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Mount Mercy MAGAZINE

MOUNT MERCY UNIVERSIT Y | SPRING 2016

WHEN SUCCESS FOLLOWS. How our graduates put their passions into action.

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PRESIDENT’S LETTER

“We are prone to judge success by the index of our salaries or the size of our automobiles, rather than by the quality of our service and relationship to humanity.” — MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.

1

At Mount Mercy University, we play a great balancing act with the

Courtney Snodgrass, a current junior and member of the Class

definition of success. Our alumni, students, and members of our

of ’17, has published two books of poetry and is in the process of

faculty and staff have achieved significant accomplishments in

starting a non-profit organization for veterans. We know we’ll see

their professional lives. Many have been overwhelmingly successful

more from her and her talented classmates in the coming years.

by every financial measure possible. But beyond the index of their salaries, many judge their success in other terms—by providing compassionate service and support to those in need, and by holding society together in vital ways.

Finally, our students are helping make our entire community of Cedar Rapids better through the successful initiative EmpowHer, a joint effort between Mount Mercy University and the Catherine McAuley Center. Through this program, Mount Mercy students

The passion of Mount Mercy faculty and staff is to help prepare

and faculty help women at the margins of society learn the skills

students to be profoundly successful at whatever they choose to

needed to gain employment and ultimately become professionally

do. The true measure of our success is found in our graduates

and personally successful.

putting their passion into action, how they define and achieve their personal success after graduating from Mount Mercy University.

At Mount Mercy, we develop students who become invaluable resources and contributors to society—to their family, workplace,

This edition of our magazine features Mount Mercy success

community and larger world. We teach that success is broadly

stories from alumni and students.

defined—that each student must uncover their own, personal

We celebrate the success of Enrique Cortina ’13, who traveled from

story of success.

his home in Spain to Mount Mercy, and obtained a career-launching

I am so proud of our students and alumni and look forward to

and life-affirming education. He now utilizes his talents as a soccer

celebrating your successes. I know you will find inspiration and

player and the knowledge and skills he gained on the Hill to lead

encouragement in the success stories featured in this edition

a semi-professional soccer team.

of Mount Mercy Magazine.

We also recognize life-long learners Kim Bauer ’15, Cynthia

Gratefully,

Dennis ’11, Judy Lubben ’03 and ’14, and Angie Wisner ’13. These graduates enjoy great professional and personal success because of their commitment to education through our nontraditional program, after experiencing gaps in their educational journeys.

LAURIE M. HAMEN President King, Martin Luther, Jr. “My Pilgrimage to Nonviolence.” New York, N.Y. From: Fellowship 24 (1 September 1958): 4-9. (PD) 6 pp. (Reprint of Chapter VI, Stride Toward Freedom.) 580901-002. 1

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M


Table of Contents

A Long Journey Home | PAGE 3

Generations of Success | PAGE 7

Leaving home can be a challenge for anyone,

A closer look at a few faces of success that

Sisterhood & Second Chances | PAGE 11

Enrique Cortina ’13, found great success

have graced the halls of Mount Mercy.

Sisters Angie and Kim never thought they

after coming to Mount Mercy from Spain.

would go to college—but Mount Mercy helped changed their minds.

Accountant Turned CFO: How Judy Lubben Leads by Mount Mercy’s Example...... PAGE 5 Enactus Changing Lives Through a Job Readiness Initiative..................................... PAGE 6 It Was Meant To Be: One Email Changed Cynthia Dennis’ Life............................. PAGE 10

CLASS NOTES AVAILABLE ONLINE!

MAGAZINE.MTMERCY.EDU Visit the Class Notes section of our online

Healing Words & Healing Minds......................................................................................... PAGE 13

magazine to stay updated on recent news from

Fall Sports Honors & Awards............................................................................................... PAGE 14

your Mount Mercy classmates! To submit an update, email alumni@mtmercy.edu.

Upcoming Events MAY 5 – Jazz, Java, Jive 7:00 p.m. | Betty Cherry Heritage Hall MMU STANDS FOR MORE THAN WHAT YOU EXPECT.

MOMENTUM AND WITH YOUR HELP, THERE’S NO STOPPING OURS.

MAY 10 – Spring Concert and Reception 7:00 p.m. | Chapel of Mercy

MAY 13 – Alumni Cork N Canvas Iowa 6:00 p.m. | Betty Cherry Heritage Hall

MAY 19–22 – Commencement Weekend www.mtmercy.edu/commencement

SEPTEMBER 23-25 – Alumni Reunion Weekend www.mtmercy.edu/alumni-reunion

WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/MAKE-GIFT make your gift today

For the latest event information and updates, visit

WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/CALENDAR

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A Long Journey Home FROM SPAIN TO MOUNT MERCY TO SOCCER LEADER By

SAMANTHA WILSON ’16

Enrique Cortina ’13, came to Mount Mercy

“Life puts you in different places for a reason,”

Cortina’s coach wasn’t the only person he

University from his hometown of Valencia,

Cortina said. “When I started to look into

found guidance and inspiration in. Many

Spain, to follow his passion for playing soccer

colleges and sent my highlights video out,

people along his journey at Mount Mercy

while working toward earning an education

Amir Hadzic [Mount Mercy men’s head soccer

influenced and molded him into the person

he and his family could be proud of. The

coach] contacted me and was very helpful

he has become today.

experiences and relationships Cortina

during the entire process. I felt I could trust

formed during his four years at Mount

him. He drew me to Mount Mercy.”

Mercy revised his future from what he imagined to a life he hadn’t dreamed of.

Among a list that stretched from his internship with the athletic department to his time spent with friends, Cortina said his education in public relations was instrumental to his success. Faculty members Joe Sheller and Dr. David Klope, both associate professors of communications, provided Cortina with the skills and in-depth knowledge he relies on. “They were excellent professors and I was lucky to have them because they were always very easy to talk to. We could spend hours talking about public relations and careers, and they’d give me a lot of tips and advice. It was great to have them.” As much as Cortina valued his professors, he made many long-lasting friendships, including a friendship with Dia (Brown) Cortina ’12, that turned into a marriage. Cortina said meeting Dia ultimately led to changing his original plans of moving back to Spain after he obtained his degree.

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“I created a team. I put the team in the league. To be honest, it was a project that I started building with my roommate, because we were both soccer-passionate. It’s funny that my senior project [at Mount Mercy] was something similar. I got to put it into reality.” — ENRIQUE CORTINA

Cortina’s responsibilities didn’t stop when planning Storm FC was finished. Because of the skills learned at Mount Mercy, he supervises the public relations department and all of the team’s communications. He also helps build the roster for the team, takes care of contracts and player needs, and is the public face of the team within the league.

“I met my wife and being with her now is one

me I should look into it if I wanted to be the

But soccer isn’t confined to his day job.

of the things that will always make Mount

person in charge of the company here.”

During his senior year at Mount Mercy,

Mercy a good experience,” Cortina said. “At home we put both of our diplomas next to each other, and that way we will always have Mount Mercy. It’s a part of us.” Because of the support he received from Mount Mercy’s tight-knit campus community, Cortina was prepared for what would be next in his journey: becoming general manager of Storm FC, a men’s semiprofessional

Cortina was head coach for Marion High

Cortina was then introduced to Jose Reygadas in Miami, who is now his boss. The two started a partnership and his

School’s varsity soccer team. It was then he added coaching to his list of passions.

adventure into the world of professional

“In my free time I coach a team of teen

soccer in the U.S. began.

girls,” Cortina said. “When I don’t have to work on the club, I’m coaching soccer. My

“I started this team from zero,” Cortina said. “I created a team. I put the team in the league. To be honest, it was a project

life is soccer, and I’m kind of lucky my wife likes soccer too.”

that I started building with my roommate,

Without his time at Mount Mercy, Cortina

because we were both soccer-passionate.

admits his life would be very different

It’s funny that my senior project was

from what it is now. His decision to attend

“The future of U.S. soccer is huge,” Cortina

something similar. I got to put it into reality.

the university ultimately shifted his plans.

said. “Back in Spain, a friend who was working

I presented this project to my boss, he

He is looking forward to what the future

for a soccer club wanted to expand to the

liked it and gave me the green light and

holds, and knows soccer will always be

U.S. He shared his vision with me and told

I went for it.”

a part of it.

soccer club in Florida—a program Cortina built from the ground up.

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Accountant Turned CFO

HOW JUDY LUBBEN LEADS BY MOUNT MERCY’S EXAMPLE By

COREY MUNSON ’08

Cedar Rapids, which is where she found the inspiration to earn her first degree in accounting. “My mentor and boss at the time was Ruth

Mount Mercy Alumna Judy Lubben ’03 and ’14, has encountered the ups and

“The instructors I had at Mount Mercy made me feel as though they cared about my success.”

Munger, who is also a Mount Mercy grad,”

— JUDY LUBBEN

attending undergraduate classes, chose

downs as a leader of one of Cedar Rapids’ largest companies—Raining Rose. Lubben, who obtained both her undergraduate accounting degree and an MBA from Mount Mercy University, has been with Raining Rose—an internationally

As an accountant, Lubben said she understood the importance of monitoring the growth of the company. “We grew at a fast rate, but we managed

12 years. She now serves as CFO and vice

our cash flow carefully,” Lubben explained.

president of administration for the company,

“We have always had a strong balance

but when she got her start in the business

sheet, even after the flood.”

of only 13 people.

In 2008 eastern Iowa was inundated with a flood that wiped out hundreds of homes

“It’s been a lot of fun,” Lubben said. “I’ve

and many businesses. Raining Rose was

worked with a lot of people who care deeply

then located in the New Bohemia area of

about the business—a lot are Mount Mercy

southeast Cedar Rapids.

grads themselves. We have been through some tough times at Raining Rose. Our first struggle was after one of the original founders, Art Christoffersen, passed away in December 2005. I came to Raining Rose because of Art and had hoped to learn a lot from him, given that his background was in accounting. Losing him so early was a shock to us all. However, we have a strong core

me I should get my degree. I don’t think I would be where I am today if I hadn’t gone to work for Ruth.” Lubben, who had two sons at home while Mount Mercy because of its convenient

recognized cosmetics manufacturer—for

office in 2003, the company consisted

Lubben said. “She was the one who told

location, small class size and professors’ passion. Barb Pooley, who was an influential mentor during Lubben’s time at MMU, was the one who recommended her for the job at Raining Rose. “The instructors I had at Mount Mercy made me feel as though they cared about my success,” Lubben said. “To this day, if I run into Barb Pooley, Rob Rittenhouse, Steve Gilmore, Tom Castle—to name just a few—we always take a few minutes to talk and catch up.” She said she also learned important

“The flood hurt, but probably helped us

lessons in leadership from her mentors

slow down,” Lubben said. “It made us

at Mount Mercy.

evaluate who we wanted to be and where we wanted to go. Shortly after the flood we decided the building we occupied wasn’t going to be enough. We built the building on First Avenue, which we are currently occupying.”

“They made me more aware of how I treat people,” Lubben said. “Everyone matters and if somebody is willing to put in the effort, I should at least try to put the effort back into them. This is probably why I love it so much at Raining Rose and why I love Mount

group. The other founder, Chuck Hammond,

Before working at Raining Rose, Lubben

Mercy. Both try to make people feel like

has been a great mentor as well.”

worked at Frank Magid Associates in

they matter.”

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By

SAMANTHA WILSON ’16

Changing Lives

Through a Job Readiness Initiative Mount Mercy University’s Enactus club

During the mock interview session,

is changing the lives of disadvantaged

human resource professionals who hired

women in eastern Iowa through a job

previous EmpowHer graduates joined

readiness initiative called EmpowHer.

the group. The women practice newly

The student-led program offers educational opportunities to women through the

“Enactus has allowed residents to practice these skills in a constructive, supportive environment, which is an important component for women who are overcoming past trauma.” — TINA GOSSMAN

learned skills in a setting much like they would find at a true interview.

Catherine McAuley Center (CMC),

Also new this year, the entrepreneurial

helping them gain the skills needed to

workshop covers basic business topics

find employment. EmpowHer covers

for women who aim to start a venture

topics like resume building, cover letters,

of their own.

creating business cards, proper attire and what to expect during a job search. Each year 10-15 women are invited to go through the free program, and the results are staggering.

“They have expanded the program from simple workshop lessons in the first year, to today, deeply engaging residents and providing individualized feedback,” said Tina Gossman, volunteer coordinator

“What we hear over and over again is

for Catherine McAuley Center. “Most

that it creates confidence, in both the

importantly, Enactus has allowed residents

women and the students, and makes

to practice these skills in a constructive,

everyone involved feel they have value,”

supportive environment, which is an

said Dr. Nate Klein, assistant professor

important component for women who

of business and advisor to Enactus.

are overcoming past trauma.”

Though Cedar Rapids boasts a 3.6 percent

Members of Enactus said the program

unemployment rate as of December

is only going to grow from here. The

2015—1.2 percentage points below

team is optimistic that they can branch

the national average—the rate of

out into the community to reach more

unemployment in the CMC Transitional

women in need of the skills EmpowHer

Housing Program is 78 percent.

can teach them.

EmpowHer’s work is making a noticeable

“I am proud to be a part of this,” said

difference, though. Since sessions began in

Macy DeMeulenaere, senior psychology

2012, 90 percent of the participants have

major and vice president of projects for

gained employment or enrolled in college.

Enactus. “It’s inspiring to see the impact

To ensure EmpowHer’s continued success,

we can have on these women’s lives.”

two workshops were added this year: mock interviewing and entrepreneurship. SPRING 2016 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 6

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Generations OF

Success

KATHY ENSTROM ’96

RACHEL COLLINS ’01

Special Agent In Charge Criminal Investigations, IRS Cincinnati, OH

School Counselor Kennedy High School Cedar Rapids, IA

ACCOUNTING & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS/ SECONDARY EDUCATION

MOUNT MERCY ALUMNI SH

JASON CONNELL ’99 CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Search and Rescue Police Officer Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department Las Vegas, NV

CYNTHIA DENN

DR. RICHARD KETTELKAMP ’93

CHRISTINA RIES ’04

Interventional and Endovascular Cardiologist and Director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab UnityPoint Clinic Cedar Rapids, IA

Nationally Syndicated Columnist Inver Grove Heights, MN

BIOLOGY

ENGLISH

MASTER OF BUSINES

Probation/Parole Super Iowa Sixth Judicial Distr Department of Correctio Cedar Rapids, IA Story on page 10

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MNI SHARE THEIR STORIES

JOANN KINTZEL ’86

JUDE SMITH-WHITMAN ’90

ACCOUNTING & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

FINE ARTS

nt

IA DENNIS ’11

F BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Parole Supervisor udicial District t of Corrections ds, IA

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CFO and Vice President for Administration Raining Rose Cedar Rapids, IA

Art Consultant art2uinc. Scottsdale, AZ

President TaxACT Cedar Rapids, IA

JUDY LUBBEN ’03 ’14

Story on page 5

STEVE SMITH ’08

TRACY ALSHOUSE, PA-C ’87

Chemical Dependency Counselor and Mental Health Worker UnityPoint Health and St. Luke’s Hospital Cedar Rapids, IA

Physician Assistant Affiliates of Family Practice Cedar Rapids, IA

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

BIOLOGY

age 10

READ THEIR FULL STORIES AT WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/SUCCESS SPRING 2016 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | 8

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WE NEED A

COMMUNITY BENEFITS

• Energize six intercollegiate athletic teams by providing new training and competition venues • Stimulate campus life and student engagement • Draw students, families and local sports fans together to enjoy quality athletic competition • Provide space for summer youth programs and camps • Create partnerships between MMU and community organizations

SHOW YOUR MMU PRIDE

WITH A GIFT TO HOME FIELD ADVANTAGE:

www.mtmercy.edu/support-homefield 9 | MOUNT MERCY MAGAZINE | SPRING 2016

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It Was Meant to Be ONE EMAIL CHANGED CYNTHIA DENNIS’ LIFE By

LISA LAFLER ’93 ’15

Neither personal tragedy nor 20 years out of the classroom could keep Cynthia Dennis ’11, from her ultimate goal of achieving a master’s degree from Mount Mercy University once she set her mind to it. Dennis attended Cedar Rapids Prairie High School and later earned a degree from the University of Iowa in communication studies with a journalism minor. Dennis is now a probation parole supervisor for the 6th Judicial District Department of Correctional Services in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where she has been employed for nearly 28 years. “I was interested in going to grad school back then, but after four and a half years of school I wanted to take a break,” Dennis said. “I had always wanted to go back to grad

“My mom was the one that really wanted me to [go back to school]; she encouraged me. If I could do nothing else for her, I wanted to finish this for her.” — CYNTHIA DENNIS

Following the Cedar Rapids flood of 2008, Dennis found herself working at the Nelson Center, which was temporarily transformed into an alternate jail facility for Linn County. “It gave me time to think about where I was in my career and things I wanted to do because I only had one wing of clients,” Dennis said.

This was followed in short order by her mother falling ill and passing away just a few weeks before graduation in spring 2011. “My instructors were very supportive and so were my classmates,” Dennis said.

school, and it just took a while for me to be in a place where I was just ready to do it.”

In 2010 she unexpectedly lost her sister.

started at 6 p.m. It was just then about 5:45 p.m., so I had time to get down there. “I called my mom and said, ‘what do you think?’ I felt it was meant to be because it just popped up. She told me to go and check it out. I talked to Barb Pooley [at

She said she felt compelled to complete her schooling to honor her mom. “My mom was the one that really wanted me to do this; she encouraged me,” Dennis said. “If I could do nothing else for her, I wanted to finish this for her.”

the open house], she said, ‘Listen; at this

Dennis believes her MBA from Mount Mercy

point in your life you’re going to be a different

has afforded her numerous opportunities

kind of learner. Try it. Just get started, and

she wouldn’t have had without furthering

During one of those long nights at work

then if you have any concerns then you will

her education.

she received what she believed was a sign.

know, but you won’t know unless you try.’

“I was sitting there…and I got an email from

So I did. I signed up.”

“If age is what is holding you back, just do it. Jump right in,” Dennis said. “You should just

Mount Mercy saying ‘there is still time, we

While working toward her Master of

do it because that’s the only way you’ll know.

are having an open house for grad school

Business Administration at MMU, Dennis

It’s going to be uncomfortable. You’re not

tonight’,” Dennis said. “It said the open house

experienced two tragic events in her life.

learning unless you’re challenging yourself.”

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&

Sisterhood & Second Chances By

MADISON COATES ’18

“Without the structure of the Accelerated Program, I would still be trying to finish my degree.... Now I can look toward the future and other aspirations.” — KIM BAUER

ANGIE KIM

From the beginning, limited options seemed to force the Bauer sisters into lives they did not wish for themselves. But through love and commitment to each other, and by their own inner strengths, both found their way to Mount Mercy University—ultimately leading to successful and satisfying careers.

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&

&

“Our parents basically laid it out for us,” Angie (Bauer) Wisner ’13, said about the life she and her sister Kim Bauer ’15, were born into. “They said you can be a secretary, you can work in a factory, join the military or

“Start taking classes and take a chance.” — ANGIE WISNER

you can get married.” “They weren’t real motivators of going to college,” Kim added. Angie and Kim grew up in the community of Bennett, Iowa. Located near Tipton in eastern Iowa, it had a modest population of 350 people when they were young. Their parents worked hard to support the family; their dad was a truck driver and mom worked in a factory. To them, the idea of obtaining a college education was never in the realm of possibilities. And, if circumstance was not hindrance enough, at just 20 months old, Angie’s arm was caught in a ringer washer. Doctors believed they would have to amputate, but her father resisted. She was left with limited use of her arm, but refused to let the

Implementation Services, helping schools prepare online testing and large assessment tests. She finished Mount Mercy’s Accelerated Program in 2015 studying business, human resource management and marketing. Angie has worked for Pearson for 25

an associate degree in business in 1991. After landing a job in data entry, she knew she wanted to go back to school to advance her career.

years and now serves as the Director of Enterprise Risk Management. Reporting to the Pearson branch in London, she analyzes risks to ensure company success. She completed the Accelerated Program

Kim wanted to move away from Bennett,

in 2002 majoring in business and later

so she headed to Los Angeles. She spent

returned to obtain her MBA in 2013.

a year on the West Coast before moving back to Iowa. After several years working in the travel industry, Kim started wondering what else was available.

“I like to get one degree per decade,” Angie said. “I want to keep going to school to keep learning. To keep my skills and knowledge fresh.”

“I owe a lot to [Angie] and her encouragement,” Kim said. “I went to school to be a travel professional, and that industry took a serious downturn. We would take walks and she would say, ‘Kim, do what I did. Start taking classes and take a chance.’”

Both Kim and Angie believe without Mount Mercy, their education and careers at Pearson would be much different than they are today. “Without the structure of the Accelerated Program, I would still be trying to finish my

accident slow her down.

That chance paid off in a big way for both

After graduating high school, the sisters

ladder at Pearson, the world’s largest

took different paths but remained close.

education company.

Angie received a scholarship to Muscatine

Kim has been with the company for 16

Now I can look toward the future and

Community College where she completed

years, and is now the Director for Online

other aspirations.”

Angie and Kim as they have climbed the

degree,” Kim said. “I would have to take courses that were during the day or during the week and less manageable. That would mean less time with family and children....

BE SUCCESSFUL.

TAKE THE NEXT STEP IN YOUR OWN SUCCESS STORY WITH MOUNT MERCY UNIVERSITY, THROUGH OUR ACCELERATED PROGRAM—BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR WORKING ADULTS. WWW.MTMERCY.EDU/ACCELERATED

ONLINEPROGRAMS.MTMERCY.EDU

Evening and Weekend Classes—Earn a bachelor’s degree in one of 11 majors while working full time.

On-demand, Online Courses—Earn your degree from where you are, on your own terms.

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Healing Words &

Healing Minds

By

AMANDA MAYOTTE ’15

Courtney Snodgrass ’17, is wasting no time in achieving her dreams of becoming an established writer and activist. Using her two areas of study in tandem, the junior English and psychology major has published two poetry collections, writes commissioned pieces, is spending part of the year editing Mount Mercy’s Paha Review and is in the daunting process of starting a nonprofit to benefit

“I love being able to create something for someone that’s going to help them heal. Poetry is a form of healing, for people and for myself.”

Amanda’s Autumn By Courtney Snodgrass

— COURTNEY SNODGRASS

area veterans.

We danced like two leaves

Snodgrass was introduced to the idea of

“Writing allows me to say whatever I want

spinning and twirling around

publishing by Associate Professor of English

to say without having to speak the words

each other in the wind.

Carol Tyx, who influenced Snodgrass to

aloud. It all circles back to the idea of expressing myself.”

Our own waltz, as we fell from the branches

submit her poetry to a contest Tyx herself had participated in.

in the beginning of October.

Beyond self-expression, Snodgrass

We bickered and touched each other

But as determined as she is, Snodgrass

has written commissioned pieces—

found a different avenue of publication

something she feels is a great honor. One

in ways we did not mean.

and withdrew her collection from the

piece was read at a funeral, another piece

contest before receiving the results.

was written for a woman who was suffering

as the foliage along the side of a

Instead, Snodgrass self-published

the pain of multiple miscarriages.

road grows deeper shades of red.

“Partially Whole”—a book that thrusts readers into a world of passion, love, loss and healing. “Writing lets me feel,” Snodgrass said. “I love going back to older pieces and getting to the end of a poem or short story and having a physical reaction—my breath hitches or my stomach drops or a part of me jolts, and I always think, ‘wow, did I really write that?’”

Our memories glaze my thoughts

“I love being able to create something for someone that’s going to help them heal. Poetry is a form of healing, for people and for myself.”

Read the full poem at MAGAZINE.MTMERCY.EDU

Recently Snodgrass was hired as a youth counselor at Four Oaks in Cedar Rapids, an organization that empowers children and families to achieve stability, self-sufficiency and permanency. She

Find Snodgrass and her work at FACEBOOK.COM/COURTNEYKSNODGRASS

plans to earn her master’s degree in

Her more recent collection, “The

counseling with an eye to supporting

Darkest Corner,” explores the torment

the unique needs of veterans, while

of depression. “How dark can the mind

also working toward publishing the

truly get?” Snodgrass asks readers

next great American Novel.

before they travel into the thoughts of a person who lives under the illness’ rule.

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FALL

SPORTS HONORS & AWARDS

s

MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY:

EVAN BOWMAN (first-team all-Heart of America Athletic Conference) | COLTON FORSTER (first-team all-Heart of America Athletic Conference) | ERIC HANSEN (NAIA Scholar-Athlete)

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY:

LINDSAY BRUNSON (honorable mention all-Heart of America Athletic Conference) | MOLLY PRUETT (honorable mention all-Heart of America Athletic Conference) | DANA EWAN (NAIA Scholar-Athlete) | KELSEY FELDMAN (NAIA Scholar-Athlete) | KATIE HOFFERT (NAIA Scholar-Athlete) | RACHEL JELLINGS (NAIA Scholar-Athlete) | ABBY MARTIN (NAIA Scholar-Athlete) | LIZ MOSBACH (NAIA Scholar-Athlete; honorable mention all-Heart of America Athletic Conference) | ALLISON SCOTT (NAIA Scholar-Athlete)

For the latest athletics information and updates, visit

WWW.MOUNTMERCYMUSTANGS.COM

MEN’S SOCCER:

FELIX BUDDE (first-team all-A.I.I.) | KEVON FARQUHARSON (first-team all-A.I.I.) | MARCO FICHTNER (first-team all-A.I.I.) | JAMIE BOOTH (honorable mention all-A.I.I.) | HARIS HADZALIC (honorable mention all-A.I.I.) | TOMAS ZAJFERT (honorable mention all-A.I.I.) | MONUEIR MOODIE (NAIA Scholar-Athlete)

WOMEN’S SOCCER:

AMINAH BALOCH (first-team all-A.I.I.) | CALLY SALTER (secondteam all-A.I.I.) | MEGAN ATKIN (second-team all-A.I.I.) | MELEAH BALOCH (honorable mention all-A.I.I.) | MEGAN HALL (honorable mention all-A.I.I.) | ALY SCHULTZ (NAIA Scholar-Athlete) | MARIA WELBORN (NAIA Scholar-Athlete)

VOLLEYBALL:

LAUREN STOPKO (A.I.I. Freshman of the Year; second-team all-A.I.I.) | LESLIE HOFFMANN (NAIA Scholar-Athlete; first-team all-A.I.I.) | CORI PETERZALEK (first-team all-A.I.I.) | OLIVIA COE (second-team all-A.I.I.) | ABBIE PEREZ (NAIA Scholar-Athlete; second-team all-A.I.I.)

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SAVE THE DATE! Alumni Reunion Weekend | September 23-25 | www.mtmercy.edu/alumni-reunion

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Mount Mercy Magazine | Spring 2016  
Mount Mercy Magazine | Spring 2016  

When Success Follows.