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The cocktail craftsman WEEKEND | 21

APRIL 11, 2014 VOLUME 22, NO. 11

www.MountainViewOnline.com

650.964.6300

MOVIES | 25

City poised for huge office growth DEVELOPMENT BRINGING AS MANY AS 42,500 NEW WORKERS, LITTLE HOUSING TO MOUNTAIN VIEW By Daniel DeBolt

A MICHELLE LE

A cyclist passes a Google self-driving car (with the camera on top) along Shoreline Boulevard during the morning rush hour on April 8.

Council wrestles with gridlock DOWNTOWN TRANSIT STATION OVERWHELMED BY EMPLOYEE SHUTTLES

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n a city where job growth never seems to quit, a growing number of workers commuting to Mountain View is causing a problem. In a study session Tuesday, April 8, it was revealed that more than a few of the city’s streets have recently reached the

lowest possible grade for traffic — an “F” — while the downtown transit station is seeing 57 different employee shuttle services during rush hour, lining Evelyn Avenue and using space in the station’s bus turnout. Council members were surprised to learn that many of

the shuttles don’t even serve Mountain View, prompting council member Ronit Bryant to suggest they be charged a use fee. Cupertino-based Apple and Los Gatos-based Netflix are among the compaSee TRAFFIC, page 8

n analysis by the Voice shows that explosive office development is knocking on Mountain View’s door, bringing as many as 42,550 new office workers who will be driving on the area’s freeways and competing for the city’s increasingly expensive and scarce housing. An examination of office projects in the works finds 834,000 square feet of additional office space under construction in the city, with an additional 1.3 million square feet proposed. With this alone, the city could add 16,400 employees to Mountain View’s job count in the coming years. That number more than doubles if you include the 3.4 million square feet of new offices (space for 26,150 additional jobs) being considered for the area around Google’s headquarters, North Bayshore. It could soon see in a major redevelopment when a North Bayshore “precise plan” is approved by the council at the end of the year. “It’s kind of scary — it’s like there’s a glacier headed in our

direction. It’s not going to hit us right away but it’s almost too late to stop it,” said resident Lenny Siegel of the office growth in the pipeline. Siegel has been raising concerns about the city’s jobshousing balance since the 1970s and is now founder of the “Campaign for a Balanced Mountain View” which seeks to sway the City Council to allow housing development in North Bayshore to balance the city’s job growth. “Once they start hiring people in all this office space — and right now they are hiring pretty fast — the impact in housing, transportation and our quality of life will be enormous,” Siegel said. In a city that currently has about 34,500 homes and about 69,000 jobs, the city’s zoning has historically allowed for more job space than housing, and the city’s new general plan will make the trend more extreme — it has zoned for a maximum of about 7,000 new homes in Mountain View by 2030, largely as the El Camino Real and San Antonio Road corridors See OFFICE, page 7

Guardsmen rescue sick baby at sea By Kevin Forestieri

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Moffett Field-based team of Air National Guardsmen rescued a seriously ill 1-year-old baby and her family from a sailboat 1,000 miles off the coast of Baja California early Sunday morning. The rescue team continued to provide support for the family aboard the USS Vandergrift when it reached San Diego on Wednesday

INSIDE

morning, April 9. Last Thursday, April 3, a fourman Guardian Angel team of the 129th Rescue Wing parachuted into the water near the Rebel Heart, a 36-foot boat, to provide medical attention for the sick baby on board. It turned out that all four family members required rescue from the Rebel Heart, which was adrift and would take on water when the engine was used. “The ship was unable to

steer, maneuver and had lost communication,” said 2nd Lt. Roderick B. Bersamina of the 129th Rescue Wing. The parents, Charlotte and Eric Kaufman, planned to sail the world with their two children, according to a report from the Associated Press. But two weeks into the trip, their daughter Lyra became ill, and shortly after that, the boat lost See AIR RESCUE, page 12

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COURTESY U.S. NAVY

A stranded family with a sick baby leave their sailboat on April 6 and head to the USS Vandergrift with four Guardian Angels from the 129th Air Rescue Wing that’s stationed at Moffett Field.


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INDECENT EXPOSURE TO KIDS Police received a report that a man in the parking lot of SummerWinds Nursery exposed himself in front of a mother and her two small children on April 5 at 5:26 p.m. The woman and her children, ages 2 and 4, had been shopping at the garden center, and were leaving when they encountered a man in the parking lot smiling at the mother. The 4-year-old told the mother that the man had exposed his genitals, according to Sgt. Saul Jaeger of the Mountain View Police Department. A witness saw the man run away onto Steven’s Creek Trail, and he was not found after a search that included the use of a police dog. The suspect was described as a white male in his mid- to late30s with black hair, a black beard and wearing a gray baseball cap. Police say detectives will be following up on the case.

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■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ April 11, 2014

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■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

School drug forum informs, shocks parents PARENTS LEFT WONDERING ABOUT SOLUTIONS By Kevin Forestieri

A

MICHELLE LE

Michael Streck-Woodward, the new head coach of Mountain View High School’s track and field team, advises Cannon Wong on April 4.

New track coach inspires students MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH HOPES NEW COACH WILL END INSTABILITY By Kevin Forestieri

M

ichael Streck-Woodard, has had a commanding presence as Mountain View High’s track and field coach since last February. And with good reason. Wrangling a roster of 121 students and program with a history of instability, it is no surprise that school officials sought some strong leadership from a coach that students describe as motivational, enthusiastic and

a little intense. Streck-Woodard is a Bay Area native, who attended Humboldt State University where he got a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology with an emphasis in exercise science. He was hired in last May by Shelley Smith, the athletic director at Mountain View High, to work in the strength and conditioning program for the football team. Smith said that Streck-Woodard seemed like a great fit for the job; he had good experience, was on the

track and football team in college and was a personal trainer for 24-Hour Fitness. “We also liked his philosophy and his approach to our philosophy,” Smith said. Toward the end of the summer, Smith still needed to fill two positions, including head coach for the track team. The track team has had problems with instability in the past because it has been difficult to See TRACK COACH, page 14

County launches suicide-prevention campaign on bus billboards By Elena Kadvany

T

he Santa Clara County Mental Health Department this week launched a campaign to raise awareness about suicide prevention, displaying on 16 Valley Transportation Authority buses the message “Give up? Not on your life” with the phone number for the county’s suicide and crisis hotline written underneath. Depending on the bus route, the message reads in English, Spanish, Vietnamese or Chinese.

“More people die from suicide than from homicide in Santa Clara County,” Nancy Pena, director of the Santa Clara County Mental Health Department, said in a press release. “While every death is tragic, we know when it comes to suicide, these deaths are preventable.” In 2013 there were 149 suicides and 56 homicides in Santa Clara County, according to the press release. “The people who died from suicide came from every city in our county, all income levels, and

a variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds,” the press release states. “The ages of people who died from suicide ranged from 15 years old to 93 years old.” “No matter what problems a person is dealing with, Hotline crisis counselors want to help them find a reason to keep living,” said Vic Ojakian, co-chair of the county’s Suicide Prevention Oversight Committee. “Things can change and no one has to suffer in silence. This is a See ANTI-SUICIDE BUS, page 17

presentation on drug use parents about a homemade at Mountain View High version of morphine known as School last week had Krokodil, a drug often used as plenty of shock value, show- an alternative to heroin. The ing graphic videos of people drug was popularized in Rusunder the influence jumping sia, and there was a reported out of windows and chewing use of Krokodil in Arizona, on walls. but there have been no cases in But the presentation did not California. Sometimes referred mention parent-student com- to as a “flesh-eating” drug, the munication, which a local sub- presentation included graphic stance abuse program director imagery of people addicted to said is a key component in Krokodil with severe skin and dealing with substance abuse, muscle damage. leaving parents to wonder During the question-andhow to communicate their answer session, parents said newfound knowledge to their they felt more informed about kids. the illegal drugs in circulaThe Mountain View Police tion, but wanted to know more Department brought “High in about what they could do. Plain Sight,” a video presenta“How do we combat this?” tion about drug use by stu- one parent asked. Some pardents, to the Spartan Theatre ents wanted to expose their in Mountain View High School children directly to the videos on April 3. The presentation and information in the prewas a response, sentation, while at least in part, others stressed to a recent teen the importance drug overdose ‘You don’t want to of communicatthat hospitaling with their ized a student, become the police, children. and comes not key is you want to be forTheparents long after an to out-of-control create an open their parent.’ teen party with dialogue with VERONICA FOSTER OF CHAC drug use ended their kids about in an arson fire. drugs, accordOfficer Ron ing to Veronica Cooper, t he Foster, program police department’s school director for the substance resource officer, explained the abuse treatment and prevenappearance, slang and side tion program at the Commueffects of a slew of drugs, nity Health Awareness Council including synthetic marijuana, (CHAC) in Mountain View. “bath salts” and ecstasy. Foster said parents have “Ecstasy will fry your brain to have a plan for what they cells,” said Cooper, explaining want to say and do when they that the use of the psychedelic confront their children about drug MDMA, or ecstasy, has a drugs and alcohol, and they negative impact on brain activ- need to know the facts about ity. Cooper said just one pill of the drugs they discuss if they ecstasy can cause brain dam- want to be taken seriously. age. “Kids today are extremely Videos in the presentation intelligent, they can look this included a clip of two men stuff up,” Foster said. smoking “spice,” a synthetic The plan should also include form of marijuana, and sub- a decisive message that the sequently breaking a window parents want to give their kids, and falling out of the room. and make it clear where they Another video showed three stand on the use of drugs and people on ecstasy chewing on alcohol. their lips and gnawing on the Although it might be good side of a wall. Cooper went on to inform See DRUG FORUM, page 18 April 11, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

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redevelop. The general plan also estimated that there would only be 82,230 jobs by 2030, a number which will clearly be surpassed in the coming years. “What were they thinking?” Siegel asks. It might be easy to point the finger at the City Council — which has opposed housing in North Bayshore, didn’t have a discussion about balanced growth over the four years (2008-2012) that the city’s general plan was being developed and passed on an alternative plan that would have allowed 16,000 new households in the city instead of just 7,000. But Siegel notes that “the council bends to public input” and on Tuesday it appeared that was happening. A majority of the council at the April 8 meeting expressed major reservations about approving a 1-million-square-foot office project at 700 East Middlefield Road which could add more than 5,000 employees from an unnamed company to Mountain View (it is being built for asset management firm Deutsche Wealth & Asset Management). It included four buildings as tall as eight stories, and a parking garage with 3,118 spaces. “We are building something for people who don’t live here, don’t work here,” said council member Jac Siegel of the project. “If we build enough, it’s not going to be Mountain View anymore. We are basically changing the character of our city significantly.” Council members eventually decided to have developer Sares

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One million square feet of office space was proposed for 700 E. Middlefield Road, one of many large development projects for Mountain View.

Regis scale back the project by 25 percent to address the project’s impacts, which apparently took Dave Hopkins of Sares Regis by surprise. He said the company had invested quite a bit of time and money on the project, including a 3-D tour of the project on a special screen wheeled into the plaza conference room Tuesday. “You took a risk,” council member Margaret Abe-Koga told Hopkins. “Things change, that’s why we’re here.” Council members Ronit Bryant and Abe Koga revealed that they actually thought it would be better to build some housing on the 24-acre site at 700 East Middlefield, with Abe-Koga mentioning “all the pressure we’re getting about (housing in) North Bayshore” and the fact that it may be easier to build housing in East Whisman, as it is closer to schools and services. Abe-Koga is one of three council members who opposed housing in North Bayshore who are leaving the council this year

due to term limits. “People are now just waiting for us to leave,” Abe-Koga said of herself, Bryant and Jac Siegel. Office job numbers in this story were calculated using the latest list of projects posted on the city’s economic development web page, along with projects not listed: 400,000 square feet in Merlone Geier’s phase two at San Antonio shopping center; 150,000 square feet of office at the city’s “Moffett Gateway” site; 500,000 square feet of office at the former Mayfield Mall site. It also subtracted the square footage of older office buildings being replaced in some cases. The council’s reduction to the Sares Regis project was not included. Employee numbers were calculated at 130 square feet per employee, within a range now commonly used, as indicated by City Council members and architect Thomas Yee at the April 8 council meeting.

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MICHELLE LE

A Google bus makes its way down Shoreline Boulevard on April 8.

TRAFFIC

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nies that take advantage of the Mountain View station’s proximity to Highway 85. “When the transit center was designed it wasn’t anticipated it would have this level of service,� said a consultant with

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â–  Mountain View Voice â–  MountainViewOnline.com â–  April 11, 2014

Nelson Nygaard. The study session focused on how to get downtown train station users to Google headquarters and the surrounding North Bayshore, a 1.5-mile trip on infamously gridlocked Shoreline Boulevard. The trip is said to be taken by 900 to 1000 transit users a day. Proposals from the consultant showed improved bike-ways up Stierlin Road and Shoreline Boulevard, as well as a dedicated transit lane on North Shoreline Boulevard and bypass bridges over Highway 101 to prevent shuttles from being stuck in Shoreline Boulevard gridlock near the Highway 101 offramps. Also proposed was a raised walkway over Central Expressway from the train station for cyclists en route to North Bayshore and shuttle riders, who may one day be picked up at shuttle stations on the north side of the expressway to alleviate gridlock at the downtown transit station. Some frustrations were expressed by council members and others about whether such measures were enough. “We aren’t going to solve the enormous traffic problem we have by putting in more transit and bike lanes,� said Lenny Siegel, founder of a campaign to balance Mountain View’s job growth with housing growth so employees can live near their jobs. “I think we need to be more imaginative. It looks like we are rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.� For the first time Tuesday, Google went on record supporting personal rapid transit (PRT), the controversial automated people-mover technology in which council members have expressed both a serious interest — and more recently — major skepticism. Council member John Inks stressed that the idea wasn’t dead yet. “Most of the study devoted to applications of existing technologies,� said Kevin Mathy Google’s transportation manager. “We need to have an eye towards PRT systems and self-driving cars that are coming closer to fruition in


-PDBM/FXT

MAPS COURTESY OF THE CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW

Possible routes for bicyclists and transit around gridlock on Shoreline Boulevard.

the U.S. every day.” Mathy also suggested the “reconstruction of Shoreline offramps” at Highway 101, presumably so that shuttles can avoid Shoreline Boulevard traffic and fixes for “Caltrain beyond (the) 2019 electrification process.” He said Google “applauds” the proposals so far, especially the bridge crossings and transit lanes, “but we hope that the study (examines) extending these lanes to HOV (high occupancy vehicle) users. People who carpool should be recognized for that effort.” Google has already made a major effort to reduce car traffic, and city officials report that solo vehicle trips are already low — representing only about 60 percent of all North Bayshore commute trips. The city’s goal is to reduce it to 45 percent. “I was hoping this study would make bicycling so attractive that Google would have bicyclists coming from all around,” said Google employee and Mountain View homeowner Aldona Majorek. She added that new bike lanes should be

‘It looks like we are rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.’ LENNY SIEGEL

as safe as possible. “Please don’t just design it for adults. It should be safe enough for my 10-year-old to go on and not be too scared,” she said. Consultants said there are now several hundred bicyclists who ride from the transit center to North Bayshore, and that the number would have to go to 1,000 or 1,500 to meet city goals. Two different proposals were presented for alleviating the bottleneck on Shoreline Boulevard at Highway 101. One showed a new dedicated shuttle lane running up the center of Shoreline Boulevard, reversible in direction, combined with a new bridge from Terra Bella Avenue over 101 for transit, bicyclists and pedestrians, making use of Caltrans property and some private property on the south and north sides of the freeway. Another option showed the bridge alongside a second

new bridge allowing shuttles and pedestrians to go both north and south while bypassing the gridlock on the existing 101 bridge. As for the shuttle traffic at the transit station, council member Ronit Bryant said she saw many shuttles with only a few people in them, as the goal appears to be to meet at least every bullet train that arrives at the station. “One small Intuit van was completely full. The others were much much bigger and there were two to three people inside,” Bryant said. She said she believed that the new Mountain View Transit Management Agency, which major employers are forming to share shuttles and other car trip reduction efforts, would help solve the transit station shuttle problem and “will actually bring relief to the downtown pretty much instantaneously.”

“Once we have the TMA I think that problem is solved,” Bryant said. Council member Mike Kasperzak, who once called himself “the pod car mayor” adamantly raised the issues of pod cars (PRT). Council members backed away from the idea a few weeks ago, expressing concerns about helping to fund the development of a high-tech PRT system under development at NASA Ames called SkyTran. He said the city could have a system based on existing technology up and running in as little as five years, as it costs significantly less per mile than light rail. “There’s at least four around the world,” he said of existing systems, including one that’s operated in Morgantown, West Virginia since 1975. “We can find out what they’re doing. If we don’t start talking about this now we’re going to be making blind

decisions without really knowing what our options are.” Council member Bryant opposed the idea, saying she doubted that her neighbors would “look happily at elevated PRT systems. The technology sounds exciting — it’s almost like science fiction. But think of what it basically is. It may not be that positive.” She raised the example of PRT at Heathrow Airport in London, saying “Heathrow is not a ‘sit down with a cup of coffee and enjoy the garden’” kind of place. “This is our city and it’s not an obvious solution.” Consultants said they would return with more proposals and by the end of the year present a complete plan for mitigating traffic from North Bayshore, with a goal of reducing solo car trips to 45 percent. City Manager Dan Rich said that there will also be estimates on general transit costs, including a request for how much it could cost to extend light rail from the NASA station to North Bayshore. Email Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

April 11, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

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■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ April 11, 2014


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April 11, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

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-PDBM/FXT Attention: Google Mountain View WiFi Users Mountain View has been a great home to Google, and to the thousands of Googlers who live here. That’s why we’re working with city leaders to provide better WiFi in several outdoor locations throughout Mountain View. The original Google WiFi network is old and doesn’t work well. So, on May 3rd, we are going to shut down the old network and start building a brand new public, outdoor WiFi network along the Castro Street corridor.

STYLE MEETS FUNCTIONALITY

We appreciate your patience while we build the new network.

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■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ April 11, 2014

steering and communication. Bersamina said the U.S. Coast Guard received a distress message from the Rebel Heart early Thursday saying that an infant on the ship had become ill and needed medical attention shortly before the ship lost communication. The rescue team did not know the exact location of the ship, and used a combat aircraft’s emergency electronic beacon to find it. The Guardian Angel team

reached the ship that night at about 7 p.m. The Guardian Angel team was able to provide medical aid and stabilize the child aboard the Rebel Heart, which Bersamina said was the first priority of the rescue team. Both the Guardian Angel team and the family stayed aboard the Rebel Heart until Sunday morning, when they were picked up by the USS Vandergrift, a U.S. Navy frigate. Although the Guardian Angel team stabilized the infant and helped transfer the family onto the Vandergrift, their job is

still not done. Bersamina said the team is responsible for providing care to the one-year-old throughout the entire rescue until they reach a medical facility. The 129th Rescue Wing is an Air National Guard unit based at Moffett Field that performs military and civilian searchand-rescue missions, including the rescue of distressed people aboard ships, lost hikers and disaster response. The unit is credited with saving the lives of more than 1,000 people, according to a press release by the 129th Rescue Wing. V

COURTESY OF 129TH AIR RESCUE GUARD

Medical supplies, food and equipment are prepared to drop near the stranded sailboat Rebel Heart.


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View our Camp Guides at ymcasv.org/summercamp April 11, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

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STANFORD WATER POLO CAMPS Ages 7 and up. New to the sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or full day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, position work, scrimmages and games.

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COMPUTER AND LEGO® SUMMER CAMPS HALF & FULL Day Options Ages 5 - 16 Many Locations including Palo Alto, Menlo Park & Sunnyvale

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Michael Streck-Woodward coaches students during practice on April 4 at Mountain View High School.

TRACK COACH

www.techknowhowkids.com

Continued from page 5

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fill the position with a long-term coach, he said. “We had a lot of turnover with our track people,” Smith said, adding that the situation was a cause for concern for parents. Streck-Woodard seemed to be the best fit for the job, and so far things are working out, according to Smith. Unlike most high school athletics, track involves a large number of students who compete in events like the hurdling, sprints, throws and jumps. This makes it hard to manage as a coach without the help of a few assistant coaches. “For track, you really need four or even five assistant coaches to split things up,” Smith said. Streck-Woodard has three assistants, one of whom is his father,

Chris Woodard. Woodard is a battalion chief for the Palo Alto Fire Depa r t ment and volunteers his time as an Michael Streckassistant coach. Woodward Woodard used to coach track in Oklahoma, and held unofficial records there for the long jump and triple jump. Despite the large roster, people who visit the track practice will find Streck-Woodard working one-on-one with students, helping them with their form and technique. The team has been successful so far this year. Smith said the team did well at a meet in Palo Alto last month, especially the boys varsity. Streck-Woodard said the girls junior varsity team has also improved a lot this spring.

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ April 11, 2014

PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION: explore.stanford.edu

Beyond their success this season, track students have come to like “Coach Mike.” “He’s really connected with the team, and charismatic,” said Kolisa Nhlapo, a sprinter and hurdler on the girls varsity team. Nhlapo has been on the track team for four years, and said the coaches have switched a lot in the past. Krysta Korpontinos, a varsity sprinter in her third year of track, said Streck-Woodard sometimes connects with the students off the field by coming to what she called “pasta parties,” where students load up on pasta and salad the night before a meet. After the track season, Smith said Streck-Woodard will continue to work on campus during the summer and into the fall as an assistant coach for the wide receivers and defensive backs on the football team. V

NCRIMEBRIEFS Continued from page 4

Dojo on April 2 at 4 a.m. The victim was working on his computer when the suspect, known as Richard Walker, asked him to turn down his music. Walker allegedly pressed on the screen of the laptop and damaged it, according to Sgt. Saul Jaeger of the Mountain View Police Department. Walker told the victim he would pay for the screen, but he could not be located. Kevin Forestieri


G U I D E TO 2014 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

For more information about these camps, see our online directory of camps at www.paloaltoonline.com/biz/summercamps/ To advertise in this weekly directory, call: 650-326-8210 Summer at Saint Francis

Athletics Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps

Atherton

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps provide an enjoyable way for your child to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. Our approach is to create lots of fun with positive feedback and reinforcement in a nuturing tennis environment. Building self-esteem and confidence through enjoyment on the tennis court is a wonderful gift a child can keep forever! Super Juniors Camps, ages 4-6; Juniors Camps, ages 6-14. www.alanmargot-tennis.net 650.400.0464

City of Mountain View Swim Lessons

Mountain View

Rengstorff and Eagle Park Pools We offer swim lessons for ages 6 months to 14 years. Following the American Red Cross swim lesson program, students are divided into one of the 11 different levels taught by a certified instructor. Rengstorff Park Pool, 201 S Rengstorff Ave and Eagle Park Pool, 650 Franklin St. www.mountainview.gov 650.903.6331

Club Rec Juniors & Seniors

Mountain View

Club Rec Juniors and Seniors is open for youth 6-11 years old.These traditional day camps are filled with fun theme weeks, weekly trips, swimming, games, crafts and more! Rengstorff Park, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue www.mountainview.gov 650.903.6331

Nike Tennis Camps

Stanford University

Weekly overnight and day camps offered throughout June, July and August for boys & girls ages 6-18. Options for all ability levels, great Nike prizes and camp t-shirt. Adult weekend clinics offered in June and August. Come join the fun and GET BETTER THIS SUMMER! www.USSSportsCamps.com/tennis 1.800.NIKE.CAMP (645.3226)

Palo Alto Elite Volleyball Club

Menlo Park/Palo Alto

In our 7th year, a community club with close ties to the schools we offer volleyball camps for girls, grades 3 - 12. From basics for beginners to advanced techniques for High School. Located at Arrillaga Family Gym (MP). Brush up on skills, get ready for school tryouts. www.paloaltoelite.com info@paloaltoelite.com

The Sacred Heart Sports Camp

Atherton

Mountain View

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camp designed to provide players with the opportunity to improve both their skills and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff. www.sfhs.com/summer 650.968.1213 x650

Arts, Culture, Other Camps Camp Boogaloo & Camp Zoom

Mountain View

These new Summer Day Camps are sure to keep your kids busy! Camp Boogaloo, open to youth 6-11 years old, will be held at Castro Park, 505 Escuela Ave. Camp Zoom, open to youth 9-12 years old, will be held at Crittenden Athletic Field, 1500 Middlefield Road. Both of these traditional day camps are filled with fun theme weeks, weekly trips, swimming, games, crafts and more! www.mountainview.gov 650.903.6331

Castilleja Summer Camp

Palo Alto

Castilleja Summer Day Camp offers a range of age-appropriate activities including athletics, art, science, computers, writing, crafts, cooking, drama, and music classes each day and weekly field trips. www.castilleja.org 650.328.3160

City of Mountain View

Mountain View

Recreation Division Discover fun with us this summer through the many programs available with the City of Mountain View Recreation Division. From sports to traditional day camps, to cooking camps, dance camps and art camps... we have it all! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue www.mountainview.gov 650.903.6331

Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Grades K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, School of Rock, Digital Arts, more! Oneand two-week sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org 650.917.6800 ext. 0

powered by Hi-Five Sports Club Hi-Five Sports is thrilled to present our third multi-sport competitive summer camp to the San Francisco Bay Area! Through experienced, passionate, and patient coaching, we believe the timeless lessons that only sports can teach with stay with the kids for the rest of their lives. www.hifivesportsclubs.com/wordpress/bayarea_hi_five_sports_ camp/bayarea_camp_summer_camp_atherton/ 650.362.4975

Deer Hollow Farm Wilderness Camps

Spartans Sports Camp

Exciting activities for kindergarteners through teens include swimming, field trips, sports and more. Enroll your child in traditional or special focus camps like Computer Animation, Baking, Urban Art & Murals, Outdoor Exploration and many others! www.paloaltojcc.org/jcamp 650.223.8622

Mountain View

Spartans Sports Camp offers multi-sport, week-long sessions for boys and girls in grades 2-6 as well as sport-specific sessions for grades 5-9. There are also strength and conditioning camps for grades 6-12. New this year are cheerleading camps for grades Pre-K - 8. Camps begin June 9th and run weekly through August 1st at Mountain View High School. The camp is run by MVHS coaches and student-athletes and all proceeds benefit the MVHS Athletic Department. Lunch and extended care are available for your convenience. Register today! www. SpartansSportsCamp.com 650.479.5906

Stanford Baseball Camps

Stanford

Stanford Baseball Camps have gained national recognition as the some of the finest in the country. These camps are designed to be valuable and beneficial for a wide range of age groups and skill sets. From the novice 7 year-old, to the Division 1, professionally skilled high school player, you will find a camp that fulfills your needs. www.Stanfordbaseballcamp.com 650.723.4528

Stanford Water Polo

Stanford

Ages 7 and up. New to sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or fully day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, scrimmages and games. 650.725.9016 www.stanfordwaterpolocamps.com

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all-sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. After camp care and swim lessions available. www.sfhs.com/summer 650.968.1213 x650

Summer Sports Camp@SportsHouse

Redwood City

All sports camp for kids ages 6-13 at SportsHouse from June 16 - August 15. Full day of fun, all summer long. Lunch included. After camp care optional. www.SportsHouse.us 650.362.4100

Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve

Children ages 6-14 can meet the livestock, help with farm chores, explore a wilderness preserve and have fun with crafts, songs and games. Older campers conclude the week with a sleepover at the Farm. Near the intersection of Hwy 85 and Hwy 280 www.mountainview.gov 650.903.6331

J-Camp Oshman Family JCC

Palo Alto

Palo Alto Community Child Care (PACCC)

Palo Alto

PACCC summer camps offer campers, grades 1st to 6th, a wide variety of fun opportunities! Neighborhood Adventure Fun and Ultimate Adventure Fun for the more active and on-the-go campers! New this year: Sports Adventure Camp, JV for the younger athletes and Varsity for the older sports enthusiasts! We introduce FAME - Fine arts, Music and Entertainment -- a 4-week opportunity for the artists. Returning is Operation Chef for out of this world cooking fun! Swimming twice per week, periodic field trips, special visitors and many engaging camp activities, songs and skits round out the fun offerings of PACCC Summer Camps! Open to campers from all communities! Come join the fun in Palo Alto! Register online. www.paccc.org 650.493.2361

TechKnowHow® Computer and LEGO® Summer Camp

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-16. Courses include LEGO® projects with motors, K’NEX®, NXT® Robotics, Arduino™, iPad® Movie Making and Game Design. Classes feature high-interest, ageappropriate projects which teach technology and science skills. Half and Full day options. Early bird and multiple week discounts are also available. www.techknowhowkids.com

YMCA of Silicon Valley What makes Y camps different?

650.638.0500

Peninsula

We believe every child deserves the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve. Y campers experience the outdoors, make new friends and have healthy fun in a safe, nurturing environment. They become more confident and grow as individuals, and they learn value in helping others. We offer day, overnight, teen leadership and family camps. Financial assistance is available. Get your summer camp guide at ymcasv.org/summer camp www.ymcav.org 408.351.6400

Academics Early Learning Write Now! Summer Writing Camps

Palo Alto/ Pleasanton

Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new) test-taking skills. Call or visit our site for details. www.headsup.org 650.424.1267; 925.485.5750

Foothill College

Los Altos Hills

Two Six-Week Summer Sessions beginning June 10. These sessions are perfect for university students returning from summer break who need to pick up a class and high school juniors, seniors and recent graduates who want to get an early start. www.foothill.edu 650.949.7362

Harker Summer Programs

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics – focusing on math, language arts and science – and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Sports programs also offered. www.summer.harker.org 408.553.0537

iD Tech Camps and iD Tech Academies

Stanford

Take interests further and gain a competitive edge! Ages 7-17 create apps, video games, C++/Java programs, movies, and more at weeklong, day and overnight summer programs. Held at Stanford and others. Also 2-week, pre-college programs for ages 13-18. www.iDTech.com 1.888.709.TECH (8324)

iD Film Academy for Teens

Stanford

Discover how filmmaking or photography can lead to a rewarding career. 2-week, pre-college summer programs for ages 13-18. Held at UC Berkeley, Yale, and NYU. Also weeklong camps for ages 7-17 held at iD Tech Camps. www.iDFilmAcademy.com 1.888.709.TECH (8324)

iD Game Academy for Teens Design & Development

Stanford/ Bay Area

Instead of just playing games, design and develop your own. 2-week, precollege summer programs in game design, development, programming, and 3D modeling. Also week long camps for ages 7-17 held at iD Tech Camps. 1.888.709.TECH (8324) www.iDGameDevAcademy.com

iD Programming Academy for Teens

Stanford/ Bay Area

Gain a competitive edge and learn how programming can become a college degree and even a rewarding career. 2-week, pre-college summer programs in programming, app development, and robotics engineering. Also weeklong camps for ages 7-17 held at iD Tech Camps. www.iDProgrammingAcademy.com 1.888.709.TECH (8324)

ISTP’s Language Immersion Summer Camp

Palo Alto

ISTP Summer Camp is designed to give participants a unique opportunity to spend their summer break learning or improving in a second language. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language of proficiency. Our camp offers many immersion opportunities and consists of a combination of language classes and activities taught in the target language. Sessions are available in French, Mandarin and Chinese and English ESL and run Monday through Friday, 8am to 3:30pm with additional extending care from 3:30pm to 5:30pm www.istp.org 650-251-8519

Mid-Peninsula High School

Menlo Park

Summer at Mid-Pen includes 5 weeks of diverse classes designed to keep students engaged in learning. Our summer classes have two purposes: to offer interesting electives and allow students to complete missing high school credit. Summer session runs from June 23 to July 24, 2014 www.mid-pen.com 650.321.1991

Stanford Explore: A Lecture Series on Biomedical Research

Stanford

EXPLORE biomedical science at Stanford! Stanford EXPLORE offers high school students the unique opportunity to learn from Stanford professors and graduate students about diverse topics in biomedical science, including bioengineering, neurobiology, immunology and many others. explore.stanford.edu explore-series@stanford.edu

Stratford School - Camp Socrates

Palo Alto/Bay Area

Academic enrichment infused with traditional summer camp fun--that’s what your child will experience at Camp Socrates. Sessions begin June 23 and end August 8, with option to attend all seven weeks, or the first four (June 23July 18). Full or half-day, morning or afternoon programs available. Perfect for grades preschool through 8th. 17 campuses throughout Bay Area. www.StratfordSchools.com/Summer 650.493.1151

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable! www.sfhs.com/summer 650.968.1213 x446

April 11, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

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SUMMER at

SAINT FRANCIS Camps for all ages SPORTS & ACTIVITY CAMP MIDDLE SCHOOL CAMPS HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES ADVANCED SPORTS CAMPS WRITE NOW!

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Catch Up. Keep Up. Get Ahead.

twitter.com/mvvoice

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6 Weeks | 2 Sessions June 9–July 18 & June 30–Aug. 8

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High school sophomores, juniors & seniors are eligible to enroll.

Summer Sessions 2014

â–  Mountain View Voice â–  MountainViewOnline.com â–  April 11, 2014

RALLYING SUPPORT TO REOPEN SCHOOLS Neighborhood representatives in northeast Mountain View are prepared to lay out several proposals at the next Mountain View Whisman School Board meeting, requesting that trustees to consider reopening the Whisman and Slater elementary schools, which were closed several years ago. Jessica Gandhi, president of the North Whisman Neighborhood Association, said she is asking residents in the area between Route 85, Route 237 and Highway 101 to come to the school board meeting to show their support for a neighborhood school. Gandhi said the board members have not talked about the details for reopening the schools and have not done the research, citing a lack of public support. Gandhi said she hopes the turnout is high at the board meeting so they can prove the public support exists. Since the closure of Slater in 2006, there have been no public schools in the northeastern area of the city. Greg Coladonato, a Mountain View resident in favor of re-opening the campuses, said their goal is to persuade the superintendent and board members to research the proposals. The Mountain View Whisman School District board meeting starts at 6 p.m. at 750-A San Pierre Way on Thursday, April 17. —Kevin Forestieri

ATHENA AWARD WINNERS

For applications & information:

(650) 424-1267 www.emersonpaloalto.com

NCOMMUNITY BRIEFS

The Mountain View Chamber of Commerce will be presenting ATHENA awards to Mountain View residents Jessica Nowaski and Davida Brooks on Thursday, April 17, at an awards ceremony and luncheon. ATHENA International, an international non-profit organization dedicated to supporting female leaders, has been presenting ATHENA awards since 1982 to women who work to improve the lives of others in their communities and assist women in realizing their leadership potential. Nowaski is a captain in the Mountain View Police Department, and the recipient of the 23rd annual ATHENA award. Brooks, a marketing coordinator at Sum of All Numbers, will be presented with the chamber’s fifth ATHENA Young Professionals award. With the help of sponsors, the Continued on next page


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ASEBALL C AM P

STANFORD BASEBALL SUMMER CAMPS 2014 Monday-Friday

Baseball School

Games Camp

(Ages 7-12)

9am-12pm ($220)

1pm-4pm ($220)

Week 1

 

  

(June 16-20)

Week 2 (June 23-27)

Week 3 (July 14-18)

Games Camp AM and PM

DEVELOPMENT CAMPS PITCHING OR HITTING (AGES 12+) ADV. PITCHING OR HITTING (AGES 12+) DEFENSE (AGES 12+)

COURTESY OF SANTA CLARA COUNTY SUICIDE PREVENTION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

A new message displayed on 16 VTA buses throughout Santa Clara County highlights the county’s suicide and crisis prevention hotline.

ANTI-SUICIDE BUS Continued from page 5

great resource and people need to know about it.” If a person feels that they are in a crisis, whether or not

they are thinking about killing themselves, they can call 1-855278-4204 and reach a crisis counselor. All calls are confidential, and this free service is available 24/7. People have called for help with substance abuse, economic worries, rela-

tionship and family problems, sexual orientation, illness, getting over abuse, depression, mental and physical illness and even loneliness. Email Elena Kadvany at ekadvany@paweekly.com

www.stanfordbaseballcamp.com Athletics ª Facilities ª Klein field

Palo Alto Community Child Care Learning, Playing, Growing Together

SUMMER FUN 2014 Grades 1– 6

Continued from previous page

chamber is granting $15,000 in scholarships to 12 students from De Anza College, Foothill College and the Mountain View-Los Altos High School District. The recipients of their SOAR scholarship are: Guadalupe Berrospe, Andres Cuenca, Jessica Fernandez, Luis Gonzalez, Dafne Hernandez, Trang Le, Marco Martinez, Rose Martinez, Stephanie Yau and Binh Nguyen. Tickets for the awards luncheon are available for $25 for Mountain View Chamber of Commerce members and $35 for the public. They can be purchased online at chambermv. org through the “Upcoming Events” sidebar on the page. —Kayla Layaoen

NIKE TENNIS CAMPS

SERIOUS. FUN.

STANFORD UNIVERSITY

JUNIOR OVERNIGHT AND EXTENDED DAY CAMPS Directed by Head men’s coach, John Whitlinger and Head women’s coach, Lele Forood June – August | Boys & Girls | Ages 9-18 STANFORD TENNIS SCHOOL Directed by Frankie Brennan & Brandon Coupe June 16-19 | Aug 11-14 | Full Day and Half Day Options | Boys & Girls | Ages 8-15 STANFORD ADULT TENNIS SCHOOL Directed by Frankie Brennan & Brandon Coupe June 14-15 & Aug 9-10 | Ages 18+

USSportsCamps.com | 1-800-NIKE CAMP (1-800-645-3226) All Rights reserved. Nike and the Swoosh design are registered trademarks of Nike, Inc. and its affiliates, and are used under license. Nike is the title sponsor of the camps and has no control over the operation of the camps or the acts or omissions of US Sports Camps.

June 2 to August 8 J.V. SPORTS ADVENTURE CAMP

VARSITY SPORTS ADVENTURE CAMP

Entering 1st – 3rd grades Walter Hays Kids’ Club Scheduled Activities* 3PORTSPLEXs3AN*OSE'IANTS

Entering 4th – 6th grades Walter Hays Kids’ Club Scheduled Activities* 3PORTSPLEXs3AN*OSE'IANTS

NEIGHBORHOOD ADVENTURE FUN

ULTIMATE ADVENTURE FUN

Entering 1st – 3rd grades Hoover Kids’ Club Scheduled Activities* !QUA!DVENTUREs3AN&RANCISCO:OO

Entering 4th – 6th grades Hoover Kids’ Club Scheduled Activities* 3CAVENGER(UNTs3AN&RANCISCO:OO

F.A.M.E. ART CAMP

OPERATION: CHEF

NEW! 4-week camp Entering 1st – 6th grades Addison Kids’ Club Scheduled Activities* 9ERBA"UENA'ARDENSs%XPLORATORIUM

5-week camp Entering 1st – 6th grades El Carmelo Kids’ Club Scheduled Activities* 3PORTSPLEXs3AN*OSE'IANTS

*Details and Registration Available Online at www.paccc.org

Support Mountain View Voice’s coverage of our community. Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org April 11, 2014 ■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■

17


5 E $1 e SAEVnter cCoTd2014

Expanded camp selection this summer!

NNE

CCO

-PDBM/FXT DRUG FORUM Continued from page 5

JUNE 16th - AUG 8th, 2014

8 Weeks Mon-Fri 9:00am-3:00pm Pre-K - 5th Grade in the Fall of ‘14 Please join us for our third summer of Hi-Five Fun on the Peninsula!!

www.hifivesportsclubs.com 650-362-4975 info@hifivesports.com

June 9 - August 1

Register today at SpartansSportsCamp.com For more info (650) 479-5906 or info@SpartansSportsCamp.com

CAMPS RUN BY EXPERIENCED MOUNTAIN VIEW HS COACHES & STUDENT ATHLETES. Grades Pre K - 8: Cheerleading Camp Grades 2 - 6: Multi-Sport Camp Grades 5 - 9: Sports Specific Camps Grades 6 - 12: Strength & Conditioning Camps

Mountain View High School • 3535 Truman Ave., Mountain View All Proceeds Benefit the Mountain View HS Athletic Department. Offer limited to a discount on one session only. Expires 8/1/14.

4TIONN! 1 A E 20ISTR OP

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for parents to know about some of the hardcore or “designer” drugs out on the market, Foster said the take-home message should not be that their kids are at risk of taking bath salts or krokodil. Parents should be more worried about the more commonly abused substances: marijuana, alcohol and pharmaceutical drugs. Foster said it’s important for parents to also avoid being alarmist. One of the videos in the presentation showed a mother that discovered her child had drugs delivered to their home, and immediately took them in to the police. “Don’t go straight to alarm and reactivity,” Foster said. “Parents need to investigate. After gathering information,

‘Ecstasy will fry your brain cells.’

W O

OFFICER RON COOPER

K-12 LEARNING AND FUN

MORNING ACADEMICS

AFTERNOON ACTIVITIES

MATH • LANGUAGE ARTS • SCIENCE • ART • AND MORE!

Grades K-6

Summer Camp +

Grades 6-12

Summer Institute

OTHER PROGRAMS · Sports Camps · Swim School · English Language Institute for International Students

find out if they need a therapist or substance abuse specialist.” Near the end of the presentation, Cooper suggested that parents look through the messages on their children’s cellphones to see if they are taking drugs. “Look at your teen’s cellphone. Look at it! It’s your phone plan,” Cooper said. Foster said that if parents want to teach their children to be open and honest about possible substance abuse, spying on their cellphones and snooping around for information will not help, and teens will feel betrayed. “If you’re going to do that, be ready for the repercussions,” Foster said. Although a number of parents at the presentation repeated the mantra, “You are their parent, not their friend,” Foster said it’s easy to take that too far. “You don’t want to become the police, you want to be their parent,” Foster said. “Kids are more likely to open up if you express appreciation and confidence. It’s the only way you’re going to get to the heart of the subject.” V

for us ur! t c ta l to Con rsona e a p

summer.harker.org Held on our beautiful lower and upper school campuses campinfo@harker.org | 408.553.5737 18

■ Mountain View Voice ■ MountainViewOnline.com ■ April 11, 2014

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at MountainViewOnline.com


7JFXQPJOU

â–  EDITORIAL â–  YOUR LETTERS â–  GUEST OPINIONS

NEDITORIAL THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

Council holds off on Shoreline cat ban

N S TA F F EDITOR & PUBLISHER Tom Gibboney (223-6507) EDITORIAL Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet (223-6537) Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt (223-6536) Kevin Forestieri (223-6535) Intern Kayla Layaoen Photographer Michelle Le (223-6530) Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Ruth Schecter DESIGN & PRODUCTION Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Assistant Design Director Lili Cao (223-6562) Designers Linda Atilano, Rosanna Leung, Paul Llewellyn, Kameron Sawyer ADVERTISING Vice President Sales and Marketing Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Advertising Representatives Adam Carter (223-6573) Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294

A

cat’s instinctual urge to chase and kill birds has been with the breed since time immemorial, handed down from their predatory ancestors, like the lion and wildcat. But the question before the City Council last week was what impact neutering has on the instincts of feral and other cats that roam around the fields at Shoreline, near the nests of the city’s cherished burrowing owls, an endangered species that could be threatened by an influx of felines. In the end, the council punted the most controversial clause of a new animal control ordinance out of contention, which would have banned feeding and releasing stray cats north of Highway 101. After dropping that provision, members voted to pass the bulk of new rules governing pets without a problem. A few months ago, the first effort to pass the animal control measure was shouted down by an onslaught of cat owners who strongly objected to a cat licensing provision. The idea was dropped in the new ordinance, and now only dogs will require a license. But the last word on whether to neuter feral cats at Shoreline or trap and move them to an uncertain fate at the Animal Shelter still awaits the findings of city staff, who have been asked by the council to assemble a “stakeholder group� to find an acceptable way to manage feral cats, and to determine the numbers and locations of feral cats in the city. At last week’s meeting, groups favoring a TNR (trap, neuter and release) program for feral cats at Shoreline claimed neutered felines would not be a threat to birds, and that if the city embarked on a campaign to remove all cats from the Shoreline area, other cats would simply move in to fill the vacuum. None of these arguments hold water for the Audubon Society, which, according to Mike Kasperzak, strongly lobbied the council to “come down hard� on stray cats. Audubon members claim the “trap, neuter and release� program without euthanasia allows cats to be a major threat to young birds,

representatives told the council. Bird-hunting is instinctive for cats, Audubon Society members said, adding that stray cats should be trapped and removed from the North Bayshore area. It was no surprise that the council did not know who to believe, and in the end decided to send a “stakeholder group� including bird advocates and cat rescuers, on a hunt for more information. Time will tell if the group is productive or becomes mired in conflict. There are some points to be made for the “trap, neuter and release�program: ■ City records show that in recent years only two endangered burrowing owls have been killed by predators, although there is no record if the predators were cats, hawks or other raptors. ■ Cat rescue groups, including the city’s own contractor, Silicon Valley Animal Control Authority, as well as the Palo Alto Humane Society, supported the effectiveness of the “trap, neuter and release� method in reducing the stray cat population in the North Bayshore. ■If cats are trapped and disappear, cat rescue groups say, territorial instincts will attract others to take over in a “vacuum effect.� ■ Just as adamantly, the Audubon Society believes there are dozens of stray cats that go into creek corridors and Shoreline Park and prey on the “...most vulnerable, the nestlings, the fledglings.� Is there a right or wrong answer to this fight over the safety of endangered birds at Shoreline? Is there a middle ground? Will city staff and the stakeholder group be able to mediate this dispute? No matter whether it favors birds or cats, the other side is certain to be outraged and protest to the council. Whatever happens, the city should make sure the endangered birds are protected, and the outdoor cat population is neutered, so it will not blossom into an unmanageable herd. Everyone loves cats, but unspayed and in the wild, they are hunters and their prey is often birds.

Email news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com

NGUEST OPINION

Email letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294

Whisman-Slater residents want schools reopened

Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales  t   fax (650) 326-0155 Email Classified ads@MV-Voice.com Email Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. ©2014 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum. Town Square forum Post your views on Town Square at MountainViewOnline.com Email

your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if letter is to be published.

Mail

to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405

Call

the Viewpoint desk at 223-6507

By Jessica Gandhi

I

need to voice my concern and raise awareness to the residents of Mountain View regarding the lack of a walkable neighborhood school in the Whisman-Slater quadrant of this city. As a leader of the North Whisman Neighborhood Association, I have been involved with other nearby leaders to address the concern that both of our neighborhood schools (Whisman and Slater) have been closed for several years. The citizens of Mountain View recently approved a bond measure (Measure G) to upgrade district schools and we want the WhismanSlater area to benefit from these upgrades just as every other school in the district will. We also want a safe, local alternative for our children who attend three schools in other parts of Mountain View. Through attendance at many school district board meetings, our neighborhood has seen little compassion or attention from the school board and administration in regard to our plight. We attribute much of this problem to the incompatibility among several of the district decision-makers who consistently bicker and bully one another when this topic arises. The Whisman-Slater area is a part of this school district and deserves to have the same consideration as all of the other areas. Why does the Whisman-Slater have to do without a walkable neighborhood school? We must transport our children across town to various campuses and watch as our schools get passed over for renovations time after time. Whisman-Slater parents will attend the April 17 school board meeting at the district office to present ideas and proposals on how the district can support our neighborhood. We have repeatedly urged the board to hold the meeting within our neighborhood boundaries (Highway 101, Route 85, and Route 237), in the large auditorium at the Whisman School campus. This location would be more con-

venient for our residents, similar to what was done in the Castro neighborhood when neighbors opposed the idea of moving the Dual Immersion program to Slater. We are reaching out to the community to gain awareness and support for this issue. Mountain View is growing larger each day. The schools are exceeding capacity in most cases and are well over the size that was considered normal in prior years. The need exists to address our cityís schools — all of them — and all neighborhoods should be treated equally regardless of economic status. Please attend the school district board meeting April 17, especially if you live within the Whisman-Slater area, to show your support and fill the board room with concerned citizens and children. If you plan to come, please sign up on our attendance sheet at http://bit.ly/whisman-rsvp. Jessica Gandhi is president of the North Whisman Neighborhood Assn.

April 11, 2014 â–  Mountain View Voice â–  MountainViewOnline.com â– 

19


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â&#x2013;  Mountain View Voice â&#x2013;  MountainViewOnline.com â&#x2013;  April 11, 2014


2014 04 11 mvv section1