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Mount Aloysius College 2016-2017

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table of contents

Mission Statement............................................................................................................................. 4 Philosophy Statement....................................................................................................................... 4 Non-Discrimination Statement......................................................................................................... 7 Disability Services............................................................................................................................ 7 Facilities............................................................................................................................................ 7 The MAC Student Commitment....................................................................................................... 8 General Student Policies................................................................................................................... 8 Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure........................................................................................ 8 Academic Integrity Appeal Policy.................................................................................................... 8 Academic Grievance Policy.............................................................................................................. 9 Bulletin Board and Flyer Policy....................................................................................................... 9 Children on Campus Policy.............................................................................................................. 9 Computer Email Policy................................................................................................................... 10 Policy.............................................................................................................................................. 11 IT Security...................................................................................................................................... 12 Computer Fair Use Policy............................................................................................................... 13 Music and Video Downloading...................................................................................................... 13 Copyright Policy............................................................................................................................. 14 Library Film Showing Policy......................................................................................................... 15 Student Club Web Pages................................................................................................................. 15 FERPA Annual Notice to Reflect Possible Federal and State Data Collection and Use................ 16 Notification of Rights Under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act................................. 16 Military Leave Process................................................................................................................... 19 Parental Notification....................................................................................................................... 19 Photo/Video Disclaimer Policy....................................................................................................... 19 Withdrawal Policy........................................................................................................................... 19 Campus Police and Safety Resources and Services ........................................................................................ 2 Campus Safety Annual Safety and Fire Report.............................................................................. 20 When to Call Campus Police and Safety ......................................................................................................... 2 Who May Call Campus Police and Safety ...................................................................................................... 2 Emergency Preparedness................................................................................................................ 21 Emergency Notification.................................................................................................................. 22 Timely Warnings............................................................................................................................. 22 Student Harassment Policy (Including Sexual Violence)............................................................... 22 Definition of Harassment................................................................................................................ 22 Student Sexual Misconduct Policy................................................................................................. 23 Alcohol and Illicit Drug Policy....................................................................................................... 25 Counseling and Treatment.............................................................................................................. 28 Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention............................................................................................... 28 Notification of Missing Student...................................................................................................... 29 Security of Residence Halls............................................................................................................ 29 Weapons.......................................................................................................................................... 30 Policy on Crime Prevention............................................................................................................ 30 College and University Information Act - Campus Policies........................................................... 30 Daily Crime and Fire Log............................................................................................................... 31 Health and Safety Inspections......................................................................................................... 32 Fire Policies for On-Campus Student Housing Facilities............................................................... 33 Smoking: Smoking and Tobacco Policy......................................................................................... 34 MAC Annual Fire Report for Student Housing.............................................................................. 34 Campus Informational Safety Programs......................................................................................... 34 Fire Safety....................................................................................................................................... 34 Student Training.............................................................................................................................. 34 2


Before the Fire................................................................................................................................ 35 On Discovering a Fire..................................................................................................................... 35 Upon Alarm Activation/On Hearing the Alarm.............................................................................. 35 Evacuation Drills............................................................................................................................ 35 Fire Safety Programming................................................................................................................ 35 Staff Responsibilities and Procedures............................................................................................. 36 Resident Assistants......................................................................................................................... 36 Additional Evacuation Procedures for Residents with Disabilities................................................ 37 Aiding Persons with Specific Disabilities in Emergency Situations.............................................. 37 Blindness or Visual Impairment...................................................................................................... 37 Deafness or Hearing Loss............................................................................................................... 37 Mobility Impairment....................................................................................................................... 37 Student ID Cards............................................................................................................................. 37 Vehicle Information........................................................................................................................ 38 Emergency Weather Parking Instructions for Resident Students................................................... 38 Parking Fines.................................................................................................................................. 39 Traffic Violation Appeal Process.................................................................................................... 39 Weather Related Cancellations and Delays.................................................................................... 39 Student Conduct.............................................................................................................................. 40 Student Conduct Process................................................................................................................. 41 Disciplinary Process........................................................................................................................ 41 Reporting an Incident...................................................................................................................... 41 Standard of Proof............................................................................................................................ 41 Level One: Hearing Process............................................................................................................ 41 Level Two: Conduct Board Hearing Process.................................................................................. 42 Level Three: Appeal Process.......................................................................................................... 43 Sanctions......................................................................................................................................... 43 Off-Campus Violations................................................................................................................... 45 Interim Suspension.......................................................................................................................... 45 Residence Life Information............................................................................................................ 46 Residence Life Policies................................................................................................................... 47 Health Requirements....................................................................................................................... 50 Athletics.......................................................................................................................................... 56 Provisional Athletic Eligibility Program......................................................................................... 59 Athletic Learning Contract: Fall/Spring 2016/2017 Semesters...................................................... 61 Resources........................................................................................................................................ 63 Child Care....................................................................................................................................... 63 Bookstore........................................................................................................................................ 64 Campus Ministry............................................................................................................................. 65 Career Development....................................................................................................................... 66 Commuter Life................................................................................................................................ 67 Counseling and Disability Services................................................................................................ 68 Facilities Services........................................................................................................................... 68 Dining Services............................................................................................................................... 68 Meal Plan Options........................................................................................................................... 69 Frequently Asked Questions........................................................................................................... 70 Student Health Services.................................................................................................................. 70 Library............................................................................................................................................. 73 Learning Commons......................................................................................................................... 74 Mission Integration & Community Engagement............................................................................ 75 Student Activities............................................................................................................................ 76 Undergraduate Academic Calendar 2016-2017.............................................................................. 79 Sports Schedule............................................................................................................................... 81 3


Mission Statement The Mission of Mount Aloysius College is to respond to individual and community needs with quality programs of education in the tradition of the Religious Sisters of Mercy. Each student will have the opportunity to acquire knowledge and to develop values, attitudes, and competencies necessary for lifelong learning within an environment which reflects a liberal arts orientation and a Catholic, Judeo Christian heritage.

Philosophy Statement As a Catholic College founded and sponsored by the Religious Sisters of Mercy, Mount Aloysius College provides a setting in which students are encouraged to synthesize faith with learning, to develop competence with compassion, to put talents and gifts at the service of others, and to begin to assume leadership in the world community. With emphasis on values of justice, hospitality, mercy, and service, the College’s liberal arts core curriculum provides the necessary basis for leadership and the knowledge and skills for success in a wide range of professions. While the academic focus is paramount at Mount Aloysius, the College also considers spiritual, cultural, social and personal growth as essential elements in the development of the student. Encouraging all students to explore their religious heritages, Mount Aloysius College welcomes women and men of all creeds, races, nationalities and ages who wish to participate in the life of the campus community. Through course work, religious activities, and service, all students are challenged to grow in faith and to fully engage in their intellectual growth and personal religious commitment. Committed to making available a student-centered education, Mount Aloysius tailors its academic and co-curricular programs to meet the developmental needs of each student. Welcoming students with a range of abilities and economic resources, the faculty and staff work to enable each student to reach his or her fullest potential. Academic advising, direct contact with faculty and staff, personal counseling and educational enrichment courses are resources provided to students throughout their college careers. Students are also encouraged to participate in extracurricular activities that include student government and other student organizations, athletics, theatre, and other social and service programs. Mount Aloysius strives to be a just and caring learning community where hospitality and compassionate service are hallmarks. Building on its early history as a women’s college, Mount Aloysius continues to have a particular interest in the education and advancement of women even as it has made the commitment to coeducational offerings in all programs. The College is firm in its commitment to creating an environment for living and learning in the hope of supporting the lifelong intellectual, spiritual, and emotional development of every student who experiences the unique and exceptional Mount Aloysius College education.

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President’s Message Welcome to Mount Aloysius College. All of the resources of this vibrant learning community are yours—all aimed at helping you succeed. We are honored at your choice to make Mount Aloysius College your learning home. Make use of every resource you need as you settle in and focus on this exciting new phase of life. You are joining a community steeped in fine traditions. Mount Aloysius has been part of life in the southern Allegheny Mountains since 1853. Those traditions—brought from Dublin, Ireland by the Religious Sisters of Mercy—are eternal, but squarely focused on your future. The Mercy values of hospitality, faith, justice and service are woven into the fabric of life at this College and touch all of us. We want you to grow here. The kind of growth we foster, while emanating from the common ground of our traditions, celebrates your unique talents. Respect and embrace your fellow learners, but honor your own path. At Mount Aloysius College we encourage the unique contributions of each student. Every year we explore a campus-wide theme together. The theme for the 2015-2016 academic year was “Voice.” This theme proved so rich that we have elected to continue our exploration of “Voice” for the 2016-2017 academic year. Our community’s development of “Voice” as our theme has taken us in many directions as we explored this simple yet provocative notion. Participate with us in this quest. Campus activities will include community service projects, our speaker series, a common reader and much more. Help us make that exploration complete by joining us. We value your enthusiasm, invite your curiosity and welcome “your voice” to our campus discourse. While academic progress should be at the center of your college experience, stay open to new adventures—make new friends and explore new ideas. Reach beyond yourself. This is your time to expand possibilities. You may make mistakes. Learn from them. Read a book that isn’t assigned. Create new horizons in our Library and study for all you are worth. Always remember—you can do hard things. Be proud when you do them. Again, I welcome you to Mount Aloysius College. We wish you well on this great journey. My wife Michele and I look forward to meeting you along the way. All the best, Tom Foley President

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Vice President for Student Affairs/ Dean of Students Message Greetings and Welcome! I encourage you to familiarize yourself with the information provided in this Student Handbook. It contains essential information about the services available to you at Mount Aloysius College, as well as the rights and responsibilities of the members of our academic community. Our Catholic and Mercy values are not simply words. They are guideposts for our community as we live, work and study together. We hold dear the values of respect for persons, service, personal growth and a belief in the common good. The policies and procedures contained in this Handbook are designed to balance individual rights with the good of the community. The Student Affairs staff and I look forward to working with you as a new or returning Mountie this year and challenging you to take full advantage of the opportunities available at the College. Respectfully,

Dr. Jane M. Grassadonia Vice President Student Affairs

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Non-Discrimination Statement Mount Aloysius College strictly prohibits and does not tolerate unlawful discrimination against any person on the basis of age, ancestry, color, disability or handicap, national origin, race, religious creed, gender, sexual orientation, genetic information or veteran status in the administration of its admissions and employment practices, educational policies, financial aid, scholarship and loan programs, athletics or any other College administered program. Any person with limited language skills will be eligible for assistance in language skills from the College upon request. The College will provide such assistance to assure that any person with limited English language skills will not have language act as a barrier either to admission or to participation in programs of the College. Inquiries or requests for information regarding civil rights or grievance procedures, should be directed to the Vice President for Student Affairs, the College’s designated Title IX and Section 504 Coordinator, at the Office of Student Affairs, Cosgrave Center/Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center, 7373 Admiral Peary Highway, Cresson, PA 16630. Tel: (814) 886-6472. If you have questions or need information regarding specific accommodation(s), including physical access to campus facilities, please contact the Office of Counseling and Disability Services department, St. Joseph’s Hall, room 101, or call (814) 886-6515. Any request(s) for accommodation should be made with as much advance notice as possible in order to provide sufficient time for the College to review and respond to your request in a timely manner. All requests should be submitted at least 30 days prior to an effective date of implementation.

Disability Services

Mount Aloysius College makes every reasonable effort to provide qualified students with disabilities the opportunity to take full advantage of programs, practices, services and facilities. Students with disabilities who wish to request an accommodation are required to do so through the Department of Counseling and Disability Services, St. Joseph’s Hall, Room 101, or call (814) 886-6515. At that time, students will be required to complete a formal request for accommodation and provide the necessary documentation. All requests should be submitted at least 30 days prior to an effective date of implementation. The Director of Counseling and Disability Services will review the request, meet with the student, and determine what accommodations are warranted and will be approved. For any request for accommodations to be implemented, it must be formally approved. The College’s policy complies with the requirements of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX and Section 504 of the Educational Amendments of 1972, and all other applicable Federal, State, and Local statutes, regulations, and guidelines.

Facilities

Designated handicapped accessible residence hall spaces are available for students with physical disabilities. The Main Building, Pierce Hall, Academic Hall, Alumni Hall, the Library, and Cosgrave Student Center have elevators and wheelchair accessible entrances. Students requiring alternate classroom seating may request such through the Counseling and Disability Services department.

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The MAC Student Commitment Mount Aloysius College is a special place. Our community is defined by our commitment in word and action to our Mercy and Catholic values. When we have to address a concern in our community, we begin with our values and our Mount Aloysius Student Commitment to creating HOME. The MAC Student Commitment – HOME Hospitality – we welcome everyone and do the small things that count in making our peers feel at home here. Others – we are committed to serving others in our communities through volunteering, acting as servant leaders, and being contributing citizens. Mercy – we respect the value of every human person and try to put ourselves in another’s shoes before judging or reacting. Engaged – we take the initiative in our learning, in our campus activities, and in looking out for each other. We are committed to abiding by all College policies and regulations to ensure that everyone can learn, work and socialize in an environment that reflects the Mercy Values of justice, mercy, service and hospitality. As a community, we are accountable for our actions and so we make this commitment to upholding these values.

GENERAL STUDENT POLICIES Academic Integrity Policy and Procedure

Mount Aloysius College is committed to the academic integrity of the entire community. All share responsibility for maintaining high standards of academic honesty, and no forms of academic dishonesty are tolerated. Forms of academic dishonesty include but are not restricted to: giving or receiving unauthorized assistance on an examination, project, or assignment, using unauthorized forms of assistance such as crib notes or cell phones on an examination, falsification of data, plagiarism (using another person’s words or ideas as one’s own), and lying or falsifying reasons for missing examinations or class. A student found guilty of lying, cheating or plagiarism, depending on the nature of the offense and the history of the student, is usually subject to one or both of the following: a grade of zero on the assignment, project, or examination or a grade of F in the course. All cases of lying, cheating or plagiarism where a punishment is incurred are reported to the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs, who maintains a record of all offenses. Serial offenders may be subject to suspension or dismissal. Students have the right to appeal as outlined in the policy below.

Academic Integrity Appeal Policy

The student submits a written appeal to the Vice President and Dean of Academic Affairs The deadline for initiating an academic integrity appeal is thirty (30) days after notification of the grade. The Dean consults with the involved faculty member and appropriate division chairs to seek a resolution to the matter. If no resolution is achieved, the matter is sent to the Academic Integrity Council. The Council shall consist of the chairperson of the division in which the offense occurred, an uninvolved faculty member from the department in which the offense occurred, another faculty member from outside the department, and a student representative to be determined by the Student Government Association. The Council reviews the case and speaks to the involved faculty member and student as needed. The Council then makes a decision regarding penalty or dismissal. The Council’s decision is final.

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Academic Grievance Policy

If a student has a cause for grievance in academic matters, except concerning Academic Integrity issues, the student is requested to meet with the faculty member involved. If an agreeable decision is not reached, the student should then request a meeting with the Department Chairperson and, if necessary, the Division Chairperson to discuss the matter. If the matter has not been resolved at the Division/Department level and further steps are necessary, the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs will make the final decision. The Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs may convene an ad hoc grievance board consisting of two faculty members, two students, and a fifth member from the College community. Board members will be approved by both parties and will act in an advisory capacity to the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. The deadline for initiating a grievance procedure is thirty (30) days after the publication of grade reports. During internal appeals, the student may not be represented by anyone other than him or herself. The three academic divisions of the College are: Health Studies and Sciences Division; Humanities, Social Science, and Professional Studies Division; and Nursing Division.

Bulletin Board and Flyer Policy

All student club and organization informational flyers must be approved and stamped with an expiration date by the Department of Student Activities before being posted on campus. Flyers may only be posted on those bulletin boards marked as general/informational. Please do not post flyers on office, club, or faculty/ staff bulletin boards. Do not post signs on walls, doors, or windows.

Children on Campus Policy

Mount Aloysius College complies with all Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and federal laws concerning the protection of children, and will immediately report any cases of suspected child abuse or neglect to ChildLine for investigation by Child Protective Services of Cambria County or local enforcement. Mandatory Reporting Employees of Mount Aloysius College, who work with children in the course of their employment with the College, are considered mandated reporters under the law. Mandated reporters are obligated by law to make a report any time they have a reasonable suspicion that a child, they are aware of through the course of their employment, is being or has been abused. Mandated reporters are responsible to make a report to ChildLine themselves or cause a report to be made by the College’s designated reporter. Mount Aloysius has designated the Director of Counseling and Disability Services as its official designee for mandated reporting. The Director of Student Health Services shall act in this capacity in the absence of the Director of Counseling and Disability Services. Outside Organizations MAC expects all organizations that bring children to our campus to have procedures in place for appropriate background checks of the adults who work with the children, and evidence of the appropriate credentialing and supervision of the children and the staff working with them. Evidence of such procedures shall be provided to College upon request.

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Children on Campus MAC is committed to maintaining an appropriate academic environment for collegiate-level teaching and learning, research, co-curricular activities, and all of the related work that supports the academic life of the college. To achieve these objectives, MAC expects the full cooperation of all faculty, staff and students in observing these policies, which apply to all persons under the age of 18 who are not otherwise enrolled in programs of MAC. As a general rule, the mission of Mount Aloysius College is higher education. MAC’s campus is not an environment structured for children unless they are enrolled in a program specifically designed for children and appropriately supervised by trained and credentialed adults with appropriate background check clearances. One such program is the Ann Harris Smith Little People’s Place, a child care program/facility on campus which is governed by state and federal rules and regulations in addition to overall campus policy. Students and faculty expect to be able to conduct their teaching and research in an adult academic environment. MAC manages the campus primarily for adults, and does not have the capacity to provide safe places for children who are not enrolled in specific programs. As a result, parents or guardians who find it necessary to bring a child to campus must adhere strictly to these rules: • No child may be left alone on campus at any time for any reason; MAC will call the police if any child is found locked in a car or wandering alone around the campus; • Children should not accompany MAC students to class; • Personnel should not bring children to work unless MAC has specifically designated a time or place for staff children to be present; • Unless they are enrolled in a specific program approved by MAC with appropriate adult supervision, children should not be in the library, classrooms, computer labs or science building; • Resident students may not ‘babysit’ children in their dorm rooms. All guests must be at least 18 years of age. Children under the age of 18 may only visit siblings who are resident students and must be escorted by said sibling at all times. Children under 18 are not allowed as overnight guests; and • Invited guests with children who are here for campus events such as Homecoming, Alumni Weekend, athletic events, theatre programs etc. are also subject to the provisions of this policy. In the interest of protecting children, we reserve the right to ask anyone failing to comply with this policy to remove themselves from campus. We understand that child care emergencies happen. We ask supervisors and faculty members to be lenient in excusing absences that result from child care emergencies. If no other arrangements can be worked out and a student brings a child to class, the faculty member may act at his or her discretion in handling the immediate situation, but in all cases, should remind the student of this policy. In all cases, the faculty member should inform the respective division chair of the situation so that appropriate follow-up communications can occur in a timely way.

Computer Email Policy

Purpose of the Policy There is an expanding reliance on electronic communication among students, faculty, staff and administration at Mount Aloysius College. This is motivated by the convenience, speed, costeffectiveness, and environmental advantages of using email rather than printed communication. Because of this increasing reliance and acceptance of electronic communication, email is considered one of the College’s official means of communication within the Mount Aloysius community. Implementation of this policy ensures that faculty, staff, and students have access to this critical form of communication and understand that it is a powerful tool that brings with it responsibilities and expectations. Full participation ensures that faculty, staff, and students can access, and be accessed by email as the need arises. 10


Scope This College email policy provides guidelines regarding the following aspects of email as one of the College’s official means of communication: • College use of email; • Assignment of email addresses; • Use and responsibilities associated with assigned email addresses; and • Email communication expectation.

Policy

College use of email Email is an official means for communication within Mount Aloysius College. Therefore, the College has the right to send communications to faculty, staff, and students via email and the right to expect that those communications will be received and read in a timely fashion. The College’s email system can be accessed on-campus and off-campus. It is the responsibility of the users to arrange access to a service provider off campus. Account disabled All student login accounts including email are verified with class registrations. If a student is not registered in any courses for a period of one year, then IT Services will disable the student’s account including email. If you graduate or leave the College be sure to remove any email you may need to a non-campus email account. Assignment of email addresses Information Technology Services will assign all faculty, staff, and students an official College email address. It is to this official address that the College will send email communications. This official address will be the email address listed in College directories. Redirecting email It is recommended that students use the College’s email system; however a faculty, staff or student may have email electronically redirected to another email address. If a faculty, staff or student wishes to have an email redirected from his or her official address to another email address (e.g., an alternate Gmail, Microsoft, or Yahoo mail account) they may do so at his or her own risk. The College will not be responsible for the handling of email outside of the College’s Gmail hosted email. Having an email redirected does not absolve a faculty, staff, or student from the responsibilities associated with communication sent to his or her official email address. Email communications expectations Faculty, staff and students are expected to check their official email address on a frequent and consistent basis in order to stay current with College communications. It is recommended that email be checked twice a week at a minimum, recognizing that some communications may be time-critical. The College considers email a primary communication tool and as such all announcements, requests, timelines, updates, requirements, etc. transmitted constitute fair notice. Failure to access or review email communication is an assumed risk on behalf of each user. Educational uses of email Faculty may determine how email will be used in their classes. It is highly recommended that if faculty have email requirements and expectations they specify these requirements in their course syllabus. Faculty may expect that students’ official email addresses are being accessed and faculty may use email for their course accordingly.

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Appropriate use of email In general, email is not appropriate for transmitting sensitive or confidential information unless an appropriate level of security matches its use for such purposes. The following criteria relate to email use: • All use of email, including use for sensitive or confidential information, will be consistent with the Systems Security and Operational Procedures policy located on the intranet; • All use of email will be consistent with local, state, and federal law, including the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). All use of email, including use for sensitive or confidential information, will be consistent with FERPA; • Communications sent to a faculty, staff, or students’ official Mount Aloysius College email address may include notification of college related actions; • Email shall not be the sole method for notification of any legal action; • The College’s campus-wide email system is designed for use by sanctioned clubs and organizations for mass communication only with prior approval of the Director of Student Activities. Students who use the system for personal conversations or in any manner for personal or financial gain that does not follow these guidelines will be subject to disciplinary action; • Email messages that have been in the trash for 30 days will be automatically purged; and • Students may also create personal web pages on sites.google.com with their Mount Aloysius email account.

IT Security

To secure information at Mount Aloysius College, all student, staff, and faculty users are responsible for taking precautions to maintain the security of information stored on or accessed from their computer or account. Never share your password with anyone. You are responsible for any accidental or purposeful deletion of files or records resulting from your user ID. If you believe someone is using your ID and password, notify the IT Department immediately so a new password can be created. In the event that any equipment or file storage equipment is lost or stolen the user must notify the IT Department immediately. By sharing accounts and passwords with other individuals, the user is then responsible for any data or network equipment accessed from that account and password. Failure to comply with this policy may result in Mount Aloysius College disciplinary procedures as well as criminal or civil prosecution. Terminals and computers should be logged off when unattended, and the office door should be locked and secured. If computers are unattended for extended periods of time, the computer should be restarted so the Novell Login screen appears. Making this part of your daily routine will provide the College with an added layer of security and prevent any unauthorized access to the College’s computer system. By performing these simple procedures, you are forcing anyone who uses your computer to enter his or her own ID and password to gain access to the network. The network and all computer systems are owned by Mount Aloysius College, and the College maintains the right to provide further regulation, as it deems appropriate, to limit use or access, deny access, and to monitor the systems for security purposes. Mount Aloysius College will respect individual privacy, but maintains the right to monitor the use of technology, including email. The College expects users to be responsible in their use of the system. If the College determines it necessary or appropriate, monitoring of all resources may be instituted in order to ensure reasonable maintenance of hardware, software, data, network traffic or security.

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Computer Fair Use Policy

To ensure that campus computing resources are being used reasonably, ethically and appropriately, the following guidelines have been implemented: Unauthorized use of facilities, networks or passwords is prohibited; and Users should not damage, change settings, reconfigure or create unnecessary traffic on College-owned hardware or software. Please note that Residence Hall students may use hubs to share network access with multiple devices in a room. Users must ensure the privacy and confidentiality of all files and programs; Facilities should not be used to: • install, run or copy software without a license to do so; • create or install viruses; • conduct commercial business; • harass others; • transmit offensive material; • guess or decrypt passwords of others; • deprive authorized users of access; • secure a higher level of privilege than permitted by the College; or • change or delete another user’s files or software without her/his permission. A full text of the Computer Fair Use Policy is located in the Policy section of the College’s Intranet at http://portal.mtaloy.edu under the documents section. Violations of the Computer Fair Use Policy could result in disciplinary action.

Music and Video Downloading

Did you know that copyright infringement is against the law and by downloading music or videos you may be in violation of this law? “Intellectual property” or copyright restrictions protect most artistic works including, but not limited to music, films, videos and software. Title 17 of the United States Code recognizes that among other exclusive rights of the copyright holder of audio and visual works are the sole rights to reproduce, display, or perform their work. Furthermore, the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) of 1998 sets forth penalties for copyright infringements performed via the Internet. What you need to know when using the network and Internet at Mount Aloysius College? As your Internet provider it is our obligation to inform you that illegal downloading of copyrighted material is not permitted. Network equipment is installed and in place in an effort to deter this type of downloading. While this technology is constantly changing, it is your responsibility to be sure that you are acting within the law. The College network alerts the IT staff of users who use excessive bandwidth. This may be further investigated and your access may be terminated until a determination can be made about the activity taking place. In some situations computers are infected with viruses or trying to act as a server for distribution of illegal downloading. Peer-to-peer (P2P) programs such as Frost Wire, BearShare, BitTorrent clients, etc. are file sharing programs that facilitate downloading of files. Be extremely cautious if you have any of these programs installed on your computer. These programs contribute to the spread of computer viruses and also may result in identity theft. YOUR IDENTITY may be stolen by criminals using this software. All campus computing falls under the guidelines of the Computer Fair Use Policy. Be sure to read and follow it.

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What are the consequences of downloading illegal files from the Internet? Potential lawsuits by recording companies and copyright holders such as the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). Your identity may be stolen. Viruses or worms can be introduced on computers that use P2P programs. Where can you find more information about copyright and music downloading? http://www.campusdownloading.com http://www.copyright.gov/title17/ What legal sources are there for downloading files? Please note that using a legal service such as those provided below DOES NOT PROTECT you from being prosecuted for illegal downloading or uploading with another program. Always review the terms and conditions of any site you use to download files. http://www.apple.com/itunes/ http://www.amazon.com/music A full text of the Computer Fair Use Policy is located in the Policy section of the College’s Intranet at http://portal.mtaloy.edu under Documents Forms and Policies www.mtaloy.edu/ about_mac/consumer-info/copyright.filesharing. Violations of the Computer Fair Use Policy could result in disciplinary action.

Copyright Policy

Mount Aloysius College recognizes and adheres to federal copyright laws regarding legal use, performance and display of copyright protected works of others. The College expects all of its members, including faculty, staff and students to obtain permission from copyright owners for uses protected by copyright law, except in instances where the use is deemed to be allowed under exemptions for academic institutions and libraries. Mount Aloysius College does not support any user illegally downloading, installing, or sharing copyrighted electronic works of others. Users who do so are subject to disciplinary action by the College including dismissal, in addition to civil and criminal penalties constituting fines and/ or imprisonment. The College further implements measures to restrict access to copyrighted works used in the online classroom only to authorized students of a course. The College exercises its right to use copyrighted materials outlined in exemptions for fair use, face-to-face teaching, online teaching and library circulation of materials. The College further educates its community of users on the legal and ethical uses of copyrighted information. Additional College guidelines relating to use or display of copyrighted works is outlined in the following College documents:

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Library Film Showing Policy.

Guidelines for Film Showings in the Library The Library supports the use of viewing films for education purposes in the Library, but recognizes that the right to display and perform films outside of personal use is governed by United States copyright law. Therefore the use of library space, materials, and equipment for educational viewings of films will be available only when the following criteria are met: • The performance must be by instructors or by pupils; • The performance is in connection with face-to-face teaching activities; • The entire audience is involved in the teaching activity; • The entire audience is in the same room or same general area; • The teaching activities are conducted by a non-profit education institution; • The performance takes place in a classroom or similar place devoted to instruction; and • The person responsible for the performance has no reason to believe that the videotape was unlawfully made.” (American Library Association, 2009). Or: Proof of copyright permission is given to the Library Director when making the room/equipment request. Furthermore, all parties displaying a film in the Library will indemnify the Library for any failure on their part to obtain necessary copyright permissions.

Student Club Web Pages

Student Clubs are encouraged to create and maintain official club web pages. Each club is responsible for the design and maintenance of their page. Free web site services include (but are not limited to): Wordpress Weebly Google Sites (accessible through your student email account) sites.google.com Once your site is completed, a representative from each club should contact the Assistant Director of Communications or the Director of Communications at marketing@mtaloy.edu for site approval. Each club web page must grant administrative access to the club advisor or a member of the Communications Department. Questions can be directed to marketing@mtaloy.edu.

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FERPA Annual Notice to Reflect Possible Federal and State Data Collection and Use

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education’s FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which your education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records — including your Social Security Number, grades, or other private information — may be accessed without your consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities (“Federal and State Authorities”) may allow access to your records and PII without your consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is “principally engaged in the provision of education,” such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to your education records and PII without your consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive your PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without your consent PII from your education records, and they may track your participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about you that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.

Notification of Rights under the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) afford eligible students certain rights with respect to their education records. (An “eligible student” under FERPA is a student who is 18 years of age or older or who attends a postsecondary institution.) These rights include: 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days after the day the Mount Aloysius College receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The school official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the school official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the school to amend a record should write the school official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed. If the school decides not to amend the record as requested, the school will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

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3. The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The school discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the Mount Aloysius College in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person serving on the board of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee. A school official also may include a volunteer or contractor outside of the Mount Aloysius College who performs an institutional service of function for which the school would otherwise use its own employees and who is under the direct control of the school with respect to the use and maintenance of PII from education records, such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent or a student volunteering to assist another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the Mount Aloysius College. 4. The right to request that Mount Aloysius College not release directory information including student’s name, address, telephone number, date and place of birth, dates of attendance, degrees, and honors. Requests to withhold directory information should be made in writing to the Registrar’s Office. 5. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the [School] to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202 Students may request a paper copy of the College’s FERPA policy by making a request in person at the Registrar’s Office. Additionally, the FERPA policy is available within the College Catalog and Student Handbook. Directory Information The law provides students the right to expect that information in their educational records will be kept confidential, disclosed only with their permission or under provisions of the law. One such provision allows the release of “Directory Information” without the student’s permission. Directory information is a type of information that generally would not be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released. At Mount Aloysius College, directory information includes name, address, telephone listing, e-mail address, photographs, date and place of birth, major field of study, dates of attendance, enrollment status (undergraduate or graduate; part-time or full-time), participation in officially recognized activities, degrees, honors, awards, most recent educational institution attended and weight and height for athletes. This information that the College has identified as directory information and that it routinely releases without a student’s explicit permission can also be made confidential at a student’s request. For students to do so, they must place their request in writing at the Registrar’s Office. Additionally, the College can refuse to release such information if a request seems improper, e.g., for commercial exploitation. The College considers a student’s FERPA rights to begin when he or she attends first course at the College, whether the course is on campus, online, or through dual enrollment.

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FERPA and Disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information FERPA permits the disclosure of PII from students’ education records, without consent of the student, if the disclosure meets certain conditions found in §99.31 of the FERPA regulations. Except for disclosures to school officials, disclosures related to some judicial orders or lawfully issued subpoenas, disclosures of directory information, and disclosures to the student, §99.32 of FERPA regulations requires the institution to record the disclosure. Eligible students have a right to inspect and review the record of disclosures. A postsecondary institution may disclose PII from the education records without obtaining prior written consent of the student – • To other school officials, including teachers, within the Mount Aloysius College whom the school has determined to have legitimate educational interests. This includes contractors, consultants, volunteers, or other parties to whom the school has outsourced institutional services or functions, provided that the conditions listed in §99.31(a)(1)(i)(B)(1) - (a)(1) (i)(B)(2) are met. (§99.31(a)(1)) • To officials of another school where the student seeks or intends to enroll, or where the student is already enrolled if the disclosure is for purposes related to the student’s enrollment or transfer, subject to the requirements of §99.34. (§99.31(a)(2)) • To authorized representatives of the U. S. Comptroller General, the U. S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or State and local educational authorities, such as a State postsecondary authority that is responsible for supervising the university’s State-supported education programs. Disclosures under this provision may be made, subject to the requirements of §99.35, in connection with an audit or evaluation of Federal- or State-supported education programs, or for the enforcement of or compliance with Federal legal requirements that relate to those programs. These entities may make further disclosures of PII to outside entities that are designated by them as their authorized representatives to conduct any audit, evaluation, or enforcement or compliance activity on their behalf. (§§99.31(a)(3) and 99.35) • In connection with financial aid for which the student has applied or which the student has received, if the information is necessary to determine eligibility for the aid, determine the amount of the aid, determine the conditions of the aid, or enforce the terms and conditions of the aid. (§99.31(a)(4)) • To organizations conducting studies for, or on behalf of, the school, in order to: (a) develop, validate, or administer predictive tests; (b) administer student aid programs; or (c) improve instruction. (§99.31(a)(6)) • To accrediting organizations to carry out their accrediting functions. ((§99.31(a)(7)) • To parents of an eligible student if the student is a dependent for IRS tax purposes. (§99.31(a)(8)) • To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena. (§99.31(a)(9)) • To appropriate officials in connection with a health or safety emergency, subject to §99.36. (§99.31(a)(10)) • Information the school has designated as “directory information” under §99.37. (§99.31(a) (11)) • To a victim of an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, subject to the requirements of §99.39. The disclosure may only include the final results of the disciplinary proceeding with respect to that alleged crime or offense, regardless of the finding. ((§99.31(a)(13)) • To the general public, the final results of a disciplinary proceeding, subject to the requirements of §99.39, if the school determines the student is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense and the student has committed a violation of the school’s rules or policies with respect to the allegation made against him or her. ((§99.31(a)(14)) • To parents of a student regarding the student’s violation of any Federal, State, or local law, or of any rule or policy of the school, governing the use or possession of alcohol or a controlled substance if the school determines the student committed a disciplinary violation and the student is under the age of 21. ((§99.31(a)(15)) 18


Military Leave Process

Students interested in requesting a leave for military purposes should contact the Registrar’s Office located in the Main Building or at 814-886-6337 and present an original copy of the military orders indicating the need to leave the College for active duty purposes. The Registrar’s Office will explain the withdrawal process and veteran’s readmission policy. A withdrawal form should be completed and signed. The reason cited on the form will be “Military.”

Parental Notification

Within the guidelines of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), found in the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act section of this Handbook, and other federal, state and local laws, Mount Aloysius College reserves the right to contact parents of students to discuss any behaviors found to be contrary to the mission, beliefs and goals of the College.

Photo/Video Disclaimer Policy

Mount Aloysius College reserves the right to use any photograph/videography taken on College property or at any event, sponsored by the College, this includes Graduation Liturgy and Commencement, without the expressed written permission of those included within the photograph. Photographs may be used in publications or other media material produced, used or contracted by Mount Aloysius College including but not limited to: view books, catalogues, search pieces, newspapers, magazines, television, websites, etc. Posing for a photo constitutes tacit consent to use the photo. Should you not wish to be photographed or have your image used by the College please step out of the photo and express your wish not to be photographed. Should students not wish for their photo taken or distributed, they must contact the Communications Office in writing of their intentions and include a photograph. The photo will be used for identification purposes and will be held in confidence by the Communications Office. Any individual, organization or company wishing to engage in still photography, videotaping or filming for production, broadcast or public dissemination by any means on or in property owned by Mount Aloysius College must obtain permission in advance from an appropriate College official. A member of the Communications staff may accompany the photographer.

Withdrawal Policy

The student wishing to officially withdraw from Mount Aloysius College can obtain the required form from the Registrar’s Office. The completed form must be turned into the Registrar’s Office to officially withdraw from Mount Aloysius College. The Registrar will notify all necessary departments. Students should be aware of the consequences of failing to complete an official withdrawal form. Additional information regarding withdrawal is available in the Tuition and Fees Section of the College Catalog.

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SAFETY Saint Gertrude Hall 21 24 Hour Security Officer on Duty 814-886-6327

Annual Safety and Fire Report

The primary responsibility of the Department of Campus Safety is to provide protection for College persons and property associated with the College Campus. Safety officers are on-duty 24 hours a day. If an officer is not in the office, he/she can be reached at 814-886-6327, or by contacting the Switchboard Operator at 814-886-4131. You may also use the blue-lighted phones in some of the parking lots or a courtesy phone inside the buildings. The Campus Safety Department is a non-sworn agency without arrest power. The department cooperates with Federal, State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies maintaining a good working relationship, especially with the Cresson Township Police. Campus Safety maintains a Memorandum of Understanding with local police regarding the investigation of criminal incidents. Local police share with Campus Safety, information regarding any criminal activity engaged in by students at off campus locations including off campus housing. Mount Aloysius College makes every reasonable effort to provide a safe environment for students, employees and visitors. Each person utilizing facilities and equipment is expected to exercise proper safety procedures and report accidents, equipment failures, equipment destruction and facility problems to the Campus Safety Department. The Campus Safety Department maintains two bulletin boards, one in St. Gertrude Hall and one in the Administration Building, with current information of crime statistics and programs offered. Resources and Services VEHICLE ASSISTANCE: The Campus Safety Department has tools to open locked cars, jumper packs for dead batteries and an air tank for flat tires. LOST and FOUND: The Lost and Found Department is located in the Campus Safety Office. Items will be disposed of after being unclaimed for 30 days. ESCORTS: A Campus Escort Service is available to any visitor, student or employee. Officers will gladly provide an escort, when available, at any time. In order to request this service, please call 814-886-6327. Escorts are offered for someone arriving or departing campus when it is dark out or during inclement weather or for anyone with a temporary or permanent disability. ENVIRONMENTAL PREVENTION: Campus Safety works to assure safe and secure conditions in campus facilities and grounds; including monitoring that foliage is trimmed, entrances are unobstructed and campus lighting is in good working order. College community members are encouraged to make Campus Safety aware of potential safety concerns on campus. Procedures for Reporting Crimes and Other Emergencies The Campus Safety Department works closely with the Vice President for Student Affairs and the Director of Residence Life to provide easy access for reporting any activity violating College regulations, any crime or emergency on campus. During regular business hours, crimes and emergencies may be reported to the Campus Safety Department on-duty officer, the Department of Residence Life, or the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. After regular hours, (9:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m., Monday - Friday) incidents should be reported to the on-duty Campus Safety personnel or, in cases involving resident student emergencies, the Residence Life staff member on duty. These same procedures shall be followed to request timely warning notifications and crime or fire statistics disclosures.

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when to call caMPus POLICE AND safety • • • • • • • • •

If you are the victim of a crime. If you observe a criminal act. If you observe or are involved in a vehicular accident. If you or someone you know becomes injured or seriously ill. If you see a suspicious person in a residence hall, parking lot or other location. To express a safety concern; i.e. burned out exterior light, propped doors, use of candles, etc. To report the use, sale or possession of illegal drugs, including alcohol. To report the possession of any type of firearm or weapon. Always call the Campus Police and Safety Department when you are unsure whether an occur-rence should be reported.

who May call caMPus POLICE AND safety

Any student, employee of the College or visitor may contact the Campus Safety Department to report a crime or safety concern. Certain other campus employees who have significant responsibility for student and campus activities are mandated by the Clery Act to contact the Campus Police and Safety Department when they learn of a crime. Departments who routinely contact the officer on duty include Residence Life, Student Activities, Athletics and faculty members. Those not obligated to report details concerning a crime (confidential report) include Campus Ministry and Campus Counseling when serving in their counseling role and not considered a campus security authority. Criminal activity may be disclosed to Campus Safety for statistical information or when imminent danger exists. Victims of a crime may also report an incident to Campus Safety without providing their identity. Campus Safety may keep your information private but are required to file a report. The officer on duty addresses reports of crime and medical emergencies immediately. The officer will respond to your complaint and meet with you to provide whatever assistance is necessary. Officers will investigate all reported crime and work with the victim/s to identify those responsible. The investigating officer will remain in contact with the victim throughout the investigation until the case is closed. Should the responsible person be identified, the victim may choose to have the suspect arrested. The Department will work with the victim to facilitate the prosecution. Mount Aloysius College will work with all victims of crime by modifying housing or class schedule upon request, when reasonably possible. The commission of any crime will not be tolerated at Mount Aloysius College.

eMergency PreParedness

Emergency response and evacuation procedure information is located on the orange sign in each room on-campus and the evacuation signs in the hallways. Each room on campus also has 9-1-1 address cards for use in case of an emergency. An Emergency Plan is located on the campus intranet at: Log into MyMAC, click on “MAC Policies – Documents,” and then click on “Emergency Action Plan.” Mount Aloysius College tests emergency plans at least annually by conducting drills. The drills range from table top sessions to campus-wide drills of the Emergency Plan.

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eMergency notification

The College “Alert” text message system, email system, phone, voicemail system, internet site, and portal page are used for emergency mass notification. Mass notification to the campus community will be done in a timely manner upon emergency first responder confirmation of a significant emergency or a dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health and safety of students or employees, unless the notification at that time will compromise efforts to contain the emergency. Officials capable of initiating the mass notification include Sr. VP for Administrative Services, Director of Campus Safety, Director of Communications, Director of I.T. Services and their designees. The Mount Aloysius College Safety Department in partnership with Student Affairs and assistance from Communications Department will determine the content and use templates as necessary. The mass notification system will be used to notify the campus community when the emergency is over/all clear. Any notification to the larger community or media will be done by the Communications department. Emergency response and evacuation procedure information is located on the orange sign in each room on-campus and the evacuation signs in the hallways. A complete campus emergency plan is located on the campus intranet: Log into MyMAC, click on “MAC Policies – Documents”, click on “Emergency Action Plan”. And then proceed to: https://jics.mtaloy.edu/ICS/icsfs/ Emergency_Action_ planpdf?target=78c84cef-3542-4065-9ef3-1e70b71a3dd9

tiMely warnings

The Mount Aloysius College Safety Department in partnership with Student Affairs and assistance form Communications Department to issue “Timely Warning” notices to the campus community on all major crimes or incidences of significance that occur on or adjacent to campus and are considered threats to the MAC community in compliance with The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act). These warnings are to aid in the prevention of similar crimes and will be distributed through e-mail to the community and poster for Maintenance, Housekeeping and Food Service. The warnings are designed to provide timely notification to the campus community of a Clery crime or an ongoing threat to the campus community. The warning provides information regarding the matter in question, and provides appropriate safety tips. The timely warning will be issued by Campus Safety Department. The timely warnings, where posted, will be removed in seven days. The emergency mass notification procedures are tested by using the same system for campus weather delays and cancellations which happens at least once a year. Small samples of telephone numbers are used for testing throughout the year.

student harassMent/DISCRIMINATION Policy

All students have the right to work, learn, and study in an environment free from all forms of discrimination and conduct which can be considered harassing, coercive, or disruptive. Accordingly, it is the policy of the college that no member of the campus community may engage in conduct that is abusive to others. This includes any discriminatory, quid pro quo situations, hostile, or hateful acts toward another person’s personal, educational or professional interests based on that individual’s race, color, gender, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, religious creed, national origin, disability, or veteran status.

definition of harassMent

For purposes of this Policy, harassment is defined as verbal or physical conduct that denigrates or shows hostility or aversion to a person’s race, color, gender, age, sexual orientation, genetic information, religion, national origin, disability, veteran status, or any other characteristic that may be protected by federal or state law and has the purpose or effect of one or more of the following: • Creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive study, learning, or work environment; • Has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interferes with an individual’s study, learning experience, or work performance; or • Otherwise adversely affects an individual’s educational or employment opportunities.

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MAC Ethics Hotline and Anonymous Reporting The MAC Ethics Hotline may be accessed 24 hours per day, 365 days per year by calling (toll free) to 877-310-0415 or via the web at www.MACEthicsLine.EthicsPoint.com. This system is an additional mechanism for reporting serious ethical issues, fraud or suspected illegal activity and unsafe or potentially dangerous conduct to college administrators for investigation and proper handling. Faculty, staff and students are encouraged to report issues or concerns to their supervisor or other College official when possible. However, the Ethics Hotline is intended to augment our internal reporting system when an individual is not comfortable using other reporting mechanisms and/or wishes to remain anonymous. This System is not a 911 service and situations involving imminent danger should be reported to Campus Safety at (814) 886-6327 or to local authorities. Examples of the types of issues or concerns that may be reported through this system are available by clicking on the links in the center of the MAC Ethics Line web page.

student sexual Misconduct/VIOLENCE Policy

Introduction Membership in the Mount Aloysius College community carries with it the responsibility for mutual trust and respect and adherence to the standards of conduct established by our community consistent with the Mercy Values. Standards for student conduct at the College are set forth in the Student Handbook, College Catalog and in other policy documents. Accordingly, this statement sets forth the College’s policy on student sexual misconduct as applicable to all Mount Aloysius College students. All acts of sexual misconduct are anathema to our Mercy Values which hold dear respecting the integrity of every human person. A range of possible sanctions are described in detail in the “sanctions” section of this handbook on pages 41 and 42. Policy Mount Aloysius College prohibits and will not tolerate unlawful harassment, discrimination or acts of sexual misconduct/violence. Actions which result in charges of sexual misconduct as defined by this policy are subject to the College’s conduct process and also may subject a student to civil and/or criminal liability under federal and state laws and policies, including Title IX of the federal civil rights laws. Definition Student sexual misconduct is defined as unwelcome acts of a sexual nature committed by a student against another person without consent including, but not limited to sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and/or other verbal or physical conduct, including but not limited to written and electronic communications of an intimidating, hostile or offensive nature, or action taken in retaliation the reporting of such behavior. Student sexual misconduct may include, but is not 1. Sexualfor Harassment; limited to: 2. Sexual Assault/Sexual Violence (nonconsensual sexual contact or sexual intercourse); 3. Domestic, dating and relationship violence, and; 4. Stalking. 5. Sexual Exploitation Specific behaviors include but are not limited to: 1. unwelcome touching – either of the victim or when the victim is forced to touch another person’s body, directly or through clothing – such as patting, pinching, brushing against the body, attempted or actual kissing or fondling, and any other inappropriate and/or unwelcome touching or feeling; 2. coerced sexual intercourse (e.g., rape, attempted rape, sodomy, or others sexual acts or misconduct); 3. unwelcome sexual propositions, invitations, or other pressure for sex; 4. implied or overt threats of a sexual nature; 5. making gestures of a sexual nature; 6. unwelcome sexual remarks about clothing, body, or sexual activities; and 7. humor and jokes about sex that denigrate women or men in general. 23


For purposes of Title IX, sexual violence is considered a form of sexual harassment, which means that, as with other forms of sexual harassment, the College must take steps to end the harassment and prevent its recurrence. Thus, while not all incidents of sexual harassment qualify as sexual violence, all sexual violence qualifies as sexual harassment. A student who is accused of sexual violence may also be found responsible for sexual harassment. Acts of physical student sexual misconduct are considered to constitute a form of sexual assault/ sexual violence when occurring without consent. To constitute lack of consent, the acts must be committed either by threat, force, intimidation, or through the use of the victim’s physical or mental inability (of which the accused was aware or should have been aware) to understand the situation, the consequences of his/her choices, or to express his/her desire. Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated in any way be it voluntarily or not or coming in and out of consciousness. Consent is informed, voluntary and revocable. Retaliation Mount Aloysius College strictly prohibits any retaliation against any individual for reporting, providing information, exercising one’s rights or responsibilities under this policy, or otherwise being involved in the process of responding to, investigating, or addressing allegations of sexual misconduct. Therefore, any retaliation intimidation, threats, coercion, or discrimination against any such actions are subject to conduct action that may include probation, suspension, or dismissal from the College. Anyone who is aware of possible retaliation or has other concerns regarding the response to a complaint of sexual misconduct should report such concerns to Campus Safety, Residence Life staff (if an on—campus incident), the Director of Student Activities/Conduct, or the VP for Student Affairs/Title IX Coordinator. Amnesty for Sexual Misconduct Complainants and Witnesses Mount Aloysius College encourages reporting of sexual misconduct and seeks to remove any barriers to an individual/group making a report. The College recognizes that an individual who has been drinking or using drugs at the time of the incident may be hesitant to make a report because of potential consequences for their own conduct. Any individual (group) who (that) reports sexual misconduct, either as a Complainant or a third party witness, will not be subject to disciplinary action by the College for their (its) own personal consumption of alcohol or drugs at or near the time of the incident, provided that any such violations did not and do not place the health or safety of any other person at risk. The College may, initiate an educational discussion or pursue other educational interventions regarding alcohol or drugs with the involved students. REPORTING AND RESOURCES The College is committed to helping students affected by sexual misconduct deal with its impact, and has many resources available to do so. Students subjected to sexual misconduct are encouraged to explore all options available to them---including College judicial processes, civil litigation, or pursuing criminal charges. These options are not mutually exclusive. The College encourages victims to notify appropriate campus resources, including the Director of Residence Life and Campus Police and Safety as soon as possible. However, there are no time limits on a victim’s options to report. Victims of sexual assault who report alleged offenses to College officials will be advised of proper procedures for reporting misconduct to legal authorities by a campus security and student affairs representative. It is also important for victims to preserve all physical evidence including clothing and written communications. An anonymous physical exam and evidence collection is available in Cambria County through Conemaugh Hospital. If requested by the victim, the College representative will assist in contacting legal authorities as well as appropriate College agents who may arrange changes in a student’s residence hall assignment and class schedule to avoid contact with the alleged perpetrator. Counseling is avail for students through Counseling and Disability Services. In addition, referrals may be made through Victim Services or similar agencies within the local area for an on call advocate to be dispatched. 24


Mount Aloysius College will investigate all complaints of sexual misconduct in a full, reliable and impartial manner. The College will take all steps necessary to stop the misconduct, prevent its recurrence, and offer appropriate remedies to address its effects on those involved. The College respects the privacy of students who seek help and/or report incidents of sexual misconduct, but cannot guarantee absolute confidentiality. (Only certain professionals, medical professionals, and clergy) can guarantee anonymous confidentiality). Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 obligates the College to stop sexual harassment (including sexual violence), remedy its effects, and take steps to prevent it recurrence. As a result, while protecting confidentiality to the greatest extent possible, the College may need to investigate an incident and take action once an allegation is known, whether or not the student wishes to pursue a complaint.

alcohol and illicit drug Policy

It is the policy of Mount Aloysius College to uphold all state and federal legislation regarding the possession, use, distribution or consumption of alcohol and other illegal drugs. The possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages or other illegal drugs is not permitted on campus nor is the consumption of alcohol permitted at any college sponsored activity on or off campus without prior approval by the President or his designee. This applies to all students regardless of age. Programs and workshops are sponsored annually by various Student Affairs departments regarding alcohol and drug abuse prevention. Alcohol Policy The law of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concerning the use of alcoholic beverages is quite specific and addresses purchase, consumption, possession or transportation of liquor or malt or brewed beverages. A person commits a summary offense if he/she, being less than 21 years of age, attempts to purchase, purchases, consumes, possesses or knowingly and intentionally transports any liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Fine can be up to $1,000.00. The College will cooperate fully with civil authorities in the enforcement of the law. If civil authorities are involved, the College will not present disciplinary charges unless the College’s interests as an academic community are directly involved. Decisions to hold a college Conduct Board hearing prior to, simultaneously with, or after criminal proceedings is at the discretion of the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students. The possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages is not permitted on campus or at any offcampus college-sponsored activity regardless of age without the permission of the President of the College or his designee. Any student present in the room or area where alcohol is contained will be held responsible for a violation of the College’s alcohol policy. Alcohol Hosting Policy An additional charge will be levied to those violators of the Alcohol Policy who transport alcohol to campus, distribute to other students or have alcohol in his/her contracted residence hall room or automobile. Students will be subject to the student conduct process if there is any evidence to indicate that alcohol may be in the possession of the student. A student may be held responsible for an alcohol violation if there is reasonable cause or evidence for the College to believe alcohol has been transported, possessed, or consumed by the student. State Legislation Pennsylvania law regarding underage alcohol possession and consumption. Section 6308 (a). Purchase, consumption, possession or transportation of liquor or malt or brewed beverages. A person commits a summary offense if he, being less than 21 years of age, attempts to purchase, purchases, consumes, possesses or knowingly and intentionally transports any liquor or malt or brewed beverages. Fine can be up to $1,000.00.

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Section 6308 (f) Exception for person seeking medical attention for another. –A person shall be immune from prosecution for consumption or possession under 6308 (a) if he can establish the following: (1) The only way law enforcement officers became aware of the person’s violation of subsection (a) is because the person placed a 9-1-1 call, or a call to campus safety, police or emergency services, in good faith, based on a reasonable belief and reported that another person was in need of immediate medical attention to prevent death or serious injury. (2) The person reasonably believed he was the first to make a 9-1-1 call or a call to campus safety, police or emergency services, and report that a person needed immediate medical attention to prevent death or serious injury. (3) The person provided his own name to the 9-1-1 operator or equivalent campus safety, police or emergency officer. (4) The person remained with the person needing medical assistance until emergency health care providers arrived and the need for his presence had ended. Public Drunkenness Section 5505. Public drunkenness and similar misconduct. A person is guilty of a summary offense if he appears in any public place manifestly under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance, as defined in the act of April 14, 1972 (P.L.233, No.64), known as The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, except those taken pursuant to the lawful order of a practitioner, as defined in The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, to the degree that he may endanger himself or other persons or property, or annoy persons in his vicinity. A person convicted of violating this section may be sentenced to pay a fine of not more than $500 for the first violation and not more than $1,000 for the second and each subsequent violation Open Container Law In a car: No driver may legally consume any alcoholic beverage in a vehicle in operation on a Pennsylvania highway. As a Pedestrian: In Pennsylvania, there is no state law to prohibit open containers of alcohol in public. However, many local governments have enacted ordinances making it illegal. DUI (Driving Under the Influence of Alcohol or a Controlled Substance) The penalties for driving while under the influence of alcohol or drugs are severe. In Pennsylvania, if you are of legal drinking age (21 or older), you are considered to be driving “while under the influence” if your blood alcohol level is .08 or higher. But, you also may be convicted of DUI at lower BAC levels, if you are stopped by police for driving erratically (too slow, too fast, straddling your lane, making wide turns, stopping for no reason, failing to obey traffic signs and signals, etc.). Severe Penalties The penalties become more severe for these three (3) things: the higher your blood alcohol concentration, the more serious the injuries and damages resulting from a crash while driving under the influence, and the more times you are convicted for DUI. Zero Tolerance Law (Under 21 DUI) The Zero Tolerance law establishes serious consequences for those under 21, who drive with any measurable amount of alcohol in their blood. The law reduced the Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) from .08 to .02 for minors (under 21) charged with Driving Under the Influence.

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Drug Policy Mount Aloysius College is a drug-free campus and students are prohibited from using illegal drugs and/or having detectible levels of drugs in their system. Drug paraphernalia is also prohibited on-campus. This policy applies to College-sponsored events and activities on-campus as well as off-site clinical or internship settings. Many academic programs on campus require students to undergo random drug screenings prior to entering clinical/field experience sites. Students are expected to test negative on their drug screen to remain in compliance with College policy. College policy states “the use of illegal drugs and/or having detectible levels in the system is prohibited;” therefore, a positive drug test will result in dismissal from the academic program for one year. If a student is attending an off-site educational experience (including, but not limited to: clinicals, practicum, internships, and externships) and tests positive on a drug screening, the student will receive a failing grade of F for the course associated with that educational experience. In addition, the student will be prohibited from continuing in that program and may not take courses in that major. A student may continue to participate in courses outside the major for the semester in which he/she tested positive. In order to continue taking courses outside the major beyond the semester in which the student tested positive, the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students must receive verification that the student completed a certified drug treatment program prior to the start of the next semester’s classes and show proof of a negative drug test. After one year, a student may reapply for admission to his/her original program or another health-related program following the guidelines specified by the program in which they are interested in participating. Students who participate in a urine drug screen with an undetermined or diluted result may be required—at the College’s discretion—to participate in an additional screening procedure, including but not limited to blood, hair, or saliva sampling. The student may be responsible for all retesting costs. Students who have a positive test have an opportunity to appeal the test within three working days of being notified of the test results. Appeals should be in writing, should list the reason for appeal as noted below, and be sent to the Vice President for Student Affairs/ Dean of Students for investigation in conjunction with the agency conducting the screenings. Appeals will only be considered by the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students and the physician responsible for coordinating the screening process under the following circumstances: 1) Standard procedures for collecting urine drug screens were not followed according to institutional guidelines; and 2) Legally prescribed drugs (prescribed within the past year) resulted in the drug screening showing a false positive. A student may not appeal a positive urine drug screen result on the basis that the sanction includes dismissal from the program. Disciplinary Sanctions The use or possession of alcohol or the discovery of any student using, possessing or distributing illicit drugs will be considered an infraction. Disciplinary action will be based on the seriousness of the offense, individual circumstances and the best interests of the College community. Possible sanctions include but are not limited to conduct warnings, required counseling sessions, fines or service to the College, probation, suspension, and dismissal.

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Counseling and Treatment

Personal concerns of any type may be discussed confidentially with the College counselor located in St. Joseph Hall 101, or call (814) 886-6336. Students may arrange to talk to the counselor or take advantage of the office’s referral service to outside agencies. Local outside agencies include: Johnstown Area: Crisis Intervention ............................................................................................1-877-268-9463 Conemaugh Health Systems............................................................................ (814)- 534-9000 Altoona Area: Altoona Regional Health System Services Behavioral Health Services...........(814) 889-2141 Primary health Network - Mental Health Services............................................(814) 942-5000 Toll Free Hotline Help and Information.......................1-(800)-662-HELP, 1-(800)-662-4357, 1-(800)-342-AIDS, 1-(800)-342-2437) Suicide Hotline...................................................................... 1-800-784-2433 1-800-SUICIDE National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Abuse................................... 1 (800)-729-6686 Blair County Access Center ............................................................................ (800)-540-4690

Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention

Prevention resources and information are available in Student Health and Counseling Services. A variety of programs and educational activities are offered annually targeted to both alcohol and other drug prevention and to promote the adoption of a wellness lifestyle. Specifically, guest speakers, alternative activities, and Safe Spring Break activities, along with behavioral counseling interventions are offered to prevent drug and alcohol use. The Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, requires all institutions of higher education to certify that it has implemented a drug and alcohol awareness program for students and employees. Toward that end, each institution is to distribute annually to its students and employees a description of its program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. Compliance is required in order to remain eligible for federal financial assistance. Possible Effects of Substance Abuse SUBSTANCE POSSIBLE EFFECTS Alcohol Toxic Psychosis, Neurological and Liver Damage, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Marijuana Bronchitis, Conjunctivitis, Possible Birth Defects Amphetamines Loss of Appetite, Delusions, Hallucinations, Toxic Psychosis Nonprescription Stimulants Hypertension, Stroke, Heart Problems Cocaine Loss of Appetite, Depression, Convulsions, Nasal Passage Injury, Heart Attack, Stroke, Seizure Cocaine Free Base Weight Loss, Depression, Hypertension, Hallucinations, Psychosis, Chronic Cough Barbiturates Severe Withdrawal Symptoms, Possible Convulsions, Toxic Psychosis Methaqualone Coma, Convulsions Heroin Addiction, Constipation, Loss of Appetite Analog of Synthetic Narcotics Addiction, MPTP Induced, Parkinsonism Morphine Addiction, Constipation, Loss of Appetite Codeine Addiction, Constipation, Loss of Appetite Oxycodone Addiction, Constipation, Loss of Appetite 28


All drugs, including alcohol, can produce serious side effects. This is true of even prescription or other legal drugs when used as prescribed, but their risks are weighed against their benefits by medical professionals in the therapeutic context. Prescription drugs used without a prescription and medical supervision can pose a serious threat to the well-being of the user. Because the drugs listed below impair the mind, they increase likelihood of accidents and violent behavior. The many health risks associated with alcohol use are well documented. Small amounts may affect judgment and coordination, impairing performance or even simple routine tasks. The repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence, with multiple physical, emotional, and psychological complications. Effects of the prolonged use of alcohol may include damage to the central nervous system; malnutrition and anemia; damage to the heart, lungs, and liver; mental disorders; and death. Seven categories of illicit drugs and their health risks follow. • Marijuana: impaired memory, lung and pulmonary damage, chronic emphysema, cancer. • Stimulants: paranoia, hallucinations, dizziness, headaches, abdominal cramps, malnutrition, overstimulation of the central nervous system, seizures, stroke, heart failure, death. • Depressants: initial effects similar to alcohol inebriation, slowed reflexes, unstable mood, loss of memory, coma, death. • Hallucinogens: distortion of reality, including illusions and hallucinations, injury of self or others, convulsions, brain damage, coma, death. • Opiates (narcotics): skin abscesses, respiratory damage, malnutrition, pneumonia and hepatitis, heart disease, diabetes, coma, death. • Inhalants: fatigue, weight loss, permanent damage to the nervous system, hepatitis, organ failure. • Designer drugs: psychosis, instant paralysis and brain damage, death. In addition, “the date-rape drugs” Rohypnol and GHB may cause a weakened or unconscious state often followed by amnesia. Drugs and alcohol abuse can reduce the body’s resistance to infections and bring malnutrition, organ damage, and mental illness. Overdoses of almost all these substances can cause psychosis, convulsions, coma, and death.

Notification of Missing Student

If a member of the Mount Aloysius College Community has reason to believe a student who resides in on-campus housing has been missing for twenty-four hours, he or she should immediately contact Campus Safety at (814) 886-6327. The on-duty officer will initiate an investigation. If the student is confirmed missing, the officer will contact the Cresson Township Police and the student’s emergency contact, missing person contact or (if under 18 years of age and not emancipated) the custodial parent/ guardian. The College will make contact no more than 24 hours after confirming the student missing. The emergency contact and missing person contact information is obtained as part of the housing contract.

Security of Residence Halls

Campus Safety works to assure safe and secure conditions in campus facilities and on grounds, including monitoring that foliage is trimmed, entrances are unobstructed and campus lighting is in good working order. College community members are encouraged to make Campus Safety aware of potential safety concerns on campus. In addition to card access, cameras are recording the entrance activity for all residence halls. Campus Safety officers and/or Residence Life staff patrol all residences at least twice a night. Residence hall entrance doors are locked 24/7. Entrance doors are accessible by residents and designated staff via card access or key. Residents must accompany any visitors they have in the residence hall. Residents are not permitted to share their access card or key with others.

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Weapons

The possession, whether open or concealed, of any weapon including, but not limited to firearms, including BB, paintball, and pellet guns, explosives including ammunitions, firecrackers, fireworks and explosive chemicals, archery equipment, biological and chemical weapons, any knife, razor or cutting instrument, the blade of which is exposed in an automatic way by switch, push button, spring mechanism, or any object that could be used to cause fear, and/ or inflict serious bodily injury, and serves no common and lawful purpose, is prohibited. Any violation of this policy may result in immediate dismissal from the College.

Policy on Crime Prevention

The College makes every reasonable effort, through the cooperation of all departments, to create an environment that is both safe and secure. Although we cannot guarantee safety, we believe that through cooperative efforts and appropriate education, we can strive toward that end. Mount Aloysius offers programs throughout the year designed to inform students about personal and campus safety procedures. Students are initially informed of these procedures during Orientation sessions. Throughout the year, programming and workshops sponsored by various Student Affairs departments include information regarding safety issues, alcohol and drug abuse prevention and sexual misconduct awareness and prevention on-campus for all students. Specific programs and activities include SAFE personal safety training for women, Take Back the Night, alcohol and drug prevention speakers, relationship and responsibility week, live fire extinguisher training and non-alcoholic activities such as Friday Night Live. This Student Handbook and email on Safety and Security at Mount Aloysius are distributed yearly to all students. In cases of criminal activity considered a threat to others, local police will be contacted immediately and warnings will be distributed via student email and posted on bulletin boards. These steps will be taken as quickly as possible so the campus community can take any precautions necessary. The College complies with federal, state and local laws including those which regulate the possession, use/sale of alcoholic beverages and controlled substances. The College cooperates with local and state police in relation to all crimes. Firearms, weapons and ammunition are prohibited at Mount Aloysius College.

College and university information act - Campus Policies

The information provided is made available to students, employees, potential members of the MAC community in accordance with the Student Right-to- Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101-542), now known as the Jeanne Clery Act and the Pennsylvania Act 1988-73 College and University Security Information Act. The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (The Clery Act) requires Mount Aloysius College, Campus Safety Dept. to provide students and employees with information on its safety policies and procedures and specific statistics for certain criminal incidents, arrests and disciplinary referrals and to make the information and statistics available to prospective students and employees upon request. It is important to note that the crime classifications for which colleges and universities must provide statistics differ under state and federal law. Statistics for certain crime classifications might appear to be different. For example, the federal statistics for motor vehicle theft differ from the state statistics for the same category because the federal classification includes attempted motor vehicle thefts, while state law requires institutions to separately report attempted motor vehicle thefts. The crime statistics reported under the Jeanne Clery Act are gathered annually by Campus Safety from local law enforcement, Residence Life, Campus Conduct, numerous Campus Security Authorities and include the following: criminal homicide, murder and negligent manslaughter. Sex offenses of rape, sodomy, sexual assault with an object, fondling, incest, statutory rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft and arson are reported.

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Hate Crimes The law requires the release of statistics by category of prejudice concerning the occurrence of hate crimes in the crime classifications listed in the preceding section and for other crimes involving bodily injury to any person in which the victim is selected because of the actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, national origin and gender identity, or disability of the victim. In August of 2008 HEOA S 488, 20 U.S.C. S 1092 (f) (1) F (ii) modified the above hate crimes to include the following additional crimes under the hate crime category: Larceny Theft: The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession, or constructive possession of another. Threats: Intimidation, stalking, unlawfully placing another person in reasonable fear, unlawfully placing another person in reasonable fear of bodily harm through the use of threatening words and/or other conduct, but without displaying a weapon or subjecting the victim to actual physical attack. Vandalism: To willfully or maliciously destroy, damage, deface, or otherwise injure real or personal property without the consent of the owner or the person having custody or control of it. Simple Assault: An unlawful physical attack by one person upon another where neither the offender displays a weapon, nor the victim suffers obvious severe or aggrieved bodily injury involving apparent broken bones, loss of teeth, possible internal injury, severe laceration, or loss of consciousness. MAC Annual Security Report and Clery Act Statistics also available on line at: http://www.mtaloy.edu/student_life/safety_and_security/safety-and-security-information.dot #MountAloysiusCollegeCleryActStatistics Sex Offender Registration The Pennsylvania State Police is the primary law enforcement agency and maintains the registry. The public may view the information at www.pameganslaw.state.pa.us

Daily Crime and Fire Log

The Mount Aloysius College Campus Safety Department maintains a combined Daily Crime and Fire Log of all incidents reported to the Department. This includes all incidents that occur on campus. The Daily Crime and Fire Log includes the violation type, date and time of occurrence, and general location of each reported incident type, as well as the status of the incident, if this information is known. The Campus Safety Department posts specific incidents in the Daily Crime and Fire Log within two (2) business days of receiving a report of an incident and reserves the right to exclude reports from the log in certain circumstances as permitted by law. The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) requires two (2) new safety related requirements of institutions that participate in federal student financial aid programs which follow: 1) Fire Log: Institutions must keep a fire log that states the nature of the fire, date, time, and general location of each fire in on-campus student housing facilities. Mount Aloysius College complies with this rule by including all fire-related incidents in the Daily Crime and Fire Log. To view the daily crime and fire-related incidents log visit the Campus Safety Department in Saint Gertrude Hall room 21. Requests for more information must be directed, in writing, to the Director of Campus Safety. Information will be made available within two (2) business days of a request for public inspection.

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2) Annual Fire Safety Report: Institutions with on-campus student housing facilities must publish annually a fire safety report that provides information on campus fire safety practices and standards. Mount Aloysius College complies with this regulation by including all fire-related incidents at on-campus student housing facilities as part of the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. Information contained in this annual fire safety report includes: number and cause of fires at all on-campus student housing facilities; number of fire-related deaths; related injuries; value of fire-related property damage; information on evacuation procedures; fire safety education and training programs; fire safety systems in each student housing facility; number of regular mandatory supervised fire drills; and policies on portable electrical appliance, smoking and open flames. The Annual Security and Fire Safety Report must include three (3) years of data. If a fire occurs in any building, community members should immediately activate the building fire alarm system by use of a pull station. If possible, also notify Campus Safety by dialing 814-886-6327 to provide detailed information on exact location of fire and if anyone is injured or trapped. The campus fire alarm systems alert community members of potential hazards. MAC community members are required to heed an activated fire alarm system, and evacuate a building immediately. Use the nearest available exit to evacuate the building. MAC community members should familiarize themselves with the exits in each building. When a fire alarm is activated, the elevators in most buildings will automatically recall to a pre-designated fire safe floor. Occupants should use the stairs to evacuate the building. If you are caught in the elevator, push the emergency phone button. The emergency phones in elevators on campus ring to the on-duty Campus Safety Officer. Fire Protection Equipment/Systems All occupied buildings on campus are equipped with automatic fire detection and alarm systems which are monitored by the Emergency 24 alarm monitoring company, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Health and Safety Inspections

The Department of Residence Life performs residential inspections at mid-year, usually during the winter break. Residents are notified beforehand of the inspection process. The inspections are conducted to identify safety violations as well as conditions which may be detrimental to the health or well-being of the wider residential community. The inspections include a visual examination of electrical cords, sprinkler heads, smoke detectors and other life-safety systems. In addition, each room is examined for the presence of prohibited items such as candles, halogen lamps, open coiled appliances, pets, etc. Rooms are also examined for evidence of prohibited activity such as smoking in the room, removal of door closers, unauthorized door locking or alarm mechanisms, removal of security screens or other equipment, tampering with life-safety equipment, etc. This inspection also includes a general assessment of cleanliness of the room, including food and waste storage. Conditions requiring follow-up are reported to the Residence Life staff. The resident’s signature on the Room and Board Contract is required in order for students to take occupancy. This signifies the student’s acceptance of and responsibility for abiding by residential and College policies as provided through all printed publications, web sites, email and other means. Per the agreement, College personnel may enter any room at any time for the purposes of inspection, establishment of order, maintenance, extermination, inventory correction, cleaning, or in case of emergency or other reasonable purposes. Fire Definitions Fire: Rapid oxidation of combustible material accompanied by heat, light and smoke of combustible material, which is found outside of its normal appliance, whether or not it is extinguished prior to arrival of emergency personnel. Fire-related Deaths: Number of persons who were fatalities because of a fire incident, including death resulting from a natural or accidental cause while involved in fire control, attempting a rescue, or persons escaping from the fire scene (an individual who dies within one (1) year of injuries sustained as a result of a fire). 32


Fire-related Injuries: Number of persons receiving injuries from fire-related incidents, including an injury from a natural or accidental cause who received medical treatment at a local medical facility. This includes first responders attempting to control the fire, attempting a rescue, or persons escaping from the fire scene. Persons may include students, faculty, staff, visitors, firefighters, or any other individuals. Estimated U.S. Dollar Loss Related to Fire Incidents: Estimated total U.S. dollar loss of both contents and structure or property destroyed because of a fire incident, not loss of business. Evacuation Procedures Posted: When a fire alarm is activated, evacuation is mandatory. DO NOT use elevators; evacuate the building using the nearest available exit and proceed to the area of refuge to begin an accountability and assessment process. Fire Alarms Monitored by Emergency 24: Fire alarms are monitored 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and 52 weeks a year by Emergency 24 dispatchers. Fire Safety Training Programs Delivered: Number of training programs delivered by Fire and Emergency Services or other responsible persons of authority within the College. Buildings Equipped with Fire Alarm Systems and Smoke Detectors: Buildings that have functional fire alarm systems and smoke detectors installed. Please note all residence halls are equipped with a functional fire alarm system and smoke detectors. Buildings Protected with Automatic Sprinkler System Throughout: Indicates an automatic sprinkler system protects all areas of a building. Fire Drills: The number of supervised scheduled drills or actual events at campus residence halls and other campus buildings that are facilitated and certified by the Campus Safety Department. Various drills are conducted throughout the year to familiarize students and employees with emergency procedures and individual roles. Each year the Campus Safety Department facilitates at least one drill per semester targeting all residential halls. All other buildings undergo at least one drill each year.

Fire Policies for On-Campus Student Housing Facilities

Portable Electrical Appliances: Extreme caution must be exercised in the use of electrical appliances. We strongly recommend the use of surge protectors. All appliances must have the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) approval. Hot plates, sunlamps, space heaters, air conditioners, electric ovens, toasters, toaster ovens, microwaves and any other appliances with exposed heating elements are prohibited. Irons and ironing boards are provided in the laundry rooms of each building. Routine health and safety inspections will occur at least once a semester. In several locations on campus there are microwaves provided by the college for student use. Caution should be taken to prevent fire hazards resulting from excessive use of appliances and over-dependence on power strips and extension cords. Lamps: A Special Safety Advisory – The use of halogen lamps is prohibited. • Carefully read all safety instructions and warnings that accompany any lamp. • Never use bulbs of a higher wattage or of a different style than is recommended by the manufacturer’s instruction. • Never remove or discard a bulb that is hot to the touch. Don’t try to operate a lamp that has damaged or missing parts. • Do not place lamps near clothing, draperies, or bedding, as accidental contact with the lamp bulb could ignite the material. Keeps lamps away from windows, bunk beds, and closets. • NEVER place materials such as towels or clothing on top of lamps. • Avoid placing lamps in location where they may be knocked over. • Always remember to turn off or unplug any lamp when changing bulbs or when leaving your room/apartment. • Taking proper precautions and guarding against potential hazards posed by lamps will help ensure community safety. 33


Smoking: Smoking and Tobacco Policy

The use of tobacco and tobacco related products is prohibited in all campus facilities including residence hall facilities in order to lessen fire and health related hazards. The use of hookahs and other smoking paraphernalia is prohibited. a. Tobacco products are not sold on campus. b. Smoking is not permitted in and around all campus athletic fields. c. Smoking outside on campus grounds is permitted ONLY in the three designated Smoking pavilions. d. Smoking pavilions are located in the following outdoor areas 1) the southeast corner of Pierce Hall, 2) the northwest corner of Academic Hall, and 3) the south side of Saint Joseph’s Hall on the opposite side of the walkway. Smoking outside of these pavilions on campus grounds is prohibited and may result in fines issued by Campus Safety Department. e. Open Flames: Fire or smoke producing articles, such as Bunsen burners, portable stoves, kerosene lamps, cut trees, incense and candles are prohibited in residence halls. Possession of hibachis, barbecue grills, smokers, potpourri burning units or other fire-starting devices or substances is prohibited in residences, as is their use in residential areas or adjacent outdoor space without staff supervision. Violators are subject to conduct action and possible criminal prosecution. f. Campfire Policy: Campfires and bonfires are not permitted on campus property without written consent of the Campus Safety Department.

MAC ANNUAL FIRE REPORT FOR STUDENT HOUSING

*This report is to comply with federal requirements. (MAC l Annual Fire Statistic Reports available on-line at http://www.mtaloy.edu/consumer-information/

Campus Informational Safety Programs

Informational programs are held throughout the academic year dealing with issues of safety and security for all students. Campus Safety is honored to be a part of the educational endeavors across campus. The programs are provided by various departments including Campus Safety, Student Activities, Student Affairs, Residence Life, and student clubs/organizations. Examples of programming topics are Alcohol abuse, driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, texting while driving, sexual assault, bystander education, “Think Drink and Think Luv with New Students� and campus policy meetings with all students.

FIRE SAFETY

Students residing in The Mount Aloysius College residence halls are provided with comprehensive training and information that will enable them to prevent, escape, report and/or handle any fire emergency within the residence halls. Ihmsen Hall has an addressable fire detection system throughout the building with pull stations, smoke and heat detectors. St. Joseph Hall and St. Gertrude Hall have an addressable fire detection system throughout the building with pull stations, smoke, and heat detectors. Misciagna Hall has an addressable fire detection system throughout the building with pull stations, smoke and heat detectors. A water charged sprinkler system is in place throughout the building. McAuley Hall has an addressable fire detection system throughout the building with pull stations, smoke and heat detectors. A water charged sprinkler system is in place throughout the building.

Student Training

Students receive the majority of their training from their Residence Assistants at the start of each semester. This training is received at mandatory floor meetings, scheduled during the first week of each semester. 34


Students are provided with information regarding their floor, their building as well as fire safety and MAC Policies and Procedures. Students are shown the location of pull stations, fire safety equipment (fire extinguishers and smoke alarms) and evacuation routes from the building. The same information is provided to new students who move in during the semester. Immediately upon moving into a hall, every student should become familiar with fire exit routes and locations of fire extinguishers. When a fire alarm sounds, all persons must immediately evacuate the building and exit by the most direct safe route. Occupants must evacuate to points sufficient to ensure their personal safety. All residents must report to their designated evacuation points identified by their Resident Assistant. All occupants must evacuate in a timely manner. Students are trained in the following fire evacuation procedures:

Before the Fire

• • •

Know the location of all pull stations on your floor. Know the location of all fire extinguishers on your floor. Know alternate exits, in the event that one is blocked.

On Discovering a Fire • • • •

Find nearest pull station, and activate the alarm. Shut all doors and windows in the vicinity of the fire. If the fire is small, use fire extinguishers to put it out. Exit by nearest safe stairway. Do not use the elevators. Do not run.

Upon Alarm Activation/On Hearing the Alarm

• If there is smoke in the room, keep low to the floor. • Try to exit the room. Feel the door with the back of your hand. If it is hot, do not open the door. • If the door is not hot, brace yourself against the door and crack it open. If there is heat or heavy smoke, close the door and stay in your room. • Don’t panic. • Seal up the cracks under the door with wet sheets, or towels. If there is smoke in the room, crack the windows at the bottom and at the top, if possible, to allow for ventilation. • Hang a sheet or towel from the window to announce that you are in your room. Call the Campus Safety Department at (814) 886-6327. Be sure to give your room number and your location in the room. • If you can exit the room, put on shoes (and if necessary a coat). If smoke is evident, get a wet towel to cover your face. • Close all doors as you exit. • If while exiting the building you are blocked by fire, go to the safest fire free area, or stairwell. If a phone is available call Campus Safety at (814) 886-6327, or find a window and signal that you are still in the building.

Evacuation Drills

In order to test the fire alarm system and observe student and staff behavior, the Campus Safety Department conducts fire evacuation drills. These drills are not publicized in advance. Students are held accountable for their behavior during these drills. Student behavioral issues are reported to Student Affairs. Fire evacuation drills are scheduled twice per year, once per semester. Drills are typically scheduled within a few weeks of the beginning of the semester. Fire alarm and facilities deficiencies are reported to the Physical Plant Office.

Fire Safety Programming

Each year, Residence Assistants schedule activities in association with Campus Safety, such as live fire extinguisher training and informational sessions. 35


Staff Responsibilities and Procedures

• All Residence Life Staff are trained annually in fire safety protocols and procedures by the Campus Safety Department. • Residence Life Professionals are responsible for the following: • Coordinating orientation and training in fire safety for resident assistants; • Ensuring the evacuation plans are in place in each residential building; • Reporting promptly to the Campus Safety Department any defective exit lights, alarm boxes, fire extinguishers and inoperable fire doors; and • Reporting promptly to the Campus Safety Department any other conditions that may create a fire hazard or unsafe condition which might interfere with the evacuation of occupants. • The Student Conduct Officer or his/her designee within the Student Affairs Division is responsible for handling the disciplinary action for students who do not comply with or violate fire safety regulations.

Resident Assistants:

Fire safety training is included in the comprehensive Resident Assistant Training Program, which occurs in the month of August. This training includes general information, such as proper notification procedures, what to do in the event of a fire, how to use a fire extinguisher and other information. RA training also includes a building specific training segment, and prepared by the Director of Campus Safety that provides RAs with detailed information about that hall. Resident Assistants are responsible for the following: • Informing their students of the policies and procedures regarding fire safety; • Observing that their students comply with all fire safety regulations and documenting any resident who violates or does not comply with those safety regulations; • Reporting any damaged, missing or stolen equipment to their director for repair or replacement; and • Conducting health and safety inspections to ensure that students are complying with all health and fire safety regulations as documented in the residence contract and/or the student handbook. Emergency Notification Procedures In the event of a fire, the following five notification procedures should be followed: • Resident or RA pulls fire alarm, notifies Campus Safety; • The fire department is notified by the alarm company; • RA on Duty and or Security notifies on-call professional staff; and • Professional staff member contacts Administration. • Campus Safety Officer is responsible for notifying the Director of Campus Safety. When a fire is reported, the resident or staff member who reports the fire should first pull the internal fire alarm. All internal alarm systems are connected via dedicated telephone lines to an alarm monitoring company. When an alarm is sounded the monitoring company notifies Cambria County 9-1-1 to dispatch the Cresson Volunteer Fire Department, and notifies Mount Aloysius Campus Safety. The Campus Safety Officer responds and contacts the alarm monitoring company. In the event of a false alarm the officer will cancel the alarm to the local fire department. The Officer contacts Cambria 9-1-1 if the alarm is not false and provides updated information for the responding fire units. Campus Safety has control over the emergency situation until the Cresson Volunteer Fire Department arrives and takes direct control over the situation. The RA on Duty should notify the on-call professional staff member for response. The Professional staff member is responsible for notifying Administration. The Campus Safety Officer is responsible for notifying the Director of Campus Safety. 36


Additional Evacuation Procedures for Residents with Disabilities

• In all emergencies, after an evacuation has been ordered, the following applies: • Check on people with special needs during an evacuation. A “buddy system,” where people with disabilities arrange for volunteers (RAs/neighbors/classmates) to alert them and assist them in an emergency, is a good method; • Always ASK someone with a disability how you can help BEFORE attempting any rescue technique or giving assistance. Ask how he or she can best be assisted or moved, and whether there are any special considerations or items that need to come with the person; • Evacuate or assist people with disabilities to get to the nearest stairwell if possible; • DO NOT use elevators, unless directed to do so by security, police or fire personnel. If the evacuation has been ordered due to a fire, elevators could fail during a fire. Security, police or fire personnel will know if the elevators can be used; • If the situation is life threatening, call Campus Safety at 814-886-6327 or 9-1-1, and • Attempt a rescue evacuation ONLY if you have had rescue training or the person is in immediate danger and cannot wait for professional assistance.

Aiding Persons with Specific Disabilities in Emergency Situations Blindness or Visual Impairment

• Give verbal instructions to advise about safest route or direction using compass directions, estimated distances, and directional landmarks. • DO NOT grasp a visually impaired person’s arm. Ask if he or she would like to hold onto your arm as you exit, especially if there is debris or a crowd. • Give other verbal instructions or information (i.e., move to the stairwell, elevators cannot be used, etc.).

Deafness or Hearing Loss

• Get the attention of a person with a hearing disability by touch and eye contact. Clearly state the problem. Gestures and pointing are helpful, but be prepared to write a brief statement if the person does not seem to understand. • Offer visual instructions to advise of safest route or direction by pointing toward stairwell exits or evacuation maps.

Mobility Impairment

• It may be necessary to help clear the exit route of debris (if possible) so that the person with a disability can exit to a safer area. • If people with mobility impairments cannot exit, they should move to a safer area such as the nearest stairwell. If that is not possible, they should move to an office or other room with the door shut which is a good distance from the hazard. • Notify Security, police or fire personnel immediately about any people remaining in the building and their locations. • Security, police or fire personnel will decide whether people are safe where they are, and will evacuate them as necessary. They may determine that it is safe to override the general rule against using elevators. • If people are in immediate danger and cannot be moved to a safer area to wait for assistance, it may be necessary to evacuate them using an evacuation chair or a carry technique.

Student ID Cards

ID cards are available at the Campus Safety Department located in Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center (ACWC), Room 219, or by calling the Campus Safety Office at 814-886-6327. The cards are valid for the entire time you are a student. Initial ID cards are free and replacement cards are available for $25.00. 37


Vehicle Information

All students must obtain a parking permit from Campus Safety. Stop by the Campus Safety Department located in St. Gertrude Hall, Room 21 to obtain your parking permit. When you register your car you will need $35 and your vehicle registration card. Resident students with a vehicle on campus will also have to register for MAC Campus Alerts, Resident Vehicle Owners group to receive any important information regarding moving of vehicles due to weather. On-campus parking is available to Mount Aloysius students. However, these spaces are only available if everyone cooperates and abides by the regulations set forth in the parking program. All students may only use parking lots 6, 7, 8 and 13 between 6:00 a.m. and 11:00 p.m. Specific areas assigned to resident students for overnight parking are enforced 11:00 p.m. until 6:00 a.m. The campus map further identifies the designated student parking areas. Lot 16 may be used by all students only during daylight hours. No parking is permitted in Lot 16 between dusk and dawn. The Campus Safety Office is authorized to tow a vehicle at the owner’s expense. Anyone who uses their vehicle to transport contraband onto campus also risks losing the privilege of having a vehicle on campus premises. Fire Department regulations do not permit parking in any fire lane or drive lane on-campus. A vehicle parked on-campus is at the risk of the owner. Mount Aloysius College assumes no responsibility for damages, thefts, accidents, or other incidents involving vehicles. All vehicles must be registered by the end of the first week of each academic semester. Vehicles can be registered at the Safety Office during orientation or thereafter. The vehicle registration card or a copy of the card must be shown to the officer for each vehicle when registering. A fee of $35 is payable at the time of registration. Replacement cost of a permit is $5. Inquire at the Campus Safety Department for registering multiple vehicles. The Campus Safety Department will issue special one-day permits in emergency situations. Campus Safety must be notified immediately, either in person or by phone relating the description, location and license plate of the unregistered vehicle. • Student with special parking needs must contact the Director of Counseling and Disability Services to discuss their specific circumstances. • Students (non-resident) wishing to leave a vehicle on campus overnight must fill out an overnight request form at the Campus Safety Department to avoid a ticket. • Students are not permitted to leave disabled vehicles on campus property. • Students are not permitted to leave vehicles on campus over break periods. • Unattended vehicles left on-campus without prior authorization from Campus Safety will be considered abandoned and will be towed at the owner’s expense. • Residents will be assigned parking areas at the beginning of each semester. They will be given parking instructions during their mandatory residence hall meeting at the beginning of the semester.

Emergency Weather Parking Instructions for Resident Students

All resident vehicles must be moved from resident parking areas when deemed necessary by the College due to weather conditions. Residents will receive notification via flyer postings, emails, MAC Alert text message, and Residence Life Personnel. On the date needed the vehicles shall be moved before 11:00 p.m. to a designated parking area. The vehicles will be moved back to resident parking areas the following day after 8:00 a.m. and before 11:00 p.m.

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Parking Fines

All violations will be assigned points as outlined in the table below: VIOLATION COST POINTS No College Permit 30.00 2 Improper Permit Display 30.00 2 Fire Lane 30.00 2 Sidewalk/Lawn 30.00 2 Unauthorized Area 30.00 2 Other Violation 30.00 2 Careless Driving 30.00 3 Handicapped Space 50.00 3 Snow Removal 30.00 4 All parking fines are $30 except for handicap parking violations which are $50. Unpaid fines may be automatically applied to your college bill and a hold may be placed on your account. If a student accumulates 10 or more points due to parking illegally, their parking privileges will be revoked for a specified period of no less than one semester or the equivalent time in weeks (15). Additional parking offenses incurred while parking privileges have been revoked will result in the student losing parking privileges for the remainder of the academic year. All points are deleted at the end of each academic year; however any active sanctions may span academic years. The ticket may be appealed to the Parking Appeal Board. The appeal form must be submitted in writing to the Campus Safety Department within five days after the date of violation. The appeal form may be obtained on the MAC portal page or at the Campus Safety Department. Fines can only be paid in the Controller’s Office during regular business hours.

Traffic Violation Appeal Process

Appeals to parking violations are heard by The Parking Appeal Board, which is comprised of two students and a faculty or staff member. Review Board hearings will be held as needed during each semester. Members of the College community are provided an opportunity to explain circumstances, in writing, regarding the issued ticket. Results of the hearing will be documented and forwarded via email to the student or employee originally requesting the appeal. The decision of The Parking Appeal Board is final. No appeals will be reviewed if filed with the Campus Safety Department after five (5) business days from the date of violation. Questions concerning procedures or interpretations of parking rules and regulations should be referred to the Director of Campus Safety located in St. Gertrude Hall, Room 22. You may also call 814-886-6421 or email wtrexler@mtaloy.edu.

Weather Related Cancellations and Delays

The “Campus Alert” text message system, email system, voicemail system, internet site and portal page are used for any emergency mass notifications. There are certain times when classes may be cancelled or delayed due to inclement weather. Please sign up for MAC text message alerts or check the college website, call the switchboard at 814-886-4131, or tune in the local radio and television stations to determine if a cancellation or delay has taken place.

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Student Conduct Cosgrave Student Center 104 - Upper Level Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday 814-886-6512 College disciplinary action is applicable to conduct which adversely affects the pursuit of educational objectives and the mission and values of the College. The College retains the right to pursue charges through the campus conduct system regardless of whether charges are concurrently pending through local civil or criminal authorities. At Mount Aloysius College, the types of behavior subject to disciplinary action includes, but is not limited to: • All forms of dishonesty including cheating, plagiarism, knowingly furnishing false information to the College, forgery and alteration or fraudulent use of College documents or instruments of identification; • Intentional disruption of teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings or other College activities; • Use or display of vulgar, abusive or offensive language or other media or social media in any college setting; • Physical or verbal abuse, threats or harassment that endangers the health or safety of another person. This includes, but is not limited to, physical assault, rape or other sexual assault; • Any action, situation, or activity that recklessly or intentionally endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student or which requires, encourages, or permits violation of any federal, state, or local statute or College policy, for the purpose of initiation or membership into any organization recognized by, or affiliated with Mount Aloysius College (hazing); • Physical abuse or injury to oneself or another person; • Theft or damages to private or college property; • Failure to comply with the directions of College officials in the performance of their duties; • Failure to comply with the Computer Fair Use Policy (outlined in this Handbook and at https://portal.mtaloy.edu/) and Library film showing policy; • Violation of the Visitation Policy or Procedures; • Possession, use or distribution of alcoholic beverages, other illegal substances, and/or drug paraphernalia regardless of age; • Disorderly or lewd conduct which is disruptive or detrimental to self, others or property; • Failure to comply with imposed disciplinary sanctions; • Failure to meet financial requirements pertaining to damages incurred, i.e. room damage, property damage and property theft in addition to any other miscellaneous expenses incurred; • Presence in an unauthorized area; • Use and/or possession of open or concealed weapons as defined by the weapons policy are prohibited; • Violation of the smoking policy; • Misuse of social media; • Violation of campus alcohol policy; and • Violation of campus drug policy.

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Misuse of the conduct system, including but not limited to: • Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the conduct system; • Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a judicial body prior to, and/or during the course of a judicial proceeding; • Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the conduct system; and • Violations of any federal, state or local law. (NOTE: In cases of violation of any federal, state or local laws, the student has the right to notify the appropriate federal, state or local authorities to initiate proceedings. The College may, however, proceed with its case against the accused even though the legal process has yet to begin. (This decision will be at the discretion of the Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students.)

Student Conduct Process Disciplinary Process

Student Conduct Administration Overview Being a member of the Mount Aloysius student body is a privilege and not a right. As in every community, there are certain rules and regulations that must be upheld. Respect for the rights and property of others and respect for all individuals is everyone’s responsibility. Only in such a community of responsible persons can an atmosphere be established that supports living and learning in a productive and mutually supportive way. Any student who fails to support the mission and objectives of the Mount Aloysius community forfeits his/her right to continued membership in it. The College reserves the right to dismiss any student whose conduct is detrimental to or in conflict with the philosophy and objectives of Mount Aloysius.

Reporting an Incident

Any person may report an alleged violation of College rules, regulations, or policies to a member of the Residence Life Staff, the Vice President for Student Affairs, or the Campus Safety Department. The incident is documented on an Incident Reporting Form which should include all of the following information: • Date, time and location of incident. • Nature of incident. • Individual(s) involved. • Witnesses. • Description of incident. • Immediate action taken. • Signature of person filing the report and the date.

Standard of Proof

The standard in all hearings is a “preponderance of evidence.” A preponderance of the evidence exists when a reasonable person, after a careful balancing of available information, would conclude a violation has occurred and the student/organization charged is responsible for the violation.

Level One: Hearing Process

The Director of Residence Life or his/her representative conducts a hearing with each student who is allegedly involved in a violation of College rules, regulations or policies. The hearing procedures follow: • The student will be notified that his/her name is mentioned on an incident report. • A hearing meeting occurs with the student to discuss and review the incident report. • The specific violations are summarized and presented to the student on a Student Conduct Record Form and the student is given the opportunity to admit violation of College rules, regulations or policies, or to deny any violation. 41


• If the student admits to the violation, sanctions are immediately issued, unless in the opinion of the hearing officer, the reported violation is more serious in nature. In such a case, a full conduct hearing may be scheduled for sanctioning purposes. The hearing officer, the violation which is reported is more serious in nature; a full conduct hearing may be immediately scheduled for sanctioning purposes. • In situations where allegations are significant in nature, at the discretion of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the case may be moved to the pre-board review level to commence a Conduct Board action.

Level Two: Conduct Board Hearing Process

Pre-Board Review The Conduct Officer or his/her designee will offer the opportunity to meet with the accused student to explain the conduct process as well as the student’s rights and responsibilities. The role of the pre-board review is not to determine accountability or responsibility, but to assist the student in understanding the Student Conduct Board hearing process and prepare his/her case. Should the student choose not to meet with the Conduct Officer or his/her designee, the accused student is still responsible for participating in the Student Conduct Board Hearing. Student Conduct Board hearings will be held even if the student chooses not to attend. Hearing Procedures As part of the pre-board review, the following processes take place: • The Conduct Officer or his/her designee schedules a pre-board review to meet with the student(s) accused with the alleged violation and presents a verbal synopsis of the charges. • The student has a maximum of two school days from presentation of charges to submit in writing the names of any witnesses (subject to the Conduct Officer or his/her designee Officer’s determination of relevance to his/her case) and prepare a case. One character witness from the College community may address the Board. It is the student’s responsibility to notify all approved witnesses as to date, time and location of hearing. • A student accused of any violation may be accompanied in his/her hearing by a Mount Aloysius faculty member, administrator or student whose role will be advisory in nature. This person is not permitted to address the board or act as a representative for the charged student. Parents, advisors or legal counsel from outside the Mount Aloysius community may not be present at any hearing; however, they may assist the student during the pre-board review process. (Note: Residence Life staff members cannot provide representation.) • The accused student is notified of the date, time, and location of the Board hearing. • At the Board hearing the accused has the opportunity to ask questions of the person initiating the charges or of witnesses in the case. In cases of sexual misconduct or other violations of a highly sensitive nature, every effort will be taken to allow both the accuser and the accused the right to ask questions regarding information pertinent to the incident without direct contact between the two parties. Both the accused and accuser are entitled to the same opportunities to have others present at the hearing. Also, in cases involving sexual misconduct the accused and accuser will both be informed of the outcome of the conduct hearing. After the hearing, the Conduct Officer presents the Board’s findings to the Vice President for Student Affairs or designee. The Vice President for Student Affairs or designee sends written notification of the results of the hearing to the student within three school days of conclusion of the hearing. In cases of alleged sexual misconduct, a panel will be designated from the conduct board membership pool. A conduct hearing is an internal review of possible violation(s) of College rules and regulations. The purpose is to determine, based upon the preponderance of evidence, if violations have occurred and to assign sanctions which have as their purpose an educational and reconciliatory function. If, in the judgment of the Conduct Board, a student (because of multiple or serious violations, uncooperative attitude, etc.) is not upholding the philosophy and objectives of the College, the student may be dismissed from Mount Aloysius. 42


The membership of the Student Conduct Board consists of students, faculty and administrators. The Director of Student Activities serves as the Conduct Officer or his/her designee and, as such, presides over the hearing. The Director of Student Activities also serves as a resource to the Conduct Board and oversees the deliberation process. The Vice President for Student Affairs reserves the right to utilize an administrative hearing when the full Board is not available during breaks in the academic calendar or the end of an academic term and as deemed necessary. The Conduct Officer or his/her designee reviews the case with the Conduct Board. He or she also introduces witnesses and directs proceedings so that only pertinent material is introduced. Finally, the Conduct Officer makes sure that both accuser and accused have ample opportunity to present the facts of the incident -- as they perceive them -- to the Board members. The Conduct Board reviews the case with the Conduct Officer or his/her designee and questions the student brought before the Board as well as any witnesses. The Board then discusses the case, including all testimony, in private. Specific violations are determined along with a recommendation for sanctions or that no violation occurred. The Conduct Board need not be unanimous in its vote; however, a majority must concur. The Conduct Officer or his/her designee presents the recommendation of the Board to the Vice President for Student Affairs. The Vice President for Student Affairs or designee will notify the student of the final outcome within three school days. Alleged victims of crimes of violence or non-forcible sexual offenses may submit a written request to the Vice President for Student Affairs within three working days of the hearing to learn the outcome of the hearing. All proceedings and results of the Board’s deliberations are confidential.

Level Three: Appeal Process

A student who wishes to appeal the recommendation(s) of the Conduct Officer or his/her designee and/or the Conduct Board must submit a written request for an appeal within five school days of the notification of the results of the hearing. The student must address one of the points listed below as grounds for appeal. The request must be directed to the Vice President for Student Affairs. The grounds for an appeal are as follows: • That the regulations for filing disciplinary charges or the hearing process were not followed. • That available, relevant evidence was not reviewed. The Vice President for Student Affairs or the appointed Appeal Officer will review the record of the proceedings. If, in the appeal, it is determined that new evidence exists or some other reason is present to consider additional evidence, or if proper procedures were not followed, the matter can be returned to the Conduct Officer or his/her designee and the Student Conduct Board for further deliberation. The Vice President for Student Affairs can accept the decision of the initial hearing, or refer the case back to the Conduct Board. The decision of the Vice President for Student Affairs is final except in cases of dismissal. A student dismissed from the College may, in addition, appeal to the President.

Sanctions

Disciplinary action is based on the seriousness of the offense, individual circumstances and the best interest of the general educational community of Mount Aloysius College. The sanction(s) which may be imposed upon individuals or organizations for the commission of the offenses recognized by the College include, but are not limited to, the following: Conduct Warning A conduct warning may be issued when the nature and circumstances of the conduct do not warrant more severe disciplinary action; however, a written warning will be a matter of record in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

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Service to the College Service to the College entails performing duties in departments including housekeeping, maintenance and food service. The conditions and the time period of the work assignment are the prerogative of the authority imposing them and will be stated in writing. If a student fails to perform the services within the stated time-period, a fine may be imposed equal to the amount of un-worked hours, multiplied by the current rate for College work-study wages or additional conduct sanctions may be imposed. Failure to pay a fine may result in immediate restriction from residence halls until the fine is paid in full and/or other disciplinary sanctions. Fines The amount and due dates of fines are determined by the authority imposing them and will be stated in writing. The College reserves the right to initiate a policy for fining students for violations during the academic year. Restitution Reimbursement must be paid for damages or misappropriations of College property or property of a member of the College community. Loss of Privileges The conditions and the time-period of the probation are the prerogative of the authority imposing them and will be stated in writing. The following are intended to serve as sanctions: • An individual may be prohibited from representing the College in an official capacity, such as an intercollegiate athlete or a student organization leader; • An individual may be prohibited from parking a vehicle on campus, living in College residence halls or from dining on campus, forfeiting full room and board fees; • An individual may be prohibited from participating in College programs, such as musical or theatrical productions, intramural events or athletic competitions; • An individual may be prohibited from participating in student visitation; and • An individual may be prohibited from using personal property (including stereos, etc.) or campus facilities. Probation Probation entails a written reprimand for the violation of specified regulations. Probation remains in effect for a designated period of time and includes the probability of more severe disciplinary sanctions if the student is found to be violating any College regulation(s) during the probationary time. Residential Probation An official warning which states that future conduct violation will constitute grounds for the loss of the privilege to live or visit in the residential facilities. Suspension Suspension is termination of student status for a specific period of time. The conditions of re-admission will be stated in a sanction letter from the Vice President for Student Affairs. Students suspended for the remainder of a semester are charged full tuition, room and board (if applicable) and fees for the semester in which the suspension occurs. Students are assigned the grades that would be appropriate if withdrawal were voluntary. A statement of the student’s status is sent to the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean, Registrar, curriculum chairperson, Admission’s Office and Controller’s Office. Residential Suspension This penalty removes the student from residence on campus and prevents the student from visiting the residential facilities for a specific period of time (i.e., the remainder of a given semester or academic year). The Director of Residence Life has the authority to suspend a student from residence if the student has failed to abide by housing policies.

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Dismissal Dismissal is permanent termination of student status and separation from the College. Dismissed students are charged full tuition, room and board (if applicable) and fees for the semester in which the dismissal occurs. Students are assigned the grades which would be appropriate if they were withdrawing voluntarily. A statement of the student’s status is sent to the Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean, Registrar, curriculum chairperson, Admission’s Office and Controller’s Office.

Off-Campus Violations

The College reserves the right, at its discretion, to adjudicate off-campus violations of the Code of Conduct through the Campus Conduct System.

Interim Suspension

When the Vice President for Student Affairs has reasonable cause to believe that a student has violated any of the College’s rules or regulations and that danger or disruption will be present if a student is permitted to remain on campus or in a College residence hall, an interim suspension may be imposed pending a full consideration of the case. A student placed on interim suspension will be required to leave campus and/or the residence halls immediately and remain off-campus until completion of the disciplinary proceedings. The Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee is authorized to impose an interim suspension. Student Grievance Policy Grievance Process for Allegations of Violations of Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972: Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, provides that “no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, or denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” The College has designated Dr. Jane Grassadonia, Vice President for Student Affairs, as the Title IX Compliance Officer. Dr. Grassadonia’s office is located in Cosgrave Center (814-8866472). If a student or employee wishes to file a complaint alleging a violation of Title IX, this complaint should be filed with Dr. Grassadonia. The Title IX/504 officer works in concert with the Director of Human Resources, the College’s risk manager and other areas to investigate and resolve grievances. A grievance involving an employee will be referred to the Director of Human Resources for resolution. The complainant also has the right to pursue resolution through the appropriate state and/or federal agencies, including the Office of Civil Rights. Grievance process for Allegations of Violations of Discrimination under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act: The Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act prohibits discrimination against any individuals because of a disability as defined in these laws. If a student believes that he/she has been a victim of discrimination he/she may file a complaint with Dr. Jane Grassadonia, Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students, at 814-886-6472 in the Cosgrave Center/ACWC. The Title IX/504 officer works in concert with the Director of Human Resources, the College’s risk manager and other areas to investigate and resolve grievances. A grievance involving an employee will be referred to the Director of Human Resources for resolution. The complainant also has the right to pursue resolution through the appropriate state and/or federal agencies, including the Office of Civil Rights.

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Residence Life Information

Residence Life Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday Director of Residence Life located in Cosgrave 112 Phone: 814-886-6407 Assistant Director of Residence Life located in Cosgrave 116 Phone: 814-886-6388 Graduate Resident Director located in Ihmsen Residence Life Office Phone: 814-886-6668 Graduate Resident Director located in McAuley Residence Life Office Phone: 814-886-6307 The Department of Residence Life at Mount Aloysius College is tasked with providing a safe, community-centered living environment on campus. The Department also enriches campus life through the creation of co-curricular events that broaden and deepen students’ academic experiences. The Residence Life staff includes professional staff and Resident Assistants (RAs) who work with residents to foster a strong sense of community in each residence hall. Freshmen and sophomore students are required to live on-campus unless they reside with their parents or guardians within the commuting distance (a 45-minute radius of campus). The residence halls are designed and programmed for traditional-aged students. The College operates five residence halls on campus: Ihmsen Hall, St. Gertrude Hall, St. Joseph Hall, Misciagna Hall and McAuley Hall and one house on Park Avenue. Most rooms are double and/or triple occupancy; however, single rooms are sometimes available for an additional fee. All of the residence halls have lounge areas with study rooms. The entire campus is served by a wireless network. Ihmsen Hall Ihmsen Hall accommodates men and women in separate sections of the building and houses predominately first-year students. Each room in Ihmsen Hall contains a sink, beds, dressers, desks, chairs and a mirror. Microwave ovens and sinks are located on each floor of Ihmsen Hall. The building is secured with an electronic access point. The security system allows entrance at two doors. St. Gertrude’s Hall St. Gertrude’s Hall is an all-women’s residence hall. Rooms are primarily single occupancy and furnished with beds, dressers, desks, chairs and mirrors. Residents access this hall by using an electronic access point. St. Joseph Hall St. Joseph Hall is a co-ed residence hall. The rooms are furnished similarly to Ihmsen Hall. Rooms are double and triple occupancy with a community bathroom. Residents access this hall by using an electronic access point. Misciagna Hall Misciagna Hall offers suite-style living for students. Each suite includes two double-occupancy bedrooms with a bed, dresser, desk, chair and closet for each resident; a living room/kitchen area with a microwave, refrigerator, sink, cupboard space, closet space, couch, arm chairs, TV stand (students must provide own TV), table, chairs and a bathroom/vanity space. Misciagna Hall is air-conditioned and houses predominantly upper class students. An electronic proximity lock allows access by residents of this hall. McAuley Hall McAuley Hall is designated as a sophomore living community and offers pairs of double occupancy rooms connected by a pass-through sink area with separate lavatory and shower. There are also a limited number of designated single rooms in the building. McAuley Hall is air-conditioned and offers study rooms and lounge areas on each floor in addition to a large multi-purpose room. An electronic proximity lock allows access by residents of this hall. 46


425 Park Avenue The Christian Living house is an off-campus living option only available through an application and selection process. Director of Residence Life The Director of Residence Life supervises the entire Residence Life program and works closely with residence hall staff to coordinate and implement Residence Life programming on campus. The Director also works closely with other members of the Student Affairs staff in the areas of programming, discipline and administration. Assistant Director of Residence Life The Assistant Director works closely with the Director of Residence Life and is involved in the daily operations of the residence halls. The Assistant Director lives on campus and may be contacted in the Ihmsen Hall Office located on the lower-level of Ihmsen Hall. Graduate Resident Director The Graduate Resident Directors assists the Director of Resident Life and the Assistant Director of Resident Life in the daily operations of the residence halls. The Graduate Resident Directors live on-campus and may be contacted in the Residence Life Offices in McAuley and Ihmsen Hall. Resident Assistants (RAs) The Resident Assistants are responsible for students living in a specific residence hall. They assist students as they develop as young men and women and responsible group members. RA’s also act as a liaison between the students and administration as they explain and enforce campus policies. Although the RA’s will be available most of the time, they are students too and need quiet time. If students are unable to reach their specific RA, they can check the RA Duty Schedule posted outside each RA’s door, or contact the Office of Campus Safety. Programming Residence Life programming is based upon the concept of wellness in mind, body and spirit. At Mount Aloysius College, wellness is guided by the values of mercy, hospitality, justice, service and respect. Residence Life challenges students to develop leadership skills, become caring community members, and pursue their chosen vocation. Programs and events are offered throughout the year, and resident students are encouraged to become involved in planning and conducting these with their RA. Off-Campus Housing The College does not offer off-campus housing. The College also does not maintain a list of available rental properties. Local listings may be obtained through the Cresson Mainliner, Johnstown Tribune-Democrat and Altoona Mirror newspapers. Area realtors may also have listings of rental properties.

Residence Life Policies

Appliances Extreme caution must be exercised in the use of electrical appliances. All appliances must have the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) approval. Hot plates, sunlamps, space-heaters, airconditioners, electric ovens, toasters, toaster ovens, microwaves and any other appliances with exposed heating elements are prohibited. Irons and ironing boards are provided in the laundry rooms of each building. Routine health and safety inspections will occur at least once a semester. Assignments/Occupancy All students must reside in their assigned rooms. The College reserves the right to increase occupancy of a room to its designated capacity or beyond its normal limit, and to assign or reassign rooms and residence halls. Unauthorized room changes will result in a $50.00 surcharge. Students shall not permit any persons to share the premises, nor shall he/she keep unauthorized roommates, boarders, or children in the assigned room. Residence hall rooms are reserved for the contracted residents of that space. No forms of cohabitation are permissible. 47


Breaks All residence halls are closed for Fall Break, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Spring Break and Easter Break. As a general rule, no resident will be permitted to remain in residence halls during scheduled closings. Housing is provided for college sponsored activities. Any student seeking extended stays due to involvement in a college sponsored activity must submit a request to the Director of Residence Life seven days prior to hall closings. All requests need to be submitted through college email. All students are required to follow residence hall closing protocols and vacate halls at the specified time. By prior arrangement, housing is provided for athletes and other students with academic or curricular requirements during vacation periods. Students who have not been granted extended stay over breaks and are found in the residence halls may be subject to a conduct meeting.

Care and Use of Rooms and Furnishings These items are forbidden in the residence halls - Candles, Incense, Halogen Lamps, Potpourri Burners.

Students are responsible for keeping their assigned residence hall areas and residence hall common spaces such as lounges and laundry rooms clean and orderly. Community and public restrooms/showers will be cleaned by campus housekeeping staff. Students can request cleaning supplies through the campus work order system. Failure to maintain standards of cleanliness may result in conduct action and assessment of cleaning charges. Ihmsen, McAuley, St. Joseph and St. Gertrude Halls – Residents are expected to clean their own sinks, toilet and shower areas. Community restrooms will be cleaned regularly by housekeeping staff. Misciagna Hall - Residents are responsible for cleaning their entire suite - including kitchen areas and bathrooms. A vacuum cleaner, dust mops, brooms, dustpans, etc. are provided in utility closets within the residence hall. Failure to maintain standards of cleanliness may result in disciplinary action and assessment of cleaning charges. 425 Park Avenue Residents are responsible for cleaning the entire house, including the kitchen, common areas, and bathrooms/showers. A vacuum cleaner, dust mop, brooms, dust pans, etc. is provided. Failure to maintain standards of cleanliness may result in disciplinary action and assessment of cleaning charges. Work Requests Resident students are expected to submit work requests for repairs or services needed. Nonemergency work requests should be submitted through the College web portal. To access this portal, log in and go to the Help Tab. Look for Maintenance Work Orders. Emergency work requests during the day should be called into the Department of Residence Life at extension 6407 or extension 6388. Emergency work request after business hours should be submitted to Campus Safety via telephone (extension 6327). Campus Safety will then notify the appropriate personnel. College Lounge Furniture College lounge furniture and other college property are placed in common areas for community use. Individuals may not take or borrow this furniture for use in their rooms; nor may they abuse or remove any college property. Anyone who chooses to violate this policy will be subject to disciplinary sanctions, including fines and restitution. All original room furnishings must remain in assigned rooms for the entire school year.

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Cooking Students are permitted to cook in the kitchen areas in their residence halls. The following kitchen use guidelines must be obeyed: • Always make sure the burners and oven are turned off after use; • Thoroughly clean cooking and eating areas—including stovetop, sink, counters, and tables; • Wash pots, pans, utensils and dishes within 30 minutes of finishing meal or event; • Dispose of any table scraps and uneaten food in the proper garbage cans; • Mark your name and the date on all food left in the refrigerator; • Throw away any uneaten food in the refrigerator after five days; and • Do not eat other people’s food without permission. Common Areas/Lounges Residence hall common areas and lounges are designed to offer gathering and program space for educational and recreational purposes. These are shared spaces and should be taken care of by each member of a residence hall community. Individuals or groups should not use these spaces in ways that prevent other students from also using the spaces (i.e., sleeping in the lounge as opposed to in resident rooms) Club meetings or other college events wishing to use Residence Hall and/or Common areas must be registered and approved by the Department of Student Activities and the Department of Resident Life. Unapproved club meetings or other events are not permitted in any of the residence hall lounge or residence common areas such as the Ihmsen Breezeway. Damages The Residence Life Staff inventories all resident rooms and residence halls prior to move-in. Students are requested to carefully review this inventory and inform their RA of any pre-existing damage not listed. Any damage found at checkout will otherwise be charged to the student. Types of damages for which assessments are made include, but are not limited to damages to furniture (burns, stains, holes, rips); walls (holes, dirt, tape marks); sinks and bathroom/ kitchen areas; floor and ceiling tiles; damaged or missing window screens or blinds; broken light fixtures; broken windows; missing furnishings (mattresses, chairs, desks, beds); unreturned keys and/or improper check-out. Any damage in a public area of the residence halls by unidentified persons will be appraised on a pro-rated basis and charged to all occupants of the residence hall where the damage occurred. Students should not, under any circumstance, attempt to repair damages themselves. Entrance Doors Students may not prop open entrance doors or share access cards/keys with another person. This action jeopardizes the safety of all resident students and will not be tolerated. Students violating this policy may be fined $200, in addition to any other disciplinary sanction deemed to be appropriate. Fire Safety Students residing in the Mount Aloysius College residence halls are provided training and information, which will enable them to both prevent fire hazards and respond to a fire emergency if a fire were to occur within the residence halls. Student Training All Residence Life staff is trained annually in fire safety protocols and procedures by the Department of Campus Safety. Students receive the majority of their training from their Resident Assistants at the start of each semester. This training is provided at mandatory floor meetings, scheduled during the first week of each semester.

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During these meetings, students are given information regarding fire safety and MAC policies and procedures. Students are shown the location of pull stations, fire safety equipment (fire extinguishers and smoke alarms) and evacuation routes from the building. The same information is provided to new students who move in during the semester. Immediately upon moving into a hall, every student should become familiar with fire exit routes and locations of fire extinguishers. When a fire alarm sounds, all persons must immediately evacuate the building, exiting by the most direct safe route. Occupants must evacuate to points sufficient to ensure their personal safety. All residents must report to their designated evacuation points identified by their Resident Assistant. All occupants must evacuate in a timely manner. Policies and procedures can be found in the Campus Safety Section of this Student Handbook. False Fire Alarms False alarms endanger lives and inconvenience many people. A false fire alarm is a criminal offense punishable by a $10,000 fine and/or five years imprisonment. Civil authorities will be immediately notified to deal with offenders. Student offenders will also be subject to the campus conduct system. Misuse of Fire Safety Equipment Other fire equipment including fire extinguishers, hoses and alarm boxes must not be tampered with or misused. A fine of $200 plus damages will be assessed to any individual or group held in violation. Any students misusing fire equipment will also be subject to the campus conduct system.

Health Requirements

Please see the Student Health Services Section of this Handbook for complete list of requirements. The following must be completed before students begin classes. A. Required for All Students: Health Forms: All students entering college must have a health form on file in Health Services and have received a physical exam by their physician. You can request a Health Form through the Health Services Office. The Physical Exam and Immunization portion of the health form must completed by your family physician. Immunizations: All students are required to have the following immunizations before entering college: • Polio series; • Varicella (Chicken Pox) vaccine or history of the disease; • Tetanus/Diphtheria vaccine (Must have a TD booster within the past 10 years.); • MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) 2 doses, or report of positive titers confirming immunity; • Meningococcal Vaccine or signed waiver (Pennsylvania Law); • A Meningitis booster is strongly recommended. • Health Insurance (We do not provide health insurance); and • Copy of health insurance card. B. Required for all Resident Students All health forms and immunizations must be completed PRIOR to moving into the residence halls. Ambulance Service. It is highly recommended that resident students purchase an ambulance subscription from the Cresson Area Ambulance. Mount Aloysius College does not transport ill students to a physician’s office or emergency room. If a student is ill and needs further evaluation an ambulance may be called to transport them. Mount Aloysius College is not responsible for payment of the ambulance transports for injury or illness. 50


Holiday Decorations Christmas trees and decorations must meet the following guidelines: • Artificial trees and decorations are allowed. Live trees and wreaths are not permitted in the residence halls. • Decorations cannot block fire safety equipment or exits and must conform to the fire safety policy. • All decorations must be taken down and/or disposed of before students leave for any Break. This includes decorations in individual student rooms. Housing and Damage Deposit Resident students are required to pay a Housing and Damage Deposit of $125 each year. The Housing and Damage Deposit reserves a room in campus housing and also functions as a damage deposit fee. The deposit is in addition to tuition and room/board charges (if damage or cleaning charges are found, the costs will be deducted from the $125 deposit) and will be refunded to the student less any damage charges to the room or residence hall. New student room assignments are based on the date of housing deposit. Should the residence halls become oversubscribed the date of housing deposit will be used to determine housing availability. Students who do not follow check-out procedures for breaks and at the end of the spring semester will be charged an additional fine. Rooms are assessed damage by the resident assistant, residence life professionals staff and the Director of Facilities. If damage is found in student rooms, a charge will be deducted from the $125 housing deposit. Students are required to pay a $125 deposit every year they plan to live on campus. Reside rooms are assessed for damage and cleanliness by the resident assistant (RA) when a student vacates the room. Keys and Access Cards Each resident student is issued a room key and a mailbox key when they officially check into the residence hall. Student ID cards will function as access cards to allow them entry into the residence halls. For security reasons, a resident may not have keys to rooms other than their own, nor may they have more than one key to their own rooms. Any student using another person’s access card or giving his or her access card to another individual will be subject to a $200 fine and/or disciplinary action. Students are encouraged to keep their ground level windows locked when not in the room. A $25 fee is charged for the replacement of a lost or damaged access card. When a student loses a key, the lock will be replaced, new keys made and the student will be charged for the new lock and labor. This policy minimizes the possibility that someone may find the key and gain access to that room. Anyone finding a key should give the key to a staff member immediately. Only College personnel are authorized to change or repair locks or to duplicate keys. Mail Service Mail delivery to the College is made in accordance with U.S. postal schedules. Mail is placed in the mailboxes in accordance with the schedule of the Residence Life Staff. Resident student mailboxes are located in Ihmsen, Misciagna, and McAuley first floor lobbies. An email notice will be sent if a student receives a package. Outgoing letters can be placed in the outgoing mail-slot located in the Ihmsen Hall Lounge or at the College Switchboard. Overweight or oversized letters and packages may be prepared for mailing at the College Support Center, located on the lower-level of the Main Building. Resident students are responsible for changing their address upon leaving the residence halls. Student packages can now be picked up in Ihmsen Residence Life office.

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Noise Any resident who is disturbing other residents with noise (voice, stereo, television, etc.) is not being considerate. It is preferred that the resident being disturbed make the first attempt to stop the noise. However, it is within the RA’s jurisdiction to confront any situation regarded as a noise problem, regardless of the time of day. Activity within any room should scarcely be noticeable outside of that room. Students who repeatedly are inconsiderate of others and create unreasonable disturbances will face disciplinary action. Use of the garbage chutes is prohibited between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 10:00 a.m. due to the noise disturbance. Obstructing Entrances Students are not permitted to hang items that block the entrance to their residence hall rooms. Overnight Guests A resident student may invite a guest of the same gender to stay overnight in his/ her room provided the following conditions are met: • Overnight guest visits will be limited to five (5) nights per month; • Overnight guests must be age 18 or older. Children are not permitted to stay overnight in the residence halls; • Ann Overnight Guest Form is completed. These are available in the Department of Residence Life or online under the Residence Life section of the college website; • The Overnight Guest Form (with appropriate signatures) must be submitted to the Department of Residence Life and the Campus Safety Office prior to 9:00 p.m. on the night of the visit; • The resident’s roommate has agreed to have the guest; and • The guest’s automobile is registered with Security and properly parked in the resident parking lot. Please remember that guests are not allowed to sleep overnight in the common areas of the residence halls. Painting/Wallpapering Painting or wallpapering by students is not allowed in student rooms. This includes walls, ceilings and furniture. Parking Parking is available for each resident student in the designated lot(s) as specified by Campus Safety at the time of vehicle registration. All vehicles must be registered with the Campus Safety Office by the end of the first week of each academic semester. Regulations for parking are stated in this Student Handbook, and resident students are held accountable for compliance with these regulations. Personal Property The College does not accept responsibility for the loss or damage to personal property due to theft, fire or other causes. Students are advised to carry insurance on personal property, either through their family homeowner’s policy or by purchasing renter’s insurance. Residents are encouraged to secure their valuables and keep their rooms locked at all times. When items are left in the residence halls or storage rooms after the official closing of the residence halls each year, the College will declare them abandoned. They will be disposed of or distributed to those in need. Pets For health and safety reasons, pets (with the exception of fish in an aquarium) are not allowed in the residence halls. If a pet is discovered, the student will immediately be expected to remove the animal from the residence hall and may face disciplinary action.

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Freshmen/Sophomore Residency Requirement Mount Aloysius requires traditional freshman and sophomore students (dependents of parents or legal guardians) to live on campus if they live outside of the established 45-minute commuting zone of the College. While living on campus is highly recommended for all traditional age students, those who live within the established 45-minute commuting zone of the College may live and commute from the home of their parents or legal guardians. Junior students and higher will have the option to live off-campus. Students moving from campus housing to off-campus housing usually lose partial federal and state funding for their educational expenses. Mount Aloysius College grant money and scholarship money is also decreased for off-campus students. Questions about housing at Mount Aloysius College should be directed to the Director of Residence Life by calling 814-886-6407. If extenuating circumstances prohibit a traditional freshman or sophomore (who lives outside the commuting distance of campus) from living on campus, the student should contact the Student Affairs Office in Cosgrave Center, room 106. Room Changes Students should make every effort to work together to achieve a compatible living situation with roommates and neighbors. If difficulties arise and students are not able to resolve these among themselves, they should seek assistance from the RA who will make every effort to assist in the resolution. The Residence Life Professional Staff may authorize a room change if all attempts at mediation have been exhausted. Students will not be permitted to change rooms for the first two weeks of each semester in order to conduct roster verifications. Thereafter, room changes may be requested through the Department of Residence Life. Any unauthorized room change may result in a fine. Room Consolidation By the end of the second week of each semester, if a student does not have a roommate and has not paid for a single room, he or she will be required to buy out the room as a single or participate in the room process in order to consolidate with a new roommate. This may require a student to move to a different room than originally assigned. If vacancies occur after the second week of the semester, the Director of Residence Life will make consolidation decisions on a case-by-case basis. Room Contracts Room and board contracts are for the fall and spring semesters (unless a student starts in January at the College) and are available to full-time students (i.e. students carrying 12 or more credits per semester) and are designed for traditional students. Any student carrying less than 12 credits, who desires to live in the residence halls must receive permission to do so from the Vice President for Student Affairs. A signed room contract is a binding obligation between the student and Mount Aloysius College. The student is responsible for satisfying the full financial obligation of the contract on time within the published College payment schedule. The student’s account must be cleared or payment arrangements made prior to moving into the residence halls. The student is also obligated to reside in the room stipulated in the contract and to abide by the rules of conduct established by the College. The Room and Board Contract is legally binding. When a student signs the contract for the academic year, the student is obligated for both fall and spring semesters. Contract releases are granted only under special circumstances. All requests for a contract release should be submitted to the Department of Residence Life. Requests will be reviewed by the Room and Board Contract Release Committee. A student’s room and board contract is automatically terminated if the student’s enrollment is terminated for any reason or the student is removed from the residence hall as a result of a disciplinary hearing. Room and board fees are not refundable.

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Room and Board Contract Release Students who wish to be released from a room and board contract must complete a Contract Release Request Form. These forms can be obtained in the Office of Student Affairs, located in Cosgrave, room 112. Completed forms with all required documentation must be submitted to Student Affairs in Cosgrave 112. Incomplete requests will be returned. Requests will be reviewed by the Room and Board Contract Release Committee. Contract releases will be granted only under extenuating circumstances. The college’s Release Policy is included with the Contract Release Request Form. Refunds The College has instituted a college-cost refund plan where a portion of board will be credited to the student’s account if the student officially withdraws from residency. Under this plan, only board may be refunded as follows: During the first calendar week of the semester 95% During the second calendar week of the semester 90% During the third calendar week of the semester 80% During the fourth calendar week of the semester 75% During the fifth calendar week of the semester 70% During the sixth calendar week of the semester 60% During the seventh calendar week of the semester 55% During the eighth calendar week of the semester 50% During the ninth calendar week of the semester 40% During the tenth calendar week of the semester 00% No refunds are made for room fees. Students who leave the College before the end of the term as a result of disciplinary action are not entitled to a refund of tuition, room or board charges. Roommate Selection Re-contracting and roommate selection for returning students will occur during the spring semester. All new students will be given the opportunity to fill out a Roommate Preference Form prior to their arrival at Mount Aloysius College. Requests will be honored only if mutual. All attempts will be made to place students according to preferences. The Residence Life Staff reserves the right to make any changes during the year, if deemed necessary, including increasing occupancy of a room to its designated capacity or beyond its normal limit. Room/Vehicle Entry and Inspection The College reserves the right to inspect a student’s room under the following conditions: • Periodic room inspection occurs on a regular basis during vacation periods and at other times during the semester for health and safety purposes. This will consist of checking rooms for missing property, damages, fire hazards and the general order and well-being of the building; • Fulfilling maintenance or custodial needs; • Clear indication that health or safety regulations are being violated; • Clear and present danger to the room occupants or other residents exists; and • Reasonable suspicion that students are violating federal, state, or local laws, or College regulations. Under this condition, staff members may enter a room or vehicle at any time after knocking at the door and identifying themselves. NOTE: The College reserves the right to initiate steps for the removal of items which are the property of the College or of its agents which are in a resident’s room without approval. Additionally, the College reserves the right to confiscate items from resident rooms and vehicles that are in violation of College regulations. 54


Smoking and Tobacco Policy Smoking and the use of all tobacco products inside of any building on campus is strictly prohibited. Smoking outside on campus ground is permitted ONLY in three designated smoking pavilions. See Fire Policies for On Campus Housing for more information. Telephones, Cable and Data All student rooms have phone lines with voicemail capabilities. Answering machines are unnecessary. Please refer to voicemail instructions to set up your password. Students in Ihmsen Hall, St. Joseph Hall, St. Gertrude Hall and McAuley Hall are responsible to bring their own phone; roommates share a phone number. Phones are supplied in Misciagna Hall and each suite shares a phone number. Cable TV is available in each room. Students must bring their own coaxial cable. In Misciagna Hall, cable-TV ports are found in the living room as well as each bedroom. Cable issues should be directed to the Department of Residence Life. To resolve a cable issue the student must schedule an appointment with the Assistant Director of Residence Life. At this meeting, the Assistant Director will facilitate an appointment between the student and a service representative form Comcast Cable. The Assistant Director can be found in the Ihmsen Residence Life office. Internet access is available to students. A connection for one computer is in each room in Ihmsen. If more than one computer needs to be connected to the Internet network, a HUB must be used. There are several ports in each suite in Misciagna for Internet access. Wireless Internet is available in all residence halls and throughout the campus. Internet issues should be reported to HELPDESK@mtaloy.edu Cable and Internet are provided in The Christian Living House. Special arrangements must be made for land-based telephone service. NOTE: Students are not permitted to accept collect phone calls of any kind. Students will be billed an extra fee in addition to the collect charges and may risk their phone service being disconnected. Visitation Policies and Procedures All visitors are expected to follow College rules, regulations and policies, including the enforcement of the College’s alcohol and drug policy. Visitation hours are (unless otherwise announced by the Department of Residence Life) Sunday through Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 midnight; and Friday and Saturday, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. All guests must be at least 18 years of age. For guests under 18 please see the Children on Campus Policy. Guests must be escorted by the resident whom they are visiting at all times. Whenever a student has a guest, he/she is responsible for the guest’s conduct while visiting. The College reserves the right to revise visitation hours, policies and procedures at any time without notice. Visitors Since most residences are shared, it is essential that resident students and their visitors respect their roommate’s rights to privacy. Consideration for the rights of others living in the residence hall is also expected. Mount Aloysius College students are responsible for their visitors’ conduct and must escort guests at all times. Both guests and students are responsible for complying with the College Visitation Policy. Any visitor, student or non-student, who does not follow proper visitation policies and procedures, will be in violation of the visitation policy and subject to disciplinary action. All visitors must be at least 18 years of age and have a valid picture I.D. with them at all times. Washers and Dryers Coin operated washers and dryers are provided for residents in each hall. These machines are intended for resident student use ONLY. Students are reminded that proper use of these machines insures their continued availability. Please follow instructions carefully — including the insertion of UNITED STATES COINS ONLY for each use. 55


Withdrawal from the Residence Halls Students who have been granted approval for a room and board contract release or have withdrawn from the college are required to: Notifies Residence Life immediately; Schedule a checkout appointment with student’s assigned Resident Assistant (RA); Complete a room condition report (RCR) at the time of the scheduled room check out and; Return room and mailbox key. Failure to complete the procedure will result in automatic forfeiture of the entire housing and damage deposit.

Athletics

Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center 101 Mountie Way Hours: Day and Evening Hours as Posted 814-886-6373 or 814-886-6359 Intercollegiate Athletics Men’s and women’s basketball, women’s bowling, tennis, cross country, golf, soccer, and men’s baseball, women’s softball, and women’s volleyball are teams sponsored by Mount Aloysius as members of the NCAA-DIII and of the Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference. Open tryouts are available for all teams. Please contact the Athletic Director for information. Students are invited to join in the school spirit by rooting for the Mount Aloysius “Mountie” athletic teams as they challenge many worthy rivals at home and on the road. Mount Aloysius Athletic Department Philosophy The philosophy of the Athletic Department of Mount Aloysius College is based upon the recognition of the positive benefits of competition and participation. Sportsmanship, teamwork, self-discipline and self-sacrifice are primary attributes that are gained through athletic competition. Academic achievement goes hand-in-hand with athletic achievement. Athletic Department personnel must support and promote the total growth of the student-athlete. Student-athletes are students first. Student-athletes should be encouraged to immerse themselves in all positive aspects of the college experience. Athletic participation should enrich the student-athlete’s experience, not limit it. Student-athlete well-being is a primary focus and, through athletic experience, character growth, and healthful lifestyles will be promoted. The Mount Aloysius College Athletic Department supports gender equity and strives for equal support and success in all departmental offerings. Mount Aloysius embraces the philosophy of the NCAA-III and celebrates the efforts and growth of its student-athletes under their guidelines and regulations. Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center The Mount Aloysius College Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center is dedicated to promoting and enhancing health and wellness for our campus community and the community at-large. Offering state of the art cardio, weight training and fitness equipment, safe and inspirational exercise space, dedicated group space, and classroom space for learning and promoting a healthy lifestyle, the Mount Aloysius College Wellness Center creates a haven in which members can focus on themselves and their health in both mind and body. The stunning Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center’s Main Arena and Auxiliary Gymnasium offer Class A athletic floors, equipment and space for player and spectators alike to enjoy the many benefits of true sportsmanship. Intramurals A collaborative effort between Athletics and Residence Life provides a variety of Intramural activities for students. Look for posted campus announcements for available activities sign-up information. 56


Health Forms and Health Insurance Varsity athletes are required to submit completed health forms to the Health Services Office prior to the start of the season in order to participate in any given sport. All student-athletes must carry health insurance. They must present their health insurance card to the Health Services office prior to the start of their practice season. All injuries not covered under the primary health coverage (i.e. dental or vision) will be the responsibility of the student-athlete. If injury is considered catastrophic and the College’s insurance is used, the student athlete will be responsible for the deductible ($1500). They also must complete the physical examination requirement and have all necessary health forms completed in advance of their first participation. If all health requirements are not completed, the student-athlete will not be cleared to practice or play. A physical examination must be done at least six months prior to participation by the student-athlete in order to be acceptable, and paperwork from that physical must be forwarded to the Student Health Services Office. A. Required for All Students: Health Forms: All students entering college must have a health form on file and have received a physical exam by their physician. All students are required to have a health form on file in Health Services. You can request a Health Form through the Health Services office. The Physical Exam and Immunization portion of the health form must completed by your family physician. Immunizations: All students are required to have the following immunizations before entering college: • Polio series. • Varicella (Chicken Pox) vaccine or history of the disease. • Tetanus/Diphtheria vaccine (Must have a TD booster within the past 10 years) • MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) 2 doses, or report of positive titers confirming immunity. B. Required for all student-athletes to participate in sports. • All of the requirements listed under A. • Physical exam by your family physician. • Health Insurance. • Copy of insurance card. • Athletic Pre-Participation Health Form. Student-Athlete Code of Conduct Being a student-athlete at Mount Aloysius College brings responsibilities as well as privileges. Student-athletes represent their team, the Athletic Department and Mount Aloysius College. Behavior - on and off-campus, and in and out of season - creates an image that is a direct reflection on them, their team and the College. It is expected that student-athletes know, understand and honor the College Code of Conduct and demonstrate good citizenship, sportsmanship and integrity during competition, on campus and in the community. Student-athletes will adhere to local, state, and federal laws, NCAA rules, and College policies. They shall treat all members of the Mount Aloysius College community with respect and civility. Hazing: Mount Aloysius College has zero tolerance for hazing activities. Hazing is defined as planning, directing or committing acts which willfully or recklessly endanger the mental or physical health of a student, or subjects the person to ridicule, embarrassment, or unlawful activity for the purpose of initiation, admission into, affiliation with, or as a condition for continued membership in a group or organization. Gambling: Participation in gambling activity is prohibited. 57


Tobacco: Use of tobacco is prohibited while practicing, traveling with the teams or during any College sponsored athletic event. Alcohol: Use of alcohol is forbidden for all students on campus or at college related activities off campus. State laws governing alcohol consumption in other settings must be obeyed. Banned Drugs: Use of any drugs banned by the NCAA is prohibited. Academic Integrity: Student-athletes must adhere to the College academic integrity policy. Policy on Non-Compliance Code of Conduct In the event a student-athlete fails to meet the stated expectations of the Student-Athlete Code of Conduct, they may be subject to the following sanctions according to the degree and number of violations: • Suspension from practicing with their team/community service assignments; • Suspension from playing in games/matches with their team; • Dismissal from the team; • College sanctions may also be imposed according to the College Conduct System practice; and • Local, state, or federal sanctions may also be imposed as applicable by civil authorities. Use of Athletic Facilities and Fields The facilities and athletic fields are available to students, faculty, alumni, and staff of Mount Aloysius. The facility and athletic fields are also available for community use. For more information on use guidelines and rental fees, please see the Director of Athletic Facilities. Please also refer to the Children on Campus Policy. The Athletic Convocation and Wellness Center (ACWC) Main Gym use is limited for teams and special events. The Auxiliary Gym can be used for recreation as long as it is available. Mount Aloysius College Minimum Academic Eligibility Standards for Athletic Participation Cumulative Grade Point Average • During the first two full-time semesters, all student-athletes must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 1.5. • Transfer students, during their first year of attendance at the conference institution, shall be held to the same standard as incoming freshmen. • Beginning with third full-time semester, a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 shall be required to compete in a conference sponsored sport. Normal Progress By the start of the fifth full-time semester (or third year of athletics eligibility), the studentathlete shall be enrolled in a course of study toward fulfilling a major. Waivers Mount Aloysius College chooses not to grant waivers to any student. We believe that a student who is at risk academically should concentrate on his/her studies. The student will be eligible for athletic competition again only after his/her cumulative grade point average reaches 2.0 or higher.

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Mid-Semester Reinstatement It is possible for a student-athlete who is ineligible at the start of a semester to return to eligibility mid-semester in the following circumstances: • Successful completion of an incomplete course; • An official grade change; • Recognition of institutional error; and/or • Completion of a course lasting less than a full semester. In all circumstances, the student-athlete will not be eligible until the grade change is officially recorded in the Registrar’s Office.

Provisional Athletic Eligibility Program

The purpose of the program is to provide the student-athlete with structure and guidance for improving their academic performance. The Program Coordinator will monitor the student’s progress through regular meetings with the student-athlete and through consultations with faculty and staff as necessary and appropriate. Participation in the program is required based on the following criteria: • any freshman athlete earning a cumulative grade point average below 1.5; • any transfer student with a cumulative grade point average below 1.5 during their first semester at Mount Aloysius College; and • after the freshman year, any athlete with a semester grade point average below 2.00. (Note: at the start of the third semester, all athletes must maintain a cumulative grade point average of a 2.00 or better to be eligible for athletic competition.) Requirements: The student-athlete must sign the Learning Contract and fulfill the provisions outlined. Consequences of violating the provisions of the Athletic Learning Contract: • First offense will result in a one game suspension. • Second offense will result in a two game suspension. • Third offense will result in suspension from the team.

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Athletic Learning Contract: Fall/Spring 2016/2017 SEMESTERS __________________________________________ has agreed to the terms and conditions of the Learning Contract below. Failure to live up to these conditions may result in suspension of playing privileges. I will achieve a semester GPA of 2.5 or greater, will pass all courses with a grade of C or higher, and will maintain and complete a full-time credit load. I will attend all scheduled classes and any other course-required activities and events. Perfect attendance is an expected and achievable goal. If I miss a class, I will inform the Program Coordinator within 24 hours with a reasonable explanation. Every two weeks I am required to schedule a progress meeting with the Program Coordinator to review and discuss progress. As part of this meeting, I will submit a one-page, typed report on significant aspects of the period, including but not limited to academic progress, grades, tests, papers, etc. I am required before the last date for withdrawal to meet with each of my professors in order to discuss my academic progress and report back to the Program Coordinator. I will follow any reasonable instructions, recommendations, or modifications (referrals for tutoring, for example) as they occur during the semester. I have read and I understand the terms of the Learning Contract, and I agree to the conditions set forth.

STUDENT SIGNATURE: _____________________________________ DATE: __________

PROGRAM COORDINATOR: _________________________________ DATE: __________

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CAMPUS resources child care Ann Harris Smith Little People’s Place Child Development Center Cosgrave Student Center - Lower Level Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Monday - Friday 814-886-6456 www.mtaloy.edu/student_life/the-ann-harris-smith-little-peoples-place/ The Ann Harris Smith Little People’s Place is a state licensed, nationally-accredited (NAEYC) childcare center. We serve students, staff, faculty and community members who are in need of reliable, affordable and quality childcare while attending class or working. The College administers this program consistent with the College non-discrimination policy. Registration The following forms, available at the Center, must be completed and submitted before a child is accepted into the Little People’s Place: • Application; • Agreement; • Parental Consent; and • Child Health Appraisal. Children are expected to visit before enrolling to insure a proper “fit.” Parents must use the Childcare Center as indicated on the agreement. Charges are based on the number of day and hours indicated in the agreement. Ages We accept children ages 2-5. The number of daily spots 2 year olds is limited. We have found these age groups work and play easily together. Curriculum Activities in the Little People’s Place Daily plans include organized and age appropriate learning activities, music, storytelling and free play. Weather permitting; we try to go outside each day. . Nap and snack time take place in the afternoon. Parents/guardians should check their child’s cubby when they pick up their child. The center staff will put a monthly newsletter, receipts, special notices, other correspondence, and the children’s work in the cubby On occasion, parents may be asked to provide materials for special projects. You are encouraged to be an active part in your child’s day. Please share any information with us that will help us during your child’s day. Meals and Snacks Breakfast is not served at the Center. Be sure your child has breakfast at home. Lunchtime is at noon in the center. Parents can purchase a lunch form the dining hall or bring one from home. Parents are occasionally asked to bring a snack. We ask that you send healthy snacks. Payment Procedures Costs of services and payment procedure information can be obtained by contacting the childcare center in person or by phone during hours of operation Sick Care The center does not provide sick care. Parents and guardians are encouraged to arrange for alternative care when a child is ill.

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Bookstore

Cosgrave Student Center - Lower Level Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., Monday - Friday Email: bookstore@mtaloy.edu Facebook 814-886-6380 The Mount Aloysius College Bookstore offers a variety of merchandise and services selected especially for students. The Mount Aloysius College Bookstore is here to serve you. If we do not carry an item you would like us to stock, please do not hesitate to give us a suggestion. The Bookstore accepts cash, checks or credit cards for purchases. MAC’s Bookstore offers extended hours during the first week of each semester. Specific dates and times are posted in the Bookstore, on our web and Facebook pages, recorded on our voicemail and posted throughout campus. Textbooks The Bookstore provides both day and evening students all of the required textbooks and whenever possible, used and rental textbooks are made available. The Textbook Reservation Program allows you to obtain textbooks without the hassle of back-to-school rush. There are many advantages to this program. For example, a Bookstore employee will match texts with course schedules for you and you will have first opportunity for used books and avoid long lines. A $20 deposit is required to participate in the Textbook Reservation Program. The $20 deposit is deducted from the total purchase price. We also offer textbook rentals on many new and used textbooks. A credit card and ID are required to rent textbooks. We also offer limited reference materials. Special order titles are welcomed too. Because the beginning of the semester is a very busy time, we encourage you to ask the person at the service desk for help if you cannot find a required textbook. Generally, if a book-tag is not posted, your course does not require a textbook. However, if a tag is on the shelf, but the text is missing, it is possible that we may have run out of the book. Just notify the person at the service desk if this occurs. We are here to help. We also encourage early registration. Textbooks are purchased primarily based upon registration. Mount Aloysius College Mountie Merchandise The Bookstore offers a wide variety of imprinted apparel, hats, glassware and various other gift items. Supplies We are able to provide the student with a range of school supplies, art supplies and greeting cards. Book Buy Back Textbook buy back is offered daily in the Bookstore. Buy back will end two weeks before the start of the semester and begin again two weeks after the start of the new semester. Return Policies The return policy is posted in the Bookstore behind the service area and at the entrance and exit to the store. Students are expected to be familiar with the return policies. Copies of the policies are available at the service desk. Please remember to maintain a copy of your sales receipt for your textbooks. SPECIAL NOTE: The Bookstore is closed for some holidays and to conduct an annual inventory each June. Please call the store if you are not sure we are open. Information regarding special circumstances is made public through various college publications and at the Bookstore. If you call and do not get an answer, please leave a message on our voice mail and we will return your call as soon as we are able. In the event of an emergency, the Bookstore adheres to all college closings. Information will be posted on our Facebook and web pages.

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HELPFUL HINTS WHEN SHOPPING FOR REQUIRED TEXTS AT THE BOOKSTORE Please bring your class schedule with you! All of the required texts are arranged alphabetically according to the course code number on your class schedule. Please keep your sales receipt. Refunds are not issued on any textbook unless proper proof of purchase and an ADD/DROP slip are provided to Bookstore personnel. If you can’t find it, ask us! If we are out of the textbook you need, please tell the person at the service desk. “Outs” are replaced within 48 hours if stock is available at the publisher. Be sure you are buying the correct textbook(s). Please, take the time to read the shelf tag. If you are unsure about a textbook, do not purchase the book. You will save time and money by avoiding unnecessary purchases. Please, do not write in your book until you have decided to continue taking the course. Textbooks cannot be fully refunded if damage has occurred. Once you have decided to follow through with a class, please do put your name in your textbook. Report any stolen book to the Bookstore and Campus Safety.

Campus Ministry

St. Gertrude Hall - Rooms 36, 38, and 40 Office Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and by appointment Sunday Evening Mass 7:00 p.m. Weekday Masses – T.B.D. 814-886-6476/6483 Campus Ministry nourishes the development of religious faith and practice at Mount Aloysius College, while affirming the individual and empowering the community to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Campus Ministry respects the religious traditions of the many while expressing the identity and mission of a Catholic college rich in the tradition of the Sisters of Mercy. Campus Ministry participates in every aspect of the college community through prayer, liturgy, community service, and pastoral care and encourages all to integrate personal faith into the academic and social environment of the college. Students are encouraged to develop their leadership skills via two student leadership teams. Members of the Student Ministry Outreach Team (also known as SMOT) lead faith based programs such as retreats, prayer services, liturgies and faith sharing “fostering spirituality peer to peer.” Members of the Social Action Leadership Team (Also known as SALT) are “servant leaders” who implement service projects and social just related events aimed at fostering creative nonviolence and addressing the critical concerns of the Sisters of Mercy. Campus Ministry fosters global citizenship through mission trips both domestically and internationally. Alternative break experiences provide opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to serve within the United States and abroad during college breaks. Participants are able to developer their spirituality and deepen their relationship with God while living out the Gospel values and examining issues of injustice further developing a life-long commitment to working for the Common Good. Our Lady of Mercy Chapel is located in the Chapel Wing adjoining the second floor of the Main Building. This historic chapel is open daily for meditation and prayer. All students, faculty and staff members are welcome regardless of denomination. Special services are held at Thanksgiving, Christmas, during Lent and on other occasions throughout the year. Service Ministry Outreach Team (SMOT): Campus Ministry participates in every aspect of the college community through prayer, liturgy, community service, and pastoral care and encourages all to integrate personal faith into the academic and social environment of the college. Members of the Student Ministry Outreach Team (also known as SMOT) lead faith based programs such as retreats, prayer services, liturgies and faith sharing “fostering spirituality peer to peer.” 65


The Student Ministry Outreach Team consists of eight students from various faith backgrounds. They play an active role in liturgical planning and implementation. In addition, they plan many faith-based programs such as: • MAC Goes to Church, a monthly nondenominational prayer service • Midmonth drop ins, day long hospitality events that foster community • Thanksgiving prayer service, an interfaith prayer event open to the entire campus community • Angel Tree, a community outreach event that provides Christmas gifts for local children. • Implementation of the campus Peace Garden, a week long project in celebration of Earth Day • Easter Jam, a Christian music event. • Hunger and Homelessness awareness events • Peace Walk, a campus walk that fosters global social and economic concerns • Midterm de-stressing events

Career Development

Main Administration - Suite 101 Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday - Friday 814-886-6320 Career Development offers assistance with Career Exploration, Personality Type Assessment, Résumé/Cover Letter Writing, Interview Skills, Internship Preparation, Job Search Strategies, and all career planning goals. Services are available by individual appointment, scheduled workshops, and events, walk-in service when available, and self-directed use of office resources during regular business hours. Overview of Services • Career Events & Workshops: Mock interview fairs, networking events, résumé-writing workshops, interview workshops, Mountie Makeover Mania and more. Visit our website for a complete and current list! • Career Planning Resources: Software to assist students in the career exploration, selfassessment process includes the Focus 2 Personality Assessment and other online resources. • Career Resources: Complimentary handouts available in the Career Center including sample résumés and interview questions by major, cover letter examples, helpful packets, and more. • Mounties@Work: An online database that allows students to upload résumés to the website and review job/internship listings posted by employers. Be sure to register today by visiting the Mounties@Work Student Login link under the MyMac Portal Page. • Mock Interviews: One-on-one practice interviews to build confidence and improve interview skills. • Employer Directory: Listed in Mounties@Work, this database of contacts allows students to get in touch with regional employers accepting résumés from Mount Aloysius students. • Job & Internship Fairs: Employers are invited annually to the campus to network with students, schedule interviews, and accept résumés. Information about other off-campus job and internship fairs is also available. • Graduate School Information: Learn about graduate school opportunities at Mount Aloysius College and schools around the country. • Graduate Follow-Up Survey: Annual tracking survey to assess graduate employment status. • Alumni Services: Alumni are invited to utilize the Career Development office for further assistance with their career goals as a life-long service of the college.

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coMMuter life

Cosgrave Student Center 104 Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and Hours as Activities Require Commuters make up a large, diverse segment of our College community. Therefore, the goal of the Student Affairs Staff is to provide resources, services and programs that enhance the experience of all MAC commuters. Commuter students now have the opportunity to become involved in college life to the fullest, gaining leadership, communication, organizational and team building skills. We hope you become involved today! Contact the Office of Student Activities, located in the upper-level of the Cosgrave Student Center and get more information. Commuter Meals Commuters are encouraged to take advantage of the reasonable prices offered in the Dining Hall. They can take advantage of the convenience of purchasing a meal plan or by purchasing flex dollars. Commuting students have the following options: $50 Flex for $50. $105 Flex for $100 $220 Flex for $200. Cash, credit card or flex dollars added to you ID card are accepted in the Cosgrave Dining Hall or the MAC Shack. Lockers Lockers are available in the Cosgrave Student Center, lower-level in the men’s and women’s locker rooms. For daily use, see the desk attendant. To reserve a locker for the semester, see the Director of Student Activities in Cosgrave 104, 814-886-6321. Vending Services Vending machines are located throughout campus. Refunds may be obtained by contacting the Controller’s Office located in the Main Building, Room 124. Cosgrave Student Center Game Room The Game Room, located in the lower-level of the Cosgrave Student Center, is a popular outlet for students to socialize and relax between classes. The Center is equipped with three pool tables, two Ping-Pong tables, a foosball table, air hockey, and television. At the lower-level student desk, students may check out Ping-Pong paddles, balls, pool cues, board games, a Wii, and a DVD player with their Student ID. Students will be required to submit photo identification when using the fitness center. Students using the facilities should request a key from the desk to lock their items while working out. Kitchens There is a microwave in Cosgrave and the upper-level of the Main Building, and there is a full-kitchen in the Campus Ministry Hospitality Center. Lounges Study and lounge areas in both the lower and the upper levels of Cosgrave Center are available for student use when no other College functions are being held. There are also spaces in the Library, Learning Commons, and the Campus Ministry Hospitality Center. Commuter Student Representation The Office of Student Activities and the On the Go Commuter Club will host meetings to gather commuter student insight and ideas to improve commuter student-life on campus. Please watch for the announcements and come share your opinions. Also, the Student Government Association, (SGA) holds two positions strictly for commuter students to represent their constituency at all meetings. 67


Counseling and Disability Services

Saint Joseph Hall - Room 101 & 103 Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday - Friday 814-886-6515 A licensed professional counselor is available for counseling and consultation. Common goals of counseling include: • learn to deal with uncomfortable emotional issues such as anger, anxiety, shyness, depression, grief, guilt, fear, jealousy and low self-esteem; • improve relationships with family, friends, instructors, co-workers, employers and others; • learn time management and stress management skills; • overcome test anxiety and fear of public speaking; • increase communication skills, including social skills, assertiveness training and conflict resolution; • learn new decision-making and problem-solving skills; and • learn how to deal with a traumatic event. Services are confidential and not noted on any student record. Appointments are suggested, but walk-ins are seen as time permits. Programs on various topics are available for interested student groups and clubs. Topics include alcoholism and the family, anger management, procrastination, understanding mental illness, smoking cessation and team building.

facilities serVices

The office is located on the top floor of the Men’s House Hours: 7:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday - Friday 814-886-6311 It is the goal of the Facilities Department to provide a comfortable, well maintained environment for our students, faculty and staff. Non-emergency work requests should be placed from your portal page. Log in, go to the Help Tab and look for Maintenance Work Orders. During the day, emergency work requests should be called into Ext. # 6311. After business hour emergencies should be called into the Campus Safety Department at Ext. #6327. Campus Safety will contact the appropriate department for the repair.

dining serVices Cosgrave Dining Hall Cosgrave Student Center, Upper Level

7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. 9:30 a.m. -10:30 a.m. 10:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 814-886-6334 Monday – Thursday Friday 68

7:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 7:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Gonzaga’s MAC Shack Cosgrave Student Center, Upper Level


Metz Culinary Management Metz Culinary Management offers a food service program dedicated to delivering variety, value and service at each and every meal. Your satisfaction is very important! Comments, questions or suggestions are encouraged in order that better service may be offered. Just stop by or call the Dining Service Office located in the kitchen of the Cosgrave Dining Hall. We are happy to provide special services for students which include, but are not limited to: - Special meals for students on restricted diets. Arrangements can be made by contacting the Residence Life Office in Cosgrave 112 or e-mail residencelife@mtaloy.edu. - Bagged meals will be provided on request (24 hour advance notice needed) for any student who will miss a meal due to a conflict with class, work, or clinical schedules, or any event that will prevent the student from eating a meal on campus during dining hall hours - Sick meals for students who are not well enough to come to the dining hall. Contact the Residence Life Office. Commuters are encouraged to take advantage of the reasonable prices offered in the dining hall. They can take advantage of the convenience of purchasing a commuter meal plan or by purchasing flex dollars.

Meal Plan Options

Resident Students Student living on campus are required to purchase a meal plan. Several plan options are available to fit students’ lifestyle/academic schedule. 17 meal plan - This plan includes 17 meals per week, $125 flex dollars and two guest-passes per semester or, 12 meal plan - This plan includes 12 meals per week, $185 flex dollars and four guest-passes per semester. Eight (8) meal plan for students on clinicals/student teaching – This plan includes 8 meals per week, $120 flex dollars and three guest-passes per semester, Please note that a written request and a copy of the students schedule, emailed to residencelife@mtaloy.edu, is needed to be considered for this plan. Outside work commitments are not accepted as a rationale for this plan. Commuters have the following options: 4 Meal Plan - This plan includes 4 meals per week, $100 flex dollars and three guest meals. Cash, credit card or flex dollars added to your ID card are accepted in the Cosgrave Dining Hall or the MAC Shack. Your MAC ID card serves as your meal plan/flex dollar card. You can use the card at the Cosgrave Dining Hall or at the MAC Shack, both located on the upper floor of Cosgrave Student Center. Your ID card must always be presented at the time of service. Only you are authorized to access your meal plan. Never give your card to another person. Flex Dollars Each meal plan comes with flex dollars that can be used in the dining hall or in the MAC Shack for meals or snacks. Flex dollars that are included in a meal plan do not rollover and must be used by the end of the semester. Students can add additional flex dollars to their ID card at the Controller’s office in the Main Administration building. Any additional flex dollars added to a student ID (above the base plan amount) will roll over from the fall to spring semester, but not from the spring semester to the fall semester. Guest Meals Each meal plan comes with a designated number of guest meals. Students are able to treat family or friends to a meal when they visit. If a student has used their guest meals, they can utilize their flex dollars to pay for a visiting family member or friend. 69


Frequently Asked Questions

I am a residential student. Which meal plan should I choose? Look at your class schedule and off campus commitments. How many times of week will you be eating in the dining hall? If you plan to stay on campus most of the time, the 17 meal plan might be your best choice. If you plan to go home on the weekends and eat at some of your meals in the MAC Shack, then the 12-meal plan might be your best option. If you have clinicals or student teaching on your schedule Can I change my meal plan second semester if my academic schedule and needs change? Yes, you can. You will automatically be set up to remain in the same meal plan from fall to spring, but if your academic schedule changes, you can request a change form from Residence Life. You will need to request the change before classes begin for the spring semester. Meal plans cannot be changed during a semester. Will I run out of meals? You shouldn’t! The system will still allow you to swipe only one time per meal, unless you are using a guest-meal in the dining hall. You will, however, need to manage your Flex Dollars so that you have money for meals and don’t spend them too quickly on extras like additional snacks, soda, candy etc. The basic meal plan (12 or 17) provides the bulk of your meals each week. We have found that students regularly miss meals for a variety of reasons and also desire flexibility so they can pick something up in the MAC Shack outside of regular meal hours. What happens if I lose my ID? Go to or call the Campus Safety (814) 886-6327 and report your card lost or stolen. There may be a fee involved for replacing lost or damaged card. What if I have a special dietary requirement? No problem! Our Campus Dining Services Program can accommodate most dietary requirements. For more information, please contact the Department of Residence Life by email at ResidenceLife@mtaloy.edu. Flex Dollars Students may also add flex dollars to their ID card to use at Gonzaga’s MAC Shack or in the dining hall. The funds will rollover from fall to spring. Money can be deposited into your account at the Controller’s Office, over the phone or online by credit card.

Student Health Services

St. Joseph Hall 102 Hours - 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday - Friday 814-886-6515 or 814-886-6391 In case of an emergency after hours contact Campus Safety at 814-886-6327. The Health Services Department operates under the direction of a registered nurse with the cooperation of a consultant physician. Confidential student health records are maintained. Medical information is released only with the student’s written consent. All new students including degree completion Medical Imaging and Medical Laboratory Technologist DuBois students are required to submit a completed health form including health history, physical exam and immunization record form prior to attendance at classes. All other degree completion programs through the Office of Graduate and Continuing Education are not required to submit a student health form. Students in health related programs have additional requirements and specific screening tests for certain diseases. Students enrolled in healthcare programs requiring clinical education will be subject to random drug tests. Clinical experiences will not be permitted without a completed Health Form. Forms are obtained from Health Services and returned to Health Services.

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All students are encouraged to carry health insurance. Health insurance is required for all international and resident students as well as intercollegiate athletes. Mount Aloysius College does not provide student health insurance. Students requiring health insurance will need to provide verification of health insurance by submitting a copy of their health insurance card. Health Services can provide information about various companies that provide student health insurance. Students are entitled to unlimited walk-in visits to Health Services for nursing assessment and treatment of minor illnesses and injuries. Physician consultation is available at specific times by appointment. If a student requires diagnostic testing or other services through a medical facility separate from Health Services, that medical facility will bill the student or the student’s insurance for services. Students should make their own non-emergency transportation arrangements to other medical facilities or consult Health Services for other options. Local ambulance service is available for emergencies. Health Services can provide local ambulance information and subscription rates. If a student is seen at Health Services, the student will be given a written excuse if the student is unable to attend classes. All resident students are required by law to have a meningococcal vaccine or sign a waiver by Pennsylvania State Law. Additional College policies related to health services and protocols are available on the Student Health Services web page. Resources and Services Student health information. Blood pressure screening. Non-prescription drug dispensing Health promotion/disease prevention literature. Confidential, individual health counseling. Physician/emergency/community health referrals. Health screening programs. Physician visits by appointment. Annual influenza vaccine. Ambulance subscriptions. Health insurance information. CPR Certification. Hepatitis B Vaccine. Tuberculin PPD (Mantoux) testing. Tetanus/Diphtheria boosters. Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Vaccine. Varicella Vaccine. Meningitis Vaccine. Nursing assessment and treatment of minor illness and injuries. All students must complete a health form and submit it prior to the start of classes.

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Health Requirements for All Students To assure your health and safety while you are part of our college community we will require specific health information. The following must be completed before students begin classes. A. Required for All Students: Health Forms: All students entering college must have a Health Form on file and have received a physical exam by their physician. You can request a Health Form through the Health Services Office/or find online. The Physical Exam and Immunization portion of the health form must be completed by your family physician. Immunizations: All students are required to have the following immunizations before entering college. Polio series. Varicella (Chicken Pox) vaccine or history of the disease. Tetanus/Diphtheria vaccine (Must have a TD booster within the past 10 years) MMR (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) two doses or report of positive titers confirming immunity. B. Required for all Resident Students living on campus. All of the requirements listed under A. Meningococcal Vaccine or signed waiver (Pennsylvania Law.) Health Insurance (Mount Aloysius College does not provide health insurance.) Copy of health insurance card. C. Required for all Health Studies, Nursing, and Phlebotomy students. All of the requirements listed under A. Hepatitis B vaccine series of three doses. Current CPR certificate from the American Heart Association BLS Healthcare Provider, Adult, Child, Infant, and AED. (We hold CPR classes on campus. If you have received CPR training off-campus your card must not expire during the semester.) Titers: All Nursing and Health Studies Students must submit documentation of antibody titers for varicella, rubella, mumps, and rubella showing immunity. If students are not immune, they must receive the vaccine for that which they are not immune and submit the dates 4-6 weeks before the beginning of classes. D. Required for all College Athletes who are going to participate in sports. All of the requirements listed under A. Physical exam by your family physician. Health Insurance. Copy of insurance card. Athletic pre-participation health form.

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Library

Hours: (Some Exceptions Apply) Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Sunday 12:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. 814-886-6477 http://library.mtaloy.edu The Library at Mount Aloysius College is a modern 31,000 square-foot facility that opened in 1995. The collections provide users with access to over 85,000 bound volumes and over 15,000 current print and electronic journal subscriptions. The facility includes a newly created Learning Commons, a state-of-the-art computer lab (Buhl Computer Lab), a presentation room, group study rooms, the Ecumenical Studies Center, and the Information Technology Center. Mountlink The Library provides access to its collections through Mountlink, an online catalog. Access to database articles is provided through the Mount Aloysius College website. Access to the collections of other libraries is provided through the Library’s Interlibrary Loan program, and through memberships in regional and national resource sharing consortia. The Library has a high-speed wireless Internet connection available at public terminals and throughout the facility. There are 14 computer terminals, four scanners, a printer and a photocopy machine on the main floor of the Library. Laptops for in-library use are also available for check-out at the Circulation desk. Circulation Service The Circulation Desk is located directly inside the main door of the Library. It is staffed during all hours of Library operation. The circulation staff provides general information as needed and manages the circulation of books and other materials. Books can be returned to the Library after hours by using the book drop located to the right of the front entrance. After presenting current College photo ID, patrons may check out books for 30 days with one renewal. At the Circulation Desk patrons may also borrow reserve materials, and access back issues of local and national newspapers. Fines for overdue books are 10¢ per day. Laptops overdue fines are $25 per day. Reference Service The Library staff takes an active role in the instructional and research programs of the College; assisting students in the effective use of available resources. Through reference service and in-class information literacy instruction, professional librarians assist students in developing and refining the information skills necessary for academic success and lifelong learning. At the Reference Desk service is provided on a one-on-one basis, either walk-in or by appointment, by phone at 814-886-6478 and by email (askalibrarian@mtaloy.edu). Interlibrary Loan (ILL) If you cannot find what you need within the Mount Aloysius College Library you can borrow from other libraries without leaving campus. ILL services are provided for Mount Aloysius College students, staff and faculty who need books or periodical articles not available in the MAC Library collection. Cooperative arrangements make ILL possible from 40,000 public, university, and special national libraries. ILL requests may be submitted in person at the Circulation or Reference Desk, or online via the Library website. Buhl Computer Lab The Buhl Computer Lab is a modern classroom located on the lower-floor. The computer lab houses 31 networked computers and is available to students when not in use for instructional purposes.

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Quiet Study Room A quiet study room is available for students on the second floor of the Library. The room includes several individual study carrels allowing for concentrated study. It also houses one desktop computer and is wireless enabled for laptop use. Ecumenical Studies Center The Ecumenical Studies Center is located on the lower floor and houses more than 18,000 books, audio visual materials, pamphlets, and artifacts on theology, religion, philosophy and related subjects. This collection has the potential to create sharing across denominations and religious traditions. The collection was made possible by the generous donation of Rev. Gerald L. Myers.

Learning Commons

Library - First Floor 814-886-6566 http://library.mtaloy.edu/learning-commons/ Learning Commons Overview The goal of the Learning Commons is to provide a variety of academic support services, resources and spaces that support the holistic learning process of the user. To that end the Mount Aloysius College Learning Commons will provide space for co-location of academic support services, flexible and mobile learning spaces where users can decide the arrangement of their learning environment, technology rich spaces that allow individuals to not only access materials but become creators and producers of information. The Commons is also a comfortable and inviting individual and group work space. Mount Aloysius College Learning Commons will provide space for research, technology assistance, active learning and tutoring in one central location. Rationale for the MAC Learning Commons Learning Commons are built with the recognition that learners need access to a variety of services in order to be academically and professionally successful. The Learning Commons phenomenon also recognizes that the individual plays a large role in their own knowledge development. The development of the MAC Learning Commons is a purposeful decision to make academic learning support services for students more visible and accessible to all MAC students. The Learning Commons will focus on excellence in academic endeavors, proving space where all students can come to improve their skills in research, writing, technology, presentation and subject expertise. Learning Commons Services The Learning Commons provides research help from experienced librarians, writing and subject-oriented tutoring from knowledgeable staff and well-trained peer tutors and basic technology support for word processing, printing and accessing online College resources. Training opportunities for students to develop skills through small workshops in the areas of research assistance, technology training, study skills, citation styles and avoiding plagiarism will also be provided in the Learning Commons. Library staff will to be present, providing assistance with check-out of library materials and course reserves. Tutoring The Learning Commons is the central point for all tutoring services at the College. Professional tutors for writing, study skills, and math are located in the Learning Commons. Tutors for health studies and Nursing reside in their respective academic buildings; however, all appointments for professional tutors can be made via our scheduling system on the Library home page. Additionally, the Learning Commons offers peer tutoring in nearly every discipline at the College. This service can also be requested from our web page. For More Information Questions about the Learning Commons can be directed to Theresa Spanella, Learning Commons Coordinator, at (814) 886-6566 or at tspanella@mtaloy.edu. 74


MISSION INTEGRATION & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

St. Gertrude Hall Offices #31 (Coordinator of Service Learning), #29A (Graduate Assistant) and Administration #116 (Executive Director of Mission Integration and Community Engagement) 7373 Admiral Peary Highway Cresson, PA 16630 Hours: Day and Evening Hours as Posted 814-886-6546 or 814-886-6366 Community Service Guidelines Purpose: Community service is one of the four Mercy Values promoted at Mount Aloysius College. It is reflected in the core values of Mount Aloysius College and is central to the mission of our Catholic, Mercy institution. Service provides students the opportunity to use their gifts and talents to help those in need and to support local non‐profit organizations. The service completed by our MAC community members contributes to an individual’s intellectual, social and spiritual growth. Requirement: Each Mount Aloysius College student has varying levels of community service hour requirements depending on what activities, scholarships or classes that they select. Please email missionintegration@mtaloy.edu if you have questions about your service requirements. Definition: Community service: • It is unpaid • It is a voluntary act performed by a student or group of students with an approved non‐profit agency. • Time spent in planning or preparation of the service can be counted as service hours. Guidelines: • Donating/collecting food or goods: When documenting hours, count the time spent gathering the goods and transporting them to the site (not the quantity of goods collected). • Service Learning: Those who participate in a service learning course/activity document hours spent in direct service with the community (i.e., working at a retirement home to teach financial skills), not their time spent in the classroom planning the activity. • What does not count for Service Hours? - Any event used to promote student organizations for the purpose of gaining new members. - Projects where the organization is paid for services and retains the funds. - Illegal projects. • Any persons representing Mount Aloysius College at events or service projects must abide by the following guidelines: - Dress appropriately for the project you are completing. No obscene language, drug, alcohol, pornography or violence should be visible on clothing. - MAC employees and students should wear Mount Aloysius College clothing if possible during service projects. - Limit time spent cell phones or listening to electronic devices unless permitted by the organization being served. - Use appropriate language when performing service. Some facilities house children and elderly. - Be respectful to the supervisor(s) of the organization being served. - Do not complete any task that makes you feel uncomfortable. - Community Service Online Form can be found online www.mtaloy.edu/communityengagement 75


Student Activities

Cosgrave Student Center 110 Email: getinvolved@mtaloy.edu Facebook group: Get Involved at Mount Aloysius College Twitter: #getinvolvedMAC 814-886-6321 Hours: 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and Hours as Activities Require Activity Center Hours: Hours as Posted The Office of Student Activities administers a wide variety of programs and events that provide opportunities for socialization, leadership and personal growth within and beyond the campus community. The goal of the Department is to expand the learning that students receive in the classroom and make the college experience well-rounded. Student Organizations http://www.mtaloy.edu/student-life/clubs-organizations/ Joining a student organization is a way to find your niche on campus, make new friends with similar interests, develop your leadership potential or simply try something new. Many clubs and organizations are connected to an academic department on campus and many are based on personal hobbies. The list below is ever evolving, so make sure to visit our website for an up-to-date list with a description of each club, advisor and officer contact information and meeting times for the current semester. Anti-Bullying Club Anything Goes Club Belltower Newspaper Biology Club Black Student Union Bowling Club Brothers and Sister United CAC (Colleges Against Cancer) Campus Activity Board - CAB CRU Christian Fellowship Cheerleading/Spirit Team Chi Alpha Sigma (Athletic Honor Society) Child Advocacy Association College Democrats College Republicans Comic Book Club Criminology Club Dance Team Delta Epsilon Sigma Honor Society Digital Grotto Group ENACTUS Freshman Class Global Human Impact Information Technology Club Interpreting Club Legal Society Pep Band 76

MAC Gay/Straight Alliance MAC Political Action Coalition MAC Service Members Club Medical Assistant Club Medical Imaging Club Mount Aloysius Gaming Initiative National Society of Leadership and Success Nursing Student Organization On the Go Commuter Club Peer Educators Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Physical Therapy Assistants PSEA (Student) Psychology Club Residence Hall Association Senior Class Simply Caring Step Team (Absolute Attitude) Student Accounting Society Student Art Club Student Athletic Advisory Committee Students in Free Enterprise Student Government Association Student Ministry Outreach Team Surgical Technology Theatre Club Vox Nova Choral Group


Student Government Association (SGA) The Student Government Association (SGA) is comprised of elected students from the various Mount Aloysius student groups and is the main representative voice of the student body. The three main objectives of SGA are Leadership, Service and Communication. The Association is committed to developing positive relationships between the students and the administration of Mount Aloysius College. Campus Activities Board (CAB) The Campus Activities Board is open to the entire Mount Aloysius Community interested in helping to coordinate events for the campus and instill a sense of tradition at Mount Aloysius. There are multiple committees that students may choose to participate in or even chair. Chartering of Student Clubs New student groups are always welcome at Mount Aloysius College. To form a club or organization and obtain College recognition, the following procedures must be completed: Any student in good standing with Mount Aloysius College may request permission from the Director of Student Activities to hold a special meeting(s) at the College for the purpose of informing interested students about a proposed organization. A student organization desiring to be recognized by Mount Aloysius College must present an “Interested Student Form” and a signature of their advisor to the Director of Student Activities. A full-time Mount Aloysius student who is in good standing with the College must submit these forms. These forms must be submitted with a constitution that will govern the operations of the organization. The Student Government Association shall review all applications for recognition and select those organizations that they feel should receive recognition from the College. The Director of Student Activities and SGA will give approval for the organization to be recognized, pending final approval by the Vice President for Student Affairs. Changes in student organization constitutions must be approved by the Director of Student Activities and the Vice President for Student Affairs, respectively. Official recognition by the College grants the following privileges to College student organizations, subject to College procedures and regulations: • The use of College facilities rent-free; • The use of campus news media; • Eligibility for awards and honors given to College student organizations; • The use of club funds; and • The use of the college van. Recognized clubs and organizations retain their privileges from year-to-year with completion of proper annual paperwork (See Organization Handbook for details). Failure to do so will result in the loss of recognition by Mount Aloysius College. Policies for Scheduling and Evaluating Programs When scheduling programs, a registered club/organization must abide by the following policies: All club/organization activities held on campus are to be cleared through the Student Activities Office. Club meetings or other college events wishing to use residence hall common areas must be registered and approved by the Department of Student Activities and the Department of Resident Life. If they are not registered and approved club meetings or other college events are not permitted in any of the residence hall lounge or residence common areas such as the Ihmsen Breezeway. If there are no conflicts with other campus activities, an approval from the Director of Student Activities will be sent. Final plans for an event should not be made until the approval is received. All official activities held off-campus and sponsored by registered student organizations must be registered with the Student Activities Office. At the completion of the event, a “Program Evaluation Form” must be submitted online via the same website above. This evaluation is used to survey the students’ responses to various programs. 77


Solicitation and Fundraising All fundraising activities and events must be pre-approved by the Office of Student Affairs. Clubs and organizations planning to engage in fundraising should fill out the “Fundraiser Approval Form” located at: http://www.mtaloy.edu/student-life/clubs-organizations/ For approval in advance of the fundraiser or solicitation. As a rule, only recognized College organizations may solicit funds/items and may use tables in the Cosgrave Student Center lobby for approved fundraisers. Furthermore, only one club/organization will be permitted to solicit/ fundraise in Cosgrave lobby at a time. The following are intended as guidelines in planning your fundraising event or activity, particularly in dealing with questions of tax-deductibility for contributors. These and other issues derived from the Internal Revenue Code can be highly technical, so please contact Institutional Advancement (IA) or the Controller’s Office should clarification be needed. Clubs and organizations can normally make purchases free of sales tax by working with the Controller’s Office and utilizing the tax-exempt status of the College. Contact the Controller’s office (following a visit to IA, as noted below, if you will be soliciting businesses) for help in making the purchase. Solicitation of businesses requires pre-approval by the Office of Institutional Advancement. This is needed because IA is often involved with solicitations on behalf of the College. Generally, approval will be granted to solicit small merchants in Cresson and surrounding communities. Larger businesses such as Sheetz (excluding their MTO program), McDonalds, and the banks generally will not be approved. Providing tax-deductibility for contributors is not a prerequisite for fundraising. Most donors, where the amount is small (under $10 or $15) almost never care about deducting the contribution. Tax deductions can only be taken where a donation has been made to a tax-exempt organization (technically a 501(c) 3 corporation). Mount Aloysius College is a 501(c) 3 organization; clubs and most student organizations have agency accounts with the College. This means that as long as the funds are processed through the Controller’s Office and the correct documentation is performed, the donor should be able to take a deduction for the donations. The IRS requires an acknowledgement letter from the tax-exempt organization for contributions of $75 or more in cash and in-kind (things other than cash), or $250 for cash-only donations. These letters are issued by IA but will only be done where the average individual contribution is expected to be $75 or more. The contributor can evidence his/her donation in smaller amounts by retaining ticket stubs, receipts, programs or other materials. Tax deductions can only be taken when the monetary donation exceeds the value of goods or services being provided to the donor, and then only for that difference. The activities may take place off-campus (if pre-approved) without jeopardizing the tax issues discussed here. There are special procedures for raffles that must be followed, please see Student Activities. Simply put, most fundraising activities by student organizations and clubs are not large enough on a donor-by-donor basis to worry about tax-deductibility for donors. Where the club is selling baked goods or hoagies, only the amount of the contribution over the value of the item is deductible (this will be pretty small in most cases). At the same time, most contributors really do not care about the deductibility of small donations. Contact Student Activities to have your fundraiser approved. Contact Institutional Advancement if businesses will be solicited. Contact the Controller’s Office if you need to make purchases exempt from sales tax. The Office of Institutional Advancement is always happy to provide counsel on fundraising to student organizations. Please call 814-886-6425 for advice or clarification. 78


UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2016-2017 Fall Semester 2016 August 15 19 22

29 30 September 1 5 16 22 October 7 10 12 28 November 4 7 11 22 28 December 9 12 13

Faculty Workshop Activities Begin Faculty Workshop Activities Conclude Classes Begin; Last Day to Register - Late Registration Fee Applies; Official Add‑Drop Course Period Begins Official Last Day to Add or Drop a Course Withdraw from Course Period Begins All-College Convocation Labor Day –NO CLASSES Last Day to Make Up Incompletes for Summer 2016 Sessions All-College Liturgy Midterm; Long Weekend Begins After Last Class Midterm Grades Due – 4:00 p.m. Classes Resume Spring Registration Begins – Current Students; Last Day to Apply for May Graduation Spring Registration Begins – New Students Final Day to Withdraw from an Individual Course with a Grade of “W” Total Semester Withdrawal Deadline; Thanksgiving Vacation Begins After Last Class Classes Resume Semester Ends after Last Class; December Graduate Recognition – 6:00 p.m. Fall Final Grades Due – 4:00 p.m. Department Faculty Workshop Activities Begin Faculty Workshop Activities Conclude

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Spring Semester 2017 January 5 6 9

16 17 20 March 1 3 6 13 31 April 6 7 10 13 18 May 2 5 6 8

Faculty Workshop Activities Begin; Faculty Workshop Activities End Classes Begin; Official Add‑Drop Course Period Begins; Last Day to Register; Late Registration Fee Applies Official Last Day to Add or Drop a Course; Martin Luther King Day (Classes Will Meet) Withdrawal from Course Period Begins Last Day to Make Up Incompletes for the Fall 2016 Semester Summer 2017 Registration Begins Spring Break Begins After Last Class Midterm Grades Due – 4:00 p.m. Classes Resume Fall Registration Begins – Current Students; Final Day to Withdraw from an Individual Course with a Grade of “W” Honors Recognition Last Day to Apply for August/December Graduation; Fall Registration Begins – New Students Total Semester Withdrawal Deadline; Easter Break begins after last class Classes Resume Semester Ends after Last Class Baccalaureate Liturgy and Pinning Ceremonies Commencement Ceremony Final Grades Due – 8:30 a.m. ***Summer 2017 Sessions to Be Announced***

MOUNT ALOYSIUS COLLEGE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MAKE NECESSARY CHANGES IN THE ACADEMIC CALENDAR

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Sports Schedule Men’s Soccer 8/23/16 8/27/16 8/29/16 9/2/16 9/3/16 9/6/16 9/7/16 9/11/16 9/13/16

9/14/16 9/18/16 9/20/16 9/21/16 9/24/16 9/27/16 10/1/16 10/5/16 10/8/16 10/11/16 10/15/16 10/19/16 10/22/16 10/25/16 10/29/16 11/2/16 11/5/16

PSU - York (Scrimmage) (Away), 4:00 PM Point Park University (Scrimmage) , 1:00 PM PSU - Beaver (JV Game) , 4:00 PM York College (NY) DH (Away), 6:00 PM SUNY Old Westbury DH (Away), 12:00 PM PSU - New Kensington (JV Game) , 4:00 PM Saint Vincent College DH , 4:00 PM Marymount University (Away), 2:00 PM PSU-Greater Allegheny (JV Game) (Away), 4:00 PM Albright College (Away), 7:00 PM Thiel College (Away), 3:30 PM Juniata College , 4:00 PM Wilson College DH (Away), 4:00 PM Medaille College DH (Away), 3:00 PM Bethany College DH , 4:00 PM PSU-Behrend DH , 3:00 PM PSU-Altoona DH , 4:00 PM D’Youville College DH (Away), 3:00 PM Franciscan University DH (Away), 4:00 PM Hilbert College DH , 3:00 PM Pitt-Greensburg DH (Away), 4:15 PM Pitt-Bradford DH , 3:00 PM La Roche College DH , 3:00 PM AMCC Playoffs (First Round) AMCC Semi-finals AMCC Championship

Women’s Soccer 8/25/16

8/27/16 9/2/16 9/3/16 9/7/16 9/9/16 9/10/16 9/13/16 9/17/16 9/21/16 9/24/16 9/27/16 10/1/16 10/5/16 10/8/16 10/11/16 10/15/16 10/19/16 10/22/16 10/25/16 10/29/16 11/2/16 11/5/16

Geneva College (Scrimmage) (Away), 4:00 PM Christendom College (Scrimmage) , 3:00 PM York College (NY) DH (Away), 4:00 PM SUNY Old Westbury DH (Away), 2:00 PM Saint Vincent College DH , 2:00 PM Hood College , 4:00 PM Keystone College , 1:00 PM Lycoming College , 4:00 PM Thiel College , 1:00 PM Wilson College DH (Away), 2:00 PM Medaille College DH (Away), 1:00 PM Bethany College DH , 2:00 PM PSU-Behrend DH , 1:00 PM PSU-Altoona DH , 2:00 PM D’Youville College DH (Away), 1:00 PM Franciscan University DH (Away), 2:00 PM Hilbert College DH , 1:00 PM Pitt-Greensburg DH (Away), 2:00 PM Pitt-Bradford DH , 1:00 PM La Roche College DH , 1:00 PM AMCC Playoffs (First Round) AMCC Semifinals AMCC Championship

Men’s Golf 8/30/16 9/3/16 9/17/16 9/18/16 9/20/16 9/26/16 10/3/16 10/9/16

at PSU-Dubois (Dubios Country Club) at Pitt-Bradford (Pine Acres Country Club) at PSU-Altoona (Sinking Valley Country Club) MAC Golf Invitational (Summit Country Club) at La Roche College (Wildwood Country Club) at Westminster (New Castle Country Club) at PSU-Behrend (Lake View Country Club) at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club) 10/10/16 at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club)

Women’s Golf 8/30/16 9/3/16 9/17/16 9/18/16 9/23/16 10/3/16 10/9/16

at PSU-Dubois (Dubois Country Club) at Westminster (New Castle Country Club) at PSU-Altoona (Sinking Valley Country Club) MAC Golf Invitational (Summit Country Club) at Ladies Invite (Ebensburg Country Club) at PSU-Behrend (Lake View Country Club) at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club) 10/10/16 at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club)

Volleyball 9/2/16

Virginia Wesleyan College (VWC) vs. VWC (Away), 3:00 PM 9/2/16 VWC vs. St. Mary’s College of MD (Away), 7:00 PM 9/3/16 VWC vs. Meredith College (Away), 10:00 AM 9/3/16 VWC vs. Ferrum College (Away), 12:00 PM 9/7/16 Eastern Mennonite University , 7:00 PM 9/10/16 Montclair State vs. Farmingdale (Away), 1:00 PM 9/10/16 Montclair State vs. Montclair (Away), 3:00 PM 9/13/16 Lycoming College , 7:00 PM 9/15/16 Summit University (Away), 7:00 PM 9/17/16 Saint Vincent College vs. PSU-Fayette (Away), 1:00 PM 9/17/16 Saint Vincent College (Away), 3:00 PM 9/20/16 Valley Forge Christian College (Away), 4:00 PM 9/20/16 Valley Forge vs. Lancaster Bible (Away), 6:00 PM 9/24/16 MAC vs. Pitt-Bradford (Ct #1) D’Youville vs. PSU-Altoona (Ct #2) , 1:00 PM 9/24/16 MAC vs. D’Youville College (Ct #1) PittBradford vs. PSU-Altoona (Ct #2) , 3:30 PM 9/28/16 Pitt-Greensburg (Away), 7:00 PM 9/30/16 Hollins University vs. MAC , 7:00 PM 10/1/16 Hollins University vs. Pitt-Greensburg , 11:00 AM 10/1/16 Shenandoah University vs. MAC , 1:00 PM 10/1/16 Shenandoah University vs. Pitt-Greensburg, 3:00 PM 10/4/16 PSU-Altoona , 7:00 PM 10/12/16 Franciscan University (Away), 7:00 PM 10/13/16 Hood College , 7:00 PM 81


10/15/16 10/19/16 10/22/16 10/25/16 10/26/16 10/29/16

Medaille College (Away), 1:00 PM Frostburg State University (Away), 7:00 PM Hilbert College (Away), 1:00 PM Waynesburg University , 7:00 PM La Roche College (Away), 7:00 PM PSU-Behrend , 1:00 PM

Women’s Bowling

at Wolfpack Invitational at WCCC , 10:00 AM at AMCC Preview at UPJ at Franciscan University Invitational , 11:15 AM at Frostburg State University Invitational , 10:30 AM 10/15/16 at Gettysburg College Invitational , 10:30 AM 10/30/16 at AMCC Championships at UPJ hosted by Pitt-Greensburg

at Western Shootout (Indianapolis, IN) at Western Shootout (Indianapolis, IN) at Western Shootout (Indianapolis, IN) at KU Fall Invite (Reading, PA) at KU Fall Invite (Reading, PA) at KU Fall Invite (Reading, PA) Special Olympics Halloween Party (Richland Lanes, Johnstown, PA) 11/3/16 at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA) 11/4/16 at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA) 11/5/16 at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA) 11/6/16 at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA) 11/10/16 AMCC # 1* hosted by NJ City (New Jersey City, NJ) 11/11/16 AMCC # 1* hosted by NJ City (New Jersey City, NJ) 11/12/16 AMCC # 1* hosted by NJ City (New Jersey City, NJ) 1/14/17 Pitt-Bradford Invitational (Bradford, PA) 1/15/17 Pitt-Bradford Invitational (Bradford, PA) 1/27/17 Red Flash Invitational (Altoona, PA) 1/28/17 Red Flash Invitational (Altoona, PA) 1/29/17 Red Flash Invitational (Altoona, PA) 2/11/17 at AMCC Championships (Hosted by MAC) (Richland Lanes, Johnstown, PA) 2/12/17 at AMCC Championships (Hosted by MAC) (Richland Lanes, Johnstown, PA) 2/16/17 James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD) 2/17/17 James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD) 2/18/17 James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD) 2/19/17 James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD) 3/2/17 at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ) 3/3/17 at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ) 3/4/17 at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ) 3/5/17 at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ) 3/11/17 at USBC Sectional Qualifier (Stratford, NJ) 3/12/17 at USBC Sectional Qualifier (Stratford, NJ) 3/16/17 at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 3/17/17 at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 3/18/17 at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 3/19/17 at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN)

Men’s Tennis

Women’s Basketball

Women’s Tennis 9/2/16 9/3/16 9/8/16 9/10/16 9/11/16 9/16/16 9/17/16 9/18/16 9/25/16 10/1/16 10/2/16 10/8/16

Thiel College , 3:30 PM Lycoming College , 11:00 AM at PSU-Altoona , 3:30 PM at PSU-Behrend , 1:00 PM at Pitt-Bradford , 10:00 AM at Pitt-Greensburg , 5:30 PM Medaille College , 2:00 PM D’Youville College , 10:00 AM at Fraciscan University , 2:00 PM at Bethany College , 11:00 AM at La Roche College , 11:00 AM AMCC 1st Round Playoff (#6 at #3, #5 at #4), TBA 10/15/16 AMCC Semi-finals (Club 4 Life, Monroeville, PA) , TBA 10/16/16 AMCC Championships (Club 4 Life, Monroeville, PA) , TBA

Women’s Cross Country 9/10/16 9/17/16 9/24/16 10/1/16

at Wolfpack Invitational at WCCC , 9:00 AM at AMCC Preview at UPJ at Franciscan University Invitational , 10:30 AM at Frostburg State University Invitational , 11:15 AM 10/15/16 at Gettysburg College Invitational , 10:30 AM 10/30/16 at AMCC Championships at UPJ hosted by Pitt-Greensburg

Men’s Cross Country 9/10/16 9/17/16 9/24/16 10/1/16

9/24/16 2/10/17 2/18/17 2/19/17 2/25/17 3/17/17 3/19/17 3/25/17 4/1/17 4/2/17 4/28/17 82

at Waynesburg Tournament , 10:00 AM Waynesburg University , 5:00 PM Washington & Jefferson , 11:00 AM Westminster College , 1:00 PM Geneva College , 12:00 PM at Pitt-Greensburg , 5:30 PM Bethany College , 2:00 PM at Franciscan University , 5:00 PM PSU-Behrend , 11:00 AM Pitt-Bradford , 11:00 AM at Lycoming College , 4:00 PM

10/7/16 10/8/16 10/9/16 10/14/16 10/15/16 10/16/16 10/29/16

10/23/16 11/18/16 11/19/16 11/22/16 11/26/16 11/30/16 12/3/16 12/7/16 12/10/16 12/14/16 12/17/16 12/31/16

Potomac State (Scrimmage) , TBA McDaniel Tipoff Tournament (Away), 6:00 PM McDaniel Tipoff Tournament (Away), 2:00 PM Frostburg State University , 6:00 PM Capital University (Away), 2:00 PM Carnegie Mellon University (Away), 6:00 PM D’Youville College , 1:00 PM Pitt-Greensburg (Away), 6:00 PM PSU-Behrend (Away), 1:00 PM Bethany College (Away), 6:00 PM Pitt-Bradford , 1:00 PM Chatham University , 1:00 PM


1/4/17 1/7/17 1/11/17 1/14/17 1/18/17 1/21/17 1/25/17 1/28/17 2/1/17 2/4/17 2/8/17 2/11/17 2/15/17 2/18/17 2/22/17 2/25/17

La Roche College , 6:00 PM Medaille College (Away), 1:00 PM PSU-Altoona , 6:00 PM Hilbert College , 1:00 PM Franciscan University (Away), 6:00 PM D’Youville College (Away), 1:00 PM Pitt-Greensburg , 6:00 PM PSU-Behrend , 1:00 PM La Roche College (Away), 6:00 PM Pitt-Bradford (Away), 1:00 PM PSU-Altoona (Away), 6:00 PM Medaille College , 1:00 PM Franciscan University , 6:00 PM Hilbert College (Away), 1:00 PM AMCC Playoffs (1st Round) AMCC Championships

Men’s Basketball

10/29/16 Garrett College (Scrimmage Game) (Away), 1:00 PM 11/11/16 Mercyhurst University (Scrimmage Game) (Away), 4:00 PM 11/15/16 Frostburg State University (Away), 7:00 PM 11/18/16 Coaches vs. Cancer Classic (at PSU-Altoona) (Away), TBA 11/19/16 Coaches vs. Cancer Classic (at PSU-Altoona) (Away), TBA 11/26/16 Carnegie Mellon Tournament (Away), 1:00 PM 11/27/16 Carnegie Mellon Tournament (Away), 3:00 PM 12/3/16 D’Youville College , 3:00 PM 12/7/16 Pitt-Greensburg (Away), 8:00 PM 12/10/16 PSU-Behrend (Away), 3:00 PM 12/14/16 Grove City College , 6:00 PM 12/17/16 Pitt-Bradford , 3:00 PM 1/2/17 Drew University (Away), 2:00 PM 1/4/17 La Roche College , 8:00 PM 1/7/17 Medaille College (Away), 3:00 PM 1/11/17 PSU-Altoona , 8:00 PM 1/14/17 Hilbert College , 3:00 PM 1/18/17 Franciscan University (Away), 8:00 PM 1/21/17 D’Youville College (Away), 3:00 PM 1/25/17 Pitt-Greensburg , 8:00 PM 1/28/17 PSU-Behrend , 3:00 PM 2/1/17 La Roche College (Away), 8:00 PM 2/4/17 Pitt-Bradford (Away), 3:00 PM 2/8/17 PSU-Altoona (Away), 8:00 PM 2/11/17 Medaille College , 3:00 PM 2/15/17 Franciscan University , 3:00 PM 2/18/17 Hilbert College (Away), 3:00 PM 2/22/17 AMCC Playoffs (First Round) , TBA 2/25/17 AMCC Playoffs , TBA

Baseball 2/26/17 3/3/17

3/16/17 3/18/17 3/21/17 3/22/17 3/25/17 3/29/17 4/1/17 4/4/17 4/6/17 4/8/17 4/12/17 4/15/17 4/18/17 4/22/17 4/26/17 4/29/17 5/6/17 5/7/17 5/12/17 5/13/17 5/14/17 5/17/17 5/18/17 5/19/17 5/20/17

Lynchburg College (Away), 12:00 PM Ripken Experience, Myrtle Beach, SC (Away), TBA Shenandoah University (Away), 3:00 PM Thiel College , 1:00 PM Messiah College (Away), 3:30 PM Saint Vincent College , 3:00 PM Gettysburg College (Away), 1:00 PM La Roche College , 1:00 PM PSU-Behrend , 1:00 PM PSU-Altoona (Away), 1:00 PM Penn Tech (Away), 1:00 PM Hilbert College (Away), 1:00 PM Juniata College , 1:00 PM Medaille College , 1:00 PM Pitt-Greensburg , 1:00 PM Pitt-Bradford (Away), 1:00 PM Frostburg State University (Away), 2:00 PM D’Youville College (Away), 1:00 PM First Round AMCC Tournament , TBA First Round AMCC Tournament , TBA AMCC Tournament Championship Round, TBA AMCC Tournament Championship Round, TBA AMCC Tournament Championship Round, TBA NCAA Regionals NCAA Regionals NCAA Regionals NCAA Regionals

Softball 3/4/17

3/15/17 3/18/17 3/23/17 3/25/17 3/30/17 4/1/17 4/2/17 4/4/17 4/8/17 4/12/17 4/15/17 4/18/17 4/22/17 4/26/17 5/5/17 5/6/17 5/7/17 5/12/17 5/13/17 5/14/17

Snowbird Softball Tournament, Myrtle Beach, SC (Away), TBA UPJ DH , 3:00 PM Geneva College DH , 3:00 PM Juniata College DH , 3:00 PM Grove City College DH (Away), 1:00 PM Waynesburg University DH (Away), 3:30 PM Hilbert College DH , 1:00 PM Pitt-Bradford DH , 1:00 PM Pitt-Greensburg DH , 3:00 PM D’Youville College DH (Away), 1:00 PM PSU-Altoona DH , 3:00 PM PSU-Behrend DH (Away), 1:00 PM Franciscan University DH (Away), 3:00 PM Medaille College DH , 1:00 PM La Roche College DH (Away), 3:00 PM AMCC Tournament at #1 Seed (Away), TBA AMCC Tournament at #1 Seed (Away), TBA AMCC Tournament at #1 Seed (Away), TBA NCAA Regionals (Away), TBA NCAA Regionals (Away), TBA NCAA Regionals (Away), TBA

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s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September s M t w t f s

“People with goals succeed because they know where they’re going.” – Earl Nightingale

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

August

8

Tuesday

August

9

Wednesday

August

10

clamor – noise. It was difficult to hear over the clamor in the train station. 88

@schooldatebooks


August

Thursday

11

August

Friday

12

August

Saturday

13

August

Sunday

14

-via- (way) – deviation, viaduct, trivial datebookstore.com

89


August

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September s M t w t f s

“All I can do is be the best me that I can. And live life with some gusto.” – Michelle Obama

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

August

15

Tuesday

August

16

Wednesday

August

17

sapient – wise. Grandmother was often consulted because she was sapient in giving advice. 90

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August

Thursday

18

August

Friday

19

August

Saturday

20

August

Sunday

21

aqua- (water) – aqueduct, aquatic, aquarium datebookstore.com

91


August

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September s M t w t f s

“Success is how high you bounce when you hit bottom.” – General George Patton

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

August

22

Tuesday

August

23

4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PSU York (Scrimmage) (Away)

Wednesday

August

24

quash – crush. Her dreams of medical school were quashed when she failed her entrance exams. 92

@schooldatebooks


August

25

Thursday

4:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Geneva College (Scrimmage) (Away)

August

Friday

26

August

27

Saturday

1:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Point Park University (Scrimmage) 3:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Christendom College (Scrimmage)

August

Sunday

28

-chron- (time) – chronometer, chronological, synchronize, chronic datebookstore.com

93


August

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

September s M t w t f s

“Don’t live down to expectations. Go out there and do something remarkable.” – Wendy Wasserstein

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

August

29

4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PSU Beaver (JV Game)

Tuesday

August

30

Men’s Golf at PSU-Dubois (Dubios Country Club) Women’s Golf at PSU-Dubois (Dubois Country Club)

Wednesday

August

31

explicate – explain in detail. The students explicated each step of their science project. 94

@schooldatebooks


September

Thursday

1

September

2

Friday

3:00 PM - Volleyball Virginia Wesleyan College (VWC) vs. VWC (Away) 3:30 PM - Women’s Tennis vs Thiel College 4:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs York College (NY) DH (Away) 6:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs York College (NY) DH (Away) 7:00 PM - Volleyball VWC vs. St. Mary’s College of MD (Away)

September

3

Saturday

Men’s Golf at Pitt-Bradford (Pine Acres Country Club) Women’s Golf at Westminster (New Castle Country Club) 10:00 AM - Volleyball VWC vs. Meredith College (Away) 11:00 AM - Women’s Tennis vs Lycoming College 12:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs SUNY Old Westbury DH (Away) 12:00 PM - Volleyball VWC vs. Ferrum College (Away) 2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs SUNY Old Westbury DH (Away)

September

Sunday

4

dia- (across) – diagonal, diameter, diagram datebookstore.com

95


SEPTEMBER 2016 MONDAY

Labor Day

96

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

5

6

7

12

13

14

19

20

21

26

27

28

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY 1

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 2

3

4

8

15

9

16

Eid al-Adha begins at sundown

10

Patriot Day

11

17

18

First Day of Autumn

22

23

24

25

29

datebookstore.com

30

97


September

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October s M t w t f s

“Life is what we make it, always has been, always will be.” – Grandma Moses

Monday

September

5

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

Labor Day

Tuesday

September

6

4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PSU New Kensington (JV Game)

Wednesday

September

7

2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Saint Vincent College DH 4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Saint Vincent College DH 7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Eastern Mennonite University

umbrage – offense. He took umbrage over not landing the lead role. 98

@schooldatebooks


September

8

Thursday

3:30 PM - Women’s Tennis at PSU-Altoona

September

9

Friday

4:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Hood College

September

10

Saturday

Eid al-Adha begins at sundown 9:00 AM - Women’s Cross Country at Wolfpack Invitational at WCCC 10:00 AM - Men’s Cross Country at Wolfpack Invitational at WCCC 1:00 PM - Volleyball Montclair State vs. Farmingdale (Away) 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Keystone College 1:00 PM - Women’s Tennis at PSU-Behrend 3:00 PM - Volleyball Montclair State vs. Montclair (Away)

September

11

Sunday

Patriot Day 10:00 AM - Women’s Tennis at Pitt-Bradford 2:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Marymount University (Away)

-belli- (war) – bellicose, belligerent, rebellious datebookstore.com

99


September

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October s M t w t f s

“Sometimes something worth doing is worth overdoing.” – David Letterman

Monday

September

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

12

Tuesday

September

13

4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PSUGreater Allegheny (JV Game) (Away) 4:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Lycoming College 7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Lycoming College

Wednesday

September

14

7:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Albright College (Away)

abeyance – temporary suspension. Kara held her excitement in abeyance while waiting for the judge’s score. 100

@schooldatebooks


September

15

Thursday

7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Summit University (Away)

September

16

Friday

5:30 PM - Women’s Tennis at PittGreensburg

September

September

18

Sunday

Men’s Golf MAC Golf Invitational (Summit Country Club) Women’s Golf MAC Golf Invitational (Summit Country Club) 10:00 AM - Women’s Tennis vs D’Youville College 3:30 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Thiel College (Away)

17

Saturday

Men’s Cross Country at AMCC Preview at UPJ Men’s Golf at PSU-Altoona (Sinking Valley Country Club) Women’s Cross Country at AMCC Preview at UPJ Women’s Golf at PSU-Altoona (Sinking Valley Country Club) 1:00 PM - Volleyball Saint Vincent College vs. PSU-Fayette (Away) 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Thiel College 2:00 PM - Women’s Tennis vs Medaille College 3:00 PM - Volleyball vs Saint Vincent College (Away)

auto- (self) – autocracy, automobile, autobiography datebookstore.com

101


September

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October s M t w t f s

“Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.” – James Dean

Monday

September

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

19

Tuesday

September

20

Men’s Golf at La Roche College (Wildwood Country Club) 4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Juniata College 4:00 PM - Volleyball vs Valley Forge Christian College (Away) 6:00 PM - Volleyball Valley Forge vs. Lancaster Bible (Away)

Wednesday

September

21

2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Wilson College DH (Away) 4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Wilson College DH (Away)

mollify – soothe, soften in feeling. He tried to mollify his wife by giving her flowers. 102

@schooldatebooks


September

22

Thursday

First Day of Autumn

September

23

Friday

Women’s Golf at Ladies Invite (Ebensburg Country Club)

September

September

25

Sunday

2:00 PM - Women’s Tennis at Fraciscan University

24

Saturday

10:00 AM - Men’s Tennis at Waynesburg Tournament 10:30 AM - Women’s Cross Country at Franciscan University Invitational 11:15 AM - Men’s Cross Country at Franciscan University Invitational 1:00 PM - Volleyball MAC vs. PittBradford (Ct #1) D’Youville vs. PSU-Altoona (Ct #2) 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Medaille College DH (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Medaille College DH (Away) 3:30 PM - Volleyball MAC vs. D’Youville College (Ct #1) PittBradford vs. PSU-Altoona (Ct #2)

-dynam- (power, strength) – dynamic, dynamite, dynamo datebookstore.com

103


September

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October s M t w t f s

“We must use time creatively, and forever realize that the time is always ripe to do right.” – Nelson Mandela

Monday

September

26

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

Men’s Golf at Westminster (New Castle Country Club)

Tuesday

September

27

2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Bethany College DH 4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Bethany College DH

Wednesday

September

28

7:00 PM - Volleyball vs PittGreensburg (Away)

ribald – unrestrained, profane. His ribald stories offended the wedding guests. 104

@schooldatebooks


September

Thursday

29

September

30

Friday

7:00 PM - Volleyball Hollins University vs. MAC

October

October

2

Sunday

Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown 11:00 AM - Women’s Tennis at La Roche College

1

Saturday

Muharram begins at sundown 10:30 AM - Men’s Cross Country at Frostburg State University Invitational 11:00 AM - Volleyball Hollins University vs. Pitt-Greensburg 11:00 AM - Women’s Tennis at Bethany College 11:15 AM - Women’s Cross Country at Frostburg State University Invitational 1:00 PM - Volleyball Shenandoah University vs. MAC 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs PSUBehrend DH 3:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PSUBehrend DH 3:00 PM - Volleyball Shenandoah University vs. Pitt-Greensburg

-ess (female) – goddess, lioness, actress, priestess datebookstore.com

105


OCTOBER 2016 MONDAY

TUESDAY

3

Columbus Day (Observed)

Halloween

106

WEDNESDAY

4

5

11

12

17

18

19

24

25

26

10

Yom Kippur begins at sundown

31

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

6

SATURDAY / SUNDAY

7

Muharram begins at sundown

1

Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown

2

8

9

13

14

15

16

20

21

22

23

27

28

29

30

datebookstore.com

107


October

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

November s M t w t f s

“Failure is a signpost to turn you in another direction.” – Oprah Winfrey

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

October

3

Men’s Golf at PSU-Behrend (Lake View Country Club) Women’s Golf at PSU-Behrend (Lake View Country Club)

Tuesday

October

4

7:00 PM - Volleyball vs PSUAltoona

Wednesday

October

5

2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs PSU-Altoona DH 4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PSUAltoona DH

bifurcate – divide into two. Once another employee is hired, the company will bifurcate the woman’s duties. 108

@schooldatebooks


October

Thursday

6

October

7

Friday

Women’s Bowling at Western Shootout (Indianapolis, IN)

October

8

Saturday

Women’s Bowling at Western Shootout (Indianapolis, IN) 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs D’Youville College DH (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs D’Youville College DH (Away) TBA - Women’s Tennis AMCC 1st Round Playoff (#6 at #3, #5 at #4)

October

9

Sunday

Men’s Golf at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club) Women’s Bowling at Western Shootout (Indianapolis, IN) Women’s Golf at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club)

-cura- (to care) – curator, sinecure, secure datebookstore.com

109


October

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

November s M t w t f s

“Whether you believe you can do a thing or not, you are right.” – Henry Ford

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

October

10

Columbus Day (Observed) Men’s Golf at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club) Women’s Golf at AMCC Championships (Avalon Lakes Country Club)

Tuesday

October

11

Yom Kippur begins at sundown 2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Franciscan University DH (Away) 4:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Franciscan University DH (Away)

Wednesday

October

12

7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Franciscan University (Away)

mutable – changeable. A folding screen creates a mutable partition in a large room. 110

@schooldatebooks


October

13

Thursday

7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Hood College

October

14

Friday

Women’s Bowling at KU Fall Invite (Reading, PA)

October

October

16

Sunday

Women’s Bowling at KU Fall Invite (Reading, PA) TBA - Women’s Tennis AMCC Championships (Club 4 Life, Monroeville, PA)

15

Saturday

Women’s Bowling at KU Fall Invite (Reading, PA) 10:30 AM - Men’s Cross Country at Gettysburg College Invitational 10:30 AM - Women’s Cross Country at Gettysburg College Invitational 1:00 PM - Volleyball vs Medaille College (Away) 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Hilbert College DH 3:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs Hilbert College DH TBA - Women’s Tennis AMCC Semifinals (Club 4 Life, Monroeville, PA)

-aud-, -audit- (hear) – audible, auditorium, audience datebookstore.com

111


October

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

November s M t w t f s

“It is best to learn as we go, not go as we have learned.” – Leslie Jeanne Sahler

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

October

17

Tuesday

October

18

Wednesday

October

19

2:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs PittGreensburg DH (Away) 4:15 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PittGreensburg DH (Away) 7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Frostburg State University (Away)

canard – lie, falsehood. Her ridiculous excuse was clearly a canard. 112

@schooldatebooks


October

Thursday

20

October

Friday

21

October

22

Saturday

1:00 PM - Volleyball vs Hilbert College (Away) 1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs Pitt-Bradford DH 3:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs PittBradford DH

October

23

Sunday

TBA - Women’s Basketball vs Potomac State (Scrimmage)

-leg-, -lect- (to read, to choose) – legible, eligible, election, select datebookstore.com

113


October

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

November s M t w t f s

“It is our choices...that show us what we truly are, far more than our abilities.” – J.K. Rowling

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

October

24

Tuesday

October

25

1:00 PM - Women’s Soccer vs La Roche College DH 3:00 PM - Men’s Soccer vs La Roche College DH 7:00 PM - Volleyball vs Waynesburg University

Wednesday

October

26

7:00 PM - Volleyball vs La Roche College (Away)

halcyon – peaceful, calm. Amidst the turmoil, she dreamily recalled her halcyon days on the beach. 114

@schooldatebooks


October

Thursday

27

October

Friday

28

October

29

Saturday

Men’s Soccer AMCC Playoffs (First Round) Women’s Bowling Special Olympics Halloween Party (Richland Lanes, Johnstown, PA) Women’s Soccer AMCC Playoffs (First Round) 1:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Garrett College (Scrimmage Game) (Away) 1:00 PM - Volleyball vs PSUBehrend

October

30

Sunday

Men’s Cross Country at AMCC Championships at UPJ hosted by Pitt-Greensburg Women’s Cross Country at AMCC Championships at UPJ hosted by Pitt-Greensburg

biblio- (book) – bibliography, bibliophile, Bible datebookstore.com

115


NOVEMBER 2016 MONDAY

TUESDAY 1

2

8

9

14

15

16

21

22

23

28

29

30

7

116

WEDNESDAY

Election Day

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY 3

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 4

5

Standard Time returns

10

Veterans Day

11

6

12

13

17

18

19

20

Thanksgiving

24

25

26

27

datebookstore.com

117


November

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December s M t w t f s

“Think it more satisfactory to live richly than die rich.” – Sir Thomas Browne, Sr.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

October

31

Halloween

Tuesday

November

1

Wednesday

November

2

Men’s Soccer AMCC Semi-finals Women’s Soccer AMCC Semifinals

choleric – irritable, short-tempered. The choleric receptionist became enraged by several prank phone calls. 118

@schooldatebooks


November

3

Thursday

Women’s Bowling at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA)

November

4

Friday

Women’s Bowling at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA)

November

5

Saturday

Men’s Soccer AMCC Championship Women’s Bowling at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA) Women’s Soccer AMCC Championship

November

6

Sunday

Standard Time returns Women’s Bowling at Virginia Union Invitational (Richmond, VA)

-luc- (light) – elucidate, lucid, translucent datebookstore.com

119


November

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December s M t w t f s

“There is nothing in life more liberating than to fight for something more than yourself.” – John McCain

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

November

7

Tuesday

November

8

Election Day

Wednesday

November

9

coterie – group of persons with a similar purpose. The women’s coterie liked to discuss their favorite books. 120

@schooldatebooks


November

10

Thursday

Women’s Bowling AMCC # 1* hosted by NJ City (New Jersey City, NJ)

November

11

Friday

Veterans Day Women’s Bowling AMCC # 1* hosted by NJ City (New Jersey City, NJ) 4:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Mercyhurst University (Scrimmage Game) (Away)

November

12

Saturday

Women’s Bowling AMCC # 1* hosted by NJ City (New Jersey City, NJ)

November

Sunday

13

-erg- (work) – energy, ergonomic, ergometer, metallurgy datebookstore.com

121


November

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December s M t w t f s

“Be yourself. Who else is better qualified?” – Frank J. Giblin II

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

November

14

SALSA Service-Learning Workshop @ St. Francis

Tuesday

November

15

7:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Frostburg State University (Away)

Wednesday

November

16

Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week

diluvial – pertaining to a flood. Saturday’s rain brought yet another diluvial disaster to the region. 122

@schooldatebooks


November

Thursday

17

November

18

Friday

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball McDaniel Tipoff Tournament (Away) TBA - Men’s Basketball Coaches vs. Cancer Classic (at PSUAltoona) (Away)

November

19

Saturday

2:00 PM - Women’s Basketball McDaniel Tipoff Tournament (Away) TBA - Men’s Basketball Coaches vs. Cancer Classic (at PSUAltoona) (Away)

November

Sunday

20

-fid-, -fide-, -feder- (faith, trust) – confidante, fidelity, confident, infidel, federal, confederacy datebookstore.com

123


November

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December s M t w t f s

“Dreams come true; without that possibility, nature would not incite us to have them.” – John Updike

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

November

21

Tuesday

November

22

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Frostburg State University

Wednesday

November

23

feckless – ineffective, worthless. His girlfriend’s father felt he was feckless, even though he tried to find a job. 124

@schooldatebooks


November

24

Thursday

Thanksgiving

November

Friday

25

November

26

Saturday

1:00 PM - Men’s Basketball Carnegie Mellon Tournament (Away) 2:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Capital University (Away)

November

27

Sunday

3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball Carnegie Mellon Tournament (Away)

-phon- (sound) – symphony, telephone, phonetic, phonograph, euphony, cacophony, telephone datebookstore.com

125


November

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December s M t w t f s

“I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship.” – Louisa May Alcott

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

November

28

Tuesday

November

29

Wednesday

November

30

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Carnegie Mellon University (Away)

apathy – lack of interest. Student apathy forced the club to dissolve. 126

@schooldatebooks


December

Thursday

1

December

Friday

2

December

3

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs D’Youville College 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs D’Youville College

December

Sunday

4

-anthrop- (man) – anthropology, misanthrope, philanthropy datebookstore.com

127


DECEMBER 2016 MONDAY

Kwanzaa begins

128

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

5

6

7

12

13

14

19

20

26

27

First Day of Winter

21

28

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY 1

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 2

3

4

8

9

10

Mawlid al-Nabi begins at sundown

15

16

11

17

18

22

29

datebookstore.com

23

30

Hanukkah begins at sundown

24

Christmas

25

31

129


December

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

January s M t w t f s

“If it wasn’t hard, everyone would do it. It’s the hard that makes it great.” – Tom Hanks

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

December

5

Tuesday

December

6

Wednesday

December

7

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Pitt-Greensburg (Away) 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Pitt-Greensburg (Away)

foible – minor weakness. While the employee’s resume is outstanding, her late arrival is a foible. 130

@schooldatebooks


December

Thursday

8

December

Friday

9

December

10

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs PSU-Behrend (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs PSU-Behrend (Away)

December

11

Sunday

Mawlid al-Nabi begins at sundown

-ine (nature of) – masculine, genuine, medicine, opaline, Benedictine datebookstore.com

131


December s M t w t f s

Mount Aloysius College

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

MOUNTIES !

January s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

“Learn to listen. Opportunity could be knocking at your door very softly.” – Frank Tyger

Monday

December

12

Tuesday

December

13

Wednesday

December

14

6:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Grove City College 6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Bethany College (Away)

laudatory – praiseworthy. The principal commended our laudatory work. 132

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December

Thursday

15

December

Friday

16

December

17

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Pitt-Bradford 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Pitt-Bradford

December

Sunday

18

dis-, dif- (not) – discord, differ, distrust datebookstore.com

133


December s M t w t f s

Mount Aloysius College

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

MOUNTIES !

January s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

“Don’t cheat the world of your contribution. Give it what you’ve got.” – Steven Pressfield

Monday

December

19

Tuesday

December

20

Wednesday

December

21

First Day of Winter

penury – poverty. The decrepit buildings gave the area a mark of penury. 134

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December

Thursday

22

December

Friday

23

December

24

Saturday

Hanukkah begins at sundown

December

25

Sunday

Christmas

-aster- (star) – asterisk, asteroid, disaster datebookstore.com

135


December

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

January s M t w t f s

“The lips know only shallow tunes. The heart is where great symphonies are born.” – Calvin Miller

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

December

26

Kwanzaa begins

Tuesday

December

27

Wednesday

December

28

impious – lacking reverence or respect. His callous attitude toward others reflects his impious character. 136

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December

Thursday

29

December

Friday

30

December

31

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Chatham University

January

1

Sunday

New Year’s Day

-plac-, -pac- (please) – placid, placebo, placate, complacent, pacify datebookstore.com

137


JANUARY 2017 MONDAY

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Observed)

138

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

2

3

4

9

10

11

16

17

18

23

24

25

30

31

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY / SUNDAY

New Year’s Day

5

6

1

7

8

12

13

14

15

19

20

21

22

26

27

Chinese New Year

28

29

datebookstore.com

139


January

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February s M t w t f s

“Nobody gets to live life backward. Look ahead, that is where your future lies.” – Ann Landers

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Monday

January

2

2:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Drew University (Away)

Tuesday

January

3

Wednesday

January

4

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs La Roche College 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs La Roche College

kitsch – tacky decorative objects. Their home is full of 1950s kitsch. 140

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January

Thursday

5

January

Friday

6

January

7

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Medaille College (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Medaille College (Away)

January

Sunday

8

ego- (I, self) – egoist, egotist, egocentric datebookstore.com

141


January

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February s M t w t f s

“The way to get ahead is to start now.” – William Feather

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Monday

January

9

Tuesday

January

10

Wednesday

January

11

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs PSU-Altoona 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs PSU-Altoona

itinerant – traveling from place to place. The itinerant circus will make its next stop in my town. 142

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January

Thursday

12

January

Friday

13

January

14

Saturday

Women’s Bowling Pitt-Bradford Invitational (Bradford, PA) 1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Hilbert College 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Hilbert College

January

15

Sunday

Women’s Bowling Pitt-Bradford Invitational (Bradford, PA)

-mono- (one) – monopoly, monologue, monorail, monotonous, monomania, monolithic, monotone datebookstore.com

143


January

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February s M t w t f s

“You have to believe in yourself when no one else does – that makes you a winner right there.” – Venus Williams

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Monday

January

16

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Observed)

Tuesday

January

17

Wednesday

January

18

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Franciscan University (Away) 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Franciscan University (Away)

assuage – make less severe. The government has tried to assuage the public’s fears. 144

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January

Thursday

19

January

Friday

20

January

21

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs D’Youville College (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs D’Youville College (Away)

January

Sunday

22

civi- (citizen) – civilization, civilian, civil datebookstore.com

145


January

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

February s M t w t f s

“If you’re walking down the right path and you’re willing to keep walking, eventually you’ll make progress.” – Barack Obama

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

Monday

January

23

Tuesday

January

24

Wednesday

January

25

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Pitt-Greensburg 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Pitt-Greensburg

enigmatic – puzzling. The Mona Lisa has a famously enigmatic smile. 146

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January

Thursday

26

January

27

Friday

Women’s Bowling Red Flash Invitational (Altoona, PA)

January

28

Saturday

Chinese New Year Women’s Bowling Red Flash Invitational (Altoona, PA) 1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs PSU-Behrend 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs PSU-Behrend

January

29

Sunday

Women’s Bowling Red Flash Invitational (Altoona, PA)

-sed-, -sess-, -sid- (sit) – sediment, session, obsession, possess, preside, president, reside, subside datebookstore.com

147


FEBRUARY 2017 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY 1

6

13

Presidents’ Day

148

Valentine’s Day

7

8

14

15

20

21

27

28

Washington’s Birthday

22

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THURSDAY Groundhog Day

FRIDAY 2

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 3

4

5

9

10

11

Lincoln’s Birthday

16

17

12

18

19

23

24

25

26

datebookstore.com

149


February

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

March s M t w t f s

“The point is not to pay back kindness, but to pass it on.” – Julia Alvarez

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

January

30

Tuesday

January

31

Wednesday

February

1

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs La Roche College (Away) 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs La Roche College (Away)

jettison – to cast overboard, discard. Before their move to Florida, the couple jettisoned their winter clothes. 150

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February

2

Thursday

Groundhog Day

February

Friday

3

February

4

Saturday

1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Pitt-Bradford (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Pitt-Bradford (Away)

February

Sunday

5

deb-, -debit- (to owe) – debt, indebtedness, debenture datebookstore.com

151


February

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

March s M t w t f s

“Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.” – T. S. Eliot

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

February

6

Tuesday

February

7

Wednesday

February

8

6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs PSU-Altoona (Away) 8:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs PSU-Altoona (Away)

evanescent – vanishing, not lasting. Lovely yet evanescent, the sunrise lifted her spirits. 152

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February

Thursday

9

February

10

Friday

5:00 PM - Men’s Tennis vs Waynesburg University

February

11

Saturday

Women’s Bowling at AMCC Championships (Hosted by MAC) (Richland Lanes, Johnstown, PA) 1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Medaille College 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Medaille College

February

12

Sunday

Lincoln’s Birthday Women’s Bowling at AMCC Championships (Hosted by MAC) (Richland Lanes, Johnstown, PA)

com- (with, together) – combine, commerce, communicate datebookstore.com

153


February

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

March s M t w t f s

“There is nothing like a dream to create the future.” – Victor Hugo

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

February

13

Tuesday

February

14

Valentine’s Day

Wednesday

February

15

3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Franciscan University 6:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Franciscan University

temerity – reckless boldness. She had the temerity to call me a liar. 154

@schooldatebooks


February

16

Thursday

Women’s Bowling James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD)

February

17

Friday

Women’s Bowling James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD)

February

18

Saturday

Women’s Bowling James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD) 11:00 AM - Men’s Tennis vs Washington & Jefferson 1:00 PM - Women’s Basketball vs Hilbert College (Away) 3:00 PM - Men’s Basketball vs Hilbert College (Away)

February

19

Sunday

Women’s Bowling James Brown Invitational (Baltimore, MD) 1:00 PM - Men’s Tennis vs Westminster College

-vale-, -vali-, -valu- (strength, value) – equivalent, valiant, validity, evaluate, value, valor datebookstore.com

155


February

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

March s M t w t f s

“You were born to win, but to be a winner, you must plan to win, prepare to win, and expect to win.” – Zig Ziglar

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

February

20

Presidents’ Day

Tuesday

February

21

Wednesday

February

22

Washington’s Birthday Women’s Basketball AMCC Playoffs (1st Round) TBA - Men’s Basketball AMCC Playoffs (First Round)

maladroit – awkward, tactless, inept. His maladroit response to criticism upset would-be voters. 156

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February

Thursday

23

February

Friday

24

February

25

Saturday

Women’s Basketball AMCC Championships 12:00 PM - Men’s Tennis vs Geneva College TBA - Men’s Basketball AMCC Playoffs

February

26

Sunday

12:00 PM - Baseball vs Lynchburg College (Away)

bio- (life) – biology, biography, biochemist datebookstore.com

157


MARCH 2017 MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY Ash Wednesday

First Day of Spring

158

1

6

7

8

13

14

15

20

21

22

27

28

29

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY 2

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 3

4

5

9

10

11

Daylight-Saving Time begins

16

St. Patrick’s Day

17

12

18

19

23

24

25

26

30

datebookstore.com

31

159


March

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

April s M t w t f s

“No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.” – Charles Dickens

Monday

February

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

27

Tuesday

February

28

Wednesday

March

1

Ash Wednesday

kismet – destiny, fate. Jane likes movies depicting characters accepting their true kismet in life. 160

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March

2

Thursday

Women’s Bowling at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ)

March

3

Friday

Women’s Bowling at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ) TBA - Baseball Ripken Experience, Myrtle Beach, SC (Away)

March

4

Saturday

Women’s Bowling at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ) TBA - Softball Snowbird Softball Tournament, Myrtle Beach, SC (Away)

March

5

Sunday

Women’s Bowling at Monmouth Invitational (West Long Branch, NJ)

cata- (down, break) – catastrophe, cataract, catapult datebookstore.com

161


March

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

April s M t w t f s

“Leadership is action, not position.” – Donald H. McGannon

Monday

March

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

6

Tuesday

March

7

Wednesday

March

8

gustatory – relating to sense of taste. Sara’s cooking was full of gustatory delights. 162

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March

Thursday

9

March

Friday

10

March

11

Saturday

Women’s Bowling at USBC Sectional Qualifier (Stratford, NJ)

March

12

Sunday

Daylight-Saving Time begins Women’s Bowling at USBC Sectional Qualifier (Stratford, NJ)

-pell-, -puls- (to drive) – repel, expel, propellant, compulsion, pulsate datebookstore.com

163


March

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

April s M t w t f s

“The only way to have a life is to commit to it like crazy.” – Angelina Jolie

Monday

March

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

13

Tuesday

March

14

Wednesday

March

15

3:00 PM - Softball vs UPJ DH

retrogress – go backward. The project’s failure forced the team to retrogress. 164

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March

16

Thursday

Women’s Bowling at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 3:00 PM - Baseball vs Shenandoah University (Away)

March

17

Friday

St. Patrick’s Day Women’s Bowling at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 5:30 PM - Men’s Tennis at PittGreensburg

March

18

Saturday

Women’s Bowling at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 1:00 PM - Baseball vs Thiel College 3:00 PM - Softball vs Geneva College DH

March

19

Sunday

Women’s Bowling at Music City Invitational (Smyrna, TN) 2:00 PM - Men’s Tennis vs Bethany College

-dat- (to give) – data, mandate, date datebookstore.com

165


March

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

April s M t w t f s

“A wise man will make more opportunities than he finds.” – Francis Bacon

Monday

March

20

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

First Day of Spring

Tuesday

March

21

3:30 PM - Baseball vs Messiah College (Away)

Wednesday

March

22

3:00 PM - Baseball vs Saint Vincent College

irascible – easily angered. Her frequent outbursts show she’s becoming more irascible as she ages. 166

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March

23

Thursday

3:00 PM - Softball vs Juniata College DH

March

Friday

24

March

25

Saturday

1:00 PM - Baseball vs Gettysburg College (Away) 1:00 PM - Softball vs Grove City College DH (Away) 5:00 PM - Men’s Tennis at Franciscan University

March

Sunday

26

circum- (around) – circumnavigate, circumspect, circumscribe datebookstore.com

167


March

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

April s M t w t f s

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” – Will Rogers

Monday

March

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

27

Tuesday

March

28

Wednesday

March

29

1:00 PM - Baseball vs La Roche College

hinterland – wilderness. The family moved out of the city and into the hinterland. 168

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March

30

Thursday

3:30 PM - Softball vs Waynesburg University DH (Away)

March

Friday

31

April

1

Saturday

April Fools’ Day 11:00 AM - Men’s Tennis vs PSUBehrend 1:00 PM - Baseball vs PSUBehrend 1:00 PM - Softball vs Hilbert College DH

April

2

Sunday

11:00 AM - Men’s Tennis vs PittBradford 1:00 PM - Softball vs Pitt-Bradford DH

-brev- (short) – brevity, abbreviate, breviary datebookstore.com

169


APRIL 2017 MONDAY

Passover begins at sundown

170

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

3

4

5

10

11

12

17

18

19

24

25

26

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY / SUNDAY April Fools’ Day

1

2

6

7

8

Palm Sunday

13

20

Good Friday

14

21

9

15

Easter

16

Earth Day

22

23

27

28

29

30

datebookstore.com

171


April

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

May s M t w t f s

“If you can imagine it, you can create it. If you can create it, you can become it.” – William Arthur Ward

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

April

3

Tuesday

April

4

1:00 PM - Baseball vs PSUAltoona (Away) 3:00 PM - Softball vs PittGreensburg DH

Wednesday

April

5

spurious – false, not genuine. They made spurious claims of personal injury. 172

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April

6

Thursday

1:00 PM - Baseball vs Penn Tech (Away)

April

Friday

7

April

8

Saturday

1:00 PM - Baseball vs Hilbert College (Away) 1:00 PM - Softball vs D’Youville College DH (Away)

April

9

Sunday

Palm Sunday

-ac, -ic (like, pertaining to) – cardiac, aquatic, dramatic, metallic datebookstore.com

173


April

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

May s M t w t f s

“We can do anything we want as long as we stick to it long enough.” – Helen Keller

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

April

10

Passover begins at sundown

Tuesday

April

11

Wednesday

April

12

1:00 PM - Baseball vs Juniata College 3:00 PM - Softball vs PSU-Altoona DH

gourmand – lover of fine food. Jeff became a real gourmand after years of peanut butter sandwiches in college. 174

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April

Thursday

13

April

14

Friday

Good Friday

April

15

Saturday

1:00 PM - Baseball vs Medaille College 1:00 PM - Softball vs PSUBehrend DH (Away)

April

16

Sunday

Easter

-put-, -putat- (to trim, to calculate) – computation, amputate, putative datebookstore.com

175


April

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

May s M t w t f s

“I come from a long line of family whose belief was, you can do it, but you have to work really hard.” – Condoleeza Rice

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

April

17

Tuesday

April

18

1:00 PM - Baseball vs PittGreensburg 3:00 PM - Softball vs Franciscan University DH (Away)

Wednesday

April

19

gregarious – sociable. She was a gregarious, outgoing person even in new settings. 176

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April

Thursday

20

April

Friday

21

April

22

Saturday

Earth Day 1:00 PM - Baseball vs PittBradford (Away) 1:00 PM - Softball vs Medaille College DH

April

Sunday

23

bi- (two) – bicameral, biennial, bicycle datebookstore.com

177


April

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0

May s M t w t f s

“Life is a promise; fulfill it.” – Mother Teresa

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

April

24

Tuesday

April

25

Wednesday

April

26

2:00 PM - Baseball vs Frostburg State University (Away) 3:00 PM - Softball vs La Roche College DH (Away)

adroit – accomplished, skillful. The dancer was adroit enough to succeed in tap and ballet. 178

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April

Thursday

27

April

28

Friday

4:00 PM - Men’s Tennis at Lycoming College

April

29

Saturday

1:00 PM - Baseball vs D’Youville College (Away)

April

Sunday

30

-doc-, -doct- (to teach) – docile, document, doctor datebookstore.com

179


MAY 2017 MONDAY

Memorial Day (Observed)

180

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1

2

3

8

9

10

15

16

17

22

23

24

29

30

31

@schooldatebooks


THURSDAY

FRIDAY 4

Cinco de Mayo

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 5

6

7

11

12

13

Mother’s Day

18

19

14

20

21

25

Ramadan begins at sundown

26

27

28

datebookstore.com

181


May

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

June s M t w t f s

“Success is a journey, not a destination. The doing is often more important than the outcome.” – Arthur Ashe

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

May

1

Tuesday

May

2

Wednesday

May

3

fortuitous – happening by chance. The collapse of its competitors brought fortuitous gains to the company. 182

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May

Thursday

4

May

5

Friday

Cinco de Mayo TBA - Softball AMCC Tournament at #1 Seed (Away)

May

6

Saturday

TBA - Baseball First Round AMCC Tournament TBA - Softball AMCC Tournament at #1 Seed (Away)

May

7

Sunday

TBA - Baseball First Round AMCC Tournament TBA - Softball AMCC Tournament at #1 Seed (Away)

-tempor- (time) – contemporary, extemporaneous, temporize datebookstore.com

183


May

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

June s M t w t f s

“The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

May

8

Tuesday

May

9

Wednesday

May

10

largess – generous bestowal of gifts. My grandpa showed great largess by giving me his restored hot rod. 184

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May

Thursday

11

May

12

Friday

TBA - Baseball AMCC Tournament Championship Round TBA - Softball NCAA Regionals (Away)

May

13

Saturday

TBA - Baseball AMCC Tournament Championship Round TBA - Softball NCAA Regionals (Away)

May

14

Sunday

Mother’s Day TBA - Baseball AMCC Tournament Championship Round TBA - Softball NCAA Regionals (Away)

contra- (against) – contradict, contrary, contrast, contraband, contravene datebookstore.com

185


May s M t w t f s

Mount Aloysius College

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

MOUNTIES !

June s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

“Other people may not have had high expectations for me... but I had high expectations for myself.” – Shannon Miller

Monday

May

15

Tuesday

May

16

Wednesday

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17

Baseball NCAA Regionals

quell – to quiet, pacify. Police were called in to quell the restless crowd. 186

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May

18

Thursday

Baseball NCAA Regionals

May

19

Friday

Baseball NCAA Regionals

May

20

Saturday

Baseball NCAA Regionals

May

Sunday

21

-astr- (star) – astronomy, astrology, astronaut, astrophysics, astrolabe datebookstore.com

187


May

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

June s M t w t f s

“Courage means doing the impossible within the possible.” – Elie Wiesel

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

May

22

Tuesday

May

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Wednesday

May

24

jocular – playful, suited to joking. The students were jocular as they counted down the hours until spring break. 188

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May

Thursday

25

May

26

Friday

Ramadan begins at sundown

May

Saturday

27

May

Sunday

28

de- (down, away) – debase, decant, depart, default datebookstore.com

189


May

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

June s M t w t f s

“I haven’t failed, I’ve found 10,000 ways that don’t work.” – Thomas Edison

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Monday

May

29

Memorial Day (Observed)

Tuesday

May

30

Wednesday

May

31

encomium – high praise. An encomium by the students ended the teacher’s farewell dinner. 190

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June

Thursday

1

June

Friday

2

June

Saturday

3

June

Sunday

4

-tort- (twist) – torture, retort, extort, distort, contort datebookstore.com

191


JUNE 2017 MONDAY

TUESDAY

5

6

12

13

Flag Day

14

20

First Day of Summer

21

19

26

192

WEDNESDAY

Laylat al-Qadr begins at sundown

27

7

28

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THURSDAY

FRIDAY 1

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 2

3

4

8

9

10

11

15

16

17

Father’s Day

22

23

24

Eid al-Fitr begins at sundown

29

datebookstore.com

18

25

30

193


June

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

July s M t w t f s

“You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get.” – Michael Phelps

Monday

June

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

5

Tuesday

June

6

Wednesday

June

7

irreverent – showing disrespect. The television program takes an irreverent look at doctors. 194

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June

Thursday

8

June

Friday

9

June

Saturday

10

June

Sunday

11

bene-, bon- (well, good) – benefactor, benevolence, bonus datebookstore.com

195


June

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

July s M t w t f s

“I will prepare, and some day my chance will come.” – Abraham Lincoln

Monday

June

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

12

Tuesday

June

13

Wednesday

June

14

Flag Day

lugubrious – melancholy, sorrowful. She knew he was upset by his lugubrious attitude. 196

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June

Thursday

15

June

Friday

16

June

Saturday

17

June

18

Sunday

Father’s Day

dec- (ten) – decade, deciliter, decimal, decagon, decathlon datebookstore.com

197


June

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

July s M t w t f s

“A #2 pencil and a dream can take you anywhere.” – Joyce A. Myers

Monday

June

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

19

Tuesday

June

20

Laylat al-Qadr begins at sundown

Wednesday

June

21

First Day of Summer

ameliorate – improve. Foreign aid is badly needed to ameliorate the effects of the drought. 198

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June

Thursday

22

June

Friday

23

June

Saturday

24

June

25

Sunday

Eid al-Fitr begins at sundown

-agog (leader) – demagogue, pedagogue, synagogue datebookstore.com

199


June

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

July s M t w t f s

“It is never too late to be what you might have been.” – George Eliot

Monday

June

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

26

Tuesday

June

27

Wednesday

June

28

bovine – cowlike, dull. The travelers wore bovine expressions while waiting in the airport. 200

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June

Thursday

29

June

Friday

30

July

Saturday

1

July

Sunday

2

-cy (state of being) – democracy, obstinacy, accuracy datebookstore.com

201


JULY 2017 MONDAY

TUESDAY

3

Independence Day

WEDNESDAY

4

5

10

11

12

17

18

19

24

25

26

31

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THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY / SUNDAY 1

2

6

7

8

9

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16

20

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30

datebookstore.com

203


July

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

August s M t w t f s

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” – Anais Nin

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

July

3

Tuesday

July

4

Independence Day

Wednesday

July

5

effusive – gushy. They gave us such an effusive welcome it was quite embarrassing. 204

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July

Thursday

6

July

Friday

7

July

Saturday

8

July

Sunday

9

ante- (before) – antecedent, antediluvian, ante-nuptial datebookstore.com

205


July

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

August s M t w t f s

“Keep your face always toward the sunshine – and shadows will fall behind you.” – Walt Whitman

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

July

10

Tuesday

July

11

Wednesday

July

12

facetious – inappropriately flippant. He showed his disapproval with facetious remarks. 206

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July

Thursday

13

July

Friday

14

July

Saturday

15

July

Sunday

16

-demos- (people) – democracy, demagogue, epidemic datebookstore.com

207


July

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

August s M t w t f s

“Never let the fear of striking out get in your way.” – George Herman “Babe” Ruth

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

July

17

Tuesday

July

18

Wednesday

July

19

lachrymose – tearful. The wedding guests became lachrymose when the couple shared their vows. 208

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July

Thursday

20

July

Friday

21

July

Saturday

22

July

Sunday

23

cent- (one hundred) – century, centennial, Centigrade datebookstore.com

209


July

Mount Aloysius College

MOUNTIES !

s M t w t f s 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 3 0 31

August s M t w t f s

“My future starts when I wake up every morning...Every day I find something creative to do with my life.” – Miles Davis

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Monday

July

24

Tuesday

July

25

Wednesday

July

26

augury – omen, prediction. Dan hoped his early victory was an augury of a winning season. 210

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July

Thursday

27

July

Friday

28

July

Saturday

29

July

Sunday

30

-rid-, -ris- (to laugh) – derision, risibility, ridiculous datebookstore.com

211


LANGUAGE ARTS NOUN

{p a r ts o f s p e e c h }

A WORD THAT NAMES A PERSON, PLACE, THING, QUALITY, ACT OR FEELING.

Common nouns are general and do not refer to a specific person, location or object. Examples: man, city, tonight, honesty, happiness Proper nouns are capitalized and refer to a particular person, place or thing. Examples: Reggie, Market Square Arena, Saturday

PRONOUN

A WORD THAT TAKES THE PLACE OF A NOUN.

Nominative Case Pronouns replace the subject of a sentence or clause. Examples: She took the bus to visit Aunt Jane. We are looking forward to visiting Oregon. Objective Case Pronouns receive a verb’s action or follow a preposition. Examples: Please give me the papers. Timothy’s outstanding service earned him the award. Possessive Case Pronouns show ownership or possession. Examples: The cougar escaped from its cage. Their car slid off the icy road.

VERB

A WORD THAT EXPRESSES ACTION OR A STATE OF BEING. IT ALSO INDICATES THE TIME OF ACTION OR STATE OF BEING. A VERB HAS DIFFERENT FORMS DEPENDING ON ITS NUMBER, PERSON, VOICE, TENSE AND MOOD.

Number indicates whether a verb is singular or plural. The verb and its subject must agree in number. Examples: One dog barks. Two dogs bark. Person indicates whether the subject of the verb is 1st, 2nd or 3rd person and whether the subject is singular or plural. Verbs usually have a different form only in third person singular of the present tense. Examples: Singular Plural 1st Person: I stop. We stop. 2nd Person: You stop. You stop. 3rd Person: He/She/It stops. They stop. Voice indicates whether the subject is the doer or the receiver of the action verb. Examples: Cathy wrote the letter. (active voice) The letter was written by Cathy. (passive voice) Tense indicates when the action or state of being is taking place. Examples: We need the information now. (present) Reggie shot the ball. (past) You will enjoy the school play. (future)

ADVERB

A WORD THAT DESCRIBES OR MODIFIES A VERB, AN ADJECTIVE OR ANOTHER ADVERB. AN ADVERB TELLS HOW, WHEN, WHERE, WHY, HOW OFTEN AND HOW MUCH.

Examples: The ball rolled slowly around the rim. Soccer scores are reported daily in the newspaper.

212

ADJECTIVE

A WORD THAT DESCRIBES OR MODIFIES NOUNS AND PRONOUNS. ADJECTIVES SPECIFY COLOR, SIZE, NUMBER AND THE LIKE.

Examples: red, large, three, gigantic, miniature Adjectives have three forms: positive, comparative, and superlative. The positive form describes a noun or pronoun without comparing it to anything else. Example: My apple pie is good. The comparative form compares two things. Example: Aunt Betty’s apple pie is better than mine. The superlative form compares three or more things. Example: Mom’s apple pie is the best of all! PREPOSITION

A WORD (OR GROUP OF WORDS) THAT SHOWS HOW A NOUN OR PRONOUN RELATES TO ANOTHER WORD IN A SENTENCE.

Examples: The man walked into the gym. The horse leaped over the fence. Their team won the meet in spite of several players being injured. CONJUNCTION

A WORD THAT CONNECTS INDIVIDUAL WORDS OR GROUPS OF WORDS.

Coordinating conjunctions connect a word to a

word, a clause to a clause, or a phrase to a phrase. The sentence elements joined by a coordinating conjunction must be equal. Common coordinating conjunctions are: and, but, or, nor, for, yet, so. Coordinating conjunctions used in pairs are called correlative conjunctions. Common correlative conjunctions are: either, or; neither, nor; not only, but also; both, and; whether, or. Examples: Raccoons and squirrels frequently invade our bird feeders. Neither Mary Ann nor Julie will be able to go with you. Subordinating conjunctions connect and show the relationship between two clauses that are not equally important. Common subordinate conjunctions are: until, unless, since, where, before, as, if, when, although, after, because, while, as long as, as if, though, whereas. Examples: Until you decide to study, your grades won’t improve. If I hadn’t already made plans, I would have enjoyed going to the mall with you.

INTERJECTION

A WORD THAT IS USED IN A SENTENCE TO COMMUNICATE STRONG EMOTION OR SURPRISE. PUNCTUATION IS USED TO SEPARATE AN INTERJECTION FROM THE REST OF THE SENTENCE.

Examples: Hooray! We finally scored a touchdown. Oh, no! I forgot the picnic basket. Yes! Her gymnastic routine was perfect. Ah, we finally get to stop and rest.


LANGUAGE ARTS CAPITALIZATION

{ca p i t a li z a ti o n & p l u r a l s }

THE FOLLOWING CHART PROVIDES A QUICK OVERVIEW OF CAPITALIZATION RULES.

All proper nouns Shannon O’Connor, Orlando, Bill of Rights All proper adjectives Kraft cheese, Bounty paper towels, Phillips screwdriver The first word in every sentence Her dress is stunning. Races, languages, nationalities Asian, French, African-American Nouns/Pronouns that refer to a supreme being God, Allah, Yahweh Days of the week Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Formal epithets Ivan the Terrible Bodies of water Amazon River, Lake Huron, Wea Creek Cities, towns Houston, Lafayette, Dearborn Counties Tippecanoe, Cork Continents Africa, North America Landforms Mojave Desert, the Appalachians Holidays and holy days Veterans Day, Christmas, Yom Kippur Months January, February Official documents Emancipation Proclamation Official titles President Obama, Mayor Bradley Periods and events in history Middle Ages, Renaissance Planets, heavenly bodies Mars, Pluto, Milky Way Public areas Yellowstone National Park Sections of a country or continent the Northwest, the Middle East Special events Battle of Lexington Streets, roads, highways Rodeo Drive, Route 66, Interstate 65 Trade names Honda Accord, Kellogg’s Corn Flakes

PLURALS

THE FOLLOWING CHART PROVIDES A QUICK OVERVIEW OF PLURALIZATION RULES.

The plurals of most nouns are formed by adding s to the singular.

Examples: pie = pies | desk = desks | machine = machines

The plural forms of nouns ending in sh, ch, x, s and z are made by adding es to the singular.

Examples: dish = dishes | fox = foxes | buzz = buzzes | church = churches

The plurals of common nouns that end in y preceded by a consonant are formed by changing the y to i and adding es.

Examples: fly = flies | copy = copies

The plurals of words that end in y preceded by a vowel are formed by adding only s.

Examples: holiday = holidays | monkey = monkeys

The plurals of words ending in o preceded by a vowel are formed by adding s.

Examples: studio = studios | rodeo = rodeos

The plurals of words ending in o preceded by a consonant are formed by adding s or es.

Examples: hero = heroes | banjo = banjos | tomato = tomatoes | piano = pianos

The plurals of nouns ending in f or fe are formed in one of two ways: {1} If the f sound is still heard in the plural form, simply add s.

Examples: roof = roofs | chief = chiefs

{2} If the final sound in the plural is a ve sound, change the f to ve and add s.

Examples: wife = wives | knife = knives

Foreign words and some English words form the plural by taking on an irregular spelling.

Examples: crisis = crises | criterion = criteria | goose = geese | ox = oxen

The plurals of symbols, letters and figures are formed by adding an s.

Examples: 5 = 5s

The plural of nouns that end in ful are formed by adding s at the end of the word.

Examples: handful = handfuls | pailful = pailfuls | tankful = tankfuls

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LANGUAGE ARTS

{s e n t e n ce s t r u ct u r e & s p e l l in g r u l e s }

SENTENCE STRUCTURE

A complete sentence must express a complete thought and must have a subject and a verb. Example: He lost the game. A sentence fragment results from a missing subject, verb or complete thought. Example: Because he was lost. THERE ARE FOUR TYPES OF SENTENCES: SIMPLE, COMPOUND, COMPLEX OR COMPOUND-COMPLEX

1 2 3 4

A simple sentence consists of one main clause. It expresses one main thought and has one subject and one verb. A simple sentence may contain a compound subject, or a compound verb or both. Examples: We enjoyed the concert. Amy and Scott were married yesterday. (compound subject: Amy and Scott) Ben is leaving work and going home. (compound verb: leaving and going) A compound sentence contains two or more main clauses (in italics) connected by a conjunction, a semicolon or a comma with a conjunction. Examples: I’d like to double-major, but the workload would be too overwhelming. (conjunction) Andy’s suit looks new; it just got back from the cleaners. (semicolon) Erin came home for Easter, and Courtney went to Florida. (comma/conjunction) A complex sentence has one main clause (in italics) and one or more subordinate clauses (underlined). Examples: Dad says that good grades are the result of diligent studying. (main clause, one independent clause) Diligent studying is difficult, because I have to work several hours before I can start studying. (main clause, two dependent clauses) A compound-complex sentence has two or more main clauses (in italics) and one or more subordinate clauses (underlined). Examples: Because the bus broke down, the team rode in a van, and the cheerleaders rode in cars. Unless my eyes are deceiving me, Kristi is on that runaway horse, and Dale is behind her.

SPELLING RULES Write i before e except after c, or when sounded like a as in weigh and eight.

Exceptions: seize, weird, either, leisure, neither

When the ie/ei combination is not pronounced ee, it is usually spelled ei.

Examples: reign, weigh, neighbor Exceptions: friend, view, mischief, fiery

When a multi-syllable word ends in a consonant preceded by one vowel, the accent is on the last syllable and the suffix begins with a vowel — the same rule holds true: double the final consonant.

Examples: prefer = preferred | allot = allotted | control = controlling

If a word ends with a silent e, drop the e before adding a suffix that begins with a vowel.

Examples: use = using | like = liking | state = stating | love = loving

When the suffix begins with a consonant, do not drop the e.

Examples: use = useful | state = statement | nine = ninety Exceptions: argument, judgment, truly, ninth

When y is the last letter in a word and the y is preceded by a consonant, change the y to i before adding any suffix except those beginning with i.

Examples: lady = ladies | try = tries | happy = happiness | ply = pliable

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LANGUAGE ARTS WRITING VARIABLES

{t h e w r i t i n g pr o c e s s }

BEFORE BEGINNING ANY ASSIGNMENT, IT WILL HELP YOU TO FOCUS AND REMAIN CONSISTENT IN STYLE IF YOU CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIABLES.

Audience

For whom am I writing? A letter written to your ten-year-old sister will be much different in vocabulary, subject, content, format and sentence complexity than one written to your senator.

Topic

About what subject should I write? If possible, choose a subject that interests you. Research your subject well.

Purpose

Voice

Format

Why am I writing? Have a clear purpose in mind before starting your paper. Are you writing to entertain, to instruct, to inform or to persuade? Keeping your purpose in mind as you write will result in a paper that is focused and consistent. What point of view or “voice” will I use? Writers sometimes write from the point of view of another person rather than from their own point of view. Writing in a voice other than your own can add variety and help you see your subject in a new way. Make sure your “voice” remains consistent. What form will my writing take? Different forms of writing, such as letters, diaries, reports, essays, research papers, etc., have specific requirements. Decide on the form your writing will take, and then make sure you know the requirements for that form of writing.

PLANNING AND WRITING AN ESSAY OR COMPOSITION {1} Select a general subject area that interests you. {2} Make a list of your thoughts and ideas about the subject. {3} Use your list to help focus on a specific topic within the subject area. {4} Decide what you want to say about the topic, and write an introductory statement that reflects

this purpose.

{5} Make a list of details to support your statement. {6} Arrange the list of details into an outline. {7} Do any reading and research necessary to provide additional support for specific areas of your outline.

Keep a careful list of all of your sources for your bibliography.

{8} Write a first draft. {9} Revise your first draft, making sure that:

The introduction includes a clear statement of purpose. Each paragraph begins with some link to the preceding paragraph. {c} Every statement is supported or illustrated. {d} The concluding paragraph ties all of the important points together, leaving the reader with a clear understanding of the meaning of the essay or composition. {e} Words are used and spelled correctly. {f} Punctuation is correct. {10} Read your revised paper aloud to check how it sounds. {11} Proofread your revised paper two times: once for spelling, punctuation and word usage, and again for meaning and effectiveness. {a}

{b}

215


LANGUAGE ARTS PERIOD

{p u n ct u a t i o n }

COLON

Use: to end a sentence that makes a statement or that gives a command not used as an exclamation. Example: Wash the dishes, and then take out the garbage. Use: after an initial or an abbreviation.

,

Examples: Mary J. Jones, Mr., Mrs., Ms.

COMMA

Use: to separate words or groups of words in

a series. Example: I used worms, minnows, larva, bread balls and bacon for bait. Note: Some stylebooks and instructors require a comma before “and” in a series. Example: He ran, jumped, and yelled.

:

Use: after words

introducing a list, quotation, question or example. Example: Sarah dropped her book bag and out spilled everything: books, pens, pencils, homework and makeup. SEMICOLON

;

Use: to join compound sentences that are not connected with a conjunction. Example: It’s elementary, my dear Watson; the butler is clearly responsible. Use: to separate groups of words.

Example: I packed a toothbrush, deodorant and perfume; jeans, a raincoat and sweatshirts; and boots and tennis shoes.

“”

Use: to separate an explanatory phrase from the rest of the sentence. Example: Escargots, or snails, are a delicacy that I relish.

Use: to frame direct quotations in a sentence.

Use: to distinguish items in an address and in a date. Examples: John Doe, 290 Main Street, Midtown, IN 48105 September 20, 1960

Use: to distinguish a word that is being discussed.

Use: to separate a title or an initial that follows

a name. Example: Joseph Jones, Ph.D.

?

QUESTION MARK

Use: at the end of a direct or indirect question.

Example: Did your relatives invite you to visit them this summer? Use: to punctuate a short question within parentheses. Example: I am leaving tomorrow (is that possible?) to visit my cousins in France.

APOSTROPHE

,

Use: to show that one or more letters or numbers

QUOTATION MARKS

Only the exact words quoted are placed within the quotation marks. Example: “I don’t know,” she said, “if I will be able to afford the vacation.” Example: Mr. Jones suggested I replace the word “always” with “often” in my theme. Use: to indicate that a word is slang.

Example: Julie only bought that outfit to show that she’s “with it.” Use: to punctuate titles of poems, short stories, songs, lectures, course titles, chapters of books and articles found in magazines, newspapers and encyclopedias. Examples: “You Are My Sunshine,” “Violence in Our Society,” “The Road Not Taken”

SINGLE QUOTATION MARK

Example: “As a child, my favorite movie was ‘Wizard of Oz,’ ” answered Joe.

have been left out of a word to form a contraction. Examples: do not = don’t | I have = I’ve

EXCLAMATION MARK

Use: followed by an s is the possessive form of singular nouns. Example: I clearly saw this young man’s car run that stop sign.

Use: to express strong feeling.

Use: possessive form of plural nouns ending in s is usually made by adding just an apostrophe. An apostrophe and s must be added to nouns not ending in s. Example: bosses = bosses’, children’s

216

‘’

Use: to punctuate a quotation within a quotation.

Example: Help! Help!

!


LANGUAGE ARTS OUTLINING

{o u t li n i n g}

OUTLINES CAN HELP YOU ORGANIZE YOUR IDEAS. YOU MIGHT USE AN OUTLINE TO PLAN A SPEECH, COMPOSITION OR TERM PAPER. YOU ALSO MIGHT USE AN INFORMAL OUTLINE TO TAKE NOTES.

formal

A formal outline lists the main points of a topic and shows the relative importance of each and the order in which these points are presented. It also shows the relationships among them. Formal Outline Format: I. A. B. 1. 2. a. b. (1) (2) (a) (b) II. No new subdivision should be started unless there are at least two points to be listed in the new division. This means that each 1 must have a 2; each a must have a b. Formal outlines may be either a sentence outline or a topic outline.

informal Informal outlines use as few words as possible.

Supporting details are written below each heading. Numerals, letters, or dashes may be used. Informal outlines are especially useful for taking notes. Here is an example of a informal outline. I. How lightning occurs – cloud’s particles collide and become electrically charged – positively and negatively charged particles separate – positively charged particles in cloud collide with negatively charged particles on ground II. Forms of lightning – forked – streak – ribbon – bead or chain – ball

A sentence outline uses a complete sentence for each point and subpoint. A topic outline uses words or phrases for each point and subpoint.

Here is an example of a topic outline. Thesis or Introductory Statement I. Gasoline shortage A. Long lines B. Gas “rationing” II. Voluntary energy conservation A. Gasoline B. Electricity C. Home heating fuel III. Forced energy conservation A. Fuel allocation B. Speed limit C. Airline flights D. Christmas lighting Conclusion

217


LANGUAGE ARTS YOUR WORKS-CITED LIST

{MLA s tyle o f d o c u m e n t at io n }

Your works-cited list should appear at the end of your essay. It provides the information necessary for a reader to locate and retrieve any source you cite in the essay. Each source you cite in the essay must appear in your works-cited list; likewise, each entry in the works-cited list must be cited in the text.

According to the Modern Language Association Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th edition: {1} Double-space all entries. {2} Begin the first line of an entry flush with the left margin, and indent lines that follow by one-half inch. {3} List entries in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. If you are listing more than one work by the

same author, alphabetize the works according to title. Instead of repeating the author’s name, type three hyphens followed by a period, and then give the title. {4} Italicize the titles of works published independently. Books, plays, long poems, pamphlets, periodicals and films are all published independently. {5} If the title of a book you are citing includes the title of another book, italicize the main title but not the other title. {6} Use quotation marks to indicate titles of short works included in larger works, song titles and titles of unpublished works. {7} Separate the author, title, and publication information with a period followed by one space. {8} Single space after a colon. {9} Use lowercase abbreviations to identify parts of a work (for example, vol. for volume), a named translator (trans.), and a named editor (ed.). However, when these designations follow a period, the first letter should be capitalized. {10} Use the shortened forms for the publisher’s name. When the publisher’s name includes the name of a person, cite the last name alone. When the publisher’s name includes the name of more than one person, cite only the first of these names. {11} Commonly used with electronic sources, the abbreviation n.p. indicates that neither a publisher nor a sponsor name has been provided. Use n.d. (for no date) when the web page does not provide a publication date.

WEbSITES (GEnERAL GUIDELInES)

pAGE On A WEbSITE

“How to Change Your Car’s Oil.” eHow.com. eHow, n.d. Web. 5 Jan. 2015.

ARTICLE In A jOURnAL fROM A WEbSITE

Wheelis, Mark. “Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the

(ALSO In pRInT)

ARTICLE In A pERIODICAL (GEnERAL GUIDELInES)

Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention.” Emerging Infectious Diseases 6.6 (2014): 595-600. Web. 8 Feb. 2015. Author’s last name, first name. “Article title.” Periodical title. Date: inclusive pages. Medium of publication.

bYLInED ARTICLE fROM A DAILY nEWSpApER

Barringer, Felicity. “Where Many Elderly Live, Signs of the Future.”

UnbYLInED ARTICLE fROM A DAILY nEWSpApER

“Infant Mortality Down; Race Disparity Widens.” Washington Post

ARTICLE fROM A MOnThLY OR bIMOnThLY MAGAzInE

Willis, Garry. “The Words that Remade America: Lincoln at Gettysburg.”

ARTICLE fROM A WEEKLY OR bIWEEKLY MAGAzInE

Hughes, Robert. “Futurisms Farthest Frontier.” Time 9 July 2015: 58-59.

EDITORIAL

218

Author’s last name, first name (if available). Name of Site. Version number. Publisher or sponsor, date of resource creation (if available or n.d. if you don’t know the date). Web. Date of access.

New York Times 7 Mar. 2014, nat. ed., sec. 1: 12. Print.

12 Mar. 2015: A12. Print.

Atlantic June 2015: 57-79. Print.

Print. “A Question of Medical Sight.” Editorial. Plain Dealer 11 Mar. 2015: 6B. Print.


LANGUAGE ARTS

{MLA s t y le of d o c u m e n t at io n }

Author’s last name, first name. Book title. Additional information. book (GenerAL GuideLines)

City of publication: Publishing company, publication date. Medium of publication.

book by one Author

Wheelen, Richard. Sherman’s March. New York: Crowell, 1978. Print. Garreau, Joel. Edge City: Life on the New Frontier. New York: Doubleday, 1991.

two or More books by the sAMe Author

Print. ---. The Nine Nations of North America. Boston: Houghton, 1981. Print.

book by two or three Authors

book by four or More Authors

Purves, Alan C., and Victoria Rippere. Elements of Writing About a Literary Work. Urbana, Ill.: NCTE, 1968. Print. Pratt, Robert A., et al. Masters of British Literature. Boston: Houghton, 1956. Print.

book by A corporAte Author

The Rockefeller Panel Reports. Prospect for America. New York:

book by An AnonyMous Author

Literary Market Place: The Dictionary of American Book Publishing.

book with An Author And An editor

A work in An AnthoLoGy

Doubleday, 1961. Print.

2003 ed. New York: Bowker, 2002. Print. Toomer, Jean. Cane. Ed. Darwin T. Turner. New York: Norton, 1988. Print. Morris, William. “The Haystack in the Floods.” Nineteenth Century British Minor Poets. Eds. Richard Wilbur and W. H. Auden. New York: Dell, Laurel Edition, 1965. 35-52. Print.

An edition other thAn the first

siGned ArticLe in A reference book

unsiGned ArticLe in A reference book

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Riverside Chaucer. Ed. Larry D. Benson. 3rd ed. Boston: Houghton, 1987. Print. Wallace, Wilson D. “Superstition.” World Book Encyclopedia. 1970 ed. Print. “Tharp, Twyla.” Who’s Who of American Women. 17th ed. 1991-1992. Print.

219


LANGUAGE ARTS YOUR REFERENCE LIST

{A PA s tyle o f d o c u m e n t at io n }

YOUR REFERENCE LIST SHOULD APPEAR AT THE END OF YOUR ESSAY. IT PROVIDES THE INFORMATION NECESSARY FOR A READER TO LOCATE AND RETRIEVE ANY SOURCE YOU CITE IN THE ESSAY. EACH SOURCE YOU CITE IN THE ESSAY MUST APPEAR IN YOUR REFERENCE LIST. LIKEWISE, EACH ENTRY IN THE REFERENCE LIST MUST BE CITED IN THE TEXT.

BASIC RULES According to the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association:

Indent your reference list one-half inch from the left margin, excluding the first line of each reference, which should remain flush left. This is called a hanging indent. Double-space all references. Capitalize only the first word of a title or subtitle of a work. Capitalize all major words in journal titles. Italicize titles of books and journals. Note that the italicizing in these entries includes commas and periods. Invert authors’ names (last name first); give last name and initials for all authors of a particular work, unless the work has more than six authors (in this case, list the first six authors and then use et al. after the sixth author’s name to indicate the rest of the authors). Alphabetize by authors’ last names letter by letter. If you have more than one work by a particular author, order them by publication date, oldest to newest (thus a 2014 article would appear before a 2015 article). When an author appears as a sole author and again as the first author of a group, list the one-author entries first. If no author is given for a particular source, alphabetize by the title of the piece in the reference list. Use a shortened version of the title for parenthetical citations within the text. Use “&” instead of “and” before the last author’s name when listing multiple authors of a single work.

BASIC FORMS FOR SOURCES IN PRINT An article in a periodical (such as a journal, newspaper, or magazine)

Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year of publication). Title of article. Title of Periodical, volume number (issue number), pages. You need to list only the volume number if the periodical uses continuous pagination throughout a particular volume. If each issue begins with page 1, then you should list the issue number as well Title of Periodical, volume number (issue number), pages. A nonperiodical (such as a book, report, brochure or audiovisual media)

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher. For “Location,” you should always list the city, and you should also include the state if the city is unfamiliar or if the city could be confused with one in another state. Use the two-letter zip-code abbreviation for each state. Part of a nonperiodical (such as a book chapter or an article in a collection)

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. In A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher. When you list the pages of the chapter or essay in parentheses after the book title, use “pp.” before the numbers: (pp. 1-21). This abbreviation, however, does not appear before the page numbers in periodical references. BASIC FORMS FOR ELECTRONIC SOURCES A web page

Author, A. A. (Date of publication or revision). Title of full work. Retrieved from http://web address

An online journal or magazine

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume number. doi:0000000/000000000000 Since online materials can potentially change URLs, APA recommends providing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), when it is available, as opposed to the URL. DOIs are unique to their documents and consist of a long alphanumeric code. An online journal or magazine (no DOI assigned)

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Journal, volume number. Retrieved from http://web address E-mail

Because e-mail is a personal communication, not easily retrieved by the general public, no entry should appear in your reference list. Instead, parenthetically cite in text the communicator’s name, the fact that it was personal communication, and the date of the communication: The novelist has repeated this idea recently (S. Rushdie, personal communication, May 1, 2015).

220


LANGUAGE ARTS

{A PA s t y le o f d o c u m e n t a t io n }

EXAMPLES Journal article, one author

Harlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55, 893-896. Journal article, more than one author

Kernis, M. H., Cornell, D. P., Sun, C. R., Berry, A., & Harlow, T. (1993). There’s more to self-esteem than whether it is high or low: The importance of stability of self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1190-1204. Work discussed in a secondary source

Coltheart, M., Curtis, B., Atkins, P., & Haller, M. (1993). Models of reading aloud: Dual-route and parallel-distributed-processing approaches. Psychological Review, 100, 589-608. Give the secondary source in the references list; in the text, name the original work, and give a citation for the secondary source. For example, if Seidenberg and McClelland’s work is cited in Coltheart et al. and you did not read the original work, list the Coltheart et al. reference in your reference list. In the text, use the following citation: In Seidenberg and McClelland’s study (as cited in Coltheart, Curtis, Atkins, & Haller, 1993), ... Magazine article, one author

Henry, W. A., III. (1990, April 9). Making the grade in today’s schools. Time, 135, 28-31. Book

Calfee, R. C., & Valencia, R. R. (1991). APA guide to preparing manuscripts for journal publication. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. An article or chapter of a book

O’Neil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Men’s and women’s gender role journeys: Metaphor for healing, transition, and transformation. In B. R. Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issues across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). New York: Springer. A government publication

National Institute of Mental Health. (1990). Clinical training in serious mental illness (DHHS Publication No. ADM 90-1679). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. A book or article with no author or editor named

Merriam-Webster’s collegiate dictionary (11th ed.). (2005). Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster. New drug appears to cut risk of death from heart failure. (1993, July 15). The Washington Post, p. A12. For parenthetical citations of sources in text with no author named, use a shortened version of the title instead of an author’s name. Use quotation marks and italics as appropriate. For example, parenthetical citations of the two sources above would appear as follows: (Merriam-Webster’s, 2005) and (“New Drug,” 1993). A translated work and/or a republished work

Laplace, P. S. (1951). A philosophical essay on probabilities (F. W. Truscott & F. L. Emory, Trans.). New York: Dover. (Original work published 1814). A review of a book, film, television program, etc.

Baumeister, R. F. (1993). Exposing the self-knowledge myth [Review of the book The self-knower: A hero under control]. Contemporary Psychology, 38, 466-467. An entry in an encyclopedia

Bergmann, P. G. (1993). Relativity. In The new encyclopaedia britannica (Vol. 26, pp. 501-508). Chicago: Encyclopaedia Britannica. An online journal article (no DOI assigned)

Kenneth, I. A. (2000). A Buddhist response to the nature of human rights. Journal of Buddhist Ethics, 8. Retrieved from http://www.buddhistethics.org/2/inada1 A web page

Daly, B. (1997). Writing argumentative essays. Retrieved from http://www.ltn.lv/~markir/essaywriting/ frntpage.htm

221


GEOGRAPHY

222

{w o r ld m a p }


GEOGRAPHY

{U n i te d S ta te s m a p }

223


224

YOUR BODY MASS INDEX

91 94 97 100 104 107 110 114 118 121 125 128 132 136 140 144 148 152

(59") (60") (61") (62") (63") (64") (65") (66") (67") (68") (69") (70") (71") (72") (73") (74") (75")

4'10" (58")

4'11" 5' 5'1" 5'2" 5'3" 5'4" 5'5" 5'6" 5'7" 5'8" 5'9" 5'10" 5'11" 6' 6'1" 6'2" 6'3"

19

96 99 102 106 109 113 116 120 124 127 131 135 139 143 147 151 155 160

20

100 104 107 111 115 118 122 126 130 134 138 142 146 150 154 159 163 168

21

105 109 112 116 120 124 128 132 136 140 144 149 153 157 162 166 171 176

22

) x 703

110 114 118 122 126 130 134 138 142 146 151 155 160 165 169 174 179 184

23 115 119 123 127 131 135 140 144 148 153 158 162 167 172 177 182 186 192

24 124 128 133 137 142 146 151 156 161 166 171 176 181 186 191 197 202 208

26 129 133 138 143 147 152 157 162 167 172 177 182 188 193 199 204 210 216

27

weight (in pounds)

119 124 128 132 136 141 145 150 155 159 164 169 174 179 184 189 194 200

25 134 138 143 148 153 158 163 168 173 178 184 189 195 200 206 212 218 224

28 138 143 148 153 158 163 169 174 179 185 190 196 202 208 213 219 225 232

29

YOUR BMI IS JUST ONE OF MANY FACTORS RELATED TO DEVELOPING A CHRONIC DISEASE (SUCH AS HEART DISEASE, CANCER OR DIABETES). OTHER FACTORS THAT MAY BE IMPORTANT TO LOOK AT WHEN ASSESSING YOUR RISK FOR CHRONIC DISEASE INCLUDE: DIET, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE, BLOOD PRESSURE, BLOOD SUGAR LEVEL, CHOLESTEROL LEVEL AND FAMILY HISTORY OF DISEASE.

Weight in pounds (Height in inches) x (Height in inches)

BMI

BMI = (

Calculating your BMI:

height

143 148 153 158 164 169 174 180 186 191 197 203 209 215 221 227 233 240

30 148 153 158 164 169 175 180 186 192 198 203 209 216 222 228 235 241 248

31 158 163 168 174 180 186 192 198 204 211 216 223 229 236 242 250 256 264

33

162 168 174 180 186 191 197 204 210 217 223 230 236 243 250 257 264 272

34

Underweight Normal Overweight Obese

167 173 179 185 191 197 204 210 216 223 230 236 243 250 258 265 272 279

35

Source: National Centers for Disease Control

153 158 163 169 175 180 186 192 198 204 210 216 222 229 235 242 249 256

32

Below 18.5 18.5 - 24.9 25.0 - 29.9 30.0 and Above

FOR ADULTS 20 YEARS AND OLDER, BMI FALLS INTO ONE OF THESE CATEGORIES:

HEALTHY LIVING {bo d y m a s s i n d e x c h a r t }


HEALTHY LIVING od ip Fo escr D

ize gS

n

tio

r Se

vin

s

rie

lo Ca

{ca lo ri e & ca r b c o u n t e r } s

rb Ca

t Fa

MILK, CREAM AND BUTTER

Butter Half and Half Heavy Cream Milk (whole) Sour Cream Yogurt (plain)

35 40 100 150 50 145

4 4 12 8 6 4

0 1 1 11 1 11

1 slice 2 Tbsp. 2 Tbsp. 2 Tbsp. 2 Tbsp. 2 Tbsp. 2 Tbsp. 1 /4 cup 2 Tbsp.

106 100 115 100 75 80 50 108 105

9 8 9 10 6 6 4 8 8

0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0

200 140 110 110 145 50 235 140 85 145 60 190 165 65 90 225 85 65 245 65 70

2 5 2 0 6 1 12 1 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 1 13 1 1

38 22 20 24 22 9 27 27 17 25 8 39 33 13 21 50 14 13 26 12 13

110 140 100 230 105 245 165 50 150 45

9 3 7 16 4 11 8 4 6 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

GRAINS, BREAD AND PASTA

Bagel Blueberry Muffin Cheerios Cereal Corn Flakes Corn Muffin Crackers Croissant English Muffin Italian Bread Oatmeal Pancake Pasta Pita Bread Soft Pretzel Raisin Bran Rice, white Roll Tortilla, corn Waffle, homemade White Bread Whole Grain Bread

1 bagel 1 muffin 1 ounce 1 ounce 1 muffin 4 crackers 1 croissant 1 muffin 1 slice 1 cup 1 pancake 1 cup 1 pita 1 pretzel 1 ounce 1 cup 1 roll 1 tortilla 1 waffle 1 slice 1 slice

MEAT AND POULTRY

Bacon Chicken Breast Eggs, whole Ground Beef, lean Ham Hamburger Patty Pork Chops, lean Smoked Sausage Steak Sirloin, lean Turkey (deli)

3 slices 3 ounces 1 egg 3 ounces 2.5 ounces 4 ounces 2.5 ounces 1 link 2.5 ounces 2 slices

r Se

ize gS

vin

ies

lor

Ca

s

rb

t Fa

Ca

7 3 3 6 6 4 5 8 10 7 1 19

17 1 4 0 0 8 0 0 11 0 0 19

1 0 0 30 12 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 9 1 0 1 1 0 2

32 51 3 12 54 27 20 9 8 22 16 7 1 19 1 10 9 5 12 11 24 25 8 15 10 25 23 4 19 51 17 35 115 2 10 10 5 35

FISH AND SEAFOOD

1 tsp. 2 Tbsp. 2 Tbsp. 1 cup 2 Tbsp. 1 cup

CHEESE

American Bleu Cheddar Cream Cheese Feta Mozzarella Parmesan Ricotta Swiss

on

i od ipt Fo escr D

Clam Chowder, NE Crabmeat, canned Fish Sticks Flounder or Sole Halibut Oysters, raw Salmon, canned Salmon, smoked Shrimp, fried Tuna, in oil Tuna, in water Tuna Salad

1 cup 1cup 1 stick 3 oz 3 ounces 1 cup 3 ounces 3 ounces 3 ounces 3 ounces 3 ounces 1 cup

165 135 70 120 140 160 120 150 200 165 135 375

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Apple Applesauce, sweet Asparagus, cooked Avocado Baked Beans, sweet Banana Blueberries Broccoli, cooked Broccoli, raw Cantaloupe Carrots, cooked Carrots, raw Celery Corn Cucumber Grapefruit Grapes

1 apple 1 cup 4 spears 1 avacado 1 cup 1 banana 1 cup 1 cup 1 spear 1/2 melon 1 cup 1 carrot 1 stalk 1 ear 6 slices 1/2 fruit 10 grapes Green Beans, cooked 1 cup Honeydew Melon 1 slice Kiwifruit 1 kiwi Mixed Vegs., frozen 1 cup Mushrooms 1 cup Onion, raw 1 cup Orange 1 orange Peach 1 peach Pear 1 pear Peas, cooked 1 cup Peppers, sweet, raw 1 pepper Pineapple, fresh 1 cup Potato, baked 1 potato Potato, fries 10 fries Potato, mashed 1 cup Raisins 1 cup Spinach, raw 1 cup Strawberries, raw 1 cup Tomato, canned 1 cup Tomato, raw 1 tomato Watermelon 1 slice

125 195 15 305 385 105 80 45 40 95 70 30 5 85 5 40 35 25 45 45 105 145 40 60 35 100 125 20 75 220 110 225 435 10 45 50 25 155

This information intended to be used as a guideline only. Please consult a physician or dietitian before altering your eating habits. Fats and carbohydrates listed in grams.

225


HEALTHY LIVING DIETARY GUIDELINES

{d i e t a r y gu i d e li n e s }

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DAILY FOOD CHOICES

A balanced diet of nutrient-rich foods is a key component of overall health. Follow the food group recommendations to help you eat better every day. Each of these food groups provides some, but not all, of the nutrients you need. A healthy diet is one that emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fat-free or low-fat milk products; includes lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts; and is low in saturated fats, trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium) and added sugars. Daily recommendations vary depending on age, weight, calorie intake and exercise patterns. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has developed a website, ChooseMyPlate.gov, to help you figure out the foods and portions that are right for you.

GRAINS

VEGETABLES

FRUITS

DAIRY

PROTEIN

Make half your grains whole

Vary your veggies

Focus on fruits

Get your calcium-rich foods

Go lean with protein

Eat grains, especially whole-grains, like brown rice, oatmeal or popcorn. Other grain choices include bread, crackers, cereal or pasta.

Eat more darkgreen veggies like broccoli, spinach. Eat more orange vegetables like carrots and sweet potatoes.

Eat a variety of fruit. Choose fresh, frozen, canned or dried fruit. Go easy on fruit juices.

Eat more dry beans and peas like pinto beans, kidney beans and lentils.

Go low-fat or fat-free when you choose milk, yogurt and other milk products.

Choose low-fat or lean meats and poultry.

If you don’t consume milk, choose lactosefree products or other calcium sources such as fortified foods and beverages.

Vary your protein routine – choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds.

Bake it, broil it or grill it.

Limit starchy vegetables.

Your food and physical activity choices each day affect your health — how you feel today, tomorrow and in the future. To find the foods and portions that are right for you, go to ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Find your balance between food and physical activity n n

n

n

n

226

Be sure to stay within your daily calorie needs. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes most days of the week.

Know the limits on fats, sugars and salt (sodium) n

n

About 60 minutes a day of physical activity may be needed to prevent weight gain. For sustaining weight loss, at least 60 to 90 minutes a day of physical activity may be required. Teenagers should be physically active for 60 minutes every day, on most days.

n

n

Make most of your fat sources from fish, nuts and vegetable oils. Limit solid fats like butter, margarine, shortening and lard, as well as foods that contain these. Check the Nutrition Facts label to keep saturated fats, trans fats and sodium low. Choose food and beverages low in added sugars. Added sugars contribute calories with few, if any, nutrients.


HEALTHY LIVING EMERGENCY ACTION STEPS

{e m e r ge n cy a c t io n s t e p s }

Adult Life-Saving Steps

IN THE EXCITEMENT OF AN EMERGENCY, YOU MAY BE FRIGHTENED OR CONFUSED ABOUT WHAT TO DO. STAY CALM, YOU CAN HELP. THE THREE “EMERGENCY ACTION STEPS” WILL HELP YOU ORGANIZE YOUR RESPONSE TO THE SITUATION.

1

2

3

CHECK

CALL

CARE

Check the scene for safety. Check the victim for consciousness, breathing, pulse and bleeding.

Dial 9-1-1 or your local emergency number. Be prepared to give the dispatcher the exact address or location of the emergency.

Care for the victim.

Always care for life-threatening conditions first. If there are none:

Watch for changes in the victim’s breathing or consciousness. Keep the victim from getting chilled or overheated.

If victim is unable to speak, cough or breathe –

If victim is not breathing –

Give abdominal thrusts (if person is conscious)

Place fist just above the navel and give quick, upward thrusts until object is removed.

Help the victim rest comfortably. Reassure the victim.

Give rescue breathing

Tilt head back and lift chin.

Pinch nose shut. Give one slow breath about every 5 seconds.

If air won’t go in – Give abdominal thrusts

Give up to 5 abdominal thrusts.

Look for and clear any objects from mouth.

Tilt head back and reattempt breaths. Repeat steps until breaths go in.

If not breathing and no pulse – Give CPR

Find hand position on center of breastbone.

Compress chest 30 times. Give 2 slow breaths. Repeat sets of compressions and breaths until ambulance arrives.

Courtesy of:

227


SUCCESS SKILLS

{ tips for impr oving your memor y & taking standar dized tests}

TIPS FOR IMPROVING YOUR MEMORY {1} Keep notes, lists and journals to jog your memory. {2} Decide what is most important to remember by looking for main ideas. {3} Classify information into categories. Some categories may be: a. Time – summer, sun, swimming, hot b. Place – shopping center, stores, restaurants c. Similarities – shoes, sandals, boots d. Differences – mountain, lake e. Wholes to parts – bedroom, bed, pillow f. Scientific groups – Flowers, carnation, rose {4} Look for patterns. Try to make a word out of the first letters of a list of things you are trying

to remember. You also could make a sentence out of the first letters of the words you need to remember. {5} Associate new things you learn with what you already know. {6} Use rhythm or make up a rhyme. {7} Visualize the information in your mind. a. See the picture clearly and vividly. b. Exaggerate and enlarge things. c. See it in three dimensions. d. Put yourself into the picture. e. Imagine an action taking place. {8} Link the information together to give it meaning. {9} Use the information whenever you can. Repetition is the key to memory.

TIPS FOR TAKING EXAMS {1} Concentrate. Do not talk or distract others. {2} Listen carefully to the directions. Ask questions if they are not clear. {3} Pace yourself. Keep your eye on the time, but do not worry too much about not finishing. {4} Work through all of the questions in order. If you do not think you know an answer to a

problem, skip it and come back to it when you have finished the test.

{5} Read all of the possible answers for each question before choosing an answer. {6} Eliminate any answers that are clearly wrong, and choose from the others. Words like

always and never often signal that an answer is false.

{7} If you’re required to write a short essay, quickly jot down an outline to make sure you include

all the key points in your answer.

{8} When you finish the test, go back through and check your answers for careless mistakes. Change

answers only if you are sure they are wrong or you have a very strong feeling they are wrong.

{9} Do not be afraid to guess at a question. If you have a hunch you know the answer, you

probably do!

{10}Use all of the time allotted to check and recheck your test.

228


SUCCESS SKILLS

{ li s t e n i n g & h o m e w o r k s kil l s }

LISTENING SKILLS

Listening (unlike hearing, which is a physical process not requiring thinking) gives meaning to the sounds you hear. It helps you understand. Listening is an active process that requires concentration and practice. In learning, the instructor’s responsibility is to present information; the student’s responsibility is to be “available” for learning. Not listening means you will be unable to learn the material. To help develop listening skills:

Approach the classroom ready to learn: leave personal problems outside the classroom. Try to avoid distractions. Even if you do not sit close to the instructor, focus your attention directly on him/her. Pay attention to the instructor’s style and how the lecture is organized. Participate; ask for clarification when you do not understand. Take notes. Listen for key words, names, events and dates. Don’t make hasty judgments; separate fact from opinion. Connect what you hear with what you already know.

HOMEWORK SKILLS

Keep track of your daily assignments in this datebook so you will always know what you have to do. Homework is an essential part of learning. Even though you may not have written work to do, you can always review or reread assignments. The more you review information, the easier it is to remember and the longer you are able to retain it. Realize that homework is considered an important part of learning. Not doing your homework because you do not believe in homework is self-defeating behavior. It is your responsibility to find out what you have missed when you are absent. Take the initiative to ask a classmate or instructor what you need to make up. You need to also know when it needs to be turned in. If you are absent for several days, make arrangements to receive assignments while you are out. Have a place to study that works for you – one that is free from distractions. Be honest with yourself about using the TV or stereo during study time. Make sure you have everything you need before you begin to work. Develop a schedule that you can follow. Be rested when you study. It is okay to study in short blocks of time. Marathon study sessions may be self-defeating. Prioritize your homework so that you begin with the most important assignment first: study for a test, then do the daily assignment, etc. Study for 30-40 minutes at a time, then take a 5-10 minute break. Estimate the amount of time it will take to do an assignment and plan your break time accordingly.

229


SUCCESS SKILLS

{ s u cce s s f u l n o t e t akin g }

SUCCESSFUL NOTETAKING

Taking notes reinforces what we hear in the classroom and requires active listening. Having accurate information makes your outside study and review time that much easier. Good notetaking requires practice. Be aware of each instructor’s lecture style; learning how to adapt to each style takes patience. Take notes as you (attentively) listen to the lecture. Keep notes in an individual notebook for each class or in a loose-leaf binder that has a section for each class. Your instructor may have certain requirements. Date each day’s notes, and keep them in chronological order. Some instructors provide outlines that tell you how a series of lectures will be organized; other instructors will deliver their lectures and expect you to write the information in your notes. Most instructors will emphasize important points by stressing them or repeating them a few times. Make a note in the margin or highlight any information the instructor specifically identifies as important. Write notes in short phrases, leaving out unnecessary words. Use abbreviations. Write clearly so you will be able to understand your notes when you review them. If you make a mistake, a single line through the material is less time consuming than trying to erase the whole thing. This will save time and you won’t miss any of the lecture. Don’t copy your notes over to make them neat; write them neatly in the first place. Don’t create opportunities to waste your time. Write notes on the right two-thirds of the notebook page. Keep the left one-third free for your follow-up questions or to highlight the really important points in the discussion. Listen for key ideas. Write them down in your own words. Don’t try to write down every word that your instructors say. Some instructors will use the chalkboard, an overhead projector or a PowerPoint presentation to outline these key ideas. Others will simply stress them in their discussion. Soon after class, while the information is still fresh in your mind, create questions directly related to your notes in the left column of the paper. Place these questions across from the information to which it pertains. Highlight or underline any key points, terms, events or people. Quiz yourself by covering the 2/3 side of your notes and try to answer the questions you developed without referring to your notes. If you need to refresh your memory, simply uncover the note section to find the answers to your questions. Short, quick reviews will help you remember and understand the information as well as prepare for tests. Review your notes daily. This reinforces the information and helps you make sure that you understand the material. Make sure your notes summarize, not duplicate, the material. Devise your own use of shorthand. Vary the size of titles and headings. Use a creative approach, not the standard outline form. Keep class lecture notes and study notes together.

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SUCCESS SKILLS PLAN FOR SUCCESS

{ p la n f o r s u cc e s s }

SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE DON’T BECOME SUCCESSFUL BY LUCK. THEIR SUCCESS IS THE RESULT OF SETTING GOALS AND WORKING TO ACHIEVE THOSE GOALS. IN OTHER WORDS, SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE PLAN TO SUCCEED. YOU, TOO, CAN PLAN TO SUCCEED. DON’T PROCRASTINATE. GOOD INTENTIONS WILL NOT HELP YOU SUCCEED. START PLANNING FOR SUCCESS TODAY!

{1} Organization – Getting organized is the first step to success.

Remember that you are responsible for knowing about and completing your assignments and special projects. Make sure you have a datebook to write down your homework, extracurricular activities, community activities and other responsibilities. Make sure you have all the materials you need when you go to class and when you do your homework. {2} Time Management – Managing time wisely will help ensure that you have the opportunity to do both the things you need to do and the things you want to do. Plan a definite time to do your homework. Plan time for extracurricular and social activities as well as home responsibilities. Commit yourself to your time plan, but be flexible. For example, if something happens that makes it impossible for you to do homework during the regularly scheduled time, plan an alternate time to do the homework. {3} Set Priorities – If you have lots to do, it is important to set priorities. Rank each task in 1, 2, 3 order. Start with #1 – the most important task – and continue on down the list. When doing homework, start with the subject in which you need the most improvement. Check off finished tasks. If you frequently find that you cannot finish all the tasks on your list, you may need to prioritize your optional activities and eliminate some that are low on your priority list. {4} Set Goals – Just wishing to get better grades or to excel in soccer accomplishes nothing. You need a plan of action to achieve your goals. Setting goals will result in better grades and higher self-esteem. Best of all, setting goals will make you feel in control of your life. Some hints for setting goals: Be specific. List specific goals for each academic subject. Also list goals for other school and home activities. Set time limits. Your goals can be both short-term (within a month or on the next quiz or test) and long-term (within the semester or within the school year). Set realistic goals. For example, if math has always been difficult for you, don’t aim for an “A” in Algebra at the beginning of the year. If you usually get a “C-” in math, you may want to begin by setting a short-term goal of “C+” or “B-”. Reaching that first short-term goal will give you the confidence to raise your goal for the next test or the next grading period. Draw up a step-by-step plan of action for reaching each goal; then go for it! Write your goals down, and put them in several places (your bedroom door, your datebook, your bulletin board) so you will see them several times a day. Share your goals with others – your parents, roommates, instructors, classmates, etc. They can give you encouragement. Keep at it! Be determined, and keep a positive attitude. Visualize yourself achieving your goals. Reward yourself when you reach a goal.

231


CHARACTER C

H

A

{d e f i n i n g ch a ra ct e r }

R

A

C

T

E

R

As you wind your way through this world, you inevitably come to a fork in the road: You can either be noted for your character – or be known as a character, to paraphrase a high school principal’s advice to his graduating class. Your character determines whether your friends, classmates and family members see you as a leader, respect you as a role model and, ultimately, feel their interactions with you help them become better people. But what values and personal attributes comprise character? To name just a few, character is defined by:

232

C

CARING Caring and concern for others are at the root of the Golden Rule – “Treat others as you want them to treat you.”

H

HONESTY Be honest with yourself and with others in every interaction. Honesty and integrity are the core values that make respect, courage and trustworthiness possible.

A

ACTIONS Your actions – not your intentions or words – are what define your character. Often, these become acts of courage, such as taking a stand against injustice, prejudice, cruelty and other inhumane behaviors.

R

RESPONSIBILITY Your sense of responsibility is what

A

ACCEPTANCE Character demands that we accept others’ differences and appreciate how diversity strengthens our society.

C

CITIZENSHIP People of strong moral character don’t sit on the sidelines. Contribute your “fair share” – participate fully as a concerned student, volunteer and voter.

T

TRUSTWORTHINESS Trust can’t be granted; it can only be earned. Deliver on your promises. Act honestly at every turn.

E

EMPATHY When you empathize with others, you go beyond kindness and caring; you truly begin to see the world from someone else’s perspective.

R

RESPECT Respect for yourself and for others is an integral component of character. Without respect, caring and empathy are empty expressions. Respect is what enables us to accept and appreciate others’ differences.

compels you to do the right thing, follow through on your promises and be accountable for your actions. Personal rights are only possible if they’re accompanied by responsibility.


CLASS SCHEDULE

{ f i r s t s e m e st e r }

FIRST SEMESTER Subject

Time

Monday

Instructor

Tuesday

Wednesday

Office

Thursday

Telephone

Friday

Saturday

7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00

233


CLASS SCHEDULE

{ s e co n d s e m e s t e r }

SECOND SEMESTER Subject

Time 7:00 8:00 9:00 10:00 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 8:00 9:00

234

Monday

Instructor

Tuesday

Wednesday

Office

Thursday

Telephone

Friday

Saturday


IMPORTANT DATES New Year’s Day* Martin Luther King, Jr. Day* Groundhog Day Chinese New Year Lincoln’s Birthday Valentine’s Day Presidents’ Day* Washington’s Birthday Ash Wednesday Daylight-Saving Time begins St. Patrick’s Day First Day of Spring April Fools’ Day Palm Sunday Passover begins at sundown Good Friday Easter Earth Day Cinco de Mayo Mother’s Day Memorial Day (Observed)* Flag Day Father’s Day First Day of Summer Independence Day* Labor Day* Patriot Day Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown First Day of Autumn Yom Kippur begins at sundown Columbus Day (Observed)* Halloween Standard Time returns Election Day Veterans Day (Observed)* Thanksgiving* Hanukkah begins at sundown First Day of Winter Christmas* Kwanzaa begins * Federal Holiday in the United States

{U ni ted S ta t e s }

2016

2017

2018

Fri., Jan. 1 Mon., Jan. 18 Tues., Feb. 2 Mon., Feb. 8 Fri., Feb. 12 Sun., Feb. 14 Mon., Feb. 15 Mon., Feb. 22 Wed., Feb. 10 Sun., Mar. 13 Thurs., Mar. 17 Sun. Mar. 20 Fri., Apr. 1 Sun., Mar. 20 Fri., Apr. 22 Fri., Mar. 25 Sun., Mar. 27 Fri., Apr. 22 Thurs., May 5 Sun., May 8 Mon., May 30 Tues., June 14 Sun., June 19 Mon., June 20 Mon., July 4 Mon., Sept. 5 Sun., Sept. 11 Sun., Oct. 2 Thur., Sept. 22 Tues., Oct. 11 Mon., Oct. 10 Mon., Oct. 31 Sun., Nov. 6 Tues., Nov. 8 Fri., Nov. 11 Thurs., Nov. 24 Sat., Dec. 24 Wed., Dec. 21 Sun., Dec. 25 Mon., Dec. 26

Sun., Jan. 1 Mon., Jan. 16 Thurs., Feb. 2 Sat., Jan. 28 Sun., Feb. 12 Tues., Feb. 14 Mon., Feb. 20 Wed., Feb. 22 Wed., Mar. 1 Sun., Mar. 12 Fri., Mar. 17 Mon., Mar. 20 Sat., Apr. 1 Sun., Apr. 9 Mon., Apr. 10 Fri., Apr. 14 Sun., Apr. 16 Sat., Apr. 22 Fri., May 5 Sun., May 14 Mon., May 29 Wed., June 14 Sun., June 18 Wed., June 21 Tues., July 4 Mon., Sept. 4 Mon., Sept. 11 Wed., Sept. 20 Fri., Sept. 22 Fri., Sept. 29 Mon., Oct. 9 Tues., Oct. 31 Sun., Nov. 5 Tues., Nov. 7 Fri., Nov. 10 Thurs., Nov. 23 Tues., Dec. 12 Thurs., Dec. 21 Mon., Dec. 25 Tues., Dec. 26

Mon., Jan. 1 Mon., Jan. 15 Fri., Feb. 2 Fri., Feb. 16 Mon., Feb. 12 Wed., Feb. 14 Mon., Feb. 19 Thurs., Feb. 22 Wed., Feb. 14 Sun., Mar. 11 Sat., Mar. 17 Tues., Mar. 20 Sun., Apr. 1 Sun., Mar. 25 Fri., Mar. 30 Fri., Mar. 30 Sun., Apr. 1 Sun., Apr. 22 Sat., May 5 Sun., May 13 Mon., May 28 Thurs., June 14 Sun., June 17 Thurs., June 21 Wed. July 4 Mon., Sept. 3 Tues., Sept. 11 Sun., Sept. 9 Sun., Sept. 23 Tues., Sept. 18 Mon., Oct. 8 Wed., Oct. 31 Sun., Nov. 4 Tues., Nov. 6 Sun., Nov. 11 Thurs., Nov. 22 Sun., Dec. 2 Fri., Dec. 21 Tues., Dec. 25 Wed., Dec. 26

235


NOTES

236

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