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HOW

Breastfeeding

Impacts Childhood Obesity

Wait in Times the BEST

Kevin Goldthorp President, Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation Senior Vice-President, Advancement, Mount Sinai Hospital

New President Meet our

Province

A PUBLICATION OF THE MOUNT SINAI HOSPITAL FOUNDATION


M E SS AG E FROM BRENT

The pages of this issue are filled with examples of how Mount Sinai Hospital is redefining patient care — both within the walls of our Hospital and beyond. Your generosity and dedication enable our medical teams to not only provide exemplary care to our patients every day, but to continually reflect, question, measure and improve upon that care. Your dollars fund many of the programs you will read about in this issue — programs that are truly changing the future of medicine. The issue begins with an introduction to Kevin Goldthorp, our Foundation’s new President. I take great pleasure in welcoming Kevin to the Mount Sinai family, and know he will contribute significantly to our ability to continually re-imagine all we can do for our patients. As we head into one of the most exciting eras in Mount Sinai’s history, the timing couldn’t be better to have someone of Kevin’s calibre at the helm. With a strong and visionary new leader, an inspired group of donors and volunteers and an extraordinarily talented health-care team, there is no limit to what we can do. Sincerely,

Brent Belzberg Chair, Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you want to read about. Contact Jyll Weinberg-Martin at jweinberg-martin@mtsinai.on.ca 2 T H E B E ST or M E416-586-8203 D I C I N E M ATText. E R S8832.

A Talented Leader, It’s an exciting time for Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation. We are thrilled to welcome our new President and the Hospital’s Senior Vice-President, Advancement, Kevin Goldthorp. As one of the top fundraisers in Canada, Kevin brings a wealth of experience and talent to our organization. Kevin joins Mount Sinai from Western University, where he served as Vice-President, External Relations, for the past two years. Prior to Western, he spent six years as Chief Executive Officer of Sunnybrook Foundation where he completed the integration of three foundations and launched a multi-year, $470 million fundraising campaign, raising $300 million by the time of his departure.

I can’t imagine an easier place to believe in than Mount Sinai. It is a hospital with a tremendous reputation for excellence and a very rich and compelling history. I was also drawn by Mount Sinai’s strong community of volunteers and donors who give in so many ways to the Hospital. I look forward to working with them, and telling the Mount Sinai story with a louder voice for all to hear. There is no lack of stories to tell about this great Hospital.

“We feel incredibly confident in Kevin’s ability to lead the Foundation to new heights,” says Joseph Mapa, President and CEO of Mount Sinai Hospital. “He is a strategic thinker and gifted fundraiser, and has a successful track record leading world-class organizations like ours. Above all, he is a dedicated family man with great integrity. We have ambitious goals for the future and I have no doubt that Kevin will make exceptional contributions that will benefit our Foundation, our Hospital, and ultimately, our patients.”

Having previously worked in the health-care sector, what are you most looking forward to about getting back into this area? Nothing matches the passion and commitment of hospital philanthropy. The dedication to the cause is so apparent and is a major attraction for me. Health is the foundation that allows us to do all that we do — it’s everything. The dollars we raise enable the innovation and patient care that helps people live better lives. I’ve missed that, and I’m so glad to be a part of it again.

As Kevin begins his leadership of the Foundation, we wanted to give you — our valued community — a chance to get to know him, why he’s chosen our Hospital and what Mount Sinai means to him.

How important is philanthropy and community support to a health-care organization like Mount Sinai? Enormously important. Mount Sinai could never offer the breadth and depth of care that it does without the incredible support of our community. Mount Sinai has built a legacy of excellence enabled by the strong community that has surrounded it. I believe the expertise offered at Mount Sinai is second to none, from our renowned

What drew you to Mount Sinai Hospital? As a fundraiser, you really need to believe in what you’re doing and have faith that the work you do will make a difference for people and families.

A Passionate Community Nothing matches the

passion commitment philanthropy. and

of hospital

care for moms and babies, to our leadership in geriatrics and our trailblazing in biomedical research for so many diseases including diabetes, cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Every dollar makes a difference at Mount Sinai, every dollar helps us provide the best possible care today and for the future. What would you personally like to say to our Mount Sinai supporters who will be reading this? Thank you! We owe such gratitude to each and every person who has supported this great Hospital. I cannot overstate the importance of broad-based support, whether it is $10 or $10 million, every donation counts and helps us deliver the best medicine to our patients. We want to build a greater feeling of family within our growing donor community, where every member of that family is important. We will continue to grow our community of supporters within the GTA as well as on a national level, and we will continue to show them the impact of what we can achieve together. Our donors should be proud of their association with Mount Sinai, and for the lives they’ve changed because of their generous contributions. When you are not raising funds for internationallyrenowned organizations, how do you like to spend your spare time? Easy answer: with my family. My wife and I have a 16-year-old daughter and 10-year-old twins (son and daughter). I work very hard and take great pride in my professional life, but every spare moment is spent with them.

Kevin Goldthorp

Read on to learn how — with your help — Mount Sinai is transforming the future of health care.

T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 3


H EA PA E DDIEAT R RCO I CPSY CO P Y

Empowering Parents, the Best Caregivers of All

G E R I AT R I C S

No one knows a child like a parent. From the moment they are born, there is an immediate connection and an overwhelming desire to care for that child above all else. That’s why Dr. Shoo Lee, Paediatrician-in-Chief at Mount Sinai Hospital, implemented a revolutionary new program in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) where parents — the best caregivers of all — play a major role in the care of their child. The first of its kind in North America, the Family Integrated Care Program empowers parents to provide care for their baby in the NICU while simultaneously building their own confidence as new moms and dads. This program changes the entire experience from one where parents feel little control over outcomes, to one where they feel empowered, engaged and in a unique position to contribute in a very meaningful way.

Jack (Jacqueline) Hourigan (right) with husband Andy Fenton, giving baby Tess skin-to-skin contact while they cared for her in the NICU.

Through this

incredible program, we were taught

how to care for our daughter by amazing nurses, enabling us to become an

integral part

of her medical team and better preparing us to bring her home.

4 T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S

Parents who join the program commit to spending at least eight hours at the Hospital each day and they receive coaching on basic care such as feeding, bathing, diaper changing and holding their baby to maximize the amount of skin-to-skin contact. They are also charged with taking the lead in care planning, charting their baby’s progress and presenting at rounds each morning to clinical staff. Not surprisingly, this program has resulted in measurable benefits for newborns. “By increasing parent involvement, we have seen enhanced parent-infant attachment and parental competence,” explains Dr. Lee. “When parents are empowered to provide primary care for their babies, these newborns grow and gain weight faster, the chance of infection is decreased, their length of stay is shorter and they do better when they go home.”

Jack Hourigan and her family were part of the pilot project of this initiative, which began in March 2011. “We were so happy when Tess was born, but nothing could have prepared us for the shock of being thrust into this new world where we felt more like visitors than new parents,” says Jack. Tess was born at only 27 weeks and spent significant time in the NICU. “Through this incredible program, we were taught how to care for our daughter by amazing nurses, enabling us to become an integral part of her medical team and better preparing us to bring her home.”

Dr. Shoo Lee, Paediatrician-in-Chief at Mount Sinai

Dr. Lee and his team are now expanding Mount Sinai’s Family Integrated Care Program to NICUs across the country. They expect parental involvement to become the new standard of neonatal care in Canada.

BUILDING A FAMILY-ORIENTED NICU Mount Sinai’s brand-new NICU, scheduled to open in 2014, will support family involvement in neonatal care. The Hospital’s two open-ward special care nurseries will be replaced with an integrated NICU featuring 62 private rooms. Each room will be equipped with comfortable furniture and rest space for parents, while soft lighting and silent monitoring equipment will provide a quieter, more soothing environment for babies. Four larger private rooms will accommodate families with twins, triplets and other multiple births. To help make this vision a reality, please contact us at supportsinai.ca or 416-586-8203.

Living Longer, Living Well

Dr. Samir Sinha visits with a patient.

Ontario has a growing ageing population, a group that accounts for nearly half of the province’s current health-care spending. With the 65 and older population set to double over the next 20 years, and its 85 and older population set to quadruple, the government is looking for solutions that are both respectful and empowering to older adults, as well as financially viable for the province. The Ontario government has turned to Mount Sinai Hospital’s Dr. Samir Sinha, Director of Geriatrics, for strategic recommendations on how to address this emerging situation. A star geriatrician recruited to Mount Sinai from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Sinha is also a Rhodes Scholar with a Doctorate in Sociology from the

Dr. Samir Sinha, the Honourable Deb Matthews, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, and Mount Sinai’s President and CEO, Joseph Mapa.

University of Oxford’s Institute of Ageing, all of which provide him the unique ability to analyze complex health policy issues from both a medical and sociological perspective. He was named Expert Lead of Ontario’s Seniors Strategy and tasked with spearheading both the development and implementation of the strategy. On January 8, 2013, the Honourable Deb Matthews, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, visited Mount Sinai to release Dr. Sinha’s report, entitled “Living Longer, Living Well.” The report is a comprehensive analysis of how to help seniors stay healthy and live longer at home, with recommendations that promote health and wellness, and improve health and social services and community living options for older Ontarians. Dr. Sinha conducted extensive research and consultations in 19 communities across the province, hearing from more than 5,000 seniors, 2,500 health, social and community care providers and more than 1,000 caregivers. Dr. Sinha has been the driving force behind Mount Sinai’s commitment to transform care for older patients. This work has resulted in the Hospital becoming the first acute care

academic health science centre in Canada to introduce a comprehensive, integrated and evidence-based strategy focused on providing improved outcomes and quality of life for older patients. He pioneered the implementation of Mount Sinai’s Acute Care for Elders Strategy, which is already delivering improved outcomes, like reducing readmission rates for older patients and increasing the rate at which these patients return home. It has also won Mount Sinai national and international attention. “Our patients have changed but the system hasn’t. We therefore need care that is more tailored to address the complex needs of older patients,” says Dr. Sinha. He explains that while the majority of people over 65 are in good health and lead independent lives, approximately 10 per cent of older adults use 60 per cent of the health-care resources for this population, while the healthiest 50 per cent use only six per cent of those same resources. “Our Seniors Strategy points the way for us to do things in an integrated, comprehensive and proactive manner and recognizes the needs of those patients who use our health-care system the most, while keeping the others healthy and out of hospitals for as long as possible.” T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 5


EHM EAE D R EGRE NCO C YP YM ECO D IPCYI N E

G R O U N D B R EA K I N G R E S EA R C H

Best Wait Times in the Province

Two major breakthroughs at Mount Sinai Hospital illustrate the profound impact of biomedical research on patient care, and have garnered a great deal of media attention in the process. Researchers at the Hospital’s Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute are key change agents for the future of medicine.

While most of us try to avoid visiting a hospital emergency department (ED), we are comforted to have a health-care system that is there for us should an urgent situation arise. However, when we have to wait several hours to get that care, we begin to question that very same system. Recognizing that the state of EDs in Ontario was ready for improvement, the Ontario government appointed one of Mount Sinai’s best to lead the change. Dr. Howard Ovens, Director of Mount Sinai’s Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Centre, was named Provincial Lead, ER Strategy in 2009 and continues to hold that role today. The main goal of this strategy is to help patients receive emergency care faster, so they can return home sooner and free up hospital time for other patients. There have also been other issues to address. “We knew the state of Ontario emergency departments was dismal,” says Dr. Ovens. “Ambulances would wait too long to offload patients, there were huge clogs in the department, and it was not abnormal for a patient’s entire hospital stay to be

Major Cancer Breakthrough Made at Mount Sinai demonstrated that cancer cells may not make the decision to spread on their own as previously thought, but that they are coaxed to spread by their neighbouring normal cells.

Dr. Howard Ovens

spent in the hallway of the unit instead of in a patient room.” The latter situation represented more than just inconvenience, as studies have shown repeatedly that outcomes — including mortality — are worse when care is given in an overcrowded ED. Four years later, ED performance across the province has improved dramatically. Patients are waiting 1.2 hours less for emergency care and 86 per cent of people are receiving treatment within target time frames. These changes have occurred despite increasing patient volumes, complexity of patient cases

and increased budgetary constraints. Mount Sinai has reduced various target wait times across the board by 20 to 30 per cent, and now has an offload nurse to help get ambulances back on the road faster. As a result of these and other initiatives, Mount Sinai currently has the best combined wait time scores of any academic hospital ED in the province. “There is still much to be done,” states Dr. Ovens. “However, only a few years into our efforts, Ontario’s ER Strategy has made a real difference in the lives of so many patients, and we are very proud of that.”

Dr. Jeff Wrana

Valbona Luga

Mount Sinai researchers may have forever changed the way the spread of cancer cells (metastasis) is targeted. Scientists Valbona Luga and Dr. Liang Zhang in Dr. Jeff Wrana’s lab at the Hospital’s Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute have

Breastfeeding Tips the Scales in Favour of Healthy Body Weight

THINGS TO KNOW BEFORE COMING TO THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT Visiting the Emergency Department (ED) can be a stressful experience. Following these simple steps can reduce your anxiety and allow your health-care team to provide you with the best possible care. Bring a toothbrush, change of clothes and a book or electronic device (with charger!) to keep you occupied while you wait.

“There are some things you can do while you are well to prepare for any potential emergencies down the road. Knowing your medications and your health history could go a long way.” — D R . BJUG BORG U N DVA AG, A S S O C I AT E D I R E C T O R , M O U N T S I N A I ’S S C H WA R T Z / R E I S M A N EMERGENCY CENTRE

Bring all medications with you.

Dr. Laurent Briollais If your symptoms worsen while waiting, inform the nurse.

Bring a brief list summarizing important health history information, including allergies.

Provide a detailed account of the events leading up to your visit to the ED.

Obtain clear discharge information. Talk to your doctor and record specific instructions for follow-up care. Avoid food and beverages if possible.

It’s important to understand that patients are seen in order of severity, not in order of arrival.

Ask questions! Understanding your treatment and follow-up care will reduce anxiety, help avoid a repeat visit and improve your outcomes.

Dr. Liang Zhang

Dr. Stephen Lye

There are growing concerns about the increasing rates of childhood obesity, with almost a third of Canadian children being overweight or obese and an estimated 70 per cent genetically at risk. However, exciting new research from Lunenfeld

The surprising finding revealed that normal cells send communication signals to cancer cells telling them how to spread. “Metastasis is one of the most feared words of our time,” says Dr. Wrana, a world-renowned leader in cancer research. “If we can ‘cut the telephone wires’ and halt communication between these cells, we could have a new and very important way to halt metastasis and potentially save the lives of many people with cancer.”

scientists has demonstrated that breastfeeding may help tip the scales in favour of a more healthy body weight. Mount Sinai’s Dr. Laurent Briollais is the Principal Investigator of a new study revealing that the length of time a baby is breastfed can positively impact obesity outcomes later in life. “The benefits of breast milk are well known,” says Dr. Briollais. “However, what’s new is to find that breastfeeding can have a significant impact on children who have a genetic predisposition to obesity.” Dr. Stephen Lye was also part of the research team. “This study is one of the first examples of early intervention in

the fight against obesity,” says Dr. Lye. “Rather than trying to treat the symptoms later, we’re better off trying to prevent them in the first place.”

Dr. Jeff Wrana is a Senior Investigator at the Lunenfeld and holds the Mary Janigan Research Chair in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. Dr. Laurent Briollais is a Senior Investigator at the Lunenfeld and an Assistant Professor with the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Dr. Stephen Lye is the Associate Director and a Senior Investigator at the Lunenfeld and holds the Mount Sinai Hospital Auxiliary Chair in Women’s and Infants’ Health Research.

T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 7


D I A B ET E S More than two million Canadians and 250 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes. Mount Sinai is blazing a new path for those impacted by this growing epidemic, by finding new ways to improve both quality of care and quality of life. Here are some examples of how research at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute is transforming the future of diabetes care.

Preventing Diabetes Before it Starts Dr. Andras Nagy

While many Canadians currently struggle with obesity, their problems are compounded by the increased risk of other health concerns, including Type 2 diabetes. However, new research by Dr. Andras Nagy, a Senior Investigator at the Lunenfeld, has led to an important new clue that could potentially prevent Type 2 diabetes in obese patients. Dr. Nagy and his team have discovered that a certain protein, called VEGF, can improve blood flow and insulin production within

A research breakthrough that would allow my body to even temporarily produce and regulate insulin would be

a dream come true.

DEBBI ROSS, LONG-TIME PATIENT OF MOUNT SINAI CLINICIAN-SCIENTIST DR. BERNARD ZINMAN, C .M. DEBBI WAS DIAGNOSED WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AT 22 MONTHS OF AGE.

the fat tissue of obese patients. By using VEGF, they found that the development of Type 2 diabetes could be prevented — and even reversed — in patients exhibiting early signs of the disease.

Changing Treatment, Changing Lives

STAYING HEALTHY WITH DIABETES

Staying healthy with diabetes may seem like a tall order, but following a few simple steps can go a long way in helping prevent complications and keeping your health on track.

Adopt a healthy diet

Choosing foods that work for you is important to maintaining a long-lasting healthy lifestyle. Try to focus on:

“This work has changed the way we are thinking about how obesity affects our metabolism,” says Dr. Nagy. “In fact, this study opens up a new way of looking at treatment and therapy for obese patients who are at increased risk for diabetes,” he adds.

• Healthy carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains. • Fibre-rich foods such as beans, unprocessed grains and nuts. • Good fats such as avocados, olive oil, walnuts and pecans.

Pay attention to your feet

A Portable Insulin Factory

Drs. Daniel Drucker and Bernard Zinman, C.M.

In a small, five-millimetre area on a square gel foam that resembles soft Styrofoam packaging material, millions of insulin-producing cells — called islets — are grown and harvested by Dr. Ian Rogers’ team at the Lunenfeld. By stimulating and manipulating these cells, they will ultimately perform the powerhouse blood-sugar-regulating function of a pancreas. It’s not quite growing a pancreas in a Petri dish, but it’s perhaps as close as one could get. These lab-grown islets are packaged in a medium about the size of a lima bean that could — one day — be inserted under the skin of Type 1 diabetes patients to help regulate blood sugar levels.

8 T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S

In 1987, clinician-scientist Dr. Daniel Drucker — a pioneer in diabetes research — revealed a groundbreaking discovery by pinpointing the action of a digestive hormone that regulates the production of insulin. Today, this work has led to two new medications that are the first to not only control blood sugar, but also help discourage overeating.

Dr. Ian Rogers

This bold breakthrough has the potential to transform the health and quality of life of people living with Type 1 diabetes. “With the first generation of this therapy, we expect patients will still have to do some monitoring of their blood sugar and take some insulin injections, but it should

reduce or even eliminate the need for both eventually,” says Dr. Rogers. “More importantly, it should help regulate the spikes in blood sugar and reduce the associated complications,” he adds. Dr. Rogers expects his research will be ready for clinical trials within five years.

The impact on patients? “These drugs lower blood sugar when it is high, but the moment it comes back to normal, they stop working,” says Dr. Drucker. “That means no more hypoglycemia — the number one side effect of traditional diabetes medications — and no more constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and dosage adjustments. It would change everything for patients with diabetes if they no longer had to worry about hypoglycemia.”

Dr. Andras Nagy is a Senior Investigator at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and Dr. Ian Rogers is an Associate Scientist at the Lunenfeld. Drs. Daniel Drucker and Bernard Zinman, C.M., are clinician-scientists at Mount Sinai Hospital and are both Senior Investigators at the Lunenfeld. Dr. Bernard Zinman is also the Director of the Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes and the Sam and Judy Pencer and Family Chair in Diabetes Research.

Foot care is very important with diabetes, as reduced blood flow to your feet can leave you vulnerable to infection. • Wash and dry your feet carefully every day. • Examine your feet daily for changes or recurring sores. • Always wear proper footwear and socks to avoid blisters or other damage to your feet.

Maintain proper dental care

Diabetes may leave you susceptible to tooth and gum decay. Schedule yearly dental appointments and consult your dentist if you notice any gum bleeding or swelling, as these may be early warning signs that extra care is needed.

“One of the best ways to manage diabetes is through an active and healthy lifestyle. Paying attention to your body and adopting healthy options that work for you will help a lot; even small changes can have a significant impact.” — D R . DAV I D W. TA N N E N B A U M , FA M I LY P H Y S I C I A N - I N - C H I E F

T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 9 AT M O U N T S I N A I H O S P I TA L


R ECO N ST R U C T I V E S U R G E R Y

S ET T I N G C L I N I C A L STA N DA R D S FO R O N TA R I O H O S P I TA L S

Tackling the Most Complex Cases

Mount Sinai Hospital is known for delivering the best medicine. Innovative programs like the ones below continue to set the clinical standard and set Mount Sinai apart.

Colorectal Surgical Outcomes a Model for Ontario Hospitals Dr. Robin McLeod

Dr. David Backstein

The ambition to make a prosthetic joint function like a normal joint is what drives orthopaedic surgeon Dr. David Backstein, an international leader in the area of knee and hip reconstruction. Dr. Backstein leads a team of arthroplasty surgeons at Mount Sinai Hospital that sees the most complex cases in Ontario. The most challenging surgical cases that Dr. Backstein performs are revisions. These are patients who have already undergone a knee or hip replacement, but need to have the prosthetic replaced due to complications such as infection, bone loss or the age of the prosthetic. The surgery is very complex because bone, tendons and ligaments are often damaged or were removed in the original surgery. Thirty-five per cent of the 600 hip and knee replacements performed at Mount Sinai every year are revisions — more than any other hospital in Ontario.

35%

of the 600 hip and knee replacements performed at Mount Sinai every year are revisions — more than any other hospital in Ontario.

With an ageing population and an increased expectation from patients of a quality of life that is associated with younger patients, the need for prosthetic knees and hips has risen. To address the increased demand, Dr. Backstein has promoted a model of care that allows for more efficient use of operative time, more rapid mobilization and discharge of patients, as well as utilization of an advanced practice physiotherapist who works with patients leading up to and following surgery. As a result of Dr. Backstein’s innovative approach, the department was recognized by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care for the lowest wait times for knee replacements in Ontario. 1 0 T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S

We focus our efforts on improving the lives of

our patients

— whether inside the Hospital by decreasing wait times for surgery,

Patients undergoing colorectal surgery are highly susceptible to post-surgical complications. Dr. Robin McLeod’s team is being recognized for cutting these risks in half — and other hospitals are following suit. Dr. McLeod, a surgeon at Mount Sinai Hospital, is Chair of the team responsible for developing important new guidelines that enhance recovery of patients following colorectal surgery. These new standards of care look at ways to reduce complications, improve communication and collaboration among the multi-disciplinary health-care teams, utilize the best available evidence to improve patient outcomes, and help

patients recover faster and leave the hospital sooner. As a result of their exceptional work, the team recently received a prestigious grant from the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario, and their protocols are now considered best practices and are being implemented in 12 hospitals across Ontario.

Dr. Robin McLeod is the Head of the Division of General Surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital and holds the Angelo and Alfredo DeGasperis Families Chair in Colorectal Cancer and IBD Research.

or in their daily lives by giving them their

freedom back. Our patients are top of mind at all times.

Dr. Backstein, who was born at Mount Sinai, knew early on in his training that Mount Sinai would be the ideal place for him. “Mount Sinai has established itself internationally as one of the best in this area of care,” he says. “No hospital has a better reputation.” Dr. Backstein was mentored by Dr. Allan Gross, who performed Canada’s first fresh tissue knee transplant at Mount Sinai in 1972. Five years later, his team performed Canada’s first hip joint replacement. Today, Mount Sinai is Canada’s referral centre for complex cases and — with Dr. Backstein at the helm — is considered a power hub of world-renowned experts in the field.

Dr. David Backstein is the Head of the Division of Orthopaedic Surgery at Mount Sinai Hospital and the Medical Lead & Chair for the Centre for Musculoskeletal Disease at the Hospital. He is also Associate Professor at the University of Toronto. Dr. Allan Gross is an orthopaedic surgeon at Mount Sinai. He is also a professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Toronto and holds the Bernard I. Ghert Family Foundation Chair in Orthopaedics.

Raising the Bar on the Fight against Antibiotic Resistance We live in a time (and place) where most people assume that if they acquire a common infection, they can receive antibiotics and be cured. However, the rise of antibiotic resistance has made this practice far less straightforward and even life-threatening for those whose infections no longer respond to standard antimicrobial treatment.

Dr. Andrew Morris

Mount Sinai Hospital’s Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, led by Dr. Andrew Morris, is tackling this important issue head on. Since 2009, the Program has successfully engaged physicians, pharmacists and support staff to ensure that patients receive appropriate microbial therapy. This Program has reduced the number of antibiotic-resistant infections, decreased the number of antimicrobial prescriptions by 15 per cent and reduced the cost of these drugs by 30 per cent. The prestigious medical journal, Critical Care, is recommending a new approach to treating drug-resistant bacteria, and is citing Mount Sinai’s successful Program as a best practice. The Program has also been recognized by the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario and is being implemented in hospitals across the province.

Dr. Andrew Morris is an Infectious Disease Specialist at Mount Sinai and is the Director of the Mount Sinai Hospital –University Health Network Antimicrobial Stewardship Program.

T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 11


I N F L A M M ATO R Y B OW E L D I S EA S E

Improving Patients’ Lives

Thank you!

When she was 14 years old, Karoline Fiedler was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis — a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Five years later and just about to start university, her disease progressed significantly and suddenly flared out-of-control. She was admitted to Mount Sinai Hospital and, during a six-week stay, Karoline and her physicians considered surgery to remove the diseased bowel.

Thanks to you, we raised over $1 million to support Mount Sinai Hospital’s highest priority needs. Your support has helped us purchase Panda® Warmers to keep our tiniest patients warm, change the future for patients living with diabetes by developing innovative new treatments, and respond to the critical needs of our patients in our Emergency Department. Your generosity makes us extraordinary.

While on the ward, she met others with IBD for the first time. In fact, her roommate was the same age (both celebrated their 19th birthdays while in the Hospital together) and had just completed the same surgery Karoline would eventually require. According to Karoline, one of her best decisions was joining the IBD support group at Mount Sinai. “The IBD support group is tremendous. It’s an amazing opportunity for education and peer support. It was such a relief to talk with others who shared the same experiences and also very encouraging to see and hear how people were coping and flourishing in daily life. It really helped me make the decision to move forward with the surgery, and I’m so glad I did.”

my disease would flare, when I would need the next washroom or what medications I’d be on at any given point. I couldn’t make plans for school, travel or employment since I never knew how I’d be feeling next week, month or year. Since my surgery, I’ve experienced entirely new possibilities; I work hard and I can plan ahead for travel, dinners or time with friends and family.”

For Karoline, the support and care she has received at Mount Sinai has been life-changing. “The biggest challenge of IBD has always been its unpredictability: I never knew when

Karoline is now part of the steering committee of Mount Sinai’s IBD support group and offers peer support to other IBD patients through the buddy program. “Mount Sinai has become

Dr. Mark Silverberg is a gastroenterologist and researcher at Mount Sinai and hopes to develop a simple blood test that can predict which IBD patients are at risk for severe disease and which therapies will be most beneficial for specific patients. Dr. Mark Silverberg This is personalized medicine at its best, where treatment is tailored to each individual’s unique genetic makeup and personal experience of IBD. Dr. Silverberg holds the Gale and Graham Wright Research Chair in Digestive Diseases.

B R I G H T E RTO G E T H E R.C A

a second home,” Karoline says. “I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. Even when I’m feeling lousy, I’m glad to be here.”

Since my surgery, I’ve experienced

new possibilities; I work hard and I can plan ahead for travel, dinners or time with friends and family. entirely

Changing Patients’ Futures: A Power Hub for IBD Research

1 2 T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S

We shine even brighter together.

Karoline Fiedler (right) shares her experiences with ulcerative colitis, and her mother, Cindy Fiedler, speaks from a parent’s perspective, through Mount Sinai’s IBD support group.

Dr. Ken Croitoru, Mount Sinai clinician-scientist, together with Dr. Dana Philpott from the Department of Immunology at the University of Toronto, will open Canada’s largest translational and clinical research unit dedicated to investigating the Dr. Ken Croitoru critical role that micro-organisms play in IBD. The new unit will allow for the integration of clinical care and research all under one roof, offering state-of-the-art technology and evidence-based care to thousands of IBD patients visiting Mount Sinai each year.

Your future is our commitment At the Centre for Fertility & Reproductive Health, we are dedicated to offering the very best in fertility care while maintaining your overall health and wellbeing. Our hospital-based team includes leading fertility doctors whose patient-centred approach has led to one of highest pregnancy success rates in Canada. Our state-of-the-art facility includes an onsite embryology lab which offers the most advanced treatments and technology resulting in the best care for all of our patients. When you are ready to begin exploring fertility treatment options, please contact us to book your initial consultation. Mount Sinai Centre for Fertility & Reproductive Health 250 Dundas Street West, 7th Floor, Toronto, Ontario t 416-586-4748 www.mtsinaicfrh.com Mount Sinai Hospital is a patient care, teaching and research centre affiliated with University of Toronto.

T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 13


SINAI ON THE SCENE

NEWS

The Culinary Event of the Year!

Eat Drink Give is a Sweet Success Moms for Sinai, a division of the Mount Sinai Hospital Auxiliary, transformed The Uptown Loft on Yonge Street into a candy themed experience for the second annual Eat Drink Give. More than 250 guests attended the sold-out event, which featured special guest host Dylan Lauren, candy queen and daughter of legendary fashion icon Ralph Lauren. The evening raised an incredible $108,000 — three times the amount raised in its inaugural year — to support the purchase of a GE Healthcare Giraffe Incubator, as well as other critical needs within the Hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit and David & Stacey Cynamon Mother & Baby Unit.

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2 Winning chef Lynn Crawford and guest host chef Guy Fieri

Mount Sinai Brings its Expertise to the 905

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Canada’s hottest all-star line up of Food Network celebrity chefs joined Guy Fieri on Saturday, December 1, 2012 for the third annual Chef’s Challenge®: The Ultimate Battle for a Cure. Mount Sinai Hospital’s Auxiliary put on the event for the nearly 450 fundraisers and foodies who packed The Fairmont Royal York for a culinary mêlée unlike any other. The event raised $775,000 in support of breast and ovarian cancer research and education at Mount Sinai’s Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and Marvelle Koffler Breast Centre at the Hospital.

Mount Sinai’s Sherman Health and Wellness Centre is now open in Vaughan! The Centre, located at the Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Jewish Community Campus, offers a variety of health-care services — including family medicine and an array of wellness services — all in a beautiful and convenient facility. The Sherman Centre is an extension of Mount Sinai’s commitment to delivering top-notch patient and family-centred care in a growing and thriving community.

Family Fun at the Classic South

1. Chef’s Challenge® host Guy Fieri with Lynn Crawford’s winning team. 2. Betty DeVita, President of MasterCard® Canada (Chef’s Challenge® sponsor) and Joseph Mapa, President and CEO of Mount Sinai Hospital. 3. Chef Michael Smith with participant Chris Geady at this year’s Chef’s Challenge®: The Ultimate Battle for a Cure. 4. The Classic South Golf Tournament’s winning team (from left): Beth Porzio, John Porzio Sr., Steve Pustil and John Porzio Jr.

HAVING A BABY AT MOUNT SINAI?

5. Golfers taking a swing and enjoying the day at this year’s Classic South Golf Tournament in Florida. 6. Third-place winners at this year’s Classic South (from left): Jay Hennick (Chair of Mount Sinai Hospital), Steven Hershenhorn, Steve Miller (Co-Chair of the Classic South) and Russel Tanz.

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7. A sweet night at Eat Drink Give (from left): Alana Konopny*, Lauren Kimel-Wise*, Jennifer Konopny†, Jennifer Elmaleh†, Dylan Lauren (special guest host), Jennifer Brodlieb†, Kailee Mecklinger†, Eryn Green* and Stefanie Rakowski* * Event Co-Chair; † Moms for Sinai Co-Chair

8. Global Toronto’s Carolyn Mackenzie (left) with Dylan Lauren, Founder & CEO of Dylan’s Candy Bar and special guest host of Eat Drink Give.

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Spending a sunny day playing golf in beautiful Florida has become the philanthropic event of the holiday season! Co-Chaired by Richard Levinsky and Steve Miller, the second annual Classic South Golf Tournament grossed over $125,000 for life-saving research at Mount Sinai’s Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute. It was a day of sunshine, family and friendly competition for all who attended. Torontonians vacationing in Florida never need be far away from their Mount Sinai community, and we are so grateful for that!

In an effort to improve the patient experience, women who are in labour or have a scheduled birth can now bypass the Admitting Department on the main floor and check in around the clock with Admitting on the seventh floor in the Labour & Delivery Unit, where they can be fully admitted and have any questions answered. This will allow for a faster, smoother process and help to improve your stay at Mount Sinai. T H E B E ST M E D I C I N E M ATT E R S 15


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We’re celebrating our second anniversary, and your generosity has helped us raise more than $180,000! Every day more than 5,000 physicians, nurses, support staff and volunteers work tirelessly to ensure that Mount Sinai Hospital provides the best patient care. A Grateful Hearts donation is the best way to say thank you to someone who has played a meaningful role in your care.

To find out how you can make a Grateful Hearts donation, please visit gratefulhearts.ca or call 416-586-8203. DM12 I

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