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Catalogue

Ramsar Site 999 - The Flooded Forests of Northern Cambodia

Paul Stewart The FCC, Sisowath Quay, Phnom Penh. 27th April to 31st May 2009.


Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-001

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-002

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-003

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-004

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-005

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-006

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-007

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-008

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-009

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-010

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-011

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-012

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-013

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-014

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-015

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-016

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-017

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-018

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-019

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-020

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-021

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-022

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-023

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The Convention on Wetlands

Ramsar, Caspian Sea, Iran. 2 February 1971

“The conservation and wise use of all wetlands through local and national actions and international cooperation, as a contribution towards achieving sustainable development throughout the world” As of April 2009 with159 member States, The List of Wetlands of International Importance, the ‘Ramsar List’, stands at 1,840, covering 1.74 million square kilometres, larger than the surface area of France, Germany, Spain, and Switzerland combined. Cambodia joined the Convention in 1999 and now has three Ramsar sites: Boeng Chhmar and Associated River System and Floodplain (28,000 hectares) in Kampong Thom province; Koh Kapik and Associated Islets (12,000 ha) in Koh Kong province; and the subject of Paul Stewart’s exhibition, Ramsar site no. 999, formally named “Middle Stretches of the Mekong River north of Stoeng Treng” (14,600 ha). www.mouthtosource.net


The photographs in this exhibition clearly bring out the unique features of the Ramsar site, which is a riverine wetland characterised by a strong turbulent flow. There are numerous channels between the rocky and sandy islands that support a unique type of open forest that is markedly different in composition and appearance from adjoining terrestrial forests. The main tree species on the islands are Barringtonia, Eugenia and Acacia, with the common shrub Morindopsis sp. These trees in the river have a root system that is often bent in the direction of the strong flow of water in which they endure, but these roots that grow in the riverbeds help to reduce the flow of water, especially in the wet season, and so contribute to flood control and stablisation of the river banks. The permanent water channel also has value in recharging ground water in the adjacent areas and downstream as well. For the local communities, the area is extremely important as a fishing ground, especially in the dry season, since the flooded forest provides refuge for approximately 100 species of fish, with some 50 species being of socio-economic importance. The site is also important for providing a water transportation system, and for contributing to the productivity of the areas in the downstream part of the Mekong by providing a supply of nutrient rich detritus. Apart from its hydrological importance, this Ramsar site also provides habitat for threatened species and communities of wildlife, including the Irrawaddy Dolphin and a high concentration of waterbirds, including Oriental Darters, River Terns and Small Practincoles. At present, there is minimal threat to the site from the land uses immediately adjacent to the river. However, the various dams and hydro-electric generation projects that are being proposed upstream of the Mekong and its tributaries will impact on the annual flood cycle and therefore the site itself. Dwight Peck-Ramsar Secretariat, Gland, Switzerland www.mouthtosource.net

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-024 Triptych

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-025

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-026

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-027

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-028

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Paul Stewart // Ramsar Site 999-029

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