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The light side of Lyfe WEEKEND | P.16 JANUARY 20, 2012 Volume 19, NO. 53

650.964.6300

INSIDE: MOVIES | PAGE 18

MountainViewOnline.com

Council approves Annex flood basin OVER PUBLIC OBJECTIONS, MEMBERS CITE CLIMATE CHANGE, HOSPITAL ACCESS By Daniel DeBolt

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controversial f lood basin was approved for the Cuesta Annex Tuesday night, despite strong opposition from the park users. The Santa Clara Valley Water District will now build a Permanente Creek flood basin at the Annex that is 12 feet deep in some parts, with gentle slopes and a capacity of 32 acre-feet of water. At its Jan. 17 meeting, the City Council voted 4-2 in favor of the flood basin, with council members Laura Macias and John Inks opposed. Member Jac Siegel recused himself because he owns property nearby.

The council made its decision despite a flood of skepticism from the community over the need for a basin. Of almost twodozen public speakers, only two supported the project. “To me it’s obvious flooding is getting worse, it’s getting worse all over the country,” said council member Ronit Bryant, expressing concern about climate change. “I don’t know why we would be the one place where flooding doesn’t occur.” Whether such a change would ruin the Annex, an undeveloped former orchard on 12 acres of city-owned land next to Cuesta Park, is something residents have disagreed about. “It’s kind of an anarchist park,”

MICHELLE LE

Border collies belonging to Lex Nakashima frolic at Cuesta Annex on Jan. 16.

said Lex Nakashima on Monday as he threw a Frisbee to his two border collies that were busy sticking their noses into the area’s many gopher

City museum plan is history By Daniel DeBolt

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ity officials have received a letter from the Mountain View Historical Association that axes the city’s plans to put a history museum in the back of the Cuesta Annex. Citing fundraising difficulties, the MVHA has ended an agreement with the city that required it to meet certain fundraising milestones for a museum. Its location was controversial: the rear portion of the 12-acre Cuesta Annex, an undeveloped piece of open space next to Cuesta Park that many would like to remain untouched. “It doesn’t mean we won’t continue to look at a way to put together a museum in the future or maybe finding a building that can be changed into a museum,”

INSIDE

said Pat Figueroa, former mayor and MVHA president. The announcement was met with cheers from the audience at Tuesday’s City Council meeting, which was packed with people speaking on behalf of preserving the Cuesta Annex from plans to build a flood basin there. “I’m disappointed,” said council member Tom Means. “It would have been nice to have a history museum. Each town in the area has done one. It’s nice to have something in your town that reflects where you came from.” In the letter, Figueroa said the move was spurred by the council’s decision in October to not allow developer Roger Burnell to move the 1880s-era Pearson house on Villa Street to the museum site and restore it

on his own dime. The value of the house, as well as funds that had been arranged to cover its operation, would have met the MVHA’s first fundraising goal, along with a “significant match donation towards a primary museum,” Figueroa said. Council members, almost all of whom are members of the Historical Association, cited community opposition to the Pearson house plan and lack of community support in their decision. That was despite the “win-win-win” nature of the plan, as Burnell described it, to preserve one of the city’s oldest homes, allow him to develop a 20,000-square-foot office building on the “blighted” site where the house now sits at 902 Villa St. See MUSEUM, page 11

GOINGS ON 19 | MARKETPLACE 20 | REAL ESTATE 21 | VIEWPOINT 15

holes. “The city sees it as an eyesore, everyone else sees it as a place to get away from everything.” Nakashima said he was con-

cerned that additional landscaping See CUESTA, page 6

No fear of drought, for now By Nick Veronin

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hough rain has been scarce over the past few months, Mountain View residents have little reason to fear drought at this time, an official with the Santa Clara Valley Water District said. “Overall, considering all 10 of our local reservoirs, we are at 81 percent of the average total storage for this time of year,” said Marty Grimes, a spokesman for the water district. Grimes acknowledged that it has been an unusually dry year so far — Nov. 19 was last time any of the water district’s reservoirs collected any significant amount of precipitation. And with each passing dry day, it becomes more likely that 2012 will be a particularly dry year. All the same, he said, it is too early to make meaningful predictions or to say that we are at the beginning

of a long-term trend. “We don’t know how much rain we’ll get for the rest of January, February or March,” Grimes said. “It’s too early to make any pronouncements that it’s a dry year, a wet year or an average year.” The water district spokesman also cautioned against attributing the two months of dry weather to global climate change, noting that it is natural to have variation in winter weather. In fact, he observed, it is precisely that natural variation in weather patterns that is helping the state manage this year’s dearth of precipitation. The 2010-11 rainy season, which ended Sept. 30, soaked the state, filling reservoirs to the brim and leaving California with a very bountiful snowpack. See FORECAST, page 11


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ARMED ROBBERY A deliveryman was robbed after dropping off a pizza at an See CRIME BRIEFS, page 11

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■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

World War II vet’s heroism honored, 66 years later By Renee Batti

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MICHELLE LE

Carl Clark salutes at the commendation ceremony at Moffett Field on Jan. 17.

Police chase ends in Mountain View By Sue Dremann

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23-year-old East Palo Alto man faces an assaultwith-a-deadly-weapon charge after allegedly ramming a Palo Alto police cruiser Sunday, Jan. 15. Edward Guadalupe Enriquez was arrested on three felony charges and a misdemeanor after he took police on a chase into Mountain View that involved crashing a stolen vehicle into two poles and a sign, Palo Alto police Agent Rich Bullerjahn said. The incident began at 1:36 a.m. after a Palo Alto officer on patrol saw Enriquez suspiciously cruising around the area of Newell Road

and Edgewood Drive in Palo Alto. The residential neighborhood has been plagued by burglaries, Bullerjahn said. The officer ran the vehicle’s license plate and discovered the car had been stolen from Hayward on Jan. 14. Following the vehicle, which entered southbound Highway 101 between San Antonio Road and Shoreline Boulevard, the officer turned on his rack lights and called for backup from Palo Alto and Mountain View officers. Enriquez quickly exited at Shoreline. Palo Alto police policy prohibits pursuit of a stolen vehicle, so the officer turned off his lights and continued following Enriquez, Bullerjahn said.

The vehicle crashed into a sign and pole and the officer pulled up behind it. A backup officer from Palo Alto and one from Mountain View quickly surrounded the vehicle. Enriquez allegedly threw the car into reverse and backed into the officer’s cruiser. He then drove forward and past the patrol car in front of him and drove off into Mountain View, Bullerjahn said. Enriquez, who had lost the vehicle’s left front wheel as a result of the crash, continued driving on Shoreline for a half mile. Since he had now allegedly assaulted a police officer with the vehicle, police entered into a pursuit, Bullerjahn said.

El Camino bus lanes nixed by council, again By Daniel DeBolt

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he City Council spent two and half hours discussing a plan for dedicated bus rapid transit lanes on El Camino Real on Tuesday, coming to the same position it came to after a similar discussion in June — opposed. The council took a 4-2 vote in the study session, with council members Mike Kasperzak and Margaret Abe-Koga in support of the dedicated lanes and member John Inks abstaining.

The plans would reduce El Camino Real from six lanes to four, and add two dedicated bus lanes down the middle of the street and bike lanes on each side. With two bus stations located on the median, one at Castro Street and one at San Antonio shopping center, BRT buses would run every 10 minutes, 18 hours a day. The buses would beat car traffic through the use of sensors that give buses priority at traffic lights. To make boarding times quick, tickets would be bought at stations for a $2.58 flat

fare. Most of the public speakers supported the dedicated lanes, including former Mayor Art Takahara who recalled similar opposition to light rail, now an asset to the community. “Traffic is getting worse all the time, we need to do something to move ahead,” he said. Downtown resident Aaron Grossman, called it a “worthwhile project. Slow buses trapped in the rest of the traffic, that’s the direction we’re going. It’s not cars that

t was Carl Clark’s jacket that the U.S. secretary of the Navy pinned the commendation medal on, but Mr. Clark told the hundreds of well-wishers at this afternoon’s ceremony recognizing his World War II heroism that he was accepting the honor on behalf of all the military men who fought bravely for their country but, because they were black like him, “got very little recognition for what they did.” The award, the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with the Combat Distinguishing Device, was a “long, While attempting to turn into a private parking lot, Enriquez crashed the vehicle into a second pole. At Linda Vista Avenue and Middlefield Road, he jumped out of the vehicle and hopped a wooden fence. Police set up a perimeter and found him hiding in the bushes. He was taken into custody without incident. No one was injured in the incident, Bullerjahn said. Nearby residents heard the commotion. “ I saw them taking the guy down in front of our place,” said Sarah McPhie. “I heard lots of dogs barking in the middle of the night and thought there was a dog fight outside. Then I saw a few people with flashlights walking around in front and realized

long overdue recognition” of Mr. Clark’s heroism aboard the USS Aaron Ward in May 1945, when the ship was hit by six kamikaze planes, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, who flew in to Moffett Field for the ceremony in Moffett’s Hangar 651. In presenting the medal, Secretary Mabus acknowledged the military’s record of racism that prevented people like Mr. Clark from being honored for valor. He spoke of African Americans who “risked their lives for their nation,” fighting for American ideals and the promise of justice that the See CLARK, page 8

that they were police officers. After a few minutes, they shuffled around like they were going to leave, and they lifted someone off the ground and escorted him away.” Enriquez was booked into the Main Jail in San Jose on three felonies: possession of a stolen vehicle with a prior conviction, felony evading police, assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer; and possession of burglary tools, a misdemeanor. He also had two active warrants, for misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia and a probation violation, at the time of arrest, Bullerjahn said. V

Sue Dremann is a staff write for the Palo Alto Weekly, the Voice’s sister paper.

should be the priority, it’s people. It new stop lights could be added to makes no sense not to study this.” maintain current left turns, such VTA planning manager Chris as three between Grant Road and Connolly returned Highway 85. as he had promCouncil memised with more ber Laura Macias information on Traffic is getting expressed concern traffic impacts, about the dedicatsaying that time it worse all the time.’ ed lanes making would take to get FORMER MAYOR ART TAKAHARA it harder to cross from Santa Clara El Camino where to Mountain View stoplights aren’t in would be reduced place. by only one minute with dedi“I’m terribly disappointed that cated bus lanes in the middle of the VTA chose to ignore the council in street. our last study session,” Macias said. Left turn lanes would be lost See BUS LANES, page 7 in a few areas, though up to six JANUARY 20, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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Continued from page 1

done for the basin, costing the city $10,000 a year to maintain, would make it a place where “they wouldn’t like dogs digging around.” At the meeting Mayor Mike Kasperzak said a main reason he supports the basin was because it “forever protects the area from any future development. Who knows if in 10 to 20 years the community doesn’t come out and say, ‘We need more ball fields, let’s put them at the Annex.’” Another frequent Annex user and dog owner, Sandra Barnett-Brook, said Monday that she might be OK with a flood basin in the front of the Annex, but she objected to further development of the Annex with a history museum at the rear, a concept the council has supported. The museum project, however, is off the table. It was announced at Tuesday’s meeting that the Mountain View Historical Association has stopped its effort to build a history museum in the Annex, citing financial difficulties in a letter to the city manager. Larger flood protection plans Along with basins at nearby McKelvey Park and upstream at the

B E T T E R

MICHELLE LE

The sun shines through the trees at Cuesta on Jan. 16.

Rancho San Antonio open space preserve, the project is intended to prevent a rare 100-year-flood event from damaging 2,750 properties in Mountain View. The Water District passed on other alternatives, including a dam near Lehigh Cement Quarry that would have had larger environmental impacts. City staff said it would remove the need for flood insurance for those with federally backed mortgages in Mountain View’s FEMA flood zone. The Water District came up with the smaller flood basin at the Annex after Los Altos school district officials rejected plans for a

B A N K I N G

W I T H

fourth flood basin at Blach Middle School. Engineers re-examined water flows near Lehigh Cement Quarry and found 230 acres that did not runoff into the creek as originally thought. That reduced creek flows from 2,700 cubic feet per second to 2,400 cubic feet per second, which was enough to allow the Blach school basin to be removed and cut the size of the Annex flood basin in half from its original size of 65 acre-feet. To put that in perspective, an Olympic-size pool uses only 2 acrefeet of water. The city commissioned an independent study of the Water District’s

G R E A T

hydrology that concurred with its findings, though it estimated less water flowing along Permanente in a 100-year-flood — 2,317 cubic feet per second — versus the 2,400 cubic feet per second estimated by the Water District. Local resident Mike Hayden said that if the 5-percent margin of error the Water District had given itself were applied to the 2,317 cubic feet per second, “It’s quite likely that there won’t be any need for improvements at all.” City staff recommended the flood basin because the alternative, a 4-foot diameter pipe under Cuesta Drive to catch flood waters, could leave 400 Mountain View properties subject to flooding. Under that alternative, the Water District reports that flood waters would overflow the Permanente Creek diversion channel, which flows to Stevens Creek, and flood north towards the El Camino Hospital area. Using the pipe instead of a basin, Water District modeling shows flooding about 1-foot deep around the hospital, with 2-foothigh waters on portions of South Drive and North Drive “restricting” ambulance access to the hospital’s emergency room entrance at the rear of the building, while the hospital’s buildings stay dry. Hayden said that scenario was unlikely because “there’s been no

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flooding in the diversion channel since it was built,” except in 1983 because of “an anomalous event at the cement plant” which sent water rushing down the creek. Council member Laura Macias said the hospital could find other ways to deal with the potential problem, while most council members were concerned. The hospital sent a letter of support for the Annex basin option, city staff said. “I don’t want to be the member of the council who decided that access to the hospital was really not important, that doesn’t fit with my sense of responsibility,” Bryant said. While flood waters in a 100year-flood might only be 1 to 2 feet deep, council member Tom Means said that was high enough during the 1998 flooding of Palo Alto’s San Francisquito creek to render his friend’s kitchen “effectively destroyed.” The Water District also plans to build flood walls along Permanente Creek north of Highway 101 to protect Google and other nearby businesses, remove cement channeling along portions of Permanente Creek, replace two bridges where Mountain View Avenue crosses the creek and widen portions of Hale Creek, which meets Permanente Creek south of Mountain View. V


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ANOTHER PROMETHEUS APARTMENT COMPLEX Prometheus Real Estate Group is becoming a familiar name in Mountain View’s City Hall as it announces its second apartment proposal since beginning construction on the former Minton’s Lumber site. Prometheus just made a deal to purchase the former Western Appliance building and neighboring Tropicana Lodge on El Camino Real, both of which would be torn down for an apartment complex, possibly Prometheus’ third such project in recent years if the City Council approves. The 1.39-acre site could see a complex of up to four stories with underground parking. The zoning for the site

BUS LANES

Continued from page 5

“There’s a whole lack of respect that I don’t understand.” Council member Abe-Koga defended the plan, saying it would make using buses more attractive and would benefit the poorest local residents who are “transitdependent.” To help with the $240 million

Crittenden to hold special education fair By Nick Veronin

allows 97 units, or 70 per acre. “We are planning a new, state of the art, luxury apartment community for this property — consistent with the City of Mountain View’s draft general plan, the Grand Boulevard Initiative, and the planned VTA Bus Rapid Transit program,” wrote Jon Moss, executive vice president for Prometheus, in an email. Prometheus is also designing an apartment complex of similar density at the corner of Moffett and Central Expressway after the City Council recently allowed city planners to begin work on it with a “gatekeeper request” approval, something Prometheus still needs to obtain for its most recent purchase. — Daniel DeBolt

free education resource fair for parents of students with special needs — from the mildly dyslexic to the severely autistic and physically disabled — will be held at Crittenden Middle School on Friday, Jan. 27, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. “We run into a lot of parents who don’t know what sort of resources will fit their kids,” said Christine Case-Lo, a local parent of a special needs student. The Special Education Resource Fair will feature booths and tables from at least 28 special education organizations, offering information about tools designed for and organizations that cater to the needs of special education

students, according to Case-Lo. Case-Lo, who heads the Mountain View Whisman School District’s Special Education PTA, helped organize the fair in coordination with the Special Education Local Plan Area 1 Community Advisory Committee, a regional authority on special needs education. Representatives from special needs-oriented art programs, tutoring and mental-health services, and physical therapists will gather in Crittenden’s multipurpose room — “Any resources for kids who may need a little extra,” Case-Lo said. While a wide range of resources will be available at the fair, Case-Lo noted that many of the vendors at the fair will be rep-

project, the VTA is competing with Seattle, San Francisco and New York for $75 million in federal funding. But in order to get the funding at least half the 17.4-mile stretch between San Jose and Palo Alto must have dedicated lanes. Current plans put dedicated lanes on a 10.3-mile stretch between Lafayette Avenue in Santa Clara and Showers Drive in Mountain View.

In June, VTA staff said a trip from Palo Alto to HP Pavilion on the line would take BRT 52 minutes, while it could take 60 minutes by car and 67 minutes by the current express bus line 522, which would be replaced by BRT. “At this point the cost seems high for an enhancement that doesn’t seem like much of an enhancement,” said council member Ronit Bryant, who seemed even more

opposed than she was in June. “A gradual approach might be much easier to accept.” VTA staff said that for technical reasons having to do with its transit center, Palo Alto is not being asked for dedicated lanes. Mayor Mike Kasperzak questioned that, saying Palo Alto should “share the pain.” “It does offend me that Palo Alto might be left out,” Kasperzak said.

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resenting special needs-friendly summer camps. “There are a variety of services that are available in the community that special ed parents might be interested in,” said Karen Mueller, president of the Community Advisory Committee. The fair will also offer financial planning and legal resources, “because those issues can pop up,” Mueller said. Raising a special needs child can be extremely challenging, especially in the first few years after diagnosis, Mueller said. “I have accumulated knowledge over the years, but when I started out, it was a mystery,” Mueller said. “You suddenly have the information that your child is different and you’re in for an interesting journey. Specialists tell you the earlier and the more intensive the intervention, the better. You feel like you’ve got to do it all and all at once, and that can be an overwhelming, crushing feeling.” Mueller said that the fair can be helpful even for students who are right on the edge of being considered special needs. “This is meant for students with all different levels of difficulty,” she said. V

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Saturday, January 28th 10:00 AM – 12 Noon

STATE SENATOR JOE SIMITIAN invites you to attend an

Education Update Meeting Join us to discuss the state budget’s impact on our kids, our schools, and our community. Get an update on K-12 legislation.

Palo Alto Unified School District Board Room 25 Churchill Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 Please RSVP at www.senatorsimitian.com or by calling (650) 688-6384

JANUARY 20, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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national anthem and military passages ushering in Secretary Mabus and Rep. Eshoo, family members quietly wept. And when Mr. Clark slowly walked into the spacious hall aided by a cane, applause and whistles broke out, then morphed into a hand-clapping processional chant: Carl, Carl, Carl. Also in the audience, tears streaming down her cheeks, was “life stories� writing instructor Sheila Dunec. It was Ms. Dunec who went to Rep. Eshoo with Carl Clark’s story, which the

to a conclusion.� Recognizing other blacks in Continued from page 5 the military who were never country hadn’t fulfilled for them. recognized for their service, he Mr. Clark’s actions, he said, noted: “We were loyal Ameriexemplify “a standard of conduct cans and tried to do our part.� we should all aspire to.� He noted Secretary Mabus described that Mr. Clark has said he doesn’t Mr. Clark’s heroism aboard the consider himself a hero. “But we Aaron Ward, but also his life do,� the secretary said, the audiafter he returned to his country, ence erupting in applause. stationed for a time at Moffett, Mr. Clark’s actions that day then working for the post office and into the night “played an and involving himself with undeniably significant role� in painting, writing and commusaving the ship and the lives of nity. “He led a good and produccountless sailors, said Congresstive life,� Mr. Mabus said. woman Anna Eshoo, Mr. Clark D-Menlo Park, who joined the Navy in the ‘We were loyal Americans hosted the event. For 1930s, when blacks two years, Ms. Eshoo could serve only as and tried to do our part.’ worked to secure offimess attendants — cial military recogniessentially, officers’ CARL CLARK tion for Mr. Clark, 95, servants, he said in a resident Menlo Park an earlier interview who served at Moffett with the Almanac, the Field after the war. veteran shared in 2000 during a Voice’s sister paper. The ceremony was attended by World War II life stories course On the Aaron Ward, he was family members who came from Ms. Dunec conducted at the part of an eight-man damageall over the state and country, by Menlo Park Library. Originally a control unit designated to put a multitude of friends, by Mr. writing course, it evolved into a out fires and take on other Clark’s fellow members of St. project that included oral presen- urgent roles if the ship were Francis of Assisi Church in East tations, a video and, several years attacked. On May 3, 1945, Mr. Palo Alto, and by people who had ago, a staged event. Clark sprang into action when never met Mr. Clark, but were Mr. Clark told the crowd that his ship was hit by the kamikaze touched by his story of heroism “this never would have hap- planes. and the injustice that delayed his pened� if it hadn’t been for Ms. When the first signs of the recognition for 66 years. Dunec. He thanked her and Rep. Continued on next page As a military band played the Eshoo, who “brought this honor

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-PDBM/FXT Continued from previous page

attack were apparent, Mr. Clark recalled, the seven other men in the unit huddled in one area of the deck, yards away from him. When the first plane hit, all seven men were killed. Mr. Clark was flung up against an overhead structure, breaking his collarbone; his helmet and shoes were blown off his body. When the second plane neared the ship, Mr. Clark could see the pilot’s face. Then, the plane hit, and “blew me right across the ship,” he said. With the rest of the damagecontrol team gone, Mr. Clark ignored his injuries and began an hours-long effort to extinguish fires — including one that broke out in the ammunition locker, threatening to blow up the ship — and to help his surviving shipmates. Although the fire hoses were meant to be

handled by at least two men, he often manned then by himself. Without treatment for his own injuries, he worked through the night single-handedly carrying the injured to the medic ward, he said. Although the ship’s captain told Mr. Clark he would make every effort to have him awarded for his heroism, those efforts were unsuccessful. But that injustice ended today. The country Mr. Clark defended didn’t live up to its responsibility to him, “but today, we correct that omission,” Secretary Mabus said. The ceremony was attended by Mr. Clark’s only living child, Karen Collins of Portland. His son died several years ago. Mr. Clark’s two surviving siblings also were there: Korea Strower, 93, of Washington, D.C., and Katherine Fletcher, 91, of Omaha. They and numerous

Avenidas presents its 1st Annual cousins, nieces and nephews filled the first rows of the audience. Also in attendance was Faye Lavrakas and Joanna Lavrakas, niece and sister-in-law, respectively, of retired Navy Captain Lefteris “Lefty” Lavrakas. Although Capt. Lavrakas died last August, before knowing that Mr. Clark’s medal was approved, it was his testimony, as one of the last surviving officers of the Aaron Ward, that appears to have finalized the approval. In a November 2010 letter to Secretary Mabus, Rep. Eshoo referred to Capt. Lavrakas’ statement about expediting the award: “Please hurry up, Carl and I are both in our 90s and we need to correct this injustice for Carl.”

Money Matters: A Financial Conference Saturday, January 28 8:30 am - 2 pm Topics include: Š Investing in a volatile market Š Tax information for seniors Š Maximizing Social Security Š Making sense of Medicare Š Financial management

Register at Avenidas.org or call (650) 289-5435.

V

Renee Batti is the news editor at the Almanac, the Voice’s sister paper.

Resources and programs for positive aging

Planning to stay in your own home or community as you age?

Join us for a day of free education!

Aging in Place 2012 “Knowing Your Options” Date: Time: Place:

Saturday: February 11th, 2012 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Mountain View Senior Center, Main Hall 266 Escuela Avenue

Open House New applications now available.

Sunday, January 29, 2012 12 Noon

St. Joseph Catholic School Educating the whole child 1120 Miramonte Avene - Mountain View, Ca 94040 For more information visit www.sjmv.org or call us at 650-967-1839

Topics Include:

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A representative from the El Camino Hospital Senior Health Resource Library will be our lunchtime speaker, introducing us to the many valuable services offered to the community for free or reduced cost. **Lunch provided on-site, (cash only)**

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Volunteer eldercare professionals and local businesses related to aging in place will be on-site all day to answer your questions. The City of Mountain View Senior Advisory Committee; Giving Seniors a Voice contact: nancicooper@yahoo.com

K - 8th Grade JANUARY 20, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

9


-PDBM/FXT

Downed high-voltage power lines spark fire By Nick Veronin

R

January 22, 2012, 3 p.m.

esidents of a Mountain View mobile home park near Moffett Field were roused by a series of small “explosions,” flashes of bright light and flames shooting high into the air the result of downed high-voltage electrical transmission lines, according to a PG&E official. Three lines came down near the Microsoft campus off of La Avenida Street at about 9:23 p.m. on Jan. 12, according to PG&E spokeswoman Monica Tell. The downed lines, which were carrying roughly 115 kilovolts each (and are orders of magnitudes more powerful than neighborhood electrical distribution lines) caused a brush fire and resulted in 372 PG&E customers losing power, Tell said. The fire department put the fire out in short order and power was restored by 12:30 a.m. on Jan. 13. Though there was no property damage, one of the park’s residents was taken to a local hospital for smoke inhalation from flaming foliage, according to Jaime Garrett, a spokeswoman for the Mountain View Fire Department. Doris Duran, who lives in the Santiago Villa Mobile Home Park with her husband, Chuck, had recently gotten into bed when she first heard what she called a “poof — like a little

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PG&E crews work to repair damaged power lines near La Avenida Street.

explosion — and I saw a flash through the sky. I thought they were having fireworks over at the amphitheater.” Duran said she heard a second “poof” about a minute later, followed by another flash of light. After the second small explosion — which she said “wasn’t very loud” or forceful enough to be felt — she looked out her window and saw flames shooting up near the south end of her mobile home park. She and her husband agreed that the flames stretched “a couple hundred feet” into the sky. Duran said she and her husband live on the opposite side of the trailer park from where the

K-8 ENROLLMENT

2012-2013 BEGINS FEBRUARY 1* DISTRICT OFFICE 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM District Enrollment Info Nights (K-8 registration requirements and enrollment info) January 11 - Castro Elementary January 18 - Theuerkauf Elementary 6:30 - 8:00 PM Kinder Info Site Visits and Open Houses throughout the month of January MVWSD offers Choice Programs: Castro DI (English-Spanish) Monta Loma CEL (parent participation) Stevenson PACT (parent participation)

Los materiales de inscripción están disponibles en la escuela o en línea. Residentes del distrito de Los Altos tendrán mayor prioridad.

*IMPORTANT: Registration for the month of February is BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. Go to district website to sign up for an appointment time.

Inscripciones se cierran el 3 de febrero del 2012 102 W. PORTOLA ALOS ALTOS, CA 94022  650-947-4939

www.bullischarterschool.com AAD

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 20, 2012

V

NCOMMUNITYBRIEF

Mountain View Whisman School District

10

fire occurred and that neither of them ever felt like they were in danger. Tell said the lines fell after a piece of hardware, known as an “insulator,” failed. The insulator — a series of descending ceramic disks — is the point at which a power line connects to a given transmission tower, she explained. In this incident, the uppermost insulator failed, causing the top line to fall into to the two lower lines. A portion of Stevens Creek Trail between the Crittenden and La Avenida entrances was temporarily closed to the public while crews cleaned up damage from the downed lines, police said.

More information: 650.526.3500, ext. 1001 www.mvwsd.org

HOSPITAL GETS REPAIRS The El Camino Hospital board of directors recently approved about $1.55 million in renovations to the new main building, according to the healthcare organization’s administrative chief. Changes to patient rooms’ doors, the addition of a teleconferencing system and repairs both cosmetic and utilitarian to various areas of the hospital are among the more expensive items on the list of upgrades, according to Ken King, chief administrative services officer at El Camino. There have been a number of functionality issues with El Camino’s new main hospital building since construction was completed in 2009, King said. However, El Camino officials said they have been putting off making repairs until now, when everything could be addressed in the most cost effective manner. The upgrades are scheduled to be completed by May.


-PDBM/FXT MUSEUM

Continued from page 1

and provide the History Association with a restored house to go with its museum. “I did not hear from the community that they wanted this house there,” said council member Laura Macias, explaining her vote against the proposal in the closed session meeting. “It is certainly not unusual for a historical association to want to find a location in which to preserve historical items,” Figueroa said, adding that it’s been a goal of the Association for decades. “In our case we’ve been very fortunate to have the Pioneer room

CRIME BRIEFS

Continued from page 4

apartment in the 2000 block of California Street on Jan. 15, police said. The 40-year-old victim, a Mountain View resident and Domino’s employee, was returning to his car after dropping off a pizza at about 9:10 p.m., according to MVPD spokeswoman Liz Wylie. The man was approached by two men dressed in all black. Both pointed a silver, semi-automatic handgun at him and demanded his money and cell phone, which he handed over, Wylie said. Ordered to run back to the apartment complex, he returned to the apartment he had delivered the pizza and called his boss. He did not call police until he returned to work. Officers searched the area for the two men, whom the victim

at the library. So we haven’t had to make it as urgent as other cities might have.” As for what’s next, Figueroa said the MVHA only meets quarterly and hasn’t decided. “We haven’t taken the time to really reflect what the next step is going to be. There is no need to rush into anything at this point in time.” In the meantime, the MVHA runs the city history room in the Mountain View library and continues to receive donated historical items for a future museum, mostly stored in a large shipping container. The MVHA has also launched a Facebook page, facebook.com/MVHistory. V

described as being of medium height and build and appeared to be in their late teens. The victim was not hurt in the robbery, Wylie said. The money taken in the robbery was less than $100.

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“Last year was a very good year,” Grimes said. “The statewide reservoirs are in very good shape and our groundwater is in good shape.” If last year had been a dry year, then locals would have likely already seen the district bolstering its conservation campaign, a prospect Santa Clara Valley Water has not considered this season, he added. Weather forecasters are predicting a storm forming in the Pacific will bring wet weather to the Bay Area this week. Rains will do much to clean the region’s smoggy air and bring up temperatures, but according to Grimes it will take a series of wet days before local reservoirs begin taking on more water. “Because it’s been so dry and the ground is so parched, it will take quite a bit of rain before we see any run off into our reservoirs,” Grimes said. Though drought is not currently a threat, Grimes said, “We look at conservation as a way of life. Every drop we save today is there for us if we happen to be entering another series of dry years.” V

JANUARY 20, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

11


Pam handled every aspect of our sale with reassurance, anticipation, contingency plans as needed, and all with a smile. We received multiple bids for our home and credit Pam for positioning our home sale for maximum ROI. – Chad & Linda, Los Altos

As a critic of the realty profession in general, I think Pam Blackman is truly a breath of fresh air. She is an excellent listener and communicator, surrounds herself with great help and is highly responsive.

SOLD by Pam Blackman (partial list)

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Buying OR Selling

We can’t thank you enough for the wisdom, judgment, and experience you brought to the sale of our house. You always had a command of every single detail. All the groundwork you laid played a huge part in the 8 written offers we received in just 8 days.

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 20, 2012


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JANUARY 20, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

13


-PDBM/FXT

Eshoo leads opposition to Stop Online Piracy Act By Gennady Sheyner

A

pair of Capitol Hill proposals that target pirating of American content by foreign websites are drawing fierce opposition from major high-tech firms and making unlikely bedfellows out of legislators who oppose the bills. The House bill, known as SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act]), has infuriated executives from companies such as Wikipedia and Reddit, both of which shut down their websites in protest for much of Wednesday. The two companies, along with a group of legislators that includes U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, are leading a charge against SOPA and its Senate counterpart, Protect IP Act (PIPA) — proposals that they equate to censorship and a blow to start-up companies. If signed into law, SOPA would allow companies who claim their content is being pirated to file complaints in court. A judge would then have the power to require Internet service providers to cut off service to offending sites and to force search engines such as Google to remove these

sites from the searches. The bill’s author, Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas, characterized SOPA as an act that will stop “foreign rogue websites from taking jobs and profits away from America’s innovators.� In a statement, he said that the bill’s “broad bipartisan support shows Congress’s commitment to combating rogue states and ensuring that profits go to American innovators, not criminals who steal our products and damage our economy.� But Eshoo, whose congressional district includes a slew of start-up tech companies, has consistently argued that SOPA’s reach is too broad and that it would have the unintended consequence of stifling local startups and creating uncertainty in the industry. Critics in the high-tech world have also claimed that the law would require small companies to hire teams of attorneys to fight complaints that may or may not be legitimate. The bills are heavily supported by the music and movie industries, which are particularly prone to high-tech piracy. Eshoo was one of 11 members

of the House of Representatives to sign a letter in November opposing SOPA. The letter commends the legislation’s goal of targeting “rogue� foreign websites engaging in copyright infringement, but warns of unintended consequences. “While this is a laudable goal and one we support, the SOPA’s

Eshoo argues that SOPA’s reach is too broad. overly broad language, in its current form, would target legitimate domestic websites, creating significant uncertainty for those in the technology and venturecapital industries,� the letter states. Last month, Eshoo joined a bipartisan group that includes Issa in releasing its own framework for an anti-pirating law. The group’s proposal would empower the International Trades Commission to launch investigations into accusations

of copyright infringement. The ITC would have the power to issue cease-and-desist orders to provide “appropriate immunity� to companies complying with its orders. In a statement that accompanied the framework, Eshoo said rogue websites represent “the hijacking of American genius, and must be stopped.� “But the Stop Online Piracy Act’s overly broad language will seriously hinder the growth of new businesses, new investments and new jobs,� Eshoo said. “The economic opportunities and innovation created by the Internet and start-ups could be crushed under the weight of SOPA.� She said she hopes the draft framework serves as “a good starting point for future discussions on how to best protect U.S. intellectual property rights.� Eshoo’s proposal comes at a time when SOPA is attracting support from the majority of the House Judiciary Committee, which is still finalizing the bill. According to Politico, two-thirds of the committee is prepared to vote for the act. PIPA’s opponents in the Senate, meanwhile, will consider next week whether

to filibuster the proposed act, according to the site. With action imminent, companies such as Wikipedia, the popular user-generated online encyclopedia, and Reddit have stepped up their opposition to the two legislative proposals. The administrators at Reddit, a social-media site that allows users to tag news headlines, urge users to oppose the proposed legislation. Wikipedia announced its plan to shut down the English language version of its site for 24 hours, starting at 9 p.m. Tuesday on the West Coast. Sue Gardner, executive director of Wikipedia foundation, wrote in a posting that “this will be the first time the English Wikipedia has ever staged a public protest of this nature, and it’s a decision that wasn’t lightly made.� “We believe in a free and open Internet where information can be shared without impediment,� Gardner wrote. “We believe that new proposed laws like SOPA and PIPA, and other similar laws under discussion inside and outside the United States, don’t advance the interests of the general public.� V

Gennady Sheyner is a staff writer for the Palo Alto Weekly, the Voice’s sister paper.

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 20, 2012


7JFXQPJOU NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F Editor & Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Intern Anna Li Photographer Michelle Le Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Ruth Schecter, Alissa Stallings

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Lili Cao, Shannon Corey, Diane Haas, Paul Llewellyn, Scott Peterson

Advertising Vice President Sales and Marketing Tom Zahiralis Advertising Representatives Judie Block, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Email news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com Email letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   fax (650) 326-0155 Email Classified ads@MV-Voice.com Email Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. Copyright ©2012 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM Post your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com EMAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 223-6507

Hospital could lose district funds

B

efore the little-known Local Agency Formation Commission dissolves the El Camino Hospital District, we hope hospital officials and those from the commission, including City Council member Margaret Abe-Koga, make every effort to resolve the accounting issues that apparently could wipe out the district and its taxing power. This would be a huge mistake and take away millions of dollars worth of support to local nonprofit agencies like the Children’s Health Awareness Council (CHAC), and the Community Services Agency (CSA), and others which now are the beneficiaries of these funds and would be hard-pressed to recover if the support were taken away. El Camino’s accounting was questioned by a Civil Grand Jury Report issued last summer that, while praising the hospital’s successful operation, had major concerns when the hospital “intermingled” funds from the tax district and for-profit operations “...to the extent that that one cannot delineate how taxpayer contributions are spent.” And that is the same concern raised by the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO), a county agency that oversees all special districts and has recently been empowered by legislation passed last year to be able to dissolve a special district without a vote of the people. “If we find that there’s a district that isn’t needed anymore, we may move for dissolution of that district,” said Abe-Koga, a City Council member who also sits on the LAFCO board. Last week El Camino spokeswoman Chris Ernst disputed that the new law gives the commission the power to dissolve a hospital district without a vote, but members of Assemblyman Rich Gordon’s staff, who did not want to be named, told the Voice that there is no question that hospital districts are covered by the legislation and LAFCO staff members said they are planning to look into it further this week. A factor prominently mentioned in the Grand Jury report was El Camino’s purchase of the Los Gatos hospital in 2009, an out-ofdistrict acquisition that cost nearly $100 million. The report said, “There is so little detail and transparency to the audit or to the detailed budget provided that the Grand Jury was unable to see where funds were derived for the purchase of the Community Hospital of Los Gatos in 2009...” In commenting on the report when it was issued last June, Ernst both defended the hospital’s bookkeeping practices, but said the hospital also will give “...due consideration to the findings and recommendations in the report.” Now it will be up to the LAFCO board of directors to decide whether to move toward dissolving the district, or allowing it to squeak by. The agency has taken the unusual step of auditing the district as part of its regular service review that is due in May, which could recommend dissolution of the district. We believe it would be a mistake to snuff out the district. Certainly the hospital must improve its accounting practices to assure LAFCO and the public that all income from taxpayers is tracked and allocated to non-profit practices. In addition, to meet another criticism of the Grand Jury, the hospital needs to make sure one person or entity has full responsibility for how and where the tax funds are spent. There should be absolutely no intermingling of tax funds and those earned in other ways by the hospital. However, if LAFCO decides that the hospital district should be dissolved, we urge its members to put the question on the ballot, so taxpayers, not a little-known board of only five members, can make the ultimate decision that could mean the loss of millions of dollars to nonprofit agencies that serve our communities. In this case, the punishment is out of line for the easily correctible bookkeeping errors by El Camino.

■ EDITORIAL ■ YOUR LETTERS ■ GUEST OPINIONS

NLETTERS

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

GEESE WERE HERE FIRST In regard to Bob Feichtmeir’s letter last week complaining of the condition of the Shoreline Golf Links: It is unfortunate that wild birds need to frequent the greens and fairways of the Shoreline Golf Links but regrettably, it is a matter of survival. The Bay Area, once a natural haven for wildlife, and for water birds in particular, has been built on and paved over to such an extent that these birds must inhabit what little open space is left. So please, golfers, have a heart and be prepared to share. To subsidize golf, a sport that is necessarily an extravagant use of land, is only justifiable to many non-golfers because it is a means of protection against other development. A golf course, sanitized and without birds, would be as sterile as the rest of the city. Christine Crosby Woodleaf Way

RECORD OBESITY NUMBERS CALL FOR ACTION Obesity needs to go on a diet. Obesity is responsible for the fact that millions of U.S. youth can expect to live fewer years than their parents — the first generational decline in life expectancy rates in America’s history.

Obesity is on the rise and so too are the body mass calculations of politicians who warn of its dire medical and societal consequences. Candidacy for or maintenance of any political position in this country should require that a person is within the “normal weight” body mass index (BMI) range. This would mean a major overhaul of dietary habits in Congress and city halls as well as of the foods served at political banquets and luncheons. Politicians would also need to recalculate their personal diets and exercise plans when off duty. This might seem like an insurmountable challenge — from a political and health standpoint — but how do the lawmakers of our country expect to reverse this epidemic if they themselves are contributing to the problem? If they themselves are ignoring the hypocritical nature of telling someone to “put down that hotdog” while they drink a soda? Politics should require more than being educated on the issues; it should require that politicians act as positive role models, too. Maybe it would reinvigorate the nonvoting public. Maybe it would make a dent on obesity. And, for the record, pizza is not a vegetable. Paul Thiebaut III East Palo Alto

JANUARY 20, 2012 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

â–  RESTAURANT REVIEW â–  MOVIE TIMES â–  BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT

N R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

Visions of grandeur LYFE EXECS DREAM OF A NATIONAL CHAIN, BUT PALO ALTO PROTOTYPE NEEDS SOME BASIC FIXES By Dale F. Bentson

L

VERONICA WEBER

Fish tacos at Lyfe Kitchen are loaded with shredded veggies, including jicama, carrots, avocado and cabbage.

DINNER BY THE MOVIES AT SHORELINE’S

Pizzeria Venti

ons ervati s e r g ceptin ble! Now ac availa g n i r cate

yfe Kitchen received a lot of press before and after its October opening, much of it self-written thanks to an almost hyperactive PR effort. The concept restaurant is part of a company founded by former McDonald’s executives and a venture capitalist, with the executive team also including Fortune 500 consultants. The 100-seat Palo Alto address is the prototype that execs hope will soon blossom into a 250restaurant national chain. And the food? It’s made eschewing butter, cream, high-fructose corn syrup and fried items. Menu items are all under 600 calories with less than 1,000 mg of sodium.

The mantra is to produce greattasting, nutritious food — and get it to the table quickly. It’s a step up from fast food, falling into the fast-casual category, where food is swiftly made to order. The menu at Lyfe (an acronym for Love Your Food Everyday) was developed by two high-profile chefs. Art Smith is Oprah’s former personal chef and now a celebrity chef in his own right, and Tal Ronnen is a leading vegan chef, cookbook author and caterer to the stars. The conscientious planning didn’t stop in the kitchen, either. The interior properties are made from recycled and sustainable products: bamboo flooring, soybased foam upholstery, low-voltage

Recipe from Harry’s Bar in Venice

Harry’s Bar opened in 1931 when Giuseppe Cipriani, an enterprising bartender at the Hotel Europa in Venice, got some ďŹ nancial assistance from a rich, young American from Boston named Harry Pickering. According to Cipriani company history, Pickering had been a customer at the Hotel Europa for some time, suddenly stopped frequenting the hotel bar. Cipriani saw Pickering one day and asked why he no longer patronized the bar. Pickering was broke, he explained to the bartender -- his family cut him off when it was discovered he had not curtailed his recklessness and fondness for drinking. So, Cipriani loaned his patron a chunk of cash -- about 10,000 lire, or $5,000 U.S.. Two years later, Pickering walked back into the Hotel Europa, ordered a drink at the bar, handed 10,000 lire to Giuseppe Cipriani – he then handed Cipriani more. “Mr. Cipriani, thank you. Here’s the money. And to show you my appreciation, here’s 40,000 more, enough to open a bar. We will call it Harry’s Bar,â€? Located on Calle Vallaresso, close to the Piazza San Marco, the bar -- as the Cipriani’s have always called it -- was ďŹ rst conceived as a hotel bar, serving no food, and later transformed into a restaurant. There are many imitators, but only one Harry’s Bar. To honor this famous Italian culinary icon, we submit our version of one of Harry’s Famous recipes‌

Tagliolini with shrimp and zucchini from Harry’s Bar (TAGLIOLINI CON I GAMBERI E LA ZUCCHINA DALLA HARRY’S BAR) sPOUNDFRESHYOUNGZUCCHINICUTINTO 1-inch by 1/4 inch strips sPOUNDABOUT MEDIUMSHRIMP

shelled, deveined and cut in half sTABLESPOONSOLIVEOIL sGARLICCLOVES CRUSHED sTEASPOONDRIEDREDPEPPERmAKES

sSALT s)POUNDDRIEDTAGLIOLINIORFETTUCCINEOR fresh tagliatelle (egg pasta) sTABLESPOONSUNSALTEDBUTTER SOFTENED s3PLASHOFDRYWHITEWINE sCUPFRESHLYGRATED0ARMIGIANO Reggiano cheese plus extra to pass at the table

To cook:

1390 Pear Ave., Mountain View (650) 254-1120 www.mvpizzeriaventi.com

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 20, 2012

Hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday

Bring a large pot of water to boil before preparing the sauce. If using dry pasta salt boiling water and add pasta. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, let it cook until golden, about 30 seconds, and discard it. Add the zucchini and cook for two minutes. Add the shrimp, the pepper  akes, and some salt, the wine and cook for three minutes, tossing constantly, until the shrimp are bright pink and ďŹ rm to the touch. Reserve 1/4 cup of the mixture for garnish. Set aside. If using fresh pasta, salt the boiling water, add the pasta, and cook until “al denteâ€? (about 2-3 minutes). Drain well in a colander. Toss the pasta with the zucchini-and-shrimp mixture, add the butter and the Parmesan, and toss well. Transfer to a heated serving platter dish and garnish with the reserved shrimp-andzucchini mixture. Pass around a small bowl of grated Parmigiano cheese.


8FFLFOE NDININGNOTES Lyfe Kitchen 167 N. Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto 650-325-5933 lyfekitchen.com Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun. 8 a.m.-9 p.m.

Reservations Credit Cards Takeout Highchairs Wheelchair Access Banquet Catering Outdoor Seating Noise Level Bathroom Cleanliness Alcohol Parking

Xenon lighting, recycled stainless steel and aluminum, and Douglas-fir bleacher wood salvaged from colleges and high schools. Table tops are cleaned and sanitized with ionized water. Even the men’s room uses a Sloan hands-free waterless urinal. For some people, it’s the future. For others, it’s just hyperbole. On the surface, Lyfe is almost the anti-McDonald’s, but it really isn’t and I’m sure management doesn’t view it that way. It’s a business opportunity, pure and simple, and there is nothing wrong with that. The executive team understands fast food: an unpretentious menu using nominal ingredients, an efficient kitchen where the number of footsteps to complete an order is minimal, high-tech appliances, state-ofthe-art communications, fresh ingredients, and durable diningroom seating that is comfortable enough but discourages longterm table use. Check, check and check; they’ve got it. But not quite all of it yet. On a recent visit, I found that the sweet corn chowder ($3.99), made with cashew cream and chopped herbs, was supposed to be topped with multigrain croutons — but there were none on mine. The chowder was tasty, with the dish arriving before I had my coat hung up. Okay, fast. But the surface of the soup was tepid at best while the interior was boiler-hot, suggest-

%BJMZ -VODI 4QFDJBMT BNUPQN .PO'SJ

moderate excellent beer/wine street

ing the bowl had been zapped in a microwave. The kitchen should have stirred the soup to even the heat. Fourteen seconds later, the two fish tacos ($8.99) and the side of sweet potato fries ($2.49) were piled onto my table. The tacos were light on fish but loaded with shredded veggies to fatten them out: carrot, cabbage, jicama, cilantro, onion, avocado. A larger portion of fish would have made the price more palatable. The sweet potato had been cut, fry-like, and baked. The fries were bland and limp despite being burnt around the edges. The potato would have been better had it been crisped, or at the very least seasoned. It was a near-flavorless filler. Better was the grilled artichoke ($3.99) with lemon aioli, which made a fine appetizer. The BBQ chicken flatbread ($7.99) featured free-range chicken, sweet corn, roasted onion, cilantro, agave barbeque sauce and a fivecheese blend that was especially good. Both dishes would have been great to share. Alas, there were no extra plates at the table or at the water/utensil station, which made sharing difficult. On the subject of dishes: The white dinnerware is chic and matches well with the decor but grrr, they are odd-sized plates and knives are impossible to place over the edges. They simply fall off and clatter on the table or

Since 1945 $)"3$0"-#30*-&3

2011

7PUFE ²#FTU#VSHFS³ GPSZFBST JOBSPX

slide down into the food on the plate. I liked everything but the price on Art’s unfried chicken ($11.99). The chicken was about the size of a small boneless breast, breaded and baked. It was fork-tender and the accompanying Brussels sprouts and squash, bathed in cashew cream and Dijon vinaigrette, were delightful. Despite the small ration of chicken, it was filling. Desserts are all $3.99. The lemon pound cake topped with fresh fruit was satisfying. The volcano cake was very chocolaty, but a word of caution on the minute slice of non-dairy banana rum cheesecake: The pecan crust was soggy while the pie had a soupy texture and was way too sweet. A botched effort, in my opinion. While Lyfe has a token selection of beers and wines, it excels with coffees, teas, smoothies and coolers. The cranberry-pomegranate cooler ($2.99), with cucumber and agave, was refreshing and delicious. Lyfe is an ambitious project whose foundation is right here, right now. The prices might put some people off; the portions of some dishes could be enlarged; and a couple of items need rethinking. Overall, though, Lyfe is what it claims to be: a restaurant that delivers naturally prepared, satisfying food, quickly.

VERONICA WEBER

Above: Lyfe Kitchen uses recycled and sustainable products for everything from the seat cushions to the floors. Right: A cranberrypomegranate cooler accompanies the BBQ chicken flatbread.

V

VERONICA WEBER

Dining ON THE TOWN CHINES

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If you would like to be listed in DINING ON THE TOWN please call Brent at the Voice at 964-6300. JANUARY 20, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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8FFLFOE

Spices for Health

NMOVIETIMES 3 Superstars in Berlin (Not Rated) Aquarius Theatre: Thu. at 7 p.m. A Dangerous Method (R) Guild Theatre: 3:45, 6:15 & 8:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 1:15 p.m.

Because Natural Is Better!

Wholesale Herbs, Spices, Teas, Tinctures, Oils and Extracts since 1969

SAN FRANCISCO HERB & NATURAL FOOD CO. 47444 Kato Road, Fremont 4OLLs0HONEs&AX www.herbspicetea.com

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community

MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View OfďŹ ce Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189

The Adventures of Tintin (PG) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 4:10 & 9:30 p.m.; In 3D at 1:35 & 6:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 4:35 & 10 p.m.; In 3D at 2 & 7:25 p.m. Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked (G) Century 20: 11:05 a.m.; 1:25, 3:55, 6:10, 8:30 & 10:45 p.m. The Artist (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:20 & 9:55 p.m. CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 4:40 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:50 p.m.; Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 2 p.m. Beauty and the Beast (G) Century 16: 11 a.m.; In 3D at 1:20, 3:55, 6:40 & 9:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; In 3D at 1:35, 4:10, 7 & 9:20 p.m. Carnage (R) ((( Century 16: Noon, 2:20, 4:30, 7:20 & 9:40 p.m. Contraband (R) Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 12:30, 2, 3:50, 5, 7, 8, 9:50 & 10:35 p.m. Century 20: 11:05 a.m.; 12:05, 1:55, 2:45, 4:30, 5:25, 7:10, 8:05, 9:50 & 10:45 p.m. The Descendants (R) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 3:15, 6 & 8:45 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 12:30 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 1:40, 4:20, 7:05 & 9:45 p.m. Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (PG-13) Century 16: 12:10, 3:20, 7 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 1, 4:05, 7:20 & 10:20 p.m.

CARNAGE ---

The Metropolitan Opera: The Enchanted Island (Not Rated) Century 20: Sat. at 9:55 a.m. CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: Sat. at 9:55 a.m.

(Century 16) Roman Polanski’s play-tofilm adaptation takes four civilized adults, sticks them in an upscale apartment, serves drinks, and awaits the uncomfortable truths. The joke of Yasmina Reza’s play “God of Carnage� is a slow disintegration of the thin veneer of social niceties. It’s catnip for actors. In a Brooklyn park, boys argue and one assaults the other. Swiftly, we’re off to the apartment of the injured party, where his parents (Jodie Foster and John C. Reilly) host the assailant’s parents (Kate Winslet and Christoph Waltz). The four parse some legalese and sit for a polite conversation comprising “get to know you� chat and attempted commiseration on child-rearing. Cue the disintegration. Winslet succumbs to overplaying a bit, but her cast mates hit just the right notes of ego and cravenness to make the characters as credible as they are cretinous. Rated R for language. One hour, 20 minutes. — P.C.

Mission: Impossible — Ghost Protocol (PG-13) Century 16: 12:40, 3:50, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:45, 4, 7:15 & 10:15 p.m.

THE DESCENDANTS --1/2

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011) (R) ((( Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 2:40, 6:30 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 3:30, 6:55 & 10:15 p.m. Gone With the Wind (1939) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Thu. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. also at 2 p.m. Haywire (R) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:10, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m.

Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-223-6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com

Joyful Noise (PG-13) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:50, 4:40, 7:40 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 2:15, 5, 7:45 & 10:30 p.m.

The Iron Lady (PG-13) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:15, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 & 10:05 p.m.

Red Tails (PG-13) Century 16: 12:20, 3:40, 7:10 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 2, 4:50, 7:45 & 10:35 p.m. Safety Last (1923) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m.

Private Preschool through 8th Grade 30 years of academic excellence in a family friendly environment

OPEN HOUSE Thursday, February 9th - 9a.m.

www.LACS.com RSVP: LaSha.Heard@lacs.com ĂˆĂ“xĂŠ>}`>Â?i˜>ĂŠĂ›i°]ĂŠÂœĂƒĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂƒ]ĂŠ ʙ{äÓ{ĂŠUĂŠĂˆx䰙{n°ÎÇÎn 18

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 20, 2012

(Palo Alto Square, Century 20) Any filmgoer undaunted by something different will surely walk out of this new silent film with a grin. Michel Hazanavicius’ feature has an emotional generosity that speaks louder than words. Opening in 1927, “The Artist� begins with a premiere of a silent film starring dashing George Valentin (Jean Dujardin). When Valentin stumbles into a photo op with a girl named Peppy Miller (Berenice Bejo), the ground for a relationship is paved. Peppy sees her star begins to rise in proportion to George’s fall, precipitated by the arrival of talkies and the market crash of 1929. Writerdirector Hazanavicius mostly steers clear of comparisons to the era’s epics and screen comics, instead inhabiting the more manageable territory of melodrama. The acting is inventive, and the film joyously celebrates the movies. Rated PG-13 for a

disturbing image and a crude gesture. One hour, 41 minutes. — P.C.

Hugo (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 2:50 & 9:20 p.m.; In 3D at 11:30 a.m. & 6:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 5:05 & 10:40 p.m.; In 3D at 2:10 & 7:55 p.m.

SHAPING THE LEADERS OF TOMORROW

THE ARTIST ---

The Devil Inside (R)Century 20: 5:45, 8 & 10:10 p.m.

Hot Water (1924) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 9 p.m.

To include your Church in

NMOVIEREVIEWS

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: Noon, 3:30, 7:05 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 1:20, 4:25, 7:35 & 10:30 p.m. Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 3, 6:10 & 9:05 p.m. CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 1:15, 4:15 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10:10 p.m. Underworld: Awakening (R) Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 5 & 10:35 p.m.; In 3D at 11 a.m.; 1:30, 2:30, 4, 7, 8 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; In 3D at 1:30, 3:45, 6, 8:20 & 10:40 p.m. War Horse (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 11:45 a.m. & 6:20 p.m. Century 20: Fri. & Sun.-Thu. at 11:20 a.m. & 2:35 p.m. We Bought a Zoo (PG) (1/2 Century 16: 3:10 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 1:50, 4:45, 7:40 & 10:35 p.m. AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) STANFORD THEATRE: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) For information about films playing at the Aquarius, visit LandmarkTheatres.com -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

(Aquarius, Century 20) George Clooney plays Matt King, a lawyer and hapless father troubleshooting domestic and business concerns in a Hawaii he drily notes is not paradise. King’s petulance derives mostly from his wife being in a coma due to a boating accident, and his inability to do anything about it. As a father, he’s clumsy at best; by pampering 10-year-old Scottie (Amara Miller), Matt hopes to distract her from her mother’s decline. No such trickery works on delinquent 17-year-old Alexandra (Shailene Woodley). Matt’s business issue involves his role as trustee of his family’s ancestral land: 25,000 pristine acres in Kauai that will bring the Kings a pretty penny if they can agree on a buyer. As this subplot lingers, Matt becomes obsessed with a third concern: investigating a secret about his wife. It provides the excuse for the Kings to island-hop and family-bond in search of closure. Rated PG for some

mild rude humor. One hour, 38 minutes.

— P.C.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley


(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS

CONCERTS

FAMILY AND KIDS

‘Cultivating Compassion’ This class is on learning specific tools and practices for the cultivation of compassion along with exploration of what compassion is across traditions. The practice of compassion for the self will be emphasized. Thursdays, Jan. 19-March 15, 1-3 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Comunity, 455 Whisman Road, Suite 300, Mountain View. Call 650-968-5000. www. cancersupportcommunity.net ‘Self Publish 101’ This class is on the basics of self-publishing. Jan. 24, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 650-948-7683. ‘Technology Tuesdays: Cloud Computing & Chromebooks’ This class focuses on the topic of cloud computing. Students will explore cloud computing through the Chromebook, a lightweight mobile computer using web apps instead of traditional software. Jan. 24, Registration is required. Register on the library website. Sponsored by the Friends of the Palo Alto Library. 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Downtown Library, 270 Forest Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-329-2436. www. cityofpaloalto.org/library Communication Workshop (ToastMasters Orbiters) Toastmasters meet every first and third Thursdays to work on communication skills in a friendly environment. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Community Center, 210 South Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. Call 408571-1844. orbiters.freetoasthost.us Intensive Workshop on Sacadas and Boleos in Tango Gustavo and Jesica Homos, 2011 USA Tango Stage Champions, will offer an intensive workshop on Sacadas and Boleos in Tango for leaders and followers (intermediate level). Sacada is the displacement of feet or moving a partner’s leg gently with one’s own. Boleo is throwing or swiveling one leg. Jan. 21, Noon-2 p.m. $40. Cheryl Burke Dance Studio, 1400 North Shoreline Blvd., #-A1, Mountain View, Ca. . Call 650-864-9150. www.cherylburkedance.com/ MountainView

‘World Harmony Chorus Students of CSMA’s World Harmony Chorus perform songs from around the globe Jan. 30, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts at Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend

‘Wild-Cat Adventure’ Five live wild cats from various countries will be at Foothill. Each cat is shown on stage as information about the species is shared with the audience. Jan. 22, 2-3 p.m. $10 general, $5 for children under 12. Foothill College, Appreciation Hall, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 707-874-3176. www. wildcatfund.org Children’s Story Time A read-aloud of “Mustard: A Story about Soft Love and Strong Values� by Jessel Miller. Creative activities to follow. Cynthia Starborn is the guest reader. Ages 4 and up. Attendees should call to reserve a seat. Feb. 4, 4-4:45 p.m. Free. East West Bookstore, 324 Castro St., Mountain View. www.eastwest.com Los Altos Parent Preschool Open House Attendees can meet teachers and explore the new campus, with children invited. Jan. 21, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Los Altos Parent Preschool, 201 Covington Road, Los Altos. Call 650-947-9371. www.lapp.coop

‘Disaster-Resiliency Panel’ Panel discussion and audience Q&A. Panelists: Robert Dolci, acting director, NASA Ames; Martin Griss, director, CMU & DMI; Steve Jordan, CEO of NDRC; Tor Andre Nilson, founder and VP, IntraPoint. Jan. 31, 7-9 p.m. Free. NASA Research Park, Building 3, Moffett Field. researchpark.arc.nasa.gov/ Vegetarian Dinners The Peninsula Macrobiotic Community serves a vegetarian dinner every Monday (except holidays). Full vegan meal includes soup, grain, beans or bean products, vegetables, dessert and beverage. Communal seating. Lecture monthly. Diners are asked to make phone reservations by Mondays at 9:30 a.m. Dec. 12-Jan. 30, 6:30-8 p.m. $15. First Baptist Church, 305 N. California Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650 5993320. peninsulamacro.org

‘Argentine Tango Boot Camp’ Argentine tango instructor and performer Christy CotĂŠ will offer a “tango boot campâ€? with 13 hours of instruction. The intensive weekend is intended for beginners. Jan. 28-29, 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. $189. Cheryl Burke Dance Studio, 1400 North Shoreline Blvd., #-A1, Mountain View, Ca.. Call 650-864-9150. www.tangobootcamp.org Ballet Class For the Love of Dance studio is offering ballet class for teens and adults. Students will stretch and learn ballet technique in a comfortable setting. Wednesdays through June 26, 7-8 p.m. $60 per month. For the Love of Dance, 2483 Old Middlefield Way, Suite B, Mountain View. Call 650-861-0650. fortheloveofdancemv. com Beginners’ Square Dance Class No experience or partner needed for this all-levels class. First class is free, with refreshments included. Sundays, Jan. 8-March 4, 7-9 p.m. $4. Lotus Lane Recreation Hall, Mountain View. Call 408-2743833. Hip-Hop Class For the Love of Dance Studio is offering hip-hop class for teens and adults. Mondays through June 24, 8-9 p.m. $60 per month. For the Love of Dance, 2483 Old Middlefield Way, Suite B, Mountain View. Call 650-861-0650. fortheloveofdancemv.com Jazz-Dance Class For the Love of Dance Studio is offering jazz-dance classes for teens and adults. Mondays through June 24, 7-8 p.m. $60 per month. For the Love of Dance, 2483 Old Middlefield Way, Suite B, Mountain View. Call 650-8610650. fortheloveofdancemv.com Tiny Tots Dance Class The studio For the Love of Dance offers “tiny totsâ€? classes for 3- and 4-year-olds. Pre-ballet and tap, using activity songs and exercises that teach dance terminology; basic rhythm patterns and self-expression; listening skills and self-confidence; and an introduction to classical music. Mondays, Jan. 2-June 25, 4-5 p.m. $60 per month. For the Love of Dance, 2483 Old Middlefield Way, Suite B, Mountain View. Call 650-861-0650. fortheloveofdancemv.com

EXHIBITS Antique Toys, 1870-1930 In addition to early American toys, the exhibit also features turn-ofthe-century toy trains and accessories from fine European toymakers such as Marklin and Bing. Through April, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Museum of American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-321-1004. www.moah.org

‘SOS Film Festival’ The SOS Film Festival is hosted by the Mountain View High School Environmental Club. It features documentaries about protecting the oceans and raising awareness about ocean issues. Panel discussion included. Jan. 20, 6:30-10 p.m. Free. Mountain View High School Theater, 3355 Truman Ave. , Moutain View.

HEALTH ‘Advances in Radiation Therapy for Cancer Treatment’ This discussion will be about the latest methods for radiation treatment, and what advances may be on the horizon. Facilitated by Robert Sinha, medical director of El Camino Hospital’s radiation oncology Department. Jan. 31, 6-8 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 Whisman Road, Suite 300, Mountain View. Call 650-968-5000. www.cancersupportcommunity.net ‘Healing Power of Writing’ Attendees will write in a supportive environment, exploring the impacts of cancer in response to the facilitator’s prompts. Mondays, Jan. 23-Feb. 27, 2:30-4 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 Whisman Road, Mountain View. Call 650-968-5000. www. cancersupportcommunity.net ‘Parenting Through Cancer’ Class attendees will explore such questions as: “How much do you tell your children about your cancer? How do you know when to be concerned about changes in their behavior? How do you explain why some routines are changing?� Jan. 21, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 Whisman Road, Suite 300, Mountain View. Call 650-9685000. www.cancersupportcommunity.net ‘Relaxation and Mindfulness’ Class attendees will learn techniques to manage stress

and enhance the ability to relax and calm both mind and body. Areas of focus include mindfulness practice and cultivating mindful awareness, the power of breathing, and mindfulness in daily life. Jan. 24, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, 455 Whisman Road, Suite 300, Mountain View. Call 650-968-5000. www.cancersupportcommunity.net John’s Zumba Class Zumba classes every Thursday night, 8-9 p.m. $10. John’s Zumba Class, 2584 Leghorn St., Mountain View. Call 415-9909965. www.thatzumbaguy.com

ON STAGE ‘Doubt, A Parable’ Sister Aloysius, a Bronx school prinicipal, takes matters into her own hands when she suspects young Father Flynn of improper relations with one of his male students. The Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by John Patrick Shanley plays Jan. 26-Feb. 18. $26-32. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-9410551. www.busbarn.org ‘Moon for the Misbegotten’ This Eugene O’Neill play is a story of blarney, scheming and betrayal. Directed by Jeanie Smith. Jan. 13-Feb. 5, Thurs.-Sat. at 8 p.m. and Sun. at 2 p.m. $15-$30. Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View. thepear.org

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY ‘Insight Meditation South Bay’ Shaila Catherine and guest teachers lead a weekly “Insight Meditation� sitting followed by a talk on Buddhist teachings. Tuesdays through Feb. 7, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. St. Timothy’s/Edwards Hall , 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650-8570904. imsb.org

SENIORS ‘Advances in Cataract Surgery’ Dr. Karen Shih from the Palo Alto Medical Foundation gives an overview of advances in the field of cataract surgery. Topics will include what a cataract is, how treatment for cataracts has changed, and when people should consider surgery. Jan. 26, 1 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330.

SINGLES ‘Meet Your Valentine’ This singles’ dance includes dancing and appetizers. Adults of all ages welcome. Dressy attire requested. Feb. 3, 8-11:45 p.m. $20 ($15 if bought by Feb. 2). Michael’s at Shoreline Park, 2960 N Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 415-507-9962. www.thepartyhotline.com

SPORTS Group runs The running store On Your Mark has organized four weekly running groups, with runners of all ages and skill levels welcome. No registration necessary. All runs are three to five miles with the start and finish behind the store. Mondays at 6 a.m., Wednesdays at 6:30 a.m., Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Free. On Your Mark, 378 Main St., Los Altos. Call 650-2095526. www.onyourmarkperformance.com

VOLUNTEERS Tutor with JustREAD JustREAD is a nonprofit, literacy program dedicated to improving the reading/writing skills of students. Volunteers are trained by JustREAD and work one-on-one with students. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. JustREAD Tutorial Center, 1299 Bryant St., Mountain View. Call 650691-0416. justREADcenters.org

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‘THE PITMEN PAINTERS’ TheatreWorks presents “The Pitmen Painters,� a Lee Hall comedy-drama play about six 1930s miners who become stars of the art world. Jan. 21-Feb. 12, with afternoon and evening performances Tues.-Sun. $19 -$69. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www.theatreworks.org

AN

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JANUARY 20, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

19


Marketplace Bulletin Board 115 Announcements PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

340 Child Care Wanted

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts Infiniti 2002 QX4 - $11,200 ob BMW 2008 328i Sedan - $23,988

Box withBoyBabyBlankets/comforte Jackets BOY 6mon-3 years $5

120 Auctions Advertise Your Auction in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Ford 2000 F250 Diesel Super-Duty XLT truck 75K, $14.5K/BO 650-776-5712

130 Classes & Instruction

All Motorcycles Pre 1980 - running or not. Cash paid!! 315-569-8094. (Cal-SCAN)

Aviation Maintenance Career Work on Jet Engines - Train for FAA approved. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (888) 242-3382 toll free. (Cal-SCAN)

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

133 Music Lessons Barton-Holding Music Studio Accepting new students for private vocal lessons. All levels. Call Laura Barton, 650/965-0139 FUN, Piano/Guitar/Violin Lessons Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650)961-2192 www.hopestreetmusicstudios.com Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529 Piano Lessons in your home Children and adults. Christina Conti, B.M. 15+ yrs exp. 650/493-6950 SMALL GROUP CHORAL SINGING The Manzana Music School www.ManzanaMusicSchool.com Palo Alto Kids & Adults Guitar, Banjo, Mandolin, Violin, Cello,& Bass lessons

150 Volunteers Conversation Partners needed Feed homeless cats in MV/PA Fosterers Needed for Moffet Cats help cats near Willow-Hamiln MP museum volunteers

155 Pets Lost Cat

Mini 2009 MIni Cooper - $18,300

202 Vehicles Wanted

Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales

Pink BarbieJeep1998MattelRemote Size 3T suit/tuxedo jacketReniew Stuffed animals box full only$20 Toddler shoes Size 4-6Boy - 3 Toddler Soccer cleats size13 $5

RWC: 1228 Douglas Ave., 1/20, 11-2; 1/21, 9-1 BIG RUMMAGE SALE benefits Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. (Just south of Woodside Rd., between Broadway and Bayshore Fwy.) Cash Only. 650/497-8332 or during sale 650/568-9840

215 Collectibles & Antiques KENT COFFEY IMPRESA 6-piece 1960

230 Freebies Cat Supplies - FREE

240 Furnishings/ Household items Cast Iron Queen Canopy Bedframe $800.00 LaBarge Mirror with Gryphons - $750.00

245 Miscellaneous Infrared iHeater Heat your home for 5 cents an HOUR! Portable infrared iHeater heats 1000 sq. ft. Slashes your heating bills by 50%. FREE Shipping too! Use claim code 6239. Was $499 Now $279. Call 1-888-807-5741. (Cal-SCAN) Black & Decker Elec Mulch Mower - $65 CEMETERY PLOT, Alta Mesa - $6000.00 Vintage inspired button earrings - $6.00

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered English Spanish Nanny available Full Time C.N.A available Loving Trustline Nanny Nanny Available P/T weekends. Refs., exp. All ages, incl. newborns. 650/269-3944 Nanny Saturdays only.

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Business Services 640 Legal Services

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440 Massage Therapy SEEKING MASSAGE THERAPIST

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Chess Lessons for kids and adult

Big lotBOY 5Years winterclothes

Stanford music tutoring

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345 Tutoring/ Lessons

Avent bottles,bowls,forks,spoons

Introduction to opera

Teach English Abroad! 4-week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries! www.teflworldwideprague.com info@teflworldwideprague.com

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4 Years BOY Summer clothes$40

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Immigration or BK Paralegal Career Training. $395.00.and 94% Placement! 626-918-3599 or 626-5522885. Placement in all 58 counties. (Cal-SCAN)

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355 Items for Sale

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Jobs 500 Help Wanted Sales: CNPA (Sacramento) is seeking an articulate, highly-motivated, energetic and persistent individual to join our team. Responsible for contacting businesses via telephone and selling classified advertising. Excellent Written/Verbal communication skills. Good phone etiquette and computer skills. Phone/Sales experience a plus (25-50 outbound calls/day) Contact wolf@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN) Cook Immed. F/T opening in retirement community. Exp. pref. Excel. benefits and work environment. Apply 4075 El Camino Way, PA. HAIR STATION RENTAL Pet Sitter Fabulous pet sitter for 13 year old Blue Tick Hound. Recent diagnosis of diabetes requiring 2 injections per day. Need in home/overnight care in Mtn. View for short weekends and extended vacations of 2 weeks. Mia prefers women and needs short daily walks of 3 to 4 blocks. Please call 650.888.2639

560 Employment Information $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com (AAN CAN) Customer Services $15-$25 hr. 100 year old company. Established customers. Flexible hours. PT/FT. Retirees welcome. No starter fee. FULLER BRUSH 1-800-655-5435 email: davidfroshaug@gmail.com (Cal-SCAN) Driver Start out the year with Daily Pay and Weekly Home Time! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 1-800-414-9569. www.DriveKnight.com (Cal-SCAN) Driver - New Career For The New Year! No Experience Needed! No credit check! Top industry pay & quality training. 100% Paid CDL Training. 1-800-326-2778. www.JoinCRST.com (Cal-SCAN)

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

Auto Accident Attorney Injured in an auto accident? Call Jacoby and Meyers for a free case evaluation. Never a cost to you. Don`t wait, call now, 888-685-5721. (Cal-SCAN)

645 Office/Home Business Services Classified Advertising Reach Californians with a Classified ad in almost every county! Experience the power of classifieds! Combo~California Daily and Weekly Networks. One order. One payment. Free Brochures. elizabeth@ cnpa.com or (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Display Advertising Advertise a Display Business Card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost of $1,550. Your display 3.75x2� ad reaches over 3 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) Social Security Disability Benefits. You Win or Pay Us Nothing. Contact Disability Group, Inc. Today! BBB Accredited. Call For Your FREE Book & Consultation. 877-490-6596. (Cal-SCAN) Truck Driver Jobs Advertise your truck driver jobs in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 710 Carpentry Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

715 Cleaning Services Family House Service Weekly or bi-weekly green cleaning. Comm’l., residential, apts. Honest, reliable, family owned. Refs. Sam, 650/315-6681. Holiday Cleaning by Tere. Houses * Apartments * Offices. Genl. cleaning, laundry, ironing, comml./res. Excel. refs. Lic. #40577. 650/281-8637 House Cleaning Services All household Cleaning. 6 yrs exp., Fair Rates. 15/HR, Refs. 1st visit 10% discount. 650-630-0606 magna housecleaning Olga’s Housecleaning Res./Com. Wkly/mo. Low Rates. Local Refs. 25 years Exp. & Friendly. I love My Job! Ins. (650)380-1406

Socorro’s Cleaning Service Full housecleaning, laundry. San Carlos to MV. 650/465-3765

730 Electrical Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

Carlson’s Rain Gutter Cleaning Roof cleaning and pressure washing. 20 years in business (650)322-5030

757 Handyman/ Repairs AAA HANDYMAN

748 Gardening/ Landscaping Beckys Landscape Weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree pruning, clean-ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Power washing. 650/493-7060

J. L. GARDENING SERVICE %   % "$$# %" %  ! 25 Years of Exp.

      

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856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080 LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maintenance*New Lawns*Clean Ups*Tree Trimming*Wood Fences* Power Washing. 17 years experience. Senior Discount 650-576-6242

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ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274 Keane Construction Specializing in Home Repairs Kitchens, Bathrooms, Stucco, Dry Rot & Masonry and more! 650-430-3469 Lic.#743748 Miller’s Maintenance Plumbing, Painting, Tile and wall repair. Free Est. No job too small. Senior discount. 25 years exp. 650/669-3199

Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477. Free

AND MORE

Repair        

30 Years Experience

Jody Horst

Mario’s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. 650/365-6955; 995-3822

754 Gutter Cleaning

759 Hauling est.

R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859

Sam’s Garden Service

                  

(650)969-9894

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE TRIMMING/ PRUNING, TREE SERVICE, STUMP GRINDING, CLEAN UPS, AERATION, IRRIGATION, ROTOTILLING. ROGER: 650.776.8666

751 General Contracting NOTICE TO READERS It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

#1 Family Hauling Will beat most prices and haul anything. 650/207-9674 a J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc., office, garage, storage, old furniture, green waste and yard junk. cleanups. Licensed & insured. FREE EST. 650/368-8810 (see my Yelp reviews) College Student Will haul and recycle your unwanted items and do genl. clean up. 650/6413078; 650/868-6184 Frank’s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

767 Movers Armando’s Moving Homes, Apartments, Storage. Full Service moves. Serving the Bay Area for 20 yrs. Licensed & Insured. Armando,650-630-0424. CAL-T190632

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MOOVERS LICENSE CAL. T-118304

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327-5493 771 Painting/ Wallpaper Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION $ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $! www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti    "

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STYLE PAINTING Full service painting. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

790 Roofing Al Peterson RooďŹ ng since 1946 Specializing in   ng         

650-493-9177

795 Tree Care

Palo Alto

TREE SERVICE

             25 yrs ExpLic & Ins. #819244 (650) 380-2297

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Palo Alto 1 Bdrm Apt. $2000/mo. rent includes util., wifi & w/d. New amen., must see! (650) 274-5171 Sunnyvale, 2 BR/1.5 BA - $1,795/mo

805 Homes for Rent Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3250 Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $2,450/mo.

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

820 Home Exchanges $3250 / 2br - 1200ft.

840 Vacation Rentals/Time Shares Vacation Rentals Advertise your vacation property in 240 California newspapers for one low cost of $600. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 6 million+ Californians. Free brochure call Elizabeth (916)288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) ARCHITECT - CUSTOM HOME DESIGN PALO ALTO ARCHITECT TOP RATED RESIDENTIAL ARCHITECT

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage Texas Lake Bargain 4 AC -just $49,900. Come see how much your money can buy in the North Texas Hill Country! Spectacular 4 acre lake access homesite w/ incredible Hill Country views and covered in trees. Enjoy 18,000+ acres of crystal clear waters -boat, ski, scuba! Prime location near Dallas/Ft Worth. Low taxes, booming economy, affordable living! Ask about our FREE OVERNIGHT STAY! Excellent financing. Call now 1.877.888.1636, x1563 www.pklakefront.com (Cal-SCAN)

855 Real Estate Services Pebble Beach & Carmel Homes Considering a second home in PEBBLE BEACH or CARMEL? Start your search at www.AdamMoniz.com

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for contact information

1VCMJD /PUJDFT 995 Fictitious Name Statement ELECTRODOXZ FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 559336 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Electrodoxz, located at 2620 Fayette Drive, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): SCOTT McDEVITT 2620 Fayette Dr. Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 22, 2011. (MVV Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012) FOUNTAINBLUE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 559610 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: FountainBlue, located at 405 Hedgerow Court, Mountain View, CA 94041, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): LINDA HOLROYD 405 Hedgerow Court Mountain View, CA 94041 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 06/06/2001. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 30, 2011. (MVV Jan. 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012) HAMAMOTO EXECUTIVE SERVICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 560001 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Hamamoto Executive Services, located at 950 Desmet Way, San Jose, CA 95125, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): ALICE HAMAMOTO 950 Desmet Way San Jose, CA 95125 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 7/28/2006. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 11, 2012. (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 10, 2012)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: December 14, 2011 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: LORENA SOTOMAYOR DE FLORES The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 820 E. El Camino Real, Ste. C Mountain View, CA 94040-2837 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 - ON-SALE BEER AND WINE-EATING PLACE (MVV Jan. 13, 20, 27, 2012) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: STEPHEN JOSEPH BERGER Case No.: 1-12-PR-169958 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of STEPHEN JOSEPH BERGER, STEPHEN J. BERGER. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARY BERGER in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: MARY BERGER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the

petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 8, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ Douglas Barnes Douglas P. Barnes, A Professional Law Corp. 210 Almendra Ave. Los Gatos, CA 95030 (408)395-4800 (MVV Jan. 13, 20, 27, 2012)



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NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: January 9, 2012 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: SBI ENTERPRISES LLC The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 660 San Antonio Rd. Mountain View, CA 94040-1304 Type of license(s) applied for: 47 - ON-SALE GENERAL EATING PLACE (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2012) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN RICHARD LUCY Case No.: 1-12-PR-170035 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOHN RICHARD LUCY. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: PETER LUCY in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: PETER LUCY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 29, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ James A. Thompson 600 Allerton St., Suite 200 Redwood City, CA 94063 (650)365-7333 (MVV Jan. 20, 27, Feb. 3, 2012) Call Alicia Santillan (650) 326-8210 x6578 to assist you with your legal advertising needs. Or e-mail her at: asantillan@paweekly.com

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JANUARY 20, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

21


Coming Soon ‌ Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community.

WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS

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Roomy 3 bedroom, 1.5 bathroom home (with room to create a 2nd bath) featuring hardwood ooring, dual pane windows, expanded dining area, remodeled and expanded kitchen, laundry room, cozy ďŹ replace, ornate crown moldings, spacious living room wired for surround sound TV/Stereo, landscaped back yard with patio area and mature foliage.

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49 Showers Drive #J316

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arely available three bedroom top floor condo in The Old Mill. This beautiful home is in one of the best locations in the complex. Secure building access, third floor, one level end unit. Three bedrooms, two bathrooms, approx. 1392 square feet. Beautifully remodeled throughout. Kitchen with stainless steel appliances, updated bathrooms, laminate flooring & beautifully painted throughout. Open & flowing floor plan with lots of windows offering great scenery and beaming with natural light. Private balcony overlooking the pool and lush grounds. Great complex amenities. Walk to Target, Trader Joes, The Milk Pail and many other stores & restaurants nearby. Award winning Los Altos Schools: Covington Elementary, Egan Middle & Los Altos High School.

Offered at: $589,000 Just Listed!

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482 Mariposa Street MOUNTAIN VIEW

Coming Soon

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arely available 14, 300 sq.ft. lot, zoned R32, in downtown Mountain View. This 1915’s beauty offers 3 br/2 ba with approximately 1,940 sq.ft. along with a separate studio cottage, additional storage building & one car garage. Beautiful original character throughout yet filled with many modern upgrades & conveniences for today’s living. Short stroll to downtown restaurants, shopping & all the amenities Mountain View has to offer! Easy access to trails, freeways, Cal-Train, VTA & close to major companies. Desired Mountain View/Los Altos Schools.

Offered at: $1,399,000 www.482Mariposa.com

Jerylann Mateo Broker Associate | 650.743.7895 | jmateo@apr.com | www.jmateo.com | DRE#01362250

22

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 20, 2012

www.49ShowersJ316.com

215 Marianne Court MOUNTAIN VIEW

B

eautiful newer construction home, 14 years young! Quality finishes & custom features throughout this 5 br/3 ba home with 3,266 sq.ft. of living space. An open and flowing floorplan make a great space for entertaining both inside and out. Great neighborhood within walking distance to Ranch 99/ Nob Hill Shopping Center, schools, parks, trails, and more. Close to major companies with easy access to freeways. Desirable Mountain View Schools.

Co-Listed with V. Lynn Hawkins Asset Capital Realty DRE #01801349

Call for Details


7 5 7 S A N C A R R I Z O W AY M O U N TA I N V I E W

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JANUARY 20, 2012 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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REDWOOD CITY

PALO ALTO

3366 VERNON TE $2,288,000 5 BR 4 BA Enormous living - dining - family - kit area + 2 patios on cul-de-sac. 10,956 sq.ft. lot!

13278 MCCULLOCH AVE $925,000 4 BR 2 BA Over 1,700 sq ft home on 10K lot. 3 car gar, hdwd flrs, sep family rm w/fireplace, exc. schls

3240 SPRING ST $449,000 3 BR 2 BA Say HELLO to a GOOD BUY! This home features 3 BR, 2 BA and a BIG family rm!

800 S CALIFORNIA AV $2,598,000 5 BR 3 BA Elegance & Craftsmanship combine in this newly completed home in desirable College Terrace

Geraldine Asmus

Gary Herbert

Rod Creason

Jerry Haslam

650.325.6161

650.941.7040

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650.941.7040

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LOS GATOS

LOS ALTOS

521 TYRELLA AV $699,000 Spacious duplex in Mtn.View! Each unit has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, & garage!

3743 REDWOOD CI $1,149,000 3 BR 2 BA Wonderful South Palo Alto location near elementary school, middle school, park & library.

16755 LITTLEFIELD LANE $1,879,000 4 BR 3 BA 12,200 sq ft lot. 4 bed 3 bath. Los Gatos schls. “Martha Stewart inspired” eat-in kitchen.

1905 QUAIL MEADOW RD $1,648,000 4 BR 3 BA 1/2 acre property close to town. 2200 sq ft. New carpet and paint throughout.

DiPali Shah

Deborah Greenberg

Terri Couture

Barbara Cannon

650.325.6161

CAMPBELL PERFECT DOWNTOWN LOCATION

650.328.5211

LOS ALTOS HILLS EARLY CALIFORNIA $769,000 HACIENDA

4 BR 3 BA Perfect downtown Campbell location. Only 13 yrs old w/marble, granite & hardwood flooring. Jeff Beltramo 650.325.6161

MOUNTAIN VIEW

650.941.7040

MOUNTAIN VIEW

650.941.7040

REDWOOD SHORES

QUALITY $3,195,000 CUSTOM HOME

5 BR 4.5 BA 6000+ square ft beautiful custom home. 1.3 acre oaktree studded lot with expansive lawns. Terri Couture 650.941.7040

TOP FLOOR CONDO $199,000 SUNLIT $1,650,000 1 BR 1 BA Well cared for. Large living rm. TOP LEVEL UNIT 5 BR 5.5 BA Built w/love. Formal entry, grand living room w/high ceiling, chandelier & fireplace. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

Dining with sliding door to balcony that overlooks pool. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

2 BR 1 BA Price Reduced! End unit on top level. Lots of sunlight & views of open space. Stack W&D. Ann Griffiths

GREAT PRICE!

$499,000

3 BR 2 BA New kitch countrs, cherry stained cabinets, hrdwd flrs thru out most of hm. Dual Pn windows. Ron & Nasrin Delan 650.941.7040

2108 CAROL AV SUN 1:30 - 4:30

LOS ALTOS HILLS NATURE LOVER’S DREAM!

$2,695,000

6 BR 4 BA Rare! Over 5,000 newly remodeled at end of a cul de sac on over 1 acre! Palo Alto schls Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

LOS ALTOS NEW CONSTR. GRT LOCATION

$3,290,000

5 BR 5 BA Beautiful Architecture + Floor Plan Amenities Abound. Gleaming HW Floors, Lovely Granite. Jim Galli 650.941.7040

EXPANDED AND REMODELED

ELEGANT-AMAZING VIEWS

$2,645,000

5 BR 4.5 BA Experience a beautifully dynamic residence that transforms with the setting sun. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

VALLEY VWS W/PA SCHOOLS

$2,395,000 $1,498,000 3 BR 2 BA Private hills living awaits your

5 BR 3 BA Single story w/ 2 master suites. Granite kitchen w/ stainless steel appliances & more. Elena Talis 650.941.7040

touch & imagination!Enjoy a generous lot of 1.170 acres. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

800.558.4443

3 BR 2 BA Open Plan. Hardwood floors. Spacious rooms, 2balconies, A/C,pool. Top Las Lomitas Schools. Christine Hoover Sorensen 650.941.7040

Los Altos Palo Alto

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 20, 2012

650.325.6161

$169,000

$1,190,000 1 BR 1 BA Huge Price Reduction for

4 BR 2 BA 2000+ sq ft of living space, near parks, shops, commutes. Separate family rm, lrg backyd. Nancy Adele Stuhr 650.941.7040

this beautifully updated unit in a gated community. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

SANTA CLARA NO STAIRS! 2 CAR ATTD GRG.

1625 GRANT RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$868,000

4 BR 3 BA Townhome at Walden Park. Formal entry w/granite tile. Remodeled kitchen & baths. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

220 CENTRAL AV SAT 1:30 - 4:30

$625,000

3 BR 2 BA Twnhm at Cypress Point Woods. Remdled kitch w/maple cabinets.Dual pane windows.Central A/C Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

GREAT LOCATION!

$625,000

300 SAND HILL CIRCLE #101 $1,398,000 SUN 12 - 3 $995,000 CONDO ON THE LAKE

4 BR 2.5 BA Dual pane windows. Central air. Expansive rear yard w/patio. Pool. Los Altos schools. Helen Kuckens 650.941.7040

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PRICE REDUCED

3 BR 2 BA Great Location. Sterling Estates ranch. 3BR 2BA fenced backyard. Probate sale. Call agent. Kevin Klemm 650.328.5211

MENLO PARK CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION

$395,000

$499,000

2 BR 2 BA Spacious end unit. French doors to private deck, kitch w/granite, master w/ walk-in closet. Royce Cablayan 650.941.7040

650.941.7040 650.325.6161

2 BR 2 BA Stunning remodel! Move

PALO ALTO GREEN AND EXQUISITE!

$443,500

in ready! Top Cupt schls! Staged! Only common wall in 2-car garage.

$4,250,000 Karen Quaid

6 BR 5.5 BA What Makes This Home STAND OUT? Incredibly high energy savings!Top quality. Vivi Chan 650.941.7040

650.941.7040

WOODSIDE PRIME

2615 COWPER ST SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

LOCATION! $29,000,000 $2,388,000 Private prestigious location. 11+ acre

4 BR 3.5 BA 100% new. 4BR + Office, 3.5 baths. Top quality. Great Midtown loction. Tree-lined street. Judy Shen 650.328.5211

property in central Woodside close to town. Susie Dews & Shena Hurley 650.325.6161

ON TOP 651 E. MEADOW AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,267,000

5 BR 3 BA 5 bed, 2 office + 3 bathrm home. Attchd 1 car garage w/ample extra storage. PA schools. Helen Kuckens 650.941.7040

OF THE WORLD

$2,995,000

5 BR 4 BA Hm w/views like no other. Features meadow,pond, gated vegetable garden w/large chicken coop Phyllis & Jamie Carmichael 650.941.7040

©2011 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC. DRE License # 00313415


Mountain View Voice 01.20.2012 - Section 1