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Mount Mercy MAGAZINE

MOUNT MERCY UNIVERSIT Y | JANUARY 2017

MAGAZINE.MTMERCY.EDU


PRESIDENT’S LETTER

Ready for the future, remembering our past If we have met in person, you’ve heard me cheering the successes

students to meet the needs of our time, we are confident they

of our wonderful alumni. There is so much, and so many people,

will be ready for what’s next. We have big plans for the future of

to be proud of on the Hill.

nursing on the Hill.

Recently I visited Pam (Schmitz) Delagardelle ’84, president and

For this edition of the Mount Mercy Magazine, we could have chosen

CEO of UnityPoint Health—Waterloo. She shared part of the story

stories from thousands of alumni to highlight our world-class nursing

of her journey and told me that what she learned at Mount Mercy

program. What we offer here is a glimpse at the success of our

allowed her to lead and teach, guiding her into a life of relevant and

graduates, not the whole picture. With our dual goals of academic

practical service to others.

excellence and compassionate service, our alumni are improving

I’ve also heard from nurses on campus who have taken extraordinary journeys to share works of Mercy—such as Professor Anne Hartman, a member of our nursing faculty who regularly traveled to Nigeria; now leading local efforts to send medical supplies to staff still in the field. Anne and many others share their passion for international service with our students. We enjoy reflecting on our history of health care excellence, from the

health care’s future every day. On the Hill, our name is Mercy and our spirit is compassion, and there are few career fields in which this fact is more evident than nursing. If you are a nurse, thank you for making life better for others. We are so proud of you and cannot wait to share where Mount Mercy will take nursing next. Gratefully,

leading of our nursing program by Sister James Marie Donahue, through today as it continues to grow and expand under the superb guidance of Dr. Mary Tarbox. We are squarely focused on the future—assuring Mount Mercy remains at the forefront of nursing

LAURIE M. HAMEN

education for the next generation. There is no way to know what

President

nursing will look like in 10, 20 or 30 years, but by empowering


Contents Q|A

ADV

MOUNT MERCY: WHERE LEADERS LEARN | PAGE 2

HIST

ADVOCACY AS PREVENTION | PAGE 10

MOUNT MERCY NURSING: READY FOR TOMORROW | PAGE 14

AN AMAZING JOURNEY FROM AFRICA TO AMERICA............................................................................ PAGE 06

READ IT ONLINE!

LIGHTING A FIRE: FROM THE HILL TO THE CLASSROOM WITH A LOVE FOR LEARNING...................... PAGE 07

MAGAZINE.MTMERCY.EDU

BEATING THE ODDS................................................................................................................................ PAGE 12 FINDING THE FIX: HOW ONE SISTER IS SAVING LIVES BY LISTENING................................................. PAGE 13 WE SERVE EVERYONE............................................................................................................................. PAGE 18 STUDENT SERVICE IN CHINA LEADS TO BIG QUESTIONS, BIGGER ANSWERS.................................. PAGE 19

Get all of your favorite stories in their entirety on the web. With the online magazine, you can take us everywhere life takes you.

ANSWERING THE WHY OF NURSING...................................................................................................... PAGE 20 ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME CLASS OF 2016................................................................................ PAGE 24 SPRING SPORTS RECAP.......................................................................................................... PAGE 27 SPRING SPORTS HONORS & AWARDS..................................................................................... PAGE 28 SPRING ACADEMIC HONORS & AWARDS................................................................................ PAGE 29

MMU CLASS NOTES | PAGE 22

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JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 1


Q|A

PAM DELAGARDELLE ’84 PRESIDENT & CEO UnityPoint Health—Waterloo Waterloo, IA

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY? A | I was drawn to Mount Mercy because its nursing program had

Mount Mercy: WHERE LEADERS LEARN

Mount Mercy University’s combination of excellent academics, with a focus on compassionate service, produces graduates who hit the ground running in whatever field they desire. Each graduate’s success is a badge of honor for us and we are grateful to each and every one of them for all they do to make the world a better place. 2 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

an excellent reputation. And because I had 12 years in Catholic education, I really wanted to continue my education at a Catholic college. My mother was also a Mercy nurse. I wanted to follow in her footsteps, and to earn my bachelor’s degree in nursing.

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | As students, we studied constantly. We only had one phone in the hallway, no television, no refrigerators and no computers. The friendships we made were priceless. On Wednesday nights, we’d walk down to the Tic Toc restaurant for tenderloins, onion rings, beverages and good fun. We also had the Freaker’s Ball around Halloween, where everyone dressed in costume, including the faculty. It was something to look forward to all year.

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF? A | I’m proud of seeing the people I’ve mentored become successful in their careers. The things I’m most proud of are those accomplished as part of a team. I helped build a Catholic church in Grundy County that attracted new members and united several communities. It’s rare, and satisfying, when you can say you were part of a team that accomplished something like that.

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER? A | In a good leader, I want someone with integrity, a positive attitude, high energy and who is a good team player. It is important that leaders are coachable, have a good work ethic and high information processing.


MIKE MYERS ’83 CEO

BETH HOULAHAN ’77 SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, CHIEF NURSING EXECUTIVE

Veterans Memorial Hospital

University of Wisconsin Hospitals & Clinics

Waukon, IA

Madison, WI

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY?

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY?

A | After attending Kirkwood Community College to complete

A | I grew up in Cedar Rapids; I actually went to another college

prerequisites, I transferred to Mount Mercy. The smaller classes were more conducive to how I learned, and I liked the campus

for a year and then found out that they were just starting their nursing program. As a result, I would have had to attend for five years. I started looking back in Cedar Rapids and Iowa City, and I decided that I wanted to attend college in a more intimate setting. Mount Mercy had a great setting, and was very

and instructors.

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | I enjoyed intramural flag football and volunteering at homeless shelters. I do remember instructors who would say something profound. One teacher told me a physician is a copilot telling you when to get to a destination, and the nurse

welcoming to me, so I spent the next three years there.

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | I met a couple of life-long friends at Mount Mercy, one of

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF?

whom I still see at least twice a year. However, I believe that the focus on the profession of nursing and the pride it brings is what stands out the most to me. I felt that the emphasis that the Sisters placed on giving back to the community has

A | I won a Professional Achievement Award from Mount

affected me throughout my career.

is the pilot telling you how to get there. That stuck in my mind.

Mercy and the Person of the Year from the Waukon Chamber of Commerce for advocating for the passing of a bond vote necessary to fund a wellness center and to improve the local school and the community college’s satellite center. I also sit on boards for Allamakee County and the Iowa Hospital Association. Our hospital has been recognized by a national patient satisfaction firm for being in the 95th percentile. I’m proud of getting them recognized at both the local and the national level, because it gives the organization the validation it deserves.

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER?

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF? A | I think what first comes to mind is when patients would tell me that our time together really made a difference in their lives. I don’t believe that there’s any greater reward than hearing that. In my capacity as a formal leader, I’ve had the privilege of mentoring many individuals. To effectuate an individual’s growth and development and prepare them for new opportunities is a tremendous honor and one of my most treasured accomplishments.

A | Above all else, a good leader must have good people

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER?

skills. If you’re not a good people-person, you will struggle in a leadership position. You also need good communication skills. Ask, don’t tell—if you don’t ask questions, you can’t make good decisions. I also believe critical thinking and being able to see the big picture are extremely important. A good leader must think several moves ahead, and to do that, it helps to have

A | First and foremost, I believe that being trustworthy is the

an open mind.

most important trait of a good leader. Of course, one also needs the ability to work well in a team and good communication skills. I also feel that self-reflection and the ability to be able to express a certain amount of vulnerability and humility are also important. You need to be transparent and open to feedback.

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 3


BARB BARHAMAND ’77 TERESA COLGAN ’85 VICE PRESIDENT OF NURSING

ONCOLOGY CLINICAL NURSE SPECIALIST/PRACTICE MANAGER

Great River Medical Center

Hematology–Oncology Consultants, Ltd.

Burlington, IA

Naperville, IL

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY?

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY?

A | I grew up in Grand View, Iowa and attended a small high

A | I was attracted by the BSN program, which was new at that

school. I didn’t want to attend a large college, so I looked for small, private colleges to attend. When I visited Mount Mercy with my mother, I felt that it was just the right place. People were very kind. I grew up Catholic, and that was a very important part of my life as well. I was also drawn to the sense of community that was there.

time—both in nursing and at Mount Mercy. The opportunity to study with cadavers also fascinated me. I was from a small town

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | I was involved in the Student Nursing Association and attended a few conferences. I was also involved in the pep band on campus, playing trumpet. I worked as an RA in the dorms. My most memorable classes were anatomy and physiology, and I was fascinated by working in the cadaver lab. I also participated in spiritual retreats that were offered.

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF? A | Personally, I’d rather stay behind the scenes. I am most proud when our organization and our staff do well, whether it’s a global award or just having a positive impact on a patient or family. I did receive a Top 100 Nurse Award. I was nominated by our nurse leaders. That was a nice recognition. The proudest moment of my career was when we moved to the new hospital—that was an amazing day. That was in April of 2000. It was the result of immense planning, and it all came together almost perfectly.

and the University of Iowa seemed too big and impersonal for me.

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | The moments that stand out to me were my sophomore year capping ceremony, and, in my senior year, the invitation to cap three sophomore students myself. Lastly, our senior year pinning ceremony was memorable.

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF? A | I wrote a journal article that led to opportunities to serve on pharmaceutical nursing boards, speaking at conferences around the country, and I spearheaded the development of a local chapter for the National Oncology Nursing Society (ONS). I received the Excellence in Oncology Nursing Private Practice Award from the ONS, was named an Outstanding Woman Leader in Health Care by the State of Illinois, and received the Professional Achievement Award from Mount Mercy. The proudest moment in my career, however, would be when we opened our newest cancer treatment clinic, because it was my design and my vision.

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER?

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER?

A | I think that being confident, articulate and having the ability

A | I believe that what makes a good leader are people who

to reflect your thoughts and ideas in a positive and constructive way rather than a negative manner are the characteristics of a good leader.

have good values, first of all, because that drives good decision making. As a leader, you also need effective communication skills, high energy and resilience, because not every day is going to be perfect. I also feel that as a leader, you need to develop a solid knowledge base in whatever your specialty may be.

4 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017


HEATHER (ZIMMERMAN) RIES ’02

PENNY GLANZ ’88

CHIEF NURSING OFFICER

VICE PRESIDENT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICES

Regional Medical Center

Mercy Medical Center

Manchester, IA

Cedar Rapids, IA

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY?

Q | HOW DID YOU COME TO STUDY AT MOUNT MERCY?

A | In high school, I went on 13 or 14 college visits to several

A | I wasn’t a traditional student when I came to Mount Mercy. I

area four-year colleges. I knew I wanted my BSN and I wanted the on-campus college experience. I visited Mount Mercy four or five times at different points of the year, which allowed me to really see myself attending. It also helped that I received a substantial academic scholarship, making the tuition as affordable as state schools.

was already working at Mercy Hospital, so it seemed as if it would be a good fit for me there. I realized that more opportunities would open up for me if I received my bachelor’s degree.

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | I have a few moments that stand out. I helped take care of the elderly sisters at the Sisters of Mercy Infirmary, and those ladies are a hoot. I remember lining up outside of the Registrar’s Office in the early morning hours to sign up for classes and praying that my preferred classes weren’t full. I spent quite a long time during my sophomore year in the anatomy lab and became comfortable with death, the inner workings of the human body and the smell of formaldehyde.

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF?

Q | DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE MEMORY FROM YOUR TIME ON THE HILL? A | As a non-traditional student, I spent most of my time studying and working, so I don’t quite have many memories of spending my time there other than attending classes.

Q | WHAT CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OR MOMENTS ARE YOU PARTICULARLY PROUD OF? A | My biggest accomplishment occurred when I took over the cancer center. We were not accredited through the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer. It took a lot of preparation and a lot of work to get us ready for that. At our last accreditation, we received the Outstanding Achievement Award, which is an honor that only a few hospitals in the world receive. I also received Iowa’s Best 100 Nurses Award.

A | In college, I was inducted into the Sigma Theta Tau Nursing

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER?

Society and received the Sister Mary Edward Award. Receiving my master’s degree was a very proud moment for me. At Regional Medical Center, I assisted in nominating a deserving nurse for the Iowa Hospital Association’s Hospital Hero Award, which she won, turning a terribly tragic situation into one of connection, honor and recognition for the involved family and nurse.

A | I look for people who are the opposite of me. What I mean is

I am also proud of the CNO position I hold today. I work in the facility that I was born in. Working in the community where I grew up and now where I raise my kids, I feel that I am paying back the community that was good to me as I grew up.

you have to know yourself and hire staff whose strengths match your weaknesses. Remember that you can’t do everything by yourself. It’s also important to have a passion for your work, because if you can’t love what you’re going to do, you can’t do your best work. Communication is important, because as a leader, you will have people that report to you and not everyone communicates in the same fashion. You need to be able to communicate in different ways. Finally, I believe you must always be honest, fair and kind—this will encourage respect.

Q | WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE TRAITS OF A GOOD LEADER? A | I think that a good leader is honest, humble, an effective communicator and approachable. I also believe that a skilled leader is straight forward, organized and skilled at follow-through. JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 5


AN AMAZING JOURNEY

FROM AFRICA TO AMERICA Amazing-Grace Ighedo ’16 strives to be the very best, no matter the circumstances or challenges of her life. This led her not only to the United States from Nigeria, but also to earn the coveted Minority Nurse Scholarship from Minority Nurse Magazine, and ultimately a degree from Mount Mercy University. Her hard work at Mount Mercy also earned her the Mary Frances Warde Award during last spring’s commencement; the highest honor given to a student who transferred into Mount Mercy. It is conferred each year upon the graduate who possesses a high scholastic rating, and shows leadership and loyalty in furthering the ideals of Mount Mercy. “She always had a very positive attitude,” said Dr. Mary Tarbox, professor and chair of Mount Mercy’s Department of Nursing. “She encouraged her fellow students and acted as a role model for many, especially non-traditional, working adults with families.” Amazing-Grace Ighedo ’16

A LONG ROAD TO THE HILL Ighedo knew she wanted to be a nurse since age 16, and through hard work and personal conviction, she found a way to live that dream. “I thought I didn’t have the brains for it,” she explained, “so I studied French instead.” An unfortunate catalyst for change came in the form of a car accident. As Ighedo recovered at a medical facility in her home country of Nigeria, she experienced great love and care from the nursing staff. “The nurses there took such good care of me,” Ighedo said. “I thought, ‘I wish I could be a nurse. I wish I could help people like this.’” Though she continued her studies as a French major, she felt somewhat unsatisfied and uninspired. She knew that there was something more she wanted to accomplish—something more than graduating only to work for Nigerian oil and gas companies.

6 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

In 2009, Ighedo traveled to the United States to join her husband, Andrew, who encouraged her to follow her dreams, telling her that in this country she could become anything she wanted to be. This was her chance to finally pursue her passion. While a student at Mount Mercy, Ighedo maintained a 4.0 grade point average, earning a spot on the Dean’s List each semester. This, combined with the scholarship and Warde Award, added up to an illustrious career on the Hill. Ighedo now works in the cardiac care unit at UnityPoint Health, St. Luke’s Hospital, in Cedar Rapids. In her scant free time between work and raising a family, she also volunteers for her church and the free community clinic. She said she believes if you have a goal, you should run after it no matter where it takes you or the obstacles you face along the way. Keep pushing, keep striving, and you will eventually get where you need to be. Amazing.


Lighting a

FIRE FROM THE HILL TO THE CLASSROOM WITH A LOVE FOR LEARNING

Whether it’s coaching doctoral students on how to critically appraise research findings, teaching middle school students about the vast profession of nursing, working in Kentucky’s Appalachian Mountains or understanding how to best teach a student as an individual, Mount Mercy University’s nursing alumni took the skills they gained during their time on the Hill and used them to make the world a better place. The university develops passionate learners and equips them to succeed in whatever career they choose. Often, careers take a turn down an unexpected path, but Mount Mercy alumni share two essential characteristics: academic excellence and compassion. We’ve asked four nursing alumni to share their stories of moving from clinical practice to academia, and what we learned only reinforced what we were sure we already knew— Mount Mercy nurses are always prepared for the future.

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 7


DR. ELIZABETH SCHLENK ’75 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Dr. Elizabeth Schlenk ’75 found a passion for teaching when she was in clinical practice. Now an associate professor of nursing at the University of Pittsburgh, Schlenk teaches graduate courses in nursing research and mentors doctoral students in the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP), and Ph.D. programs. “It is rewarding to share one’s knowledge and skills with eager students who want to improve patient and population health outcomes,” she said. “Teaching students how to critically appraise research and apply evidence in nursing practice is an important component in the nursing curriculum.” Schlenk is involved in research related to adherence to chronic disorder regimens with a particular focus on adherence to physical activity regimens. She credits Mount Mercy with providing her an excellent liberal arts education and the critical thinking and leadership skills that have proven crucial in faculty life.

“It is rewarding to share one’s knowledge and skills with eager students.” — DR. ELIZABETH SCHLENK ’75

“When I was a student, Sister James Marie Donahue was chair of the Department of Nursing,” she said. “Her leadership was instrumental in developing a strong baccalaureate program that prepared me well for professional nursing practice and graduate school later.” The wide range of education and exposure to different subjects and teaching styles left its mark on Schlenk. “I learned the importance of effective teaching and good mentorship while at Mount Mercy, and I use those strategies with my own students and advisees today.”

DR. DOREEN MINGO ’95 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR & COORDINATOR OF THE OFFICE OF DIVERSITY SERVICES Allen College Waterloo, Iowa

“I try to share my experiences with on-campus groups that have been historically underrepresented.” — DR. DOREEN MINGO ’95

8 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

As associate professor and coordinator of the office of diversity services for Allen College in Waterloo, Iowa, Dr. Doreen Mingo ’95 takes great pride in being the force that reaches out to students to ensure their success. “I love being around college students,” she said. “I try to share my experiences with on-campus groups that have been historically underrepresented, which include both males and minorities. I try to be the one who keeps them motivated and engaged, and prevents them from feeling isolated, the one who assists them in building relationships with peers.” Much of her job involves expanding Allen’s pipeline programs aimed at bringing more students to nursing and other health care careers and program development. Mingo has a special fondness for teaching middle and high-school aged students about the extraordinary world of nursing and helping them see themselves as future nurses. “So often we find that kids don’t have a realistic idea of what nurses do,” she said. “They see the role as a more subservient one, rather than autonomous and independent, so they don’t tend to choose nursing.” To combat this perception, Mingo was instrumental in creating programs that encourage these students to explore nursing as a profession. Her favorite is an intensive summer nurse camp, where high school students spend six weeks learning about the profession. In five years since the program began, over 200 students have graduated and the program bolsters an impressive 94 percent retention rate. “In my profession of teaching undergraduate and graduate nursing students and encouraging young people to be future nurses, I feel like I am where God intended me to be, doing what I’m called to do,” she said.


JEAN GRAHAM ’80 DIRECTOR OF NURSING & ALLIED HEALTH PROGRAMS Faulkner State Community College Foley, Alabama

“Nursing students are choosing a field that gives them so many opportunities.” — JEAN GRAHAM ’80

As director of nursing and allied health programs for Faulkner State Community College at campuses in Fairhope and Bay Minette, Alabama, Jean Graham ’80 isn’t afraid of a challenge. She discovered shortly after graduation that her road would be one less traveled. After a short stint at the University of Minnesota Hospital, Graham moved into mission work. She spent two years working in a hospital in Kentucky’s Appalachian Mountains. “It was probably the best two years of my life,” she said. “The Southeast Appalachian is coal mining country, so it’s a totally different environment.” Leaning on what she learned in Kentucky, Graham spent nine years working in an operating room before moving to pediatrics. She went on to launch a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center at the University of South Alabama before finally landing at Faulkner State in 2000. Graham has since launched the school’s surgical technology, practical nursing Associates Degree, EMT/paramedic and veterinary technology programs. The drive for excellence and passion for service taught at Mount Mercy is reflected in Graham’s career. One constant has been her willingness to meet people where they are and provide them the services they need—whether in the classroom, operating room or exam room. “Nursing students are choosing a field that gives them so many opportunities. It is just a great field to go into because there are so many different avenues and roads they can follow.”

DR. SUSAN O’CONNER-VON ’76 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, NURSING University of Minnesota School of Nursing Minneapolis, Minnesota

Dr. Susan O’Conner-Von ’76 always knew she wanted to be a teacher. Inspired by an Irish-Catholic mother who taught in a one-room school house, O’Conner-Von learned at an early age to value education and to respect each person’s learning process. The lessons of compassion she learned as a child carried through to her studies at Mount Mercy, but that only became apparent to her after she graduated and began teaching. “One thing I learned very well at Mount Mercy was to view each patient holistically, not to consider them only in terms of their disease or condition,” she said. In practice, O’Conner-Von found a love for teaching patients and families, which led her to mentor students and new nurses. After a manager suggested teaching, O’Conner-Von began her journey to become a nurse educator.

“I learned…to view each patient holistically, not to consider them only in terms of their disease or condition.” — DR. SUSAN O’CONNER-VON ’76

Today, as associate professor of nursing at the University of Minnesota, O’Conner-Von often reflects on what she learned at Mount Mercy and relies heavily on lessons from her mother. “Her advice was always simple,” O’Conner-Von said. “It was ‘role model the love of learning,’ no matter what subject you’re teaching. Always show enthusiasm for the subject and how it is relevant to each learner’s life.”

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 9


Advocacy

AS PREVENTION

ADV

Nurse advocates fill vital roles in their communities—serving the public from the front of the courtroom, a seat at the board table, or the lobby of the state house.

MMU NURSING AT THE STATE CAPITOL “It’s easy to say you have compassion, but sometimes it’s hard to direct it and understand the impact you have.” — ANDREA WILHITE ’14

“We want students to understand the political process, how policy is developed and made, and that it can take years to finish,” Guthrie said. “We also want students to feel comfortable interacting with legislators. I think the public is often intimidated because they’re not legislators, but what I consistently tell students is ‘You’re a nurse. You know what you know, and they don’t know what you know.’” Encouraged by faculty, Andrea Wilhite ’14 was involved with the INA Legislative Day as a student and now sits on the organization’s board

At Mount Mercy University, the faculty value the importance of advocacy training. Legislative Day, an important advocacy training tool, shows students that working directly with legislators is sometimes the most effective way to advocate for their patients.

of directors as director of newly licensed RNs.

Once a year, Mount Mercy nursing students, faculty and alumni spend an afternoon at the Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines, meeting with law makers to discuss health care legislation and its impact on patients and nurses.

sometimes it’s hard to direct it and understand the impact you have.

The state-wide Iowa Nurses Association Legislative Day attracts almost 300 attendees each year. Participants spend mornings learning the importance of harnessing nursing’s political power and how to approach legislators with a simple, clear message.

experience with pride.

“Health policies and laws are made every day, and they affect the whole health care system, including nurses,” said Dr. Sharon Guthrie, assistant professor of nursing at Mount Mercy and the trip’s yearly organizer.

keep my mind open to current social issues.

Guthrie said student training in advocacy is essential and should

and now as a nurse, I understand that.”

be practiced much like other nursing skills.

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“Mount Mercy’s nursing faculty provided a solid foundation knowledge-wise, but also helped develop my compassion and respect,” Wilhite said. “It’s easy to say you have compassion, but Understanding what faculty was involved in and why they were involved helped me understand the impact I could have.” Two years into her career, Wilhite looks back at her college

“I don’t think I understood everything Mount Mercy gave me until I got out into the world,” she said. “They gave me the knowledge base that formed me into who I am as a nurse, and I continue to

“I value each individual as a person, and I don’t always see that from other people. As a student, I often heard ‘you can always spot the difference between a Mount Mercy grad and someone else,’


Andrea Wilhite ’14

Mary Rose Corrigan-Psihoyos ’85

Nancy Penner ’81

“I like to look at the needs of people, the needs of the community, and root causes of problems and issues.” — MARY ROSE CORRIGAN-PSIHOYOS ’85

SOLVING PUBLIC HEALTH NEEDS THROUGH UNDERSTANDING COMMUNITY Public Health Specialist Mary Rose Corrigan-Psihoyos ’85 works every day to address the physical, mental and environmental health concerns of Dubuque’s population. With nearly 60,000 community members, managing the city’s health department is no small task. “I like to look at the needs of people, the needs of the community, and root causes of problems and issues,” Corrigan-Psihoyos said. “Often it requires more work, but I think being fair and trying to look at the real problem also helps you understand where people are coming from, and that in turn helps you to work with them and come to a good solution.” Corrigan-Psihoyos landed in Dubuque’s health department when she was studying for boards. The city offered her a temporary, and later, full-time job related to environment health and inspections. Just four years later, she became the city’s health department supervisor and remains in the position today. “Public health has a lot of variety and, because we look at community health as a whole, a lot of what we do touches everyone,” CorriganPsihoyos said. “Whether it’s policy work or enforcement work or advocacy, it has the potential to have a big impact on the community.” Though she was integral in developing many of the city’s programs

THE LAW OF HEALTH CARE Nancy Penner ’81 takes the lessons learned in nursing school at Mount Mercy and in an early career with hospitals, and applies them to the law as an attorney for Shuttleworth & Ingersoll, P.L.C., in Cedar Rapids. Though she had a great love for her nursing work, a risk management position exposed Penner to legal issues that impact health care providers and patients. The challenge of fully understanding some of those issues, and the proximity of the University of Iowa, sent her back to school. Now, as a senior vice president in the firm, her focus is on health care legal issues, including the defense of medical malpractice lawsuits. Much of Penner’s work is focused on the areas of health law, medical malpractice and appellate litigation. Penner uses her nursing background and hospital experience regularly. On any given day, she might talk to a medical expert about allegations in a case, review a provider’s quality improvement process, or draft an argument on a topic such as informed consent. In such work, Penner finds it helpful to have experience with hospitals, medical conditions and how health care professionals work together. Though not connected on a day-to-day level with the medical field any longer, Penner’s work as a lawyer has an impact on how medical law is practiced and executed in Iowa—an invaluable service to the health care field. In addition to her work, Penner is active in the community as a way to stay connected with health care and nursing. Service is valued at Shuttleworth & Ingersoll and by Penner personally. One way Penner attempts to stay connected is to choose volunteer activities related to health care. She lends her extensive expertise to local medical and policy boards and organizations including the Continuing Care Hospital Board at St. Luke’s, the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women Executive Committee, and volunteers as an attorney for Iowa Legal Aid.

still used, her proudest moment was when her team was able to establish a federally-qualified health center, which just celebrated its 10th anniversary.

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 11


BEATING THE

ODDS

Andrew Whitters ’04

“Even when things are hard in life… you can’t be afraid of it.” — ANDREW WHITTERS ’04, ARNP, DNP

Andrew Whitters ’04 speaks from experience: “Even when things are hard in life...you can’t be afraid of it.” As a student at Mount Mercy, he received a life-threatening diagnosis of Hodgkin’s disease—a form of cancer from which he has been in remission since 2005. “I think I developed my drive, without a doubt, at Mount Mercy—it deepened while I was there,” he said. Whitters’ battle with cancer showed him he was capable of achieving anything he set his mind to, especially with a great community surrounding him. His life since Mount Mercy has proven that passion, drive and lessons learned are the keys to success in any field. His attitude, and the support he received during his time at Mount Mercy, gave him the foundation to build a fulfilling career helping others. “I remember talking with one of my professors at Mount Mercy after my diagnosis,” Whitters recounted. “I told him I didn’t want to leave… and be stuck sitting around thinking about

cancer every day. He said, ‘If you stay, I’ve got your back.’ So I decided to stay.” Whitters used the drive he developed through this experience to complete a bachelor’s degree in nursing at Mount Mercy. He then earned a master’s degree and clinical doctorate from the University of Iowa and worked in cardiovascular and vascular surgery at Mercy of Iowa City. During his time in private practice, Whitters showed a passion and skill for assisting with surgery and independently managing a surgical practice. As he studied for his nurse practitioner degree and certification, he worked extensively in the cardiac unit. After his stint in private practice, Whitters was recruited to work for the California-based medical technology firm, Endologix. He currently demonstrates new technology used to repair abdominal aneurysms in hospitals all over the country—equipping vascular surgeons to help save lives.

12 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

Whitters enjoys teaching new concepts and surgical techniques, as well as learning from the doctors and surgeons he works with. Naturally, playing a role in saving numerous lives really strikes a chord with him. While at Mount Mercy, Whitters surrounded himself with people who kept his spirits up. That long list of supporters includes his then-girlfriend, now-wife, Jennifer (Smith) Whitters ’02. Since then, the couple had two children and are thriving as a family. Other supporters who became lifelong friends include Whitters’ Mount Mercy roommate—he and Whitters were best men at each other’s weddings—as well as Jennifer’s roommate who serves as godmother to one of their sons. Through a combination of passion and drive, along with a healthy dose of friendship and family support, Whitters found his life’s calling which helped him define what really matters at the end of the day.


FINDING THE FIX: HOW ONE SISTER IS SAVING LIVES BY LISTENING

“Often, physicians don’t have the time to deal with children with problems that could be developmental and/or behavioral...” — SISTER MARGE FRIEDHOFF ’74 Sister Marge Friedhoff ’74

Independent thought, adaptability and improvisation are hallmarks of Mount Mercy nursing graduates. This is especially true of Sister Marge Friedhoff ’74, who saw a problem and fixed it, creating the CARE clinic (Constipation and Reflux Evaluation) at the Medical College of Wisconsin. The facility exclusively treats infants and children with gastrointestinal issues, often discovering and remediating problems no other pediatrician’s offices or facility has resolved.

evaluation and treatment,” Sister Marge said. “Often, physicians don’t have the time to deal with children with problems that could be developmental and/or behavioral, as opposed to physiological. And physicians may not have the time to explain things repeatedly, which some parents need to better understand the problem and its treatment.”

As a Nurse Practitioner in the CARE clinic, Sister Marge combines direct patient care with research studies that benefit her patients. Helping families and children achieve success, when other doctors and clinics have been unable to help, brings Sister Marge great joy.

Sister Marge explained how she is able to approach the health problems presented from different angles until she finds a solution that works for the children in her care. Gastrointestinal issues in children can be complex, and with assistance from her fellow medical professionals and her patients’ families, she is able to make positive changes for all involved.

“Infants and children with constipation and gastroesophageal reflux account for at least 25 percent of the patients that are referred to the Gastroenterology Department for

Mount Mercy helped reinforce early lessons of generosity in Sister Marge’s life. She spent time outside of classes providing respite care for children with special needs during the

summer and she volunteered in various nursing homes around Cedar Rapids, helping to give back to the community. She knew from a young age that she wanted to be a sister, and later, that she wanted to be a nurse. Sister Marge was encouraged to pursue a religious vocation along with a nursing degree by the Sisters of Mercy in her hometown of Elma, Iowa. She started her college career in 1969, the first year that Mount Mercy became a co-ed school and began offering a bachelor’s degree in nursing. As a novice, she lived under different restrictions than the other students at Mount Mercy, having a curfew and silence which started at 9 p.m., and ended at 7 a.m. with morning prayers. Between requirements for her vocation and not having transportation, most of her time was spent on the Hill. Sister Marge took the lessons of compassion and service she gained at Mount Mercy and as a member of the Sisters of Mercy, and applied them throughout her nursing career to care for the most vulnerable and often overlooked members of society. “My education at Mount Mercy was just the key for unlocking the dreams I had for my life. I always wanted to be a nurse and always wanted to be a sister,” Sister Marge concluded. “I’m completely satisfied being both.”

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 13


Mount Mercy READY FOR TOMORROW

HIST

“The nursing education program at Mount Mercy prepares students to be thoughtful, flexible professionals who understand learning is a lifelong process.” — DR. MARY TARBOX

Mount Mercy has always been at the cutting-edge of nursing education, and nothing could be more necessary today as we enter a time of immense change in health care. Whether that is founding one of the state’s first baccalaureate nursing degrees in 1969, providing a state-of-the-art simulation laboratory to students today, or offering advanced degrees to prepare tomorrow’s leaders in our region. And through it all, Mount Mercy remains driven by the Sisters of Mercy’s mission and deep-rooted commitment to educational excellence and compassionate service. “The nursing education program at Mount Mercy prepares students to be thoughtful, flexible professionals who understand learning is a lifelong process,” said Dr. Mary Tarbox, Chair of the Department of Nursing. “Students are active in the arts, in leadership, in sports and in community services. These activities offer excellent opportunities to enhance their current education and to set the direction for lifelong engagement, enhancing their personal and professional lives.” The effects and outcomes of this uniquely Mount Mercy style of educating not just for today, but for the future, has been recognized nationally. This summer, when naming Mount Mercy one of the top 150 colleges in the nation, Money magazine highlighted that our graduation rates

14 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

of students from financially or culturally disadvantage backgrounds is nearly 40 percent higher than the national average. Similarly, U.S. News & World Report recognized Mount Mercy as the top private college in Iowa. This recognition can be attributed to Mount Mercy’s commitment to educational excellence and the overwhelming success of our graduates, with 97 percent in a career or graduate school within nine months of graduation. “A Mercy foundation—when you think of it as being in nursing, social work and education—is a natural fit at Mount Mercy,” Tarbox said. “It gives us a foundation we can build on. When students come here, whether they’re Catholic or not, they get a Mercy education. That means there are certain obligations that come with the privilege, and certain values we hold strongly and can talk about here, as a Mercy institution.” Sister James Marie Donahue, first chair of the Mount Mercy nursing program, agrees. “I think there is a difference between what students learn at Mount Mercy, compared to other institutions,” she said. “The concept of Mercy care, carries over. It’s about taking that extra step. Not just doing what needs to be done, but going beyond that. The concept of mercy is not just about justice, but about going beyond justice in caring for patients and families, and for people in the community.”


Dr. Mary Tarbox

Nursing

Sister James Marie Donahue

“The concept of Mercy care, carries over. It’s about taking that extra step. Not just doing what needs to be done, but going beyond that.” — SR. JAMES MARIE DONAHUE

THEN AND NOW: NURSING EDUCATION AT MOUNT MERCY Contributed by

KRISTY RAINE | Mount Mercy University’s Reference Librarian and Archivist

In Cedar Rapids, the history of nursing through the Mercy tradition dates back to 1904, when seven women formed the first class of Mercy Hospital’s nursing training school. In 1933, it became affiliated with Mount Mercy and students came to campus for biology, chemistry, and sociology classes. In 1951, the Mercy Hospital program reorganized at Mount Mercy Junior College and received full accreditation. This program was led by Sister Regina Differding. Students in the School of Nursing at Mercy Hospital received credit for their Mount Mercy coursework, diplomas from the hospital school, and an Associates degree from Mount Mercy. Because Mount Mercy was to become a four-year college, the nursing major was discontinued, and the nursing program returned to Mercy Hospital in 1959. By 1968, the national climate for nursing education significantly changed, and a campus feasibility study recommended nursing as a new curriculum offering. After the Iowa Board of Nursing approved the plan in July 1968, the first, four-year cohort began their classes in September 1969. Students experienced class and resident life on campus, with Mercy Hospital as their major clinical facility. With the launch of baccalaureate studies at Mount Mercy, in 1971, the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing closed, having enrolled

900 nurses during its history. In the early 1970s, Mount Mercy’s President, Sister Mary Agnes Hennessey, was determined to meet the needs of the time by building a dedicated nursing building with lecture halls, classrooms, staff offices, conference rooms and the Clinical Simulation Laboratory (CSL). The Donnelly Center for Nursing Education opened for classes in December 1975 and was formally dedicated on April 25, 1976, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. M.J. Donnelly. Dr. Mary Tarbox assumed the responsibilities as director for the school of nursing in 1987, after Sister James Marie stepped down to lead the Sisters of Mercy in Cedar Rapids as president. Always looking to the future, Mount Mercy’s Department of Nursing added an RN to BSN program in the 1980s. Courses are offered in evening-weekend or online formats to registered nurses seeking their Bachelor of Science degree. In January 2011, Mount Mercy introduced the Master of Science in Nursing, with the first class completing their studies in May 2012. The master’s program now offers three tracks including health advocacy, nurse education, and nurse administration.

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 15


“When students move on from here, they can say they were educated in the Mercy way...” — DR. MARY TARBOX

OUR NAME IS MERCY AND OUR SPIRIT IS COMPASSION Mount Mercy’s vitality is rooted in its commitment to meeting the needs of our time, just as Catherine McAuley, the founder of the Sisters of Mercy, did in her time. According to Tarbox, to meet the needs of those around her, McAuley focused on building pathways for continued success, not simply providing the bare minimum. Based on the same principles, Mount Mercy’s nursing program looks ahead, identifies needs, and takes initiative to meet those needs.

practitioner program,” Tarbox said. “So, now, we’re looking at

“The master’s program has really met a need for nurses in the area—helping them become skilled in administrative duties, as educators, and being able to address the health care system that is coming,” Tarbox said.

heritage and because that’s who we are as professionals,” Tarbox

“Now, students are coming to us and asking to be nurse practitioners. We get calls from physicians in town asking if we have a nurse

“The spirit of nursing and the spirit of Mercy are alive and well at

16 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

starting a program—because there’s a need and that is what Mount Mercy does.” As Mount Mercy’s offerings grow, the whole community benefits. “In the nursing program, we talk about vulnerable populations and how we will provide service to those populations—because of our said. “When students move on from here, they can say they were educated in the Mercy way which has a long, tradition of compassion in the United States.”

Mount Mercy,” Sister James Marie concluded.


ALUMNI HOMEC

OMING WEEKEND

SPRING COMMEN

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LUNTEERS EYBALL TEAM VO WOMEN’S VOLL R HUMANIT Y FOR HABITAT FO

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Anne Hartman

WE SERVE

EVERYONE

Faculty, students and alumni alike embrace Mount Mercy’s core values of excellent education and compassionate service. Anne Hartman, lecturer of nursing, leverages her special abilities as a nurse to serve the people of Nigeria and teach the joy of service to all of Mount Mercy’s nurses, encouraging them to make a life of service their own. In 2007, Hartman went on a three-week mission trip to Nigeria as a part of the United Methodist Church’s Iowa-Nigeria Partnership. She worked with colleagues to build a school and, after identifying a need for basic health care services, set up village clinics. Despite the impressive work accomplished, Hartman left the country shocked and angry. “I was just astounded,” Hartman said about living conditions. “In a country with those kind of natural resources—the fifth largest oil producing country in the world—most of the population lives in utter poverty. No schools, no roads, no electricity, no running water.” Hartman and the team had helped hundreds of people during the trip, but she felt it wasn’t enough. She made the commitment to go back and has been to Nigeria five times with a medical team. They worked to strengthen hospitals and clinics so people have access to health care year-round. This allowed the team to focus on developing the trust of people, in turn, building trust in the hospitals. “We serve everyone in these clinics,” Hartman said. “We don’t turn people away because of

their faith or religion. There’s a lot of violence between Christians and Muslims in the region, and a lot of clinics will only serve people of a certain religion. We serve everyone.”

“I was just astounded... most of the population lives in utter poverty. No schools, no roads, no electricity, no running water.” — ANNE HARTMAN

Though international service is a passion, 2011 was the last year Hartman and the team were able to travel to Nigeria. Since then, the Islamic extremist group Boko Haram took over the territory and conditions became too dangerous for Westerners. According to The Washington Post, in 2015 alone, Boko Haram killed more than 6,000 people. Still, Hartman is dedicated to the people of Nigeria; she and her church send supplies and funds whenever possible to facilitate the work started just a few years ago. One project she feels helps most is providing supplies for layettes—kits filled with basic supplies needed to raise a newborn. “A lot of women don’t come to the hospital

18 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

to deliver their baby,” Hartman said. “A lot of women birth their babies in a hut, at home, where there might not be a clean environment. When we have these kits to offer, sometimes that’s all the encouragement it takes to get a mother to come to the hospital to have her baby—she knows she’ll have supplies to take home with her. “Volunteering and service learning are so embedded in MMU’s values and teaching, that every student will be challenged to think about how they can use their skills and interests to help others. Students at Mount Mercy have so many opportunities to participate in volunteerism, ranging from a one-day local event, to an alternative spring break service trip within the U.S., to international trips. I encourage them to participate in volunteer work using their skills, whether that’s through the free clinic locally, or something in the United States or internationally.” Hartman hopes to travel again in 2017, whether to Nigeria or somewhere where the need is just as critical. “My parents were always involved with missions work through church, and so to me it seemed natural to combine my love for travel with my desire to help people who need health care. Traveling with a missions team, and working in a developing country, is so much more rewarding to me than a tourist trip, because I come home with a deeper understanding of what life is like for the people who live there.”


Madison Coates ’18

STUDENT SERVICE IN CHINA LEADS TO

BIG QUESTIONS, BIGGER ANSWERS Originally from Manchester, Iowa, Madison Coates is a current junior nursing major, journalism minor, and vice president of the Mount Mercy University Association of Nursing Students. She is also a student ambassador, manager for Mount Mercy University Volleyball and member of the Nurses of Vision and Action. BY MADISON COATES ’18 Student Contributor If I learned one thing last summer it was this: sometimes God challenges you in the most unfathomable ways. Last summer, I spent 16 days working with Bring Me Hope, a Christian organization in China with a mission to improve the lives of

The second week was spent in Taiyuan, China, where I was paired with two little boys—John, 5, and Mark, 7. From the moment I saw them, I knew I was in trouble. John stole my heart. He is the most adorable little boy who has the cutest smile and gives endless hugs and kisses. Mark is diagnosed with cerebral palsy and taught me the meaning of true joy—he loved to laugh and enjoyed every moment.

orphans around the world. My journey began in Wuhan, China, where Bring Me Hope relies on volunteers to run a camp for orphans. Each child who came to camp had a form of disability. Before a policy change in 2016, each Chinese family was allowed only one child. Now they are allowed two. Because of

“I loved those kids with a love I imagine they have never felt.” — MADISON COATES ’18

this, many families abandon their children if they have any hint of physical or mental disability—they are hidden from society. But

Both weeks, I fell deeply in love with my

these children are beautiful and perfect.

families. We spent every hour of every day

At the beginning of the week, each volunteer

reading bedtime stories together. I loved

was paired with one to two translators before being paired with the kids who completed our family groups. The first week, I was paired

singing, dancing, swimming, laughing and those kids with a love I imagine they have never felt.

with two sweet girls. Maylee, who was 12 and

When people ask me how my trip to China

diagnosed with mental retardation, was the

was, I often say “it was the best and worst

most energetic and fun little girl I have ever

weeks of my life.” It was the best because

met. The other was Hannah, age 15. She had

I was able to show God’s love to these kids

the biggest heart for her brothers and sisters,

who have felt nothing but abandonment.

and showed me a true love for others.

It was the worst because once Friday came, I knew that they were heading back to a place where they wouldn’t receive that love and attention. Bring Me Hope has a policy that every person who comes to camp, both kids and translators, hear the Gospel. In China, it is illegal to spread Christianity, so I was going against the grain of the culture. It was amazing to see the opportunities God gave me to share the Good News with my translators and kids with the hope that they will eventually come to know God and His amazing love for them. Even so, I often felt anger and resentment towards God. How could He let these horrible things happen to the kids I came to love as my own? I had to constantly remind myself that His heart breaks for the same things my heart breaks for. He loves the orphans of the world, and He calls us as Christians to love them as well. As a Christian college student, I think it can be hard sometimes to step out of my comfort zone to experience what God has waiting for me. China was one of the most amazing life-changing experiences, and without taking that leap of faith, I would never have met those four amazing kids.

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 19


ANSWERING THE

WHY

Mount Mercy promotes reflective judgment, strategic communication, the common good and purposeful living through a core curriculum, liberal arts and professional majors and student development programs.

OF NURSING

MOUNT MERCY UNIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT

“These were innocent bystanders who were caught in a terrible situation. They needed our help and they needed it fast.” — JUSTIN OETH ’06 Justin Oeth ’06

When Justin Oeth ’06, stopped into work to help out for a few hours one July evening in 2012, he had no idea every skill and life lesson he had learned, both at Mount Mercy University and in his career, would be put to the test. Oeth was the highest ranking manager on duty in the emergency room at University of Colorado Hospital, July 20, 2012, when a gunman opened fire in a movie theatre full of people less than five miles away in Aurora. Twelve were killed and more than 70 injured. “At Mount Mercy, I learned not only the art and science of nursing, but also the why,” Oeth said. “We need to be ready to challenge the normal and push beyond the status quo. Answering the why of nursing, Mount Mercy prepared me to do this.” Though the events of July 2012 are not always easy for him to recount, Oeth said he now has a better appreciation for his training as a nurse, and that this event “helped me to

recognize that when bad events happen, teams can come together and take care of people.” Oeth said patients started arriving at the ER at about 1 a.m., less than half an hour after hospital staff were initially alerted to the emergency situation. “Within the first half hour, we got 24 patients in critical condition,” Oeth said. “It was a pretty intense situation. These were innocent bystanders who were caught in a terrible situation. They needed our help and they needed it fast. Ultimately, every patient that came into our facility alive, left alive.” In the moment of crisis, Oeth relied on his training and his team. He fell back on the lessons of compassion and the value given to the life of each individual, taught through the Mercy tradition at Mount Mercy. But not long after the attack, he began questioning the why of the situation as well as the why of his own career trajectory. Why he felt able

20 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

to rise to the occasion and do what needed to be done. “I had to ask myself why I was in nursing,” he said. “It was a challenging question, an internal dialogue with myself. That was probably the most enlightening moment for me when I realized, ‘Wow, I really can be in situations like this and help coordinate and lead a team.’” Oeth now serves as manager of the University of Colorado Hospital Emergency Department. On an average day, about 300 patients receive care from his team of 240 medical and staff professionals. “I learned over the months following the shooting that we need to reflect on events like this and learn from them. This was a terrible, terrible event. But if we don’t look at it and analyze why we do what we do, the event can pass us by and we don’t learn anything from it.”


MOUNT MERCY UNIVERSITY’S

GRADUATE

PROGRAMS Evenings & Weekends

Education on your terms MACJ | Master of Arts in Criminal Justice (online only) MAED | Master of Arts in Education MFT | Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy MBA | Master of Business Administration MSN | Master of Science in Nursing MSL | Master of Strategic Leadership

WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/GRADUATE-PROGRAMS

GRADUATE PROGRAMS GRADPROGRAMS@MTMERCY.EDU | 319-286-4420 JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 7


ALUM

MMU Class Notes MARRIAGES

IN MEMORIAM

JUDE SMITH ’90 and GREG RAUPP June 13, 2016

STEPHEN KEPROS ’71 July 23, 2016

RIENNE JOHNSON ’03 and JOHN SCHINNER April 2, 2016

PATRICIA (JOHNSON) ARENAS ’80 March 3, 2016

JESSICA JOENS ’12 and COREY MUNSON ’08 December 26, 2015

AMY KILBURG ’00 April 12, 2016

JESSIE CURRY ’14 and MATTHEW PURL ’14 July 16, 2016

RASHAD CARRINGTON ’13 May 8, 2016

NEW ARRIVALS

ADVANCED DEGREES

NICK GOBLIRSCH ’01 and RANDALL Daughter, Katherine, July 28, 2016

KIM (MASLOWSKI) BRO ’90 PhD in Nursing Education Nova Southeastern University August 2016

JILLANA DAVIS ’04 and GEORGE Daughter, Berkeley, July 7, 2016 NICOLE (PALOF) VAN ZANTE ’03 and MATTHEW Daughter, Bria, February 3, 2016 JANELLE (KEUNE) GROEHLER ’06 and JARED Daughter, Eleanor, April 1, 2016 MATTHEW DREWELOW ’07 and JENNY ’08 Daughter, Annalise, March 7, 2016 SARAH (BRIMEYER) SMITH ’10 and TED Son, Benjamin, May 23, 2016 JENNA (SCHUELLER) HOSCH ’12 and MATT Daughter, Ellie, July 22, 2016

CHRISTINE (BROWN) PEISKER ’90 MS in Marketing Communications Roosevelt University December 2015 SARAH (WETZEL) THOMPSON ’94 MBA University of Iowa May 2016 MARK NALL ’07 MS in Education University of Northern Iowa May 2016

HAVE A MILESTONE YOU’D LIKE TO SHARE?

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CAREER ACCOMPLISHMENTS

HEATHER (PARKER) THOMAS ’05 Regional Director Prelude Behavioral Services

MARY (BECKER) LEHNER ’69 Education Consultant Westside School Kiyeto Village, Nagaland, India

SCOTT EILERS ’06 Psychologist Mercy Medical Center

THOMAS BUTTON ’79 Director for Infection Prevention & Control Childrens Mercy Hospital Kansas City, MO

ANNETTE MAIER ’06 K-2 Principal Starry Elementary Marion School District

DAWN (MCNEW) BARNES ’94 Retired from ASAC ERIN (SMITH) BARTOS ’01 Specialist in Chemistry Certified by American Society of Clinical Pathology DINAH NIEDERLOH ’02 Teacher at Hope Academy Minneapolis, Minnesota

HANA WILLS ’06 Programmer and Analyst Humboldt State University LINDSAY DICK ’08 Services Manager Cedar Rapids Metro Economic Alliance

BRIAN BURG ’03 Men’s Basketball Chief of Staff Texas Tech University JOSE LUGO ’03 Assistant Professor in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine University of Texas, Children’s Cancer Hospital, MD Anderson Cancer Center ALICIA GERBER ’03 Certified Trauma Practitioner

APRIL HAGEMAN ’08 Account Supervisor Two Rivers Marketing RACHEL FURMAN ’09 Assistant Director of Alumni Communications Cornell College HILLARY (KAEFRING) WEHR ’16 Secretary of External Affairs/Human Resources Mercy College of Health Sciences

VALORIE (DUBOVSKY) BOUKAL ’05 Senior Benefits Manager Willis Towers Watson

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JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 23


MOUNT MERCY

Athletic Hall of Fame

CLASS OF 2016

Mount Mercy University inducted the Athletic Hall of Fame Class of 2016 on Sept. 24, with Brandon Bradley ’07, Nick Miller ’09, and David and Lonna ’86 Drewelow during Alumni Reunion Weekend.

BRANDON BRADLEY ’07

NICK MILLER ’09

DAVID & LONNA ’86 DREWELOW

Baseball

Men’s Soccer

Athletic Fundraising

Bradley, from Franklin, Tenn., was a two-year baseball standout for the Mustangs. He had one of the most prolific seasons in school history as a senior while leading Mount Mercy to the NAIA Region VII Tournament. Bradley was an NAIA Second Team All-American, the NAIA Region VII Player of the Year and the Midwest Collegiate Conference Player of the Year.

Miller, a native of Norway, Iowa, was a four-time All-Conference performer for the Mount Mercy men’s soccer program. He was Second Team All-Conference in 2004, then made the First Team in 2005. A cancer diagnosis threatened to end his career in 2006, but after a year off, Miller made a triumphant return to the Mustangs in 2007 and was a First Team All-Conference selection as a junior and senior.

David and Lonna Drewelow have been an integral part of Mount Mercy athletic fundraising efforts and alumni endeavors for nearly three decades.

In 2007, Bradley batted .394 with 12 home runs and 43 runs batted in. His .758 slugging percentage was third on Mount Mercy’s single-season list, while the dozen homers ranked sixth. Bradley’s career totals put him in the top 10 All-time in slugging percentage (2nd/.681), home runs (6th/23) and on-base percentage (8th/.449) and he is 11th in career batting average (.355). Bradley is Manager of Strategic Capacity and Network Development at CRST Logistics. He lives in Marion with his wife, Amber, and two children.

Miller is Mount Mercy’s All-time leading scorer with 60 career goals and 146 points. His 26 assists are second in school history. Miller, a double-digit scorer in each of his four seasons, scored three goals in a game seven times. His 20 goals in 2008 are a school record. He also had eight assists as a senior for a school record 48 points. Miller is a regional account executive with Medix IT. He and his wife, Kendra, have two children and currently live in Gilbert, AZ.

24 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

They have a deep devotion to Mustangs athletics and can always be found cheering on the Mustangs, both home and away. David, head coach at ActionCOACH Heartland, has chaired the Mount Mercy Golf Classic Committee for 14 years, helping the athletic department raise money for special projects since 2003. Lonna has served the university for more than 28 years, most recently as assistant vice president for development and alumni relations.


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PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO SHARE A MILESTONE, UPDATE, ACCOMPLISHMENT OR NEW NAME WITH US. ALSO, MAKE SURE YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION IS UP-TO-DATE SO WE CAN KEEP IN TOUCH!

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WE CAN’T WAIT TO HEAR FROM YOU! All news/info updates submitted by March 1, 2017 will be entered to win dinner for eight at the Mount Mercy University House.


COMMUNITY BENEFITS • Energize six intercollegiate athletic teams by providing new training and competition venues • Stimulate campus life and student engagement • Draw students, families and local sports fans together to enjoy quality athletic competition • Provide space for summer youth programs and camps • Create partnerships between MMU and community organizations

SHOW YOUR MMU PRIDE WITH A GIFT TO HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE: WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/SUPPORT-HOMEFIELD FALL 2016 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 27


BRANCH RACES TO ALL-AMERICA STATUS MEN’S GOLF EARNS NATIONAL TOURNAMENT BERTH Track & field’s Bri’anna Branch earned All-America honors, the men’s golf team qualified for the NAIA national tournament for the second time in school history, and the Mount Mercy athletics department set a new standard in the classroom to conclude another successful season in 2015–16. After setting a school record in the preliminary round of the 100 meter dash with a time of 11.7 seconds, Branch nearly matched that in the finals, crossing the finish line in 11.77 seconds to finish sixth at the NAIA Outdoor Track & Field Championships in Gulf Shores, Alabama. The freshman became the seventh woman in school history to earn All-America status at the NAIA outdoor national meet. A pair of Mustangs joined Branch at nationals in May. Senior teammate Dana Ewan placed 17th in the marathon with 3 hours, 44 minutes, 16 seconds, while men’s track & field junior Evan Bowman set a school best (2:45:46) during a 10th-place finish in the marathon in Gulf Shores. Bryant Rader (2:48:11) set the previous record at the NAIA outdoor championships in 2012. Also in May, after a runner-up finish at the Heart of America Athletic Conference Championship, nationally-ranked Mount Mercy earned an at-large berth in the NAIA Men’s Golf National Championship at TPC Deere Run in Silvis, Illinois. Led by junior Pedro Velasco, who tied for 63rd with a 228 total over 54 holes, the Mustangs placed 24th in their second-ever appearance at the national tournament. George Long, an NAIA Second Team All-American and 2015–16 Heart of America Conference Player of the Year, headlined a group of five Mustangs to make the All-Heart of America team. Long, a sophomore who led the team in scoring at 73.2 strokes per round, was a top-five finisher in seven of 10 events and set a school record with a seven-under-par 64 at the Deer Park Classic.

Joining Long on the All-Heart of America team were Pedro Velasco, freshman Will Bruyeres, junior Chad Nitz and senior Warren Bynoe. All four were within half a stroke of each other in scoring average. Velasco was second on the team in strokes per round (74.5), Bruyeres and Bynoe were third (74.6), while Nitz ranked fifth (74.9). Velasco and Bynoe each posted three top-five finishes, while Bruyeres and Nitz had two a piece. Mount Mercy, which had a record number of teams (6) qualify for national championship events in 2015–16, also had one of the most successful academic years in school history. The Mustangs counted 10 NAIA Scholar Teams and 28 NAIA Scholar-Athletes, the highest ever in those categories. A team must have a minimum 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale as defined by the institution in order to be considered for the NAIA Scholar Team award. The team GPA includes all eligible varsity student-athletes. The 10 Mount Mercy squads honored this year were women’s soccer, women’s volleyball, women’s cross country, women’s golf, women’s basketball, men’s indoor track & field, men’s outdoor track & field, women’s indoor track & field, women’s outdoor track & field and softball. Student-athletes who maintain a minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and achieved junior academic status are honored as NAIA ScholarAthletes. Mustangs recognized in 2015–16 were: Monueir Moodie | men’s soccer Aly Schultz, Maria Welborn | women’s soccer Leslie Hoffmann, Abbie Perez | women’s volleyball Eric Hansen | men’s cross country Dana Ewan, Kelsey Feldman, Katie Hoffert, Rachel Jellings, Abby Martin, Liz Mosbach, Allison Scott | women’s cross country Meg Monson, Paige Wenger | women’s golf McKenna Sexton | women’s basketball Zach Berryman, Stephen Burgess, Eric Hansen, Monueir Moodie | men’s track & field Dana Ewan, Suzanne Flexsenhar, Allison Scott, Taylor Zumbach | women’s track & field Carson Burgart, Alexis Ferguson, LJ Putzier, Brianna Sturtz | softball

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 27


SPRING 2016

SPORTS HONORS & AWARDS

SOFTBALL:

MEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD:

Carson Burgart | NAIA Scholar-Athlete Alexis Ferguson | NAIA Scholar-Athlete Amanda Gaffey | Second Team All-A.I.I.

Jon Andersen | All-Heart of America in 5,000m race walk Zach Berryman | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, Academic All-Heart of America Evan Bowman | National qualifier in marathon, All-Heart of America in 10,000m and 5,000m Stephen Burgess | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, Academic All-Heart of America Gustavo Caballero | All-Heart of America in triple jump Anthony Crawley | Heart of America champion in javelin, All-Heart of America in javelin Colton Forster | All-Heart of America in 5,000m and 10,000m Eric Hansen | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, Academic All-Heart of America James Lindstrom | All-Heart of America in 3,000m steeplechase Monueir Moodie | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, Academic All-Heart of America

Tawny Menster | Second Team All-A.I.I. Hannah Petersen | Second Team All-A.I.I. LJ Putzier | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, NFCA Second Team All-Central Region, A.I.I. Player of the Year, First Team All-A.I.I. Brianna Sturtz | NAIA Scholar-Athlete

BASEBALL: Tarran Beasley | Second Team All-A.I.I. Cody Bell | First Team All-A.I.I. Cale Henke | Second Team All-A.I.I. Jimmy Lizarraga | Second Team All-A.I.I.

MEN’S GOLF: Will Bruyeres | All-Heart of America Warren Bynoe | All-Heart of America George Long | Heart of America Player of the Year; All-Heart of America Chad Nitz | All-Heart of America Pedro Velasco | All-Heart of America, Academic All-Heart of America

WOMEN’S GOLF: Meg Monson | NAIA Scholar-Athlete; All-Heart of America, Academic All-Heart of America Paige Wenger | NAIA Scholar-Athlete; Academic All-Heart of America

WOMEN’S OUTDOOR TRACK & FIELD: Aminah Baloch | All-Heart of America in 4x100m relay Bri’anna Branch | National qualifier in 100m, Heart of America champion in 100m, All-Heart of America in 100m, 200m and 4x100m relay Lindsay Brunson | All-Heart of America in 4x800m relay Raeshonda Chandler | All-Heart of America in 4x400m relay Sha’Rhonda Clark | All-Heart of America in 4x100m relay Receva Duos | All-Heart of America in 100m hurdles Dana Ewan | National qualifier in marathon, NAIA Scholar-Athlete, All-Heart of America in 10,000m, Academic All-Heart of America Suzanne Flexsenhar | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, All-Heart of America in heptathlon, Academic All-Heart of America Jade Gridiron | All-Heart of America in 4x100m relay Ashli O’Shea | All-Heart of America in 4x800m relay and 4x400m relay Allison Scott | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, All-Heart of America in 4x800m relay and 4x400m relay, Academic All-Heart of America Kathryn Vander Poel | All-Heart of America in 800m, 4x800m relay and 4x400m relay Taylor Zumbach | NAIA Scholar-Athlete, Academic All-Heart of America

28 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | JANUARY 2017

For the latest athletics information and updates, visit

WWW.MOUNTMERCYMUSTANGS.COM


SPRING 2016

ACADEMIC HONORS & AWARDS

Mary Catherine McAuley Award...............................................................F. Tessa Emmalyn Friason Mary Frances Warde Award...................................................................... Amazing-Grace A. Ighedo The Sister Mary Norbert Karnik Art Award................................................................ Alyssa Vicente The Outstanding Accounting Student Award.....................................................Laura Marie Bowen The Outstanding Economics Student Award.......................................................Harley Anne Miller The Outstanding Finance Student Award....................................................... Amanda Rose Corbin

HONOR CORDS GRADUATING “WITH DISTINCTION” IN THE MOUNT MERCY UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM

The Dale Harrison Outstanding Management Award................................. Meg Elizabeth Monson The Outstanding Human Resource Management Award.................................Abbey Rose Kilburg The Outstanding Marketing Student Award.......................................................Donald R. Brady, Jr. The Sister Immaculata Business Award............................................................. Katrina Ashbacher The Accelerated Student of the Year Award................................................................ Julie Wiebold The Biology Award...................................................................................................Lindsey Simmons The Sister Mary Agnes Hennessey Communication Award........................Taylor Elaine Zumbach The Computer Science Award................................................................................. Brittney Seeman The Criminal Justice Award....................................................................................Megan Marie Hall The Sister Roseline Kos Education Award....................................................... Callan Nicole Timms The Sister Mary Xavier Creative Writing Award................................................. Billie Renee Barker The Sister Mary Ildephonse Award..................................................................... Billie Renee Barker The Music Award.............................................................................. Hillary Christina Stout Kaefring The Sister Mary Edward Nursing Award................................................... Amazing-Grace A. Ighedo The Sister Monica Ryan Philosophy Award..............................................................Blakely Gardner The Christine L. Woodruff Psychology Award.......................................................Megan Marie Hall The Sister Siena Davis Religious Studies Award.....................................................Blakely Gardner The Anne K. Stenzel Social Work Award...................................................................... Ashle K. Bray The Artists of Dionysus Award........................................................ Hillary Christina Stout Kaefring The Sister Mary Roberta Lyness Award.............................................................. Katrina Ashbacher The Sisters of Mercy Award...................................................................................Melissa Ann Boyle The President’s Award..........................................................................................Aimee C. Redlinger The Co-Curricular Service Award.............................................................F. Tessa Emmalyn Friason

Emilie Marie Jacobson Kayley Keller Abbey Rose Kilburg Taylor F. Sabelka Lindsey Simmons Paige Elizabeth Wenger

KAPPA XI CHAPTER OF SIGMA THETA TAU HONOR SOCIETY OF NURSING Orchid & White Cords Emily Adams Doris Mukhwana Alukwe Sarah Ann Bierle Rebecca Marie Crooks Alyssa Rae Duhme F. Tessa Emmalyn Friason Claire Adrienne Funke Kelsey Nicole Gerhart

Josetta R. Greif Jerica Sue Gretter Graciela Hammel Kalene Rochelle Heaverlo Amazing-Grace A. Ighedo Kristy Lynn Lueken Mikayla Jeanne Morrison Kaylee Marie Putzier

Taylor F. Sabelka Sarah Struchen Heather C. Wade Paige Elizabeth Wenger Rachel A. White Nicole Eileen Wubbena

Blue & Gold Cords

KAPPA GAMMA PI HONOR SOCIETY Cream & Brown Cords Megan Marie Hall Amazing-Grace A. Ighedo Sarah Elizabeth Kleiman Meg Elizabeth Monson Mikayla Jeanne Morrison Anna Marie Riester Jessica Telfer Billie J. Tessendorf

PSI CHI HONOR SOCIETY OF PSYCHOLOGY Gold Cords with Blue & Gold Tassels Haylie Dawn Canterbury Blakely Gardner Lindsay Elaine Schaffer Angel Jeancarlo Vicente

JANUARY 2017 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 29


OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTION

Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Cedar Rapids, IA Permit No. 177

Laurie M. Hamen, J.D. President Doug Brock, CPA Vice President for Finance Dr. Robert Callahan Vice President for Administrative, Enrollment & Student Services Brenda K. Haefner ’96, CFRE Vice President for Development & Alumni Relations Dr. Janet Handler Provost Sr. Shari Sutherland ’71 Vice President for Mission & Ministry Brandt Worley Chair, Board of Trustees

EDITOR

1330 Elmhurst Drive NE Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52402-4797 www.mtmercy.edu CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

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Corey Munson ’08 Assistant Director for Communications & Project Management

CONTRIBUTORS

Need to change your contact information? Visit www.mtmercy.edu/update.

Madison Coates ’18 Laura Collingwood ’02 Director for Alumni Relations Terri Crumley, DMA Assistant Vice President for Enrollment & Dean of Admissions Amber Downs ’17 Jason Furler ’95 Sports Information Director Jessica Gortner, MBA Assistant Vice President for Marketing & Communications Amanda Mayotte ’15 Coordinator of Marketing & Media Content

YOUR INVESTMENT. OUR FUTURE. S U P P O R T YO U R A L M A M AT E R TO DAY WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/MAKE-GIFT

Hannah Mougin ’18 Kristy Raine Librarian & Archivist

DESIGN Dixie Albertson Associate Director for Graphic Design

WEB Phillip Platz Assistant Director for Multimedia Marketing Mount Mercy Magazine is published by Mount Mercy University in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. It is mailed free of charge to alumni and friends of the university.

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Mount Mercy Magazine | January 2017  

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