its progression can actually be charted on a timeline, a historical trajectory that plots the milestones in its advancement – from the invention of the icebox and the woodstove with a hinged hotbox that served as the first oven, right up to granite islands, bamboo floors and custom concrete backsplashes. So, what is next? Some would argue it’s the green kitchen. But what exactly is a green kitchen? Perhaps the best way to explain it is to say it is more concept than style, more ideology than look and, at its core, simply less. And by less, Montreal designer LouisPhilippe Pratte suggests, it has to incorporate more than eco-friendly materials. If you want to create a truly green kitchen, he says, you have to ask yourself two questions: What do you want? And then take a step back and consider the next question: What do you really need?

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“When you pose the question ‘what do I really need?’ it becomes a whole different kind of exercise and opens a whole different path for design,” Pratte explains. For example: How many dishes do you really need? Evaluating what is needed and what is not can have an overarching effect on the design and look of the space, he says. Pratte is the owner of À Hauteur d’homme, a design studio in Montreal that specializes in kitchens and custom-made furniture, with a distinctly environmentally conscious approach.

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For him, a green kitchen incorporates such natural renewable materials as wood and eco-friendly veneers that have low emissions, but it also has to accommodate a style of living that is more ecologically aware. “We often hear ‘I need more storage,’ ” Pratte says. “We never hear the opposite. We tend to feel we need more than what we need.” So he explores the premise that less is really needed for how we live. He admits it is an exercise that invites customers to re-examine the consumption and overconsumption that has become a hallmark of modern living.

How much stuff do we really need? Consider dishes. How many are enough? Pratte did the exercise himself. And he encourages others to consider doing it, too. Fewer dishes means fewer cabinets. “Get rid of upper cabinets,” he says. It will help you breathe better in the space, and it can have a beneficial effect on the cost of a new kitchen. “This is the next step,” he says of this approach. It’s the next phase of kitchen design that is more environmentally friendly in not only the materials it uses but how it enables a more sustainable approach to everyday living. –>

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“We need to go further. There is a need in the market for this,” Pratte says, adding that it is not always obvious to all – almost counter-intuitive. “I realized we had to offer a method to do this,” he explains. That is why he has partnered with such companies as Allo Printemps, which helps clients embark on the evaluation of their needs before the design process even begins.

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Another aspect of a green kitchen is that the design has to be durable. Because what is the point of using eco-friendly materials and reducing consumption practices if it needs to be updated and redone every few years? A graduate of l’Université de Montréal, Pratte has a background in industrial design. He also studied car design in Europe and worked at the European studios

of Mazda. Now, focusing on furniture for the past decade, he brings a distinctive look to his work that incorporates his values of sustainability. “We are trying to do design that will last,” he says. All the furniture his company creates comes with a lifetime warranty as part of a commitment to durability.


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“It has to be clear. It has to be relevant, justifiable. Things have to be there for a reason,”

As for the look, it “has to be simple but not simplistic. It has to be clear. It has to be relevant, justifiable. Things have to be there for a reason,” Pratte explains, adding that he strives to find the right detail for the right function. “After a while, I realized it all comes down to durability,” he says. “I don’t like design when it tries to show off.”

A green approach aims to improve on the form and function of a kitchen, a central space that is often referred to as the heart of a home. It can perhaps be a showpiece that reflects environmental consciousness, too.

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FOR THE JOY OF FAMILY LIFE

Club Piscine’s founder generously built a year-round retreat for his extended family BY JULIE GEDEON PHOTOGRAPHY: ANKA BUZOLITCH

VIRTUALLY ALL OF US HAVE caught televised glimpses of the famed Kennedy Compound in Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, but other special family retreats have been built closer to home. Robert Aumont, the founder of Club Piscine, created an idyllic place for his clan to gather along Lake Champlain’s northernmost shore in Venice-en-Québec, an hour’s drive south of Montreal. “My uncle wanted to continue the tradition started by my grandmother who insisted that we all gather – about 40 of us back then – in her small home every New Year’s Day,” says Pierre Roberge, who co-manages the property. “She even left a little money in her will to encourage her six boys and one girl – my mother – and all of their children and grandchildren to gather at least once a year.” As the clan steadily expanded, Robert Aumont built the retreat in 2005 to have ample space for all 80 relatives to sit down for New Year’s Day lunch and yet afford him, his siblings and their immediate families some privacy as well. –>

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“So, the main floor has large common areas for everyone to enjoy, while the second storey features seven individual studio units, each fully equipped and furnished with a kitchen, living area, bedroom and bathroom,” says real estate broker Sylvie Ménard who recently listed the property on the family’s behalf. Determined to make the family gatherings fun year-round, Robert set up a large pool table in one room, and a cinema in another with surround-sound and sofa chairs for 18 viewers. Originally building a gym as well, Robert later transformed it into a ground-level suite to avoid using the stairs in his retirement years.

While providing convenient laptop/desk space for most of the year, the long counter was specifically built as a sweet table for the array of desserts served every New Year’s Day.

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A gym area was converted into a groundfloor suite that afforded the homeowner some privacy while he remained connected with the rest of the family by simply opening the French doors. Windows abound to capitalize on the stunning lake views.

Outdoors, he revitalized the existing pool area, installed a tennis court, and built a large covered deck with an elaborate outdoor kitchen. “We’ve often sat outside by the fireplace in view of the lake well into winter,” Pierre recalls. “My uncle spared no expense when he knew something would be used, like the exterior oven that fits three pizzas at a time or all of the quality leather sofas in each room. But when no one was using the large hot tub, he replaced it with a second smaller outdoor kitchen.” –>

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Robert Aumont always prioritized function. As a result, the house is extensively windowed to capture the lake views while the back patio seamlessly extends the ground living space. The barnlike siding gives this unique property a humble richness. “He contemplated every detail so carefully,” Sylvie Ménard adds. “Constructing the building at a higher elevation on a concrete slab, as well as landscaping the lakefront so there’s no chance of flooding.” The 900,000-square-foot property features various natural features, including numerous tapped maple trees, 80 feet of beachfront, and extensive marshland. The roofed deck that Aumont had built to observe the waterfowl doubles as a child’s dream fort. –>

(Right) Seven fully equipped condo units accommodate relatives on the second floor, while the many entertainment features on the ground level include a comfy cinema with surround-sound. (Below)

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The common areas focus on family fun while each studio reflects the personal tastes of its occupants.

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A covered patio with a full kitchen and pizza oven extends the home’s indoor/outdoor space. The property has various elements – some landscaped, some natural – that guard against the possibility of flooding.

Robert, who eventually lived at the property year-round, delighted in welcoming his family, including his own three grown children and 10 grandchildren. He set up a company to manage the place after his death two years ago, but having 80 owners/co-managers has posed challenges, which is why the estate is up for sale. Pierre Roberge, who treasures the property and his countless family memories associated with it, hopes it will go to new owners who will cherish it as much as he does. “My uncle was a visionary who could see the beauty in a pile of rubble,” he says. “He found

this one-of-a-kind property and turned it into something truly special while respecting the natural character.” Zoned for touristic use, the property readily lends itself to becoming a year-round vacation resort or wellness retreat if another large family doesn’t snatch it up. “The way it’s set up now with the groundfloor suite, the property can offer the new owners complete privacy from the upstairs studios, if they want it,” Ménard says. This property can be viewed at: www.sylviemenard.com

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ART

STIRRING UP AN EMOTIONAL RESPONSE Artist Frank Lipari creates serene landscapes with a strong emotional undercurrent BY PHILLIPA RISPIN

FRANK LIPARI IS A LATE BLOOMER. That’s not to say that, in his 60 th year, he hasn’t had a full family life or a productive career, but it’s only recently that he has devoted himself full-time to his passion: painting. Lipari’s path through life was fairly conventional. He grew up in Montreal and was graduated from l’Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) with a degree in business administration and a major in marketing. He worked mostly in advertising, and by his late thirties was vice-president of creative and design at a retail marketing agency. “For my 52nd birthday, my wife gave me a painting course at Westmount’s Visual Arts Centre,” he recounts. The course’s 10 lessons “brought me back to my teen days, when I used to draw.” Lipari offered a painting to his mother-inlaw, who hung it over her mantel in Kennebunkport, Maine. An interior designer saw it, and from there his reputation spread. –>

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By 2014, he was “100 per cent dedicated to art.” His work is carried by several galleries in New England and two in Ontario. But that’s just the surface of his story. The undercurrent runs much deeper. The main influence on his life was the death of his mother when he was 12 years old – a loss that has affected him profoundly and that strongly informs his artwork, with its moody landscapes, isolated animals, and brooding skies. “When I began high school, I was a bit tormented, introverted,” Lipari recounts. “My father was preoccupied, and I turned into myself. I had a lot of time alone. My uncle took me under his wing, and we went fishing and hunting in the Laurentians. I turned to Nature as a focus.”

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That uncle, his father’s brother, was “a seminal influence” on Lipari’s life. “As a kid I always liked Robert Bateman’s work, and I do like making animals,” he says. “With my uncle, I saw animals in the landscape. It was like a gift; for me, animals are part of the landscape. I like horizons, wide open spaces, a very minimalist approach. There’s a feeling of grandeur. It comes from, as a kid, being powerless, feeling so small. My life is so little in the big picture of things.” Lipari focuses almost exclusively on Nature as a subject. Arctic landscapes are a strong motif in his work, inspired by trips with his uncle to go goose hunting in James Bay. He also went on an African safari two years ago. It was worlds apart in flora, fauna, and climate, but nonetheless immersed him in a landscape of huge vistas and skies. His technique is his own. He credits the Visual Arts Centre course with teaching him about technical aspects of painting, such as the chemistry of colour, but he is otherwise self-taught. “I never really learned to ask for help,” he says. “I think I was always a bit creative in my approach for everything, and I have a certain type of discipline” that is evident in his technique. –>

“I like horizons, wide open spaces, a very minimalist approach. There’s a feeling of grandeur. It comes from, as a kid, being powerless, feeling so small. My life is so little in the big picture of things.”

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Lipari paints on a large canvas (60 inches by 40 inches is not unusual), mainly in acrylics. An idea is inspired by something he’s seen in real life, or by a photo, but “most of the time I’ll compose an image from scratch in my head.” His years surrounded by graphic design in ad agencies have led him to painstakingly plot the proportions and layout of a picture. He sketches on paper with pencil to get the final look and then extrapolates the image to the large canvas. On the canvas, he sketches in erasable watercolour pencils, and then starts on the background, using a four-inch-wide brush and thinned paint. He painstakingly builds up layers for the background, then does the same for the sky. “I use an inconsistency of paint when laying it down, tone on tone, very discreet, and then start blending,” he says. After that he adds in the water or land, then the background – for example, an island – and then the main subject matter in the foreground. “The main subject becomes more technical,” he says. It involves “precise work, small brushes and very liquid colour.”

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“I haven’t done much research on artists,” Lipari says. “I want my art to come from me. This is how I’ve learned to do it. It’s completely me, from zero to 100 per cent completion.” He says art must come from the soul. “It has to show the artist’s emotional being. I like art that means something to me and means something to the people who see it. If I were asked to do an abstract, I wouldn’t know where to start. Composition is important too. It’s all that: subject matter, composition, a mood. Touching emotions is my greatest motivation.” While art comes from the soul, the world in which Lipari makes his art is crucial, too. He is emphatic about “the importance my wife Caroline plays in my life and how this wonderful woman helped me get in touch with my inner self. Without her understanding and love, I would not be the man and artist I am today. “Caroline and our three girls make me feel like I’m not alone in this world and, because of them, I don’t feel so small. Caroline is not only busy handling galleries, market development and a host of other responsibilities, but she’s also my beacon.” Frank Lipari’s work can be viewed at www.flipari.com. He can be reached at franklipari@icloud.com

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UPGRADING THE NEW A Vancouver condo is given special design treatment to elevate it beyond its new-build finishings

BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA PHOTOGRAPHY: COLIN PERRY STYLING: NEGAR REIHANI

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NEGAR REIHANI IS ACCUSTOMED to transforming old spaces into new ones; that’s her job as an interior designer in Vancouver. However, in the case of a brand-new luxury condominium unit in the city’s downtown sector, Reihani was asked to go one step further - to transform new space into yet even newer space. The owners of the 2,500-square-foot condo in the Coal Harbour neighbourhood wanted their West Coast vacation home to have a boutique-hotel style with high-end contemporary Italian furnishings and clean sight lines. But when the owners took possession of the new build, they found some of the interior finishes of the condo were not what they had expected … not luxurious enough. Had they gone ahead and furnished the new space without upgrading some of the interior finishes, Reihani says, the end result would not have measured up to expectations: “It would have been like giving fine fabric to a tailor who cuts off-the-rack suits for an ordinary men’s store.”

An oval-shaped black marble table in the formal sitting area (above) draws the eye to spectacular views of Burrard Inlet, Stanley Park and the ocean beyond. Low-profile chairs in the contemporary kitchen (right) keep sightlines clean.

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“We had to come up with a quick plan of attack,” says Reihani, owner and principal designer of Space Harmony studio. The owners, a young Asian couple who live in China and come and go, wanted their Vancouver pied-àterre to be “modern and comfortable, almost gender-neutral … like a hotel, but homier.” To that end, Reihani suggested the couple allocate 30 per cent of their budget to refinishing the condo and the remaining 70 per cent to the purchase of the fine Italian furnishings they desired. Redefining the space was one of the first things that needed changing, the designer says. The condo has an open-concept design, and its floor plan is shaped like a semi-circle, with floor-to-ceiling windows on the exterior curve. The windows provide spectacular 180-degree views of Vancouver’s urbanscape and water, including Burrard Inlet, Stanley Park and the ocean beyond. –>

The floating bench provides face-to-face seating in the lounge area and is an ideal place from which to watch the spectacular sunsets.

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A standalone tub was removed from inside the shower to create “a more interesting shower experience.” The oversized shower has his and her water systems.

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Originally, says Reihani, the dining area, lounge space and formal seating area – in that order – were lined up in a row around the windows. She suggested the dining area be moved so it would be between the two seating areas and directly adjacent to the kitchen. “We wanted to create different zones of seating,” she says. By pushing the dining area into the middle of the space, it became a focal point. Reihani suggested a large round table – tinted glass on a grey oak sculptural base – to soften the space, facilitate flow and still meet Asian cultural expectations. New, wide-plank greyish-white oak floors replaced the dark wood flooring that came with the condo. Seagrass wallpaper in a grey-beige tone was installed throughout the entire unit, harmonizing the space and creating warmth and texture. “Everything is about layers,” says Reihani. “It’s how you create interest, a ‘wow’ effect.’’ The owners loved the kitchen’s custom millwork and Gaggenau appliances, she says. The contemporary cabinets in exotic West African wenge wood were outfitted with touch-latch fittings that eliminated the need for knobs and handles. Many of the cabinets were recessed to add further interest. But a stainless-steel backsplash diminished the kitchen’s clean contemporary look, so a translucent painted glass backsplash was installed as a replacement. “It totally changed the whole look,” says Reihani. In the new lounge area, she says, a floating wall bench was added across from the sectional sofa to create face-to-face seating; it also provides a perch from which to enjoy the view. “It’s now the owner’s favourite place to sit,” she says. –>

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A muted, neutral palette gives the bedroom its calm ambience. A chaise lounge in the home office softens the room into a place for relaxation and reading.

The bathroom in the master bedroom, which was originally equipped with a large glass shower enclosure that housed a standalone tub, was renovated. The bath was taken out of the shower enclosure, and two separate shower systems and a heated bench were installed to create one luxurious, oversized shower. And, Reihani says, something had to be done to improve the entrance foyer. It felt cold and unwelcoming. A new lighting fixture shaped like an egg was installed on a new mirrored wall to brighten the space, and a floating bench was installed to add comfort. “In the end, they loved everything,” she says. “When they walked in once they returned to Canada, the condo’s new look surpassed what they had imagined. It was modern, elegant and their style.” THE AUTUMN ISSUE

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CABIN FEVER

Prefab chalets are offering us new and beautiful ways of building

BY BARBARA MILNER, INTERIOR DESIGNER

Photos courtesy of The Backcountry Hut Company

AS THE LEAVES CHANGE COLOUR and temperatures drop, cabin fever kicks in. Images of dreamy shelters on tricky terrains take over our thoughts. Be it the fantastical fall foliage, the unmistakable smell of burning wood, or the return of crisp air, worthy of woolies and chunky knits, the cabin craze is contagious. So much so that a new generation of outdoor enthusiasts have evolved a seasonal obsession into a year-round housing

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solution. And how they are doing it may surprise you. Today’s most lusted-over cabins have constructed a strong comeback for prefab builds. “Prefab,” or prefabricated, refers to any structure that is constructed primarily off-site, in a factory, and shipped to the home site. Here are a few ways modern prefab cabins are paving the way for prettier, stronger, healthier and more affordable housing.


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1. ARRESTING ARCHITECTURE By prioritizing innovative architecture and design, modern prefab cabins are poised to become icons in their surroundings. Recognizing the demand for exceptionally designed shelters, enterprising prefab builders have partnered with architects to develop blueprints that have beautified and poetized backcountry living. Much like haute couture fashion designers or Michelin star chefs, architects can be perceived as producing expensive and esoteric products. By predesigning these structures with architects, prefab builders have been able to democratize access to architecture by taking it to people who would not regularly incur the expense. Method Homes, a custom manufacturer of prefab modern structures based in Seattle, Washington, partners with leading architects for its prefab Cabin Series and custom prefab projects. Brian Abramson, founder and CEO of Method Homes, says “architects are excited about designing for prefab because constraints force them to think beyond their usual parameters; they are challenged by the limits and being able to cater to clientele that would not regularly walk through their door.” British Columbia’s The Backcountry Hut Company is committed to designing prefab cabins that aren’t limited to being rudimentary. Co-founder Wilson Edgar, former president of the British Columbia Mountaineering Club, joined forces with BC architect Michael Leckie to create striking structures for those with a passion for the outdoors and a desire for their passion project to be seen and enjoyed for generations to come. The Great Lakes cabin, one of three of the company’s modular flat-pack kits, is a 700-square-foot structure that takes cues from the Canadian Shield, Ontario cottage country and the Great Lakes region of North America. –>

Photo from IDS Toronto 2019

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2. BUILT TO LAST North America continues to grapple with the misconception that prefab is low quality and should be cheaper than traditional construction. The reality is that prefab manufacturing removes a lot of unknowns from the construction process and shortens building timelines. By being in a controlled environment, materials are not exposed to the elements and extreme weather as they are when used on-site. Machinery is often more precise, generating less waste. And skilled labourers can work in more comfortable conditions. Method Homes produces between 70 and 80 per cent of its Cabin Series in-factory. And as a testament to the company’s high-quality standard, a cabin currently in production is slated for use as a primary residence in Eugene, Oregon.

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All photos courtesy of Method Homes

As with traditional construction, prefabs adhere to regional building requirements. Architects and builders at the forefront of the modern prefab cabin movement are incorporating such high-end materials as engineered Douglas fir, known for its strength and stability. And they’re installing efficient mechanical systems such as radiant heat, aluminum-clad windows, and standing-seam metal exterior cladding for durability in a range of environmental conditions. Wilson Edgar says his firm’s prefab cabins essentially embrace Old-World wisdom by cultivating a built-to-last culture versus a built-for-profit culture. Lifecyle management is key to this approach, ensuring that each structure is not only visually stunning, but lasts longer and minimizes the impact on its environment.


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3. HEALTH AT HEART Good design and healthy homes go hand in hand. Sustainable and energy-efficient features such as solar panels, LED lighting, FSC-certified lumber, 100 per cent recyclable components, and a zero-waste philosophy are becoming synonymous with modern prefab cabin manufacturing. Maintaining or even enriching the health of the landscape is also a key benefit of the prefab cabin craze. While there is always a degree of destruction with construction, limiting that percentage is something prefab builders have been able to accomplish by minimizing disruption to the build site and engaging with nature in close proximity. By transporting flat-pack kits of parts to remote locations for assembly, The Backcountry Hut Company has paved the way for award-winning modern cabin design to be erected in locations that would make even the most experienced contractors squirm. With assembly focusing more on human power than mechanical power, the building site maintains its integrity and wellness. 4. CREATING AFFORDABLE HOUSING SOLUTIONS Proving to be more than just a pretty facade, the rising popularity of modern prefab cabins may very well lead to ingenious solutions for housing in general. “We are actively working on affordable housing solutions,” says Brian Abramson of Method Homes. “Coming up in the next five years, you will start to see off-site solutions that utilize technology to respond to the need for affordable housing with healthy design.” Our thirst for healthy design could mean a push to the belief that less is better and that we should focus on quality space rather than the quantity of space. Perhaps it’s a microcosm for living at large: focus on the things that are important to you and don’t lose sight of your environment.

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FIRST NATIONS CUISINE

Restaurants that specialize in Indigenous cooking are attracting attention across Canada BY JULIE GEDEON

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Braised Elk with a sunchoke puree, Arctic trio, Poached Pear with a saskatoon berry ice cream

Slow Roasted Bison Legs and Seared Seal

Arctic Trio (Beet and Maple Cured Salmon, Seal Loin Tartare, and house smoked arctic char

INDIGENOUS CUISINE IS TAKING a world stage as First Nations chefs and others guided by Elders source and prepare scrumptious food that honours traditions. At Kū-kŭm in Toronto, Joseph Shawana employs his French culinary skills to showcase traditional ingredients. His seasonal menu is a contemporary interpretation of Indigenous food across Turtle Island (North America). “I had to learn a lot from Elders and my own trial and error because our primarily oral culture was so disrupted by the government’s residential system for so long,” he says. Raised on the Wiikwemkoong Unceded Reserve, located on Manitoulin Island, Shawana foraged for wild liquorice, mushrooms and herbs, but knew little about his Odawa history. “It was only after moving to Toronto that I learned about my heritage,” he says.

Braised Elkm with root veg, and a sunchoke puree

Kū-kŭm, the Cree word for “grandmother,” pays tribute to the matriarchs who once prepared all the food. The restaurant’s popularity has prompted a move to a larger venue two years after opening. The seasonal menu incorporates fiddleheads and morel mushrooms, as well as maple water and birch syrup come spring. The commitment to fully using animals results in braised bison leg wrapped in caul fat with roasted root vegetables, smoked Yukon gold mash, baby leeks and oyster mushrooms. Seal is popular with its liver flavour and tender beef texture, and highly sustainable with the current overpopulation. “We serve it as tartare or seared with sweet beets,” Shawana says. His Indigenous spin on French desserts includes sweetgrass-infused crème brûlée and pine needle and citrus sorbet. –>

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At the Grey Eagle Hotel Resort and Casino on Tsuut’ina Nation’s land near Calgary, executive chef Bill Alexander is honoured to prepare Indigenous meals. “I try to create modern dishes that First Nations people will proudly say accurately reflect traditions,” he says. Having worked globally for 22 years, Alexander joined Grey Eagle three and a half years ago to take charge of the large food operation while also returning full circle to the recipes he learned from his Mohawk grandmother while growing up at Akwasasne near Cornwall.

Maple smoked salmon

Bill Alexander, executive chef

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Bison Carpaccio

Indigenous charcuterie board

Charcuterie boards pay homage to how meat was preserved from a large animal. “The smoked venison carpaccio is one of my favourites but I took a risk because it’s as rare as I can serve meat here where everyone likes things well done,” Alexander says. “Our smoked bison pastrami sandwich inspires Montreal’s smoked meat kind of happiness.” Indian fry bread tacos are a powwow staple. “A good frybread has people lining up,” Alexander adds. Don’t be dissuaded by the casino location. The family restaurant is separate. The Indigenous menu is designed to make it difficult

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to choose one item. “If a dish is performing way better than others, I’ll remove it for a while so people try something new,” Alexander says. He minimizes food waste by teaching staff to fully butcher animals, dehydrate salmon and chicken skins into chips, and turn carrot-tops into pesto. “People leave here with a new appreciation for their food,” he says. He’s taught Germany’s top chefs about Turtle Island cuisine and is now a consulting chef for West Jet. “When people share delicious food, they often start thinking about what else they have in common,” he says.


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Bison burger

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At Wanuskewin Heritage Park near Saskatoon, executive chef Kirk Borchardt also considers food a universal language that allows people to appreciate each other’s cultures. “Most Canadians know more about Asian than Indigenous food, but that’s changing,” he says. Ra ised i n nor ther n Sa skatchewa n, Borchardt hunted and fished, so he welcomed the opportunity as a non-Indigenous chef to return home from British Columbia to learn Northern Plains cooking. “The Elders have deepened my understanding about the seasonality of ingredients,” Borchardt says. “They’ve also taught me how to respect food by, for instance, not tasting any of it ahead of time if it’s being prepared for a feast.” The popular Wanuskewin bison burger comes with a bison shank bacon to make full use of the animal. The barbecue sauce is prepared in-house with Saskatoon berries. An Indigenous fishery provides the sustainable whitefish dipped in a muskeg tea batter for the fish and chips. Bison - sausage, burger or stew – headlines the menu, but many visitors likewise appreciate the venison burger or chili, or the rabbit pot pie. “People are becoming more adventurous eaters again,” Borchardt notes. –>

Rabbit Pot Pie

Fish and chips

Kirk Borchardt, executive chef

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For Inez Cook, the owner of Salmon ’n’ Bannock in Vancouver, Indigenous cuisine is about reclaiming food sovereignty. “I was one of the Sixties Scoop children, removed from my family and put up for adoption. I lost my First Nations status until I regained it as an adult, after a bill was passed,” Cook says. As a flight attendant, she learned about other cultures through authentic cuisine. “So, when the 2010 Olympics were headed to Vancouver, I couldn’t accept that we didn’t have a single Indigenous restaurant in the city,” she recalls. “I searched one of the local First Nations communities and asked who made the best bannock.” Salmon ’n’ Bannock has expanded from a few items to be influenced by Squamish, Cowichan, Salish, Haida, Ojibway, Cree and other First Nations staff to rank it among Trip Advisor’s top 10 Vancouver restaurants for the past eight years. “Our restaurant showcases Indigenous cuisine for a modern palate,” Cook says. Birch syrup, huckleberries, soapberries, stinging nettle and sea asparagus are prepared with a modern f lair. The poached salmon comes wrapped in Haida Gwaii kelp with bannock dumplings. The game sampler features cooked bison, duck prosciutto and elk salami. “Our bison roast is slow-braised for 24 hours and melts in your mouth,” Cook says. “The smoked and braised duck wings have an Iroquois grit coating for crunch.” Cook’s sustainable buying practices put Indigenous people first, followed by local, Canadian and Turtle Island businesses.

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Rainbow Trout stuffed with Ojibway Wild Rice

Bison burger on bannock with boar bacon

Seared elk

Salmon sampler

Stinging Nettle Ojibway Wild Rice

Sage smoked salmon bannock flatbread

Traditional wind dried salmon

Bannock


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Grilled veggies, quinoa, feta and mint Garnish

Ground moose sliders

Chef Norma Condo

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Wild Indigenous salad

Black beans, steamed kale and sage casserole

Mi’kmaw chef Norma Condo is also sourcing wild rice and other traditional crops from Indigenous businesses. In late June, Condo opened the Miqmak Catering Indigenous Kitchen in Pierrefonds, Quebec, the only Indigenous-owned restaurant on the Island of Montreal, according to Aboriginal Tourism Quebec. “Wow, it still hasn’t sunk in because I’ve been so busy,” says Condo, who’s operated a catering business on Montreal’s West Island since November 2018. “I wanted a restaurant so more people can experience how delicious and healthy Indigenous food is,” adds Condo, who is originally from Gesgapegiag, a Mi’kmaw community about 500 kilometres east of Quebec City on the Gaspé coast.

Ground Moose Meat Sauce with Luskinikn Bannock

She is serving her grandmother’s Mi’kmaw version of bannock called luskinikn, as well as other personal favourites, such as a friend’s recipe for Chippewa Chicken. She’d like people to try her moose stew or sliders, but it’s illegal in Quebec, as in most provinces, to serve wild game in restaurants. “I don’t understand why our rights to our traditional food have been taken away from us – why we can’t serve it to others,” she says. For now, Condo is serving tacos with pork instead, but hopes that greater awareness of Indigenous cuisine will lead to a change in the laws. –>

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Back in Toronto, Johl Whiteduck Ringuette has been catering for 16 years to educate Canadians about Indigenous cuisine, but he opened NishDish as a quick service counter/ café two years ago so First Nations people could have some Anishnawbe (Nish) food. “They can enjoy a thoroughly nutritious bowl of The Three Sisters soup of healthy white corn, squash and beans for $8,” says Ringuette, who appears on Master Chef Canada this year. His parents taught him to hunt, fish, pick berries, tap trees and cook over a fire. “Mark Thompson, a medicine man, later asked me to use my gift for preparing food to return the Anishnawbe diet to our people,” he adds. “Discriminatory government policies eradicated our food systems and traditions... Re-establishing them will be my lifelong journey.”

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Corn cakes topped with eggs and bison chipotle sausage, a side of fresh berries and Ojibwe syrup

Strawberry cucumber salad

Sweet potato and russet potato soup, strawberry cucumber salad, seared Arctic Char and rosemary butter mashed potatoes

Mini tart with smoky gouda, chives and

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Venison stew with corn bread

buffalo mozzarella

Chef Johl Whiteduck Ringuette

Wild blueberry bannock

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Wild boar bacon breakfast wrap

Ringuette describes how the Haudenosaunee developed companion planting through their understanding that corn, squash and pole beans grew better together, and revitalized their soil. His wild rice casserole often provides an opportunity to relate how the Anishnawbe are the people of the rice. “It raises the question about what happened to the wetlands that allowed wild rice to thrive for so many species in addition to people,” he says. “And how we can restore that natural balance.” He likewise notes that the venison, elk, bison and pheasant on his menu all come from distant farms now when they were once plentiful in the wild. “It underlines the need to respect land and water treaties,” he says, “so that First Nations can provide for our future generations.”


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Kū-kŭm

HERE IS A SAMPLING OF FIRST NATIONS RESTAURANTS ACROSS CANADA: Kū-kŭm 577 College St., Toronto, Ont. 416-519-2638 www.kukum-kitchen.com

NishDish Marketeria & Catering 690 Bloor St. W., Toronto, Ont. 416-855-4085 www.nishdish.com

Grey Eagle Resort and Casino 3779 Grey Eagle Dr. SW, Calgary, Alta. 403-719-8777 www.greyeagleresortandcasino.ca/dining

Wanuskewin Heritage Park RR #4, Penner Rd. Saskatoon, Sask. 306-931-6767 www.wanuskewin.com

Salmon ’n’ Bannock Bistro 7-1128 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. 604-568-8971 www.salmonandbannock.net

Miqmak Catering Indigenous Kitchen 10409 Gouin Blvd. W., Pierrefonds, QC 514-421-0031 www.miqmak-catering-indigenous-kitchen.business.site

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FROM HODGEPODGE   TO HAPPY HOME A Calgary couple transform a mid-century bungalow into a family-friendly home BY ELISABETH KALBFUSS PHOTOGRAPHY: JOEL KLASSEN STYLING: KATIE NELSON

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THE HOME THAT THE SLEMKO FAMILY bought was ready for an upgrade. While it was clear that it had been lovingly cared for by the previous owners, there was damage from a recent basement flood due to a water-main break. And a series of building additions over the years had left it disjointed in style and function, with three different kinds of hardwood floors and three heating systems covering various areas of the house. “The kids’ bedrooms were cold,” says Kristi Slemko. “Our bedroom felt like Hawaii.” Despite those issues, the Slemkos could see that the Calgary bungalow had the potential to be perfect for them. With just over 2,000 square feet on the main floor, and the large basement, it had enough space to create bedrooms for each of the family’s four children. It was also right next to a park that would become an extension of their own outdoor space, and it was within walking distance of the children’s school.

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With four children, it was inevitable that the kitchen and dining area would become the hub of this house. Homeowner Kristi Slemko loves the clean lines of the cabinetry in the kitchen and dining area, the white and wood-tone finishes of which were chosen by Aly Velji. The layout and design of the cabinets was done by Kingswood Cabinets through Alloy Homes Inc. Velji also designed the kitchen’s hood fan cabinet in keeping with the mid-century style of the house. Vintage dining table: Reclaim to Fame.

By gutting the inside and taking the building back to the studs, the homeowners, working with builder Alloy Homes, were able to repair the furnace issues and make the home much more energy-efficient. They rerouted the duct work, linking it to a single heating system, added spray-foam insulation everywhere, and splurged on triple-glazed windows. “There are so many windows in the house, and we love all that natural light,” Kristi says. “Because so much area is window rather than wall, it didn’t make sense not to have that insulating factor. This will be our home at least until the kids are through school, so it seemed to make sense to make that investment.” It paid off: a condensation problem caused the furnace to shut down last winter but the family didn’t notice for days; despite the cold outside, the temperature in the house dropped by only three degrees. –>

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Starting over also let them design the home in the spirit of its mid-century roots. “Because this was a renovation, I wanted to ensure we were keeping true to the original style,” says Aly Velji, principal at Alykhan Velji Designs. “There were some really great details, like the entrance stairwell that we opened up to create the gorgeous slat-wall detail. We wanted to ensure each space in the home shone, but also worked cohesively with the rest of the home when it came to finishes.”

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In the k itchen, white cabinets a nd counters line the work area with the clean lines the homeowners wanted; they tie in to wood cabinets that lead to the dining area. Colourful tiles became an important element in re-establishing that mid-century aesthetic, says Katie Nelson, senior interior designer at Alykhan Velji Designs. The homeowners chose green subway tiles for the kitchen, and classic four-by-four-inch blue tiles for the girls’ bathroom. “It helped us ensure the finishes in the space felt modern and updated, while still maintaining the personality of the original house,” she says.


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The living area has a lounge space at one end, where Kristi and her husband Derek like to have coffee. At the other end, there’s a baby grand piano – a birthday surprise for Kristi. And in the middle of the two spaces is the main seating area, facing a white-painted brick wall with a semi-circular wood-burning fireplace. That had been a big selling point for the homeowners, reminding Kristi of the fireplace in her childhood home. “I never enjoyed cleaning it out; that was my chore,” she says. “But I have lots of memories of winter time, snuggling up by the fire. It’s nice to re-create that.” –>

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Designer Aly Velji says black bathroom fixtures are a great alternative to chrome or brass. “It’s a wonderful neutral that works with so many different styles,” he says.

By keeping the main elements in the rooms soft and neutral, Nelson says, the design team used the tile features, furniture and accessories to bring the space to life. “This also meant that the architectural features in the home remained the focus of this house,” she says. “We wanted the interior design elements to support these features, and not take away from them.” Along with the master bedroom, there are two other upstairs bedrooms for the couple’s daughters, and two bathrooms. The designers eliminated a powder room to create a homework area for the children, with a corkboard for their art, field-trip forms and other school notices. They created bedrooms for the boys in the basement, along with a bar area for the adults and a hangout space where the children can take their friends. “The big reason we used Aly is that we like the layered look, the textured feel. We like that the team was able to give us a good mixture,” says Kristi. “Derek didn’t want 60 pillows on the bed. We wanted it decorated, not overdone.”

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ALL FIRED UP

Montrealers are flocking to pottery classes to reconnect with the Earth

BY TRACEY MACKENZIE

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POTTERY IS NOT NEW. Human beings have been creating it for an estimated 20,000 years. Clay pots and objects used for cooking, rituals, storage, decor and transporting goods have been discovered in archeological sites worldwide. What is new, however, is a renewed interest in the pastime of creating pottery. In 2017, Vogue magazine described the pottery hobby as “the new yoga,” a contemplative activity that is an antidote to our technology-driven lives. Everyone – from celebrities to office workers, it seems – is sitting at the potter’s wheel in the hope of making something masterful, or at the very least, useful. The clay, soft and moist between the fingers, is allowing them to reconnect with Mother Earth, giving them a break from non-stop connectivity. While many municipalities have long had pottery guilds that allow their residents to work with clay, the activity is now sufficiently popular that private studios have sprung up to meet the demand for classes. –>

Photos by Virginie Gosselin courtesy of Atelier Make

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Turning clay on a wheel is often compared to gardening for its meditative qualities. Just ask Orlin Stoyanov. He used to spend his free time gardening at his parents’ home in his native Bulgaria. “I loved having my hands in the earth; it was very grounding,” he says. “When I was digging in the soil at my parents’ villa next to the Black Sea, I found a really old pot buried in the ground. It dated back to Roman times. It was literally history in your yard.” Missing his connection with the Earth after moving to Montreal, Stoyanov took some pottery lessons. He became smitten, and eight years later, founded Maison Stoï, his own studio in the Rosemont district of Montreal, where he teaches others. It attracts students ranging from novice to advanced. “Teaching happened very organically for me,” he says. “My style is more that of a mentor than a teacher. I like to let my students develop their skills and experiment with different techniques and glazes.”

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Orlin Stoyanov

He begins each class with a demonstration. Beginners try to reproduce his piece under his guidance during the three-hour class, but more advanced students are encouraged to create their own pieces. “All of my students are allowed to make multiple pieces and have them fired and glazed before the end of the term,” Stoyanov says. “I encourage creativity. There are so many techniques and types of clay that the learning is endless.”

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Photos courtesy of Maison Stoï

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There are three basic types of clay: earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. Each has its own qualities. • Earthenware is easy to work with, so it’s good for throwing on a wheel and hand-building. It is red or orange because of its high iron-oxide content. • Stoneware is more durable than earthenware, so it’s good for making dinnerware and mugs. The colour ranges from sandy brown to various shades of grey. • Kaolin (or white clay), the main ingredient in china and porcelain, is less forgiving than the other types. It absorbs water easily, so must be worked quickly, which can be difficult for a novice. However, porcelain is considered the most desirable of the three clays, so is worth the effort. –>

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Porcelain is the clay of choice of Maya Ersan and Jaimie Robson, who run Atelier Make, a pottery studio housed in a storefront locale in the Plateau Mont Royal neighbourhood. Here, the demand for pottery courses has fueled classes five evenings per week. “All of our students start with porcelain. The end result is more minimalist,” says Ersan. “Working with porcelain is also harder, so if the student is able to master it, they will easily master the other types of clay.” Many of Atelier Make’s students come from the surrounding neighborhood. “We get a lot of professionals who are trying out the wheel,” she says. “However, there is also a growing number of retirees and woman on maternity leave. Many people who come to the studio have to think or make decisions all day so this is their chance to relax and work with their hands.”

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Jaimie Robson


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Photos by Virginie Gosselin, courtesy of Atelier Make

In addition to being ceramists, Ersan and Robson are also artists and designers. They say that objects should add beauty to a space. This aesthetic is evident in their studio, where they produce lanterns that seem to be made of paper but are actually porcelain. Functional and aesthetically pleasing, they can be used alone or in a grouping. Ersan says Atelier Make also attracts clients who are environmentally conscious. “Our clients want something handmade and not factory-produced. They want to know where it comes from,” she says. “I am the same. Nothing in my house is not handmade.” If you’re thinking of shutting off your electronic devices to reconnect with the Earth, a pottery course may be your “new yoga.” Paradoxically, you’ll be carrying on a not-so-new tradition that began 20,000 years ago. Maison Stoï 6683 Ave. de Lorimier Ave., Montreal 514-885-1291 www.maisonstoi.com Atelier Make 1241 Gilford St., Montreal 514-717-6253 www.ateliermake.com Maya Ersan

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FALL FOR NEW DECOR

THE SUN, AS IT PROGRESSES through the zodiac signs, sets the annual rhythm. As autumn dawns, it visits two style-oriented signs: discerning Virgo and trend-conscious Libra. This — plus the fact that it’s easier to book a contractor than in summer — makes it arguably one of the best times of the year for decorating. Virgo season kicks off in late August. A lthoug h fa ll is tech n ica lly a month away, psychologically it starts then. The French-speaking world has a word for it, la rentrée, the time when we prepare to re-enter the usual routine. And Virgo is all about details and getting it right. Its critical bent

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Autumn’s astrological line-up offers opportunity to make your home stylish and cozy BY SUSAN KELLY

impels us to take a hard look at our homes. Can we really live with that sectional or backsplash for another year? What will it take to finally move that wall? To do during Virgo season: Make lists and plan. Get organized and purge those closets and catch-all drawers. Ditch the old look or create a new one by rearranging the furniture and accessories. Comparison-shop to find just the right new items to complete the look. In late September, the sign of the designer, Libra, takes a turn. Venus-fueled, it fires our urges towards love, aesthetics and beauty. Historically, this was post-harvest time, when we celebrate the fruits of our labours. We begin

to think less about such things as energy-efficiency, more about elements that delight the eye. It’s also time to enjoy this sign’s flair for great company and conversation. To do during Libra season: Think finishing touches, even flourishes, that add symmetry and refinement. Up your art game by investing in original works. Prioritize love, either in things that thrill you or by making choices à deux. Hold a vernissage to show off your artful choices, even if only a new rug or wall mural. Every year is different, of course, with a fresh set of opportunities and challenges. The 2019 Libra season will be particularly intense.


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Just before it gets underway, the planets Jupiter (expansion) and Neptune (vision) will tangle. Exactly on September 21 but active until the end of the year, this combo can expand our creative horizons exponentially. It is a wonderful time to lose ourselves in showrooms and vision boards, to dream the impossible dream home. The trouble is, optimism may overshadow such practical concerns as budget, and we can easily overlook important details. Which may lead to being misled, either by fast-talking sales associates or contractors, or by our own unrealistic or inflated wish lists. This is where practical Saturn, which gains strength in mid-September, can come to the rescue. It is in its home sign of sensible Capricorn, which doubles down on the management skills. This energy helps us think about investment possibilities and resale value. And contrary to Jupiter, this one is all about minimalism, perhaps to the point of austerity, getting by with only the bare necessities. These two planets are on parallel tracks this fall. Our challenge: to balance the Saturn practicality with Jupiter-Neptune vision, inspiration with common sense, expansion with aceticism, and so on. And it is during the time of Libra, the sign that is all about equilibrium, that we will have ample opportunities to do so. The new moon in this sign on September 28 kicks off a month-long period particularly favourable for all design efforts.

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But decorating is about more than a single season or fleeting fad. Here’s a look at what the planets have to say about trends that should not only feel right in fall 2019, but have staying power into the next decade. Multi-purpose spaces: This trend should surge in coming years. Saturn and Pluto are in the frugal, efficient sign of Capricorn, and in December, Jupiter will join them. A dining room or bedroom that sits unused most of the time? Such waste! Expect ingenious solutions way beyond the Murphy bed to help them do double duty. Organic shapes and materials: With so many planets in earth signs, it’s all about authentic materials. Wood, stone or whatever, we want them in as close to natural state as possible. And with Neptune in the water sign of Pisces, flowing lines help us connect with nature and spirit. So, the trend towards furniture and accessories with rounded, curving lines and architectural arches should continue. Globally inspired: This one took off with Jupiter in Sagittarius, a sign with gypsy in its soul. Until the end of 2019, the trend towards exotic ethnic and tribal-inspired touches, especially prints, should continue. The following year’s Capricorn concentration could shift the focus to those that reflect our own culture or ancestry. Boho and maximalism: Jupiter in Sagittarius likes to keep things on the fun and casual

side. It also inclines towards excess. Adding lots of colour, pattern and personality may feel right now, but by next January might not. However, the dip should be temporary as these trends likely will return, although with less force, mid-2020. Geometric shapes: Not a new trend, but one that in 2019 took on presence with bolder colours and oversized patterns. It likely will veer towards simplicity in 2020, what with the earth sign preponderance. Some trendwatchers are seeing the triangle and diamond replacing the omnipresent octagon and hexagon. Extreme texture: Uranus is sojourning in Taurus, the most sensual of signs, and will do so for years. Our homes must appeal to all the senses, especially the tactile one. First, it was velvet upholstery and chunky knit accessories. Now, think big statements such as textured wallpaper or tiles, furniture with rough-hewn wood surfaces and so on. Bold vs. moody colours: Both are trending now. Early indications are that there soon will be a softening on both fronts, the bold becoming less vibrant, the moody less brooding. Behr says its 2020 paint collection reflects a desire for work-life balance while Sherwin-Williams talks about “palettes that bring joy, serenity and focus.”

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STREET MEETS C H I C ON THE

41ST FLOOR A synthesis of styles creates the right aesthetic tension in a downtown pied-à-terre BY PHILLIPA RISPIN PHOTOGRAPHY: LARRY ARNAL STYLING: IMAN LALJI

STREET AND CHIC – two interior design aesthetics that are not often wed. Throw in regal as well and you’ve got the design challenge facing Iman Lalji in this two-bedroom hotel-condominium apartment. Lalji is the owner of Designed by Iman and has known the apartment’s owner, Q Dhalla, for about eight years, first as a friend and now as a client. Q has a home in Brampton, but travels about half of every month on business as a developer of hotels and retirement homes. He needs an in-town pied-à-terre, somewhere to stay closer to clients and to entertain when he is in Toronto. –>

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“Something between street art and chic was my design guideline for Iman,” says Q. “I wanted a lighter palette, something airy but not completely white, and with warmer tones.” Apart from the aesthetic, Q requested that Lalji incorporate local and East African (his family’s origin) products and artwork as much as possible.

“Q sent lots of inspiration photos,” Lalji says. “He expressed that he really liked graffiti, kind of like a street vibe. He sent pictures of street art but he would also send me photos of very regal sorts of places. The challenge was to somehow create a space that reflects a street vibe while still feeling luxurious.”

Homeowner Q Dhalla was delighted that the Kalla White porcelain slabs in the kitchen backsplash were mounted so that the “vein” in the “marble” seems to run from ceiling to sink. Tile: Porcelanosa.

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Before they could set to work on decor, however, Q had to find the right apartment. “I was looking for a place that had some prestige in its location, and I wanted somewhere quiet,” he says. He started searching during the summer of 2018 and figures he looked at “a couple dozen units. I asked Iman for her design opinion whenever I had a few to look at. This one was a reasonable price, in a good neighbourhood for me, had high ceilings and a layout open enough that we had a clean canvas.” –>

(Left) The custom-made mirror in the foyer gives a hint of the eclectic design elements to come. Q worked with Courtney Coon from Declutter with Coco to design storage space that ensures a designated place for everything. Miramar pendant light: Hinkley Lighting. (Below) The artwork in the dining area is by Jasmina Cibic.

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The apartment, in Toronto’s financial district, is approximately 1,650 square feet. It encompasses an open-concept living-dining-kitchen area, a master bedroom with ensuite bathroom, another full bathroom, and a second bedroom. Lalji’s design strategy was to use luxurious materials and fabrics and colours, something that would stand up to “some pops of graffiti and loud patterns and bold pillows.” Witness the living room with its wool-and-cashmere carpet and velvet sofa enlivened by jazzy black-and-white patterns on cushions, throw and coffee table. A spectacular porter’s chair in the living room upholstered in black-andwhite houndstooth fabric further illustrates the concept.

Keeping the patterns varied but in the same colour scheme ensures harmony in the living-room’s design. The spectacular porter’s chair has a strong presence that nonetheless does not overpower the striking coffee table that was custom-made in India. Porter’s chair: ModShop.

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The master bedroom features various amenities that make it a luxurious retreat. For example, the full-length mirror can be illuminated to show the viewer in three types of lighting. The Hermès blanket was a housewarming gift from Q’s father. Nikas chandelier: Mobilia; leather and metal headboard: Crate & Barrel.

Even more arresting is the guest bedroom, which is moody in shades of black and red. The luxurious connotations of the overstuffed headboard, velvet accent pillows and textured bedding contrast with the street vibe of the graffiti-themed wallpaper and the faux-leather look of the pendant light. Lalji calls the wallpaper “really funky” and notes that “the subtler patterns for the furniture balance between soft and loud.” If the guest room wallpaper is dense and intricate, so too is the wallpaper in the master bathroom’s water closet. Graffiti-like in its own way, it has wide black lines winding sinuously up and down the wall. “When I first saw the bathroom wallpaper, I didn’t like it,” says Q. “It’s generated polarizing reviews. Some people love it; some say ‘What was the designer thinking?’ Iman said ‘Let it grow on you.’ ” And grow on him it did. –>

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In the ensuite master bathroom, a sinuous wallpaper design provokes strong opinions. The mirror was imported from India and is made of bone, mother of pearl, and marble. Azteca wallpaper: Drop It Modern; artwork: Renwil.

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Q’s family is from East Africa. Three photos in a corner of the master bedroom are “a reflection of who he is, in a modern way,” says Lalji. “I like gallery walls, but they can be right in your face and not well thought out. I wanted the three to look like a piece of art that reflects Q’s personality.”

Although the local (i.e., “street”) influence is obvious in certain aspects of the decor, nods to East Africa are more subtle but ubiquitous. In the master bedroom, custom-made nightstands on each side of the bed feature bone inlay. A striking mirror over the master bathroom vanity has a frame of bone, mother of pearl and marble. Another mirror, in the foyer, is framed in bone and onyx. A corner of the master bedroom is decorated with three photographs of African animals: a male lion, a mother elephant and her baby, and a giraffe. Q moved into the apartment in January, and he’s discovered that it suits his lifestyle just fine. “It’s perfect,” he says. “I’ve had several parties, and out-of-town guests stayed there. It’s working out really well.”

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BLENDING OLD AND NEW

A newly renovated powder room in an 1840s house offers modern convenience while respecting the past

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BY NADINE THOMSON, INTERIOR DESIGNER PHOTOGRAPHY: LUISA G. GONZÁLEZ

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During the renovation of a historic home, it is not always easy to decide which elements are integral and should be preserved and which should be updated or tossed aside. However, the owner of this mid-19th-century home knew exactly how her new powder room should look and feel. She was on a casual shopping trip when she happened upon a one-of-a-kind blue crystal bowl, imported from Mirano, Italy. She knew immediately that it should go in her soon-to-berenovated home. The vessel sink was the starting point for the transformation of the ground-floor powder room, and it influenced all other choices in the design. Here’s how the project unfolded:

1. In any renovation, a good rule is to change out the functional elements such as plumbing and electricity in favour of the latest technology while also abiding by building codes and industry standards. In this powder room, the old toilet with its wall-hung water tank had so much charm that it was difficult to consider removing it. However, it just didn’t work with the updated functionality of the house. The old toilet was replaced with a new Toto Eco Soirée with its ‘tornado’ flushing system and green technology. Its classic lines ensure that the old one is not missed.

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BEFORE

BEFORE

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5 2. The owner and I worked on the house as a team for four years and we’ve since conferred on other projects. This powder room is one of the many architectural gems on the ground floor of the Regency-style home and is the only room in the house that is wallpapered. Its Mirano crystal vessel sink and various bronze-coloured details make the space shimmer with elegance and a touch of mystique. The homeowner mixed styles in this space harmoniously, and they communicate with each other through the use of the bronze hues. All elements are in the same palette except for the blue crystal Mirano bowl, which serves as the focal point.

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3. Powder rooms are the belle of the ball if they’re designed right. Make them bold and fun and don’t miss your opportunity to do something you would never do elsewhere in your home. The square footage is often quite small, so you can install materials and elements that might be too expensive in a larger space. Since you often do not spend much time in a powder room, you will also not tire of the decor so quickly; so be brave and add lots of eye candy.

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4. Another reason for using the bronze palette was that we could use various textures and design styles without creating a disconnected feeling. The eye loves harmony; therefore, if you are using more than one style in a space, a unified palette will prevent it from looking busy.

5. The 14-foot ceiling, unusual in most homes, adds grandeur to this powder room. We were able to install ornate egg-and-dart crown moldings to add visual interest. Such antique elements as the mirror and chandelier, along with the warm wood of the original panels and shutters of the circa 1847 windows, make the room glow with warmth. These elements are juxtaposed against the streamlined style of the vanity and modern floor tiles.

6. Over-sized mirrors in any space add drama. An important feature of a mirror is what it reflects; in this case: the magnificent original windows of this gracious old house.

7. A small modification was made to the bathroom layout to accommodate a large custom-made vanity, the counter of which was designed by the homeowner herself. The space allocated for the original vanity was approximately four feet wide. By reducing the size of the wall that houses the secondfloor plumbing, we were able to extend the alcove to seven feet, allowing room for the vanity with its ample counter space and cabinet. Wall-mounting the vanity exposes the floor, creating the illusion of more space.

The nine-by-15-inch floor tiles are inset with two-inch-square tiles between each row. They run perpendicular to the flow of the room to add visual interest and to increase the sense of width. Mosaic glass wall tiles, Brizo wall-mounted faucet, crystal bowl sink, and Toto Eco Soirée toilet: Ciot; chandelier and crystal wall sconces: Wayfair.

8. The former vanity was repurposed in another building.

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LIFESTYLE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

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THE D OM R E D E UN These geodesic structures in Quebec’s Charlevoix region provide cozy accommodations for a get-away-from-it-all holiday BY BRENDA O’FARRELL

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IN THE QUIET OF A NEW MORNING, the sun casts the first rays of light on the maple trees that stand on the mountainous ridge before it begins a delicate dance on the surface of the river stretching to the horizon. As the dew decides whether it’s time to retreat from the forest floor, a crow calls in the distance. It’s quiet, yet alive with sound. That thought is confirmed as the distinctive siren of a cicada warms the summer air. This is how the day starts in the Charlevoix region, a ruggedly untamed and serene area on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River east of Quebec City.

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LIFESTYLE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

As you take it all in with a deep relaxing breath, you turn your attention from the untamed landscape for a moment and walk to the kitchen to brew your coffee. Within moments, the rich smell of a dark Colombian roast fills the air. You return your attention to the view and step out onto the wooden deck as you stretch your arms out as far as they can reach, arching your back ever so slightly. It’s a familiar move, practiced morning after morning, but somehow on this day it feels more fitting, more complete, more essential. You smile as you realize how the thoughts of the world you were running to keep up with just the day before release their grip on your

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psyche, and with it the tension that has kept the muscles in your neck taut. The rush and worry of yesterday’s world are a million miles away. They have no dominion here, for you are in the dome. Let the weekend begin. This experience – the wedding of the calming atmosphere of nature with the pampering luxury of a five-star hotel all in a unique space – is what the owners of Dômes Charlevoix aimed to create when they launched their venture last fall. Inspired by geodesic domes worldwide and given a distinctive upgrade, Dômes Charlevoix sets out to turn the traditional tourist notion of travelling to a destination

and looking for accommodations on its head. “The space becomes the destination,” says Guillaume Genest, one of the three owners, with Simon Allard and Simon Veilleux, of this new niche experiential tourism company. The pleasure of living in it is the vacation. Unlike any conventional cabin or lodge, these geodesic domes – an untraditional living space devoid of the familiar constraints of vertical walls and right angles – have been designed with high-end interiors to provide a unique experience. Built in a pristine setting along one of the widest stretches of the river, the domes’ location is an integral part of the package that allows guests to unplug and pause. –>

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And they are proving to be very popular. Since launching last fall, DĂ´mes Charlevoix has hit full occupancy. Its three domes, each designed to accommodate between two and four individuals, are built high on a ridge to maximize the view of the river, while not being visible one from the other. They are booked year-round for short-term stays by people from across Canada and around the globe, with each season offering its own distinctive experience.

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The demand is so fierce, Genest and his partners have started construction on two additional domes. Both will be ready to receive guests this autumn. Form, ambience, isolation, luxury: These are the words that Olivier Bourgeois uses to describe the ingredients that contribute to the domes’ unique characteristics. He is the lead architect at Bourgeois Lechasseur Architectes, the firm tasked with designing the luxurious interiors and exterior decks equipped with hot tubs that allow for an intimate, relaxing and indulgent way to commune with the surroundings.


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“The form is very special,” Bourgeois says. “We are not used to living in a circular space like an igloo. It creates a cozy space.” Nothing in the domes touches the membranes that cover the aluminum skeletons of the structures, adding to the cocoon-like characteristic of the spheres. The fully equipped kitchens, bathrooms and sleeping areas are concentrated in a central cube space. The beds are given full exposure to the view outside. The experience of staying in a dome is more intense in winter, Bourgeois says, as the snow and cold add to the sense of isolation,

while the comfort provided by heated floors and small wood stoves adds to the coziness. And in keeping with the high-end hotel approach, each dome is equipped with WiFi so that guests can stream music while they relax. As Genest puts it, the domes may be nestled in iconic Quebec woods, but they are definitely not the coureurs-de-bois cabins of old. Dômes Charlevoix www.domescharlevoix.com

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DESIGN

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CREATIVITY STARTS AT HOME A Toronto designer uses her expertise to create unique interiors in her own family home BY CHERYL CORNACCHIA PHOTOGRAPHY: ALEX LUKEY STYLING: SVETLANA TRYASKINA AND CHRISTINA HANLON

TORONTO DESIGNER Svetlana Tryaskina loves creating exciting, new living spaces out of homes that have become lacklustre, outdated and no longer functional for their owners. Redesigning homes has been her passion and profession for the past 12 years. Of all the residential projects she has undertaken over the years, however, a recent renovation of a 3,000-square-foot home in Toronto’s Ledbury Park neighbourhood was especially close to her heart. The project entailed the complete transformation of the three-bedroom, two-storey home that she shares with her husband and their two children. –>

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“I wanted a dramatic house,” says Svetlana. “Working from home creates situations where I sometimes have to invite clients and suppliers over to discuss a project. I wanted the house to represent my style. I wanted to be bold, to be fearless … for it to feel like a designer lived in the house. I didn’t hold back on anything. I was my own client.”

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As the owner and principal designer of Estee Design, a Toronto-based boutique design firm, Svetlana says she has acquired a long list of favourite products, patterns, techniques and design features. Turning her own house into a personal calling card meant borrowing heavily from her favourite lists.

A round table, fashioned out of rare lilac-coloured marble, defines the space in this dining room.


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The two-storey house is relatively new; it was built 12 years ago. It has a traditional layout, but with extra-high ceilings. Typical of many Toronto houses, it is long and narrow, measuring 56 feet deep and just 17 feet wide. Walking through the changes she made, Svetlana starts at the front door and the redesign of her home’s entranceway and stairwell. She calls herself a “wallpaper junkie,” and one of her favourite Cole & Son wallpapers is based on a pattern by Piero Fornasetti, a 20th century Italian artist. She says she knew the iconic cloud-like graphic in tonal black and white would set a whimsical, dramatic mood for the house while adding formality at the same time. A spectacular starburst light fixture on the ceiling adds to the sense of whimsy. –>

A relatively small entryway makes a big statement with black-andwhite tonal wallpaper from Cole & Son. The black ceiling highlights the polished-nickel light fixture.

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DESIGN

Mauve Venetian plaster adds colour and drama to the formal living area and adjoining dining room. A sunburst installation above the hearth conceals the entertainment centre.

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Adjacent to the foyer, through a set of French doors is the home’s main formal living area: adjoining living and dining rooms. In these rooms, Svetlana used Venetian plaster to harmonize the space. Long used in Italian homes, a modernized version of the old technique is

made by VeniLux. In this case, it was applied to the ceilings with a mauve tint, adding drama and creating contrast to the room’s grey walls and white moldings. “It’s a luxury finish,” says Svetlana. “It’s not every day that you see it. It makes a big statement.”


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The kitchen is next. Here the black-andwhite colour palette is repeated. Black Eternal Marquina Silestone clads the countertops, while white subway tiles create a clean-looking backsplash. An Arabescato Carrara marble top on the kitchen island complements and completes the look. Together, it all contrasts beautifully with the home’s original wood floors, which have been refinished jet-black. A commissioned art installation – a five-by-10foot plaster relief behind the kitchen sink – is a modern interpretation of a Chinoiserie pattern; it gives the room a one-of-a-kind wow. “I wanted to take the kitchen to another level,” says Svetlana of the relief by Anthony Valin of Rustik Design. –>

(Right) A walnut butcher block warms up the contemporary kitchen and separates the Arabescato Carrara marble breakfast table and adjoining island.

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DESIGN

Black and white wallpaper bestows an elegant and contemporary look on the family room, adjoining the kitchen. The wallpaper, from Schumacher, has an unusual geometric pattern.

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(Above, left) A floral mural adds drama and a sense of movement to the master ensuite. (Left) Brass, marble and graphic wallpaper give a subtle feminine touch to the powder room.

One of the last two rooms on the main floor is the family room, immediately adjacent to the kitchen. To connect the family room to the kitchen in an effortless flow, Svetlana once again turned to the black-and-white palette and wallpaper. “I needed an intriguing pattern that would add interest and depth to the kitchen and soften the blacks and whites,” she says, adding that the Schumacher wallpaper was perfect. She used it on the wall at the far end of the kitchen where there is a small breakfast table, and also in the family room. It brings warmth to the space without compromising the luxuriousness of the room. A stunning powder room boasts more marble, geometric wallpaper and interesting fixtures. Svetlana says she couldn’t be happier with how the design of her home turned out. And she adds that there’s an additional bonus in designing one’s own place. She says she often finds the end of a project bittersweet because she has to say goodbye and leave it behind. Here, in her own home, “I get to stay and enjoy what I’ve created. And I also see how my family are enjoying the space.”

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LANDSCAPE

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A GROWING BUSINESS The Filion family has built a landscape company that is a one-stop shop for the garden of your dreams BY WENDY HELFENBAUM

DOMINIQUE FILION WAS 18 YEARS OLD in 1992 when he launched his business with just one lawn mower. Since then, his landscaping company – one of the South Shore’s largest – has thrived thanks to its mission: To provide top-notch horticultural expertise and exceptional customer service. “Dominique soon began adding other landscaping services in response to his clients’ needs, such as flowerbed maintenance and shrub trimming,” recalls his sister Catherine Filion, who joined the company 12 years ago as its assistant general manager. As president, Dominique leads a team of 135 employees, including landscape architects, garden designers, horticulturists, technicians, certified landscapers, masons and an agronomist. Together, the crew covers all South Shore municipalities and the island of Montreal. Catherine credits her parents, Pierre and Johanne, with teaching the importance of having a well-maintained, beautifully landscaped property. “These were the family values passed along to us; that’s how our business was born,” she explains.

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Pierre worked with Dominique to develop the company before retiring. Johanne heads up the award-winning design office and coowns the South Shore headquarters with her son. Catherine co-owns the Montreal office, opened four years ago with her brother. Today, Services Paysagers Dominique Filion offers a complete range of tailored landscaping ser vices, including design and execution of residential and commercial projects, plus horticultural and tree maintenance. “What distinguishes us is we offer a turnkey service; we take care of everything,” says Catherine.

As certified Master Landscapers, the company aims to surpass existing industry standards and deliver exceptional quality, regardless of project size, she adds. “For us, no project is too small or too big, and we take that to heart,” Catherine says. “It takes a lot of creativity to bring out the best in a garden, whether it’s a tiny space or a massive one. People want to maximize their space and be outdoors as long as they can, and we help them do this.” The company also has a robust commercial niche, designing and maintaining outdoor spaces and green roofs. “We do work for a lot of condo associations that want turn-key services with high residential standards,” she says.


LANDSCAPE • HOME IN CANADA • AUTUMN 2019

To preserve the health and beauty of residential or commercial landscaping yearround, a dedicated crew does everything from spring cleaning, planting and fertilizing flowerbeds to weeding, pruning shrubs, trimming or removing trees and raking leaves. One unique service, Flash-Project, is especially popular with clients, Catherine says. Targeting specific areas of a property for a face-lift, a landscaping team divides perennials, revitalizes and redesigns flowerbeds and replaces polymer sand between paving stones to instantly boost curb appeal. “We create very elegant landscapes that match the style of the homeowner’s property, and we want them to last. Once an outdoor space has matured, it’s important to keep the plants

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and flowers under control,” she explains. “The before and after is really spectacular, and this upkeep allows you to keep the visual impact without having an overgrown garden.” Autumn is the ideal time to begin a longterm landscaping project, Catherine says, adding that the company’s teams work until December. “It can be a long process from initial meeting to determine the client’s needs, to developing the design concept, presenting sketches for approval, drawing up final plans, and then finally starting the work,” she says. “Starting in the fall allows homeowners to really plan out their project so it can be among the first to be executed in the spring. Plan early, and then everything’s ready so we can start planting your garden.”

Services Paysagers Dominique Filion 13 rue Principale, Saint-Basile-Le-Grand, ~ 450-653-0000 7940 18th Avenue, Montreal ~ 514-722-9000 www.dominiquefilion.ca/contact

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BUYERS’ GUIDE

AN ICON FOR OUR TIME Frank Gehry, Architect www.foga.com FOR THE JOY OF FAMILY LIFE Sylvie Ménard, Real Estate Broker www.sylviemenard.com sylvie@sylviemenard.com 514-827-6200 A GROWING BUSINESS Services Paysagers Dominique Filion www.dominiquefilion.ca 514-722-9000 THE RIGHT FIT Tina Baer, Real Estate Broker tbaer@profusion.global C: 514-603-9870 ~  T: 514-935-3337 FALL FOR NEW DECOR www.susankellyastrology.com STIRRING UP AN EMOTIONAL RESPONSE Frank Lipari, Artist www.flipari.com A SPOONFUL OF SUGAR Ollia Macarons & Tea www.byollia.com 403-457-9775 High Tea Bakery www.highteabakery.com 204-775-2064 Pastry Training Centre of Vancouver www.vancouverpastryschool.com 604-569-1680 Lincoln Apartment Bakery www.lincolnapartmentbakery.com 514-600-1123 Ice A Cake Institute www.iceacake.com 647-899-7265 Le French Fix Pâtisserie www.lefrenchfix.ca 902-497-5308 STREET MEETS CHIC ON THE 41ST FLOOR Designed by Iman www.designedbyiman.com 647-465-4626 Declutter with Coco www.declutterwithcoco.com 647-641-2845 Crate & Barrel www.crateandbarrel.ca Drop It Modern www.dropitmodern.com Hinkley Lighting www.hinkleylighting.com Jasmina Cibic www.jasminacibic.org

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Mobilia www.mobilia.ca ModShop www.modshop1.com Porcelanosa www.porcelanosa.com 416-782-5394

ALL FIRED UP Maison Stoï www.maisonstoi.com 514-885-1291 Atelier Make www.ateliermake.com 514-717-6253

Renwil www.renwil.com 905-671-3948 ~ 1-800-667-9506

CREATIVITY STARTS AT HOME Estee Design www.esteedesign.com 416-827-4220

BLENDING OLD AND NEW Nadine Thomson Interior Design www.nadinethomson.com 514-775-2259

LESS IS SO MUCH MORE À Hauteur d’Homme www.hh.ca 514-419-2429

FOR FUN AND FAMILY LIFE U31 Design www.u31.co 416-597-1576

A BLESSING IN DISGUISE Designed By Iman www.designedbyiman.com 647-465-4626

BENEDICTION THROUGH BEADS Salt Spring Malas and Yoga Jewelry www.saltspringmalas.com 778-403-1934

Declutter with Coco www.declutterwithcoco.com 647-641-2845

UNDER THE DOME Dômes Charlevoix www.domescharlevoix.com FIRST NATIONS CUISINE Kū-kŭm www.kukum-kitchen.com 416-519-2638 Grey Eagle Resort and Casino www.greyeagleresortandcasino.ca/dining 403-719-8777 Salmon ’n’ Bannock Bistro www.salmonandbannock.net 604-568-8971 NishDish Marketeria & Catering www.nishdish.com 416-855-4085 Wanuskewin Heritage Park www.wanuskewin.com/visit/dining 306-931-6767 Miqmak Catering Indigenous Kitchen www.miqmak-catering-indigenous-kitchen.business.site 514-421-0031 UPGRADING THE NEW Space Harmony www.spaceharmony.ca 604-782-1450 CABIN FEVER The Backcountry Hut Company www.thebackcountryhutcompany.com 604-355-7797 Method Homes www.methodhomes.net

Taps Bath Centre www.tapsbath.com EM Dynamics www.em-dynamics.ca Porcelanosa www.porcelanosa.com/gb/showrooms/canada Model Space Designs www.modelspacedesigns.ca FROM HODGEPODGE TO HAPPY HOME Alykhan Velji Designs www.alyveljidesigns.com 403-617-2406 OUTSIDE IN Guillaume Kukucka, Architect www.guillaumekukucka.com 514-691-2829 Stone Tile www.stone-tile.com Céragrès www.ceragreslesbains.ceragres.ca Velux www.velux.ca Luminaire Authentik www.luminaireauthentik.com


AD LIST

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Avenue Design

13

Bunny Berke

33

Celadon Mitchell Gold

11

Clinique de Chirurgie Plastique

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Club Cuisine BCBG

50

CMR

43

Distributions Bellucci

42

Fabricville

2 160 15 9 21 161

Galerie le Bourget Gendron Chocolate Gloria Bass Design Life Group Rosenthal Linen Chest OCAD

17

Scavolini

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Services Paysagers Dominique Filion

162 19

Stewart Museum Sylvie Menard

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Tina Baer

164

Vicostone

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Zytco Solarium

NEXT ISSUE

The arrival of cold weather sends us back indoors after a season of al fresco living. Being inside compels many of us to pay closer attention to the interior design of our homes. In our upcoming Winter issue, we’ll look at specific elements of interior design – lighting, wallpaper, flooring and textiles – to help you make decisions about the materials that will enable you to create a more beautiful home. Don’t miss the winter issue. On sale in November.

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Home In Canada - Montreal - Autumn 2019  

Autumn's issue features architect Frank Gehry on the cover and main feature. Also in the issue are homes from all over Canada.

Home In Canada - Montreal - Autumn 2019  

Autumn's issue features architect Frank Gehry on the cover and main feature. Also in the issue are homes from all over Canada.