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MAY 6, 2011 VOLUME 19, NO. 17

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INSIDE: WEEKEND | PAGE 18

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Council: what to do with $30 million from Google? MONEY FROM 52-YEAR LAND LEASE MAKES BUDGET CUTS DIFFICULT FOR COUNCIL By Daniel DeBolt

N COURTESY OF THE U.S. NAVY

Navy contractor Amec Environmental installs scaffolds underneath Hangar One’s massive dome.

Hangar One’s windows won’t be saved SIDING REMOVAL DELAYED; UNIQUE WINDOWS TOO DAMAGED TO SALVAGE By Daniel DeBolt

A

fter a last minute inspection, NASA officials have decided that Hangar One’s 4,638 unique windows aren’t worth saving, a disappointment for preservationists and Navy history buffs. The decision was explained

in an e-mail from United States Navy official Scott Anderson. An April 28 inspection by NASA found “significant damage to the corrugated windows (cracks, rust, water tightness), and the window attachments (rust, putty, water tightness).” Anderson wrote. “NASA has determined that it is not economically feasible to keep the

windows in-place or to save the windows at all. NASA indicated to the Navy that they were no longer asking for the Navy to save the windows or keep them in-place.” A few of the windows will be saved for history’s sake, Anderson said, but the rest will be See HANGAR ONE, page 13

One injured in downtown house fire By Nick Veronin and Andrea Gemmet

S

hortly after 4 a.m. on the morning of April 28, Tim Dobbins, his wife, daughter and the two family cats were stirred by the shriek of their smoke alarm. Dobbins, who rose to investigate, said he initially assumed it was a

INSIDE

malfunction. It was not, however. A candle had been left burning and the home, located in the 600 block of California Street, which Dobbins and his wife have lived in for the past 28 years was in flames. Everyone made it out of the house safely, including the two cats, and although much was lost in the blaze, Dobbins said, “Things are

looking up. Thank goodness the smoke alarm went off,” Dobbins said. “I’m sure it saved our lives.” Dobbins, a well-known local preschool teacher, said that aside from being grateful everyone made it out alive, the outpouring of community support has really made a See FIRE, page 14

ow that Google has agreed to pay for a $30 million land lease up front, laying off city employees to fix the city’s budget deficit appeared to have much less appeal in Tuesday’s City Council meeting. Google has agreed to make a one-time payment for a 52-year lease of city land — a 9-acre lot at Shoreline Boulevard and Charleston Road where an office building is slated. Meanwhile, the city has been facing recurring budget deficits because rising employee compensation costs are outpacing revenue growth. “I don’t think we need to do cuts at all,” said council member Margaret Abe-Koga. During city budget talks Tuesday council members appeared reticent about making cuts to fill a projected $2.6 million gap next year. “This continual cutting, I think we’ve gotten to the point where there’s not much that can be done there anymore,” said council member Ronit Bryant. “We only have so much to go before the city is no longer the city we want.” With city employees already doing more with less, “at a certain point it just becomes a job to survive,” Bryant said. Instead of layoffs and cuts spread throughout the city’s government to bring expenses in line with revenues, council members suggested that the city begin looking at doing “something radical,” as Bryant said, to

GOINGS ON 22 | MARKETPLACE 30 | MOVIES 21 | REAL ESTATE 32 | VIEWPOINT 16

fix the budget in the future. Abe-Koga seemed to be saying the same thing. “We need to look at what we can do for longer term savings,” she said. Council members pointed to ambitious budget fixes listed on the final tier of proposed budget cuts, which include property tax ballot measures, new land lease revenue, consolidation of city departments and sharing services and their costs with other cities. See BUDGET, page 13

LASD parcel tax passing narrowly By Andrea Gemmet and Nick Veronin

A

s the polls closed May 3, Measure E, a new $193 annual parcel tax to benefit local schools had the votes to pass and its proponents were optimistic. However, at least one opponent of the proposal is holding out hope that lastminute ballots will dash the two-thirds majority it needs to pass. Measure E led with 67.1 percent of the vote on Wednesday just before the Voice press deadline. That’s just over the margin of two-thirds that it needs to win. See ELECTION, page 13


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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011


7PJDFT A R O U N D

T O W N

Asked in Downtown Mountain View. Pictures and interviews by Nick Veronin

What is your reaction to the news of Osama bin Laden’s death? “Martin Luther King Jr. said it best: ‘I mourn the loss of thousands of precious lives. But I will not rejoice in the death of one, not even an enemy. Returning hate for hate, multiplies hate. ... Hate cannot drive out hate, only love can do that.’� Justin Shavalier, Los Gatos

“When I saw the crowds outside the White House, the image that I got ... was of people in Lebanon or Syria or Iran celebrating an attack on someone else. It’s just the other side of the coin. Although it was an important act, we shouldn’t celebrate it.� Lanny Berg, Mountain View

“I’m actually very happy to see that we caught bin Laden. I think he started everything and we lost a lot of good men and women. I’m happy that he’s no longer here.�

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ROBBERY A woman told police she was pushed from behind and robbed of her purse at about 7 a.m. on April 27 as she walked in the 500 block of Escuela Avenue. The robber was wearing a red hooded sweatshirt, according to Liz Wylie, spokeswoman for the Mountain View Police Department. The victim, a 45-year-old Mountain View woman, struggled to keep her purse. But the man ultimately wrestled the purse away from her and fled, Wylie said. He was last seen running west on Gamel Way. Police searched the area for the suspect or evidence, but came up with nothing, Wylie said. The victim lost $150 in the robbery.

LOITERING A young woman returned home in the early hours of April 28 and saw an unknown man walking up to her bedroom window, police said. The 19-year-old pulled up to her condominium complex located at 928 Wright Ave. at about 12:30 a.m., according to Liz Wylie, spokeswoman for the Mountain View Police Department.

When the young woman pulled up, she saw a man wearing a black hooded sweatshirt and light colored pants, and he appeared to be peering in her window. Wylie said the woman was worried that the man was going to attempt to break in, so she opened her car door, hoping the noise would scare the man off. The man immediately turned and walked away at the sound of the woman’s car door.

RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY A burglar, or burglars, made use of a very short window of opportunity last week — crawling through the kitchen window of a Mountain View apartment and making off with an undetermined amount of miscellaneous jewelry. The burglary happened sometime between 9:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. on April 28 at a complex located at 2390 Middlefield Rd., according to Liz Wylie, spokeswoman for the Mountain View Police Department. When one of the apartment’s resident’s returned home, he found the kitchen window open with its screen pried off, Wylie said.

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The Mountain View Voice is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 4

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011


-PDBM/FXT MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Developer seeks fast-track for 16-acre office campus By Daniel DeBolt

A

MICHELLE LE

Ashley Pankonen and Justin Sarmiento, both seniors at Mountain View High School, discuss the stresses of applying for college on April 28.

Will I get in? Can I afford it? COLLEGE APPLICATION SEASON BRINGS PRESSURE, EXCITEMENT AND OPTIMISM By Nick Veronin

C

hecking Facebook around the time that college acceptance letters go out can be tough, Daniel Kline says. The onslaught of positive status updates declaring who got in where, and, in some cases, how much has been awarded in financial aid, grants and scholarships can deal quite a blow to the ego of those viewing them. Kline, an 18-year-old senior at Mountain View High School, said he had a contact who did just that

— repeatedly reminding Kline of how hard a time he was having figuring out how he would pay for his own college tuition. “It makes me kind of mad,” says Ashley Pankonen, 18, and a senior at Mountain View High School. “They don’t have to worry about the same things that you have to worry about.” Pankonen says that she doesn’t mean to come off as bitter. She knows that there is no use worrying about such matters. All the same, though, “it hurts,” she says.

Social media adds a new twist to the already tumultuous and emotional road to college, according to Marti McGuirk, an academic counselor at Mountain View High School. “It’s different, because it’s so immediate,” McGuirk says. When she was graduating from high school she may have taken a look in the school newspaper to see who was going where, but that would likely leave each student the chance to digest their own situaSee COLLEGE, page 10

City close to hiring a new manager COUNCIL TO INTERVIEW EIGHT CANDIDATES FRIDAY; MAY MAKE DECISION NEXT WEEK By Daniel DeBolt

T

he city has received 76 applications from people looking to fill the city’s top job. With interviews beginning Friday, a new city manager could be selected as early as next week Council members have gone through all 76 resumes to narrow the candidates down to eight to be interviewed on Friday. It will be an all-day meeting that

will be closed to the public, said Mayor Jac Siegel. The top three selected on Friday will be interviewed all day on Tuesday, first by city department heads in the morning, then by the council again in the afternoon. During lunch, the council will hear the pros and cons of the finalists from the perspective of city department heads. “In the afternoon we will meet with them individually and

hopefully we can all agree on who is the best candidate,” Siegel said. “If we are not happy with the candidates we have we will go out again,” to seek applicants, or take another look at the others who applied. The meetings will all be closed to the public in order to respect each candidate’s privacy. Many may not want their current employers to know they are looking for a new job, Siegel said.

large office campus proposed for Middlefield Road near Highway 237 could host a major company’s headquarters with 3,500 employees— especially if it is approved within 12 months, a developer said Tuesday. The City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved a gatekeeper request for 690 East Middlefield Road to allow city planning to begin. No designs have been drawn, but Mollie Ricker, principal of Palo Alto-based Dostart Development Company, said possibilities include three buildings five- to nine-stories tall and a pair of buildings 10-stories tall to provide a landmark gateway to the city seen by drivers coming in on Highway 237. The buildings could total more than 685,000 square feet, but could grow to 909,000 square feet if neighboring properties on Maude Avenue are included in the project. Ricker said the unusual size of the site, 15.6 acres, could motivate a large company to locate its headquarters there. She couldn’t name the names of prospective tenants but “you can take the biggest employers in Mountain View and you can bet we’ve talked to them.” The city’s largest employers include Google (said to have 10,000 employees in Mountain View), Microsoft and Intuit. The project would be the “first ever mid-rise project along the freeway in Mountain View,” Ricker said. Because of the requirements of at least one prospective tenant, and the financing that could result, “we have the highest chance of success On paper the candidates appear to be impressive. “Some are very highly experienced, very highly qualified,” Siegel said. None of the candidates are city of Mountain View employees. Siegel said the top eight candidates are primarily men, as was the entire pool, and all but two are California residents. Most are from Northern California. They include university administrators, assistant city managers, a finance director and city managers currently employed with other cities, large and small. Siegel said council members were shocked to see some of the

if we can get through the planning process within 12 months,” Ricker said. “Within 12 months we can develop a really great project.” A previously approved Dostart project at the site failed as the recession hit and financial markets closed, Ricker said. The “class A” office project boasted a helicopter pad, but at 340,000 square feet it was half the size of the current proposal. City planners said the site would be rezoned in the city’s general plan update next year, which will study cumulative impacts of higher density office development in the neighborhood. But city planners now have the green light to get an early start on the Dostart site. A doubling of allowed floor area ratio has been proposed for the Dostart project, from 0.5 to 1.0, which could result in a range of configurations, from tall and narrow 10 story buildings with large courtyards to shorter two story buildings with little open space. “A FAR of 1.0 is not excessive if it is going to get people out of their cars,” said Mayor Jac Siegel, referring to the nearby light rail station, which allows a density bonus for “transit oriented development.” In a letter to the city, Ricker said the site is 425 feet from a six-minute trip to the downtown train station via light rail. Council member Laura Macias was the only critic. “I’m not excited about 10 story buildings” in a neighborhood of buildings “no greater than two to three stories.” Ricker told the council that the project could bring $8-10 million in fees to the city and as much as $2.5 million in “off-site improvements” for public use. V

names on the list. The council may announce that a selection has been made Tuesday, but the person’s name will not be released until background checks and negotiations over compensation are complete, Siegel said. The council may make a compensation offer to the selected candidate on Tuesday. “If we do come to a decision by next week, we could have somebody on board by July,” Siegel said. E-mail Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

MAY 6, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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It’s not a sport that you see too frequently, but Mountain View resident Michelle Rahn snapped this photo of kayak polo players in action on Shoreline Lake on a sunny winter day. If you have a photo taken around town which you’d like published in the Voice, please send it (as a jpg attachment) to editor@mv-voice.com.

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new primary care practice, which promises patients highly affordable care without any of the hassles often associated with health insurance, opened May 4 in Mountain View. Founded by two medical doctors, M. Samir Qamar, and his wife, Hisana Qamar, MedLion charges patients a monthly $49

membership fee for access to an unlimited number of appointments. Patients are charged an additional $10 per visit — and that’s it. “It does sound too good to be true,� Qamar said with a chuckle, noting that he is often asked whether his practice is some sort of underhanded scheme. “It is something that is almost a deterrent to our growth.� The key word being “almost.�

Qamar founded MedLion in 2009 in Monterey, and said he began turning a profit within seven months, he said. Qamar said that in bypassing insurance companies and having patients pay him directly, he saves a great deal of money. That’s because dealing with insurance companies is an incredibly complex, and pricy, process. See MEDLION, page 9

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Quiet local reaction to Osama bin Laden’s death By Nick Veronin

R

owdy celebrations took place outside the White House after Sunday’s surprise announcement from President Barack Obama that a team of U.S. Navy SEALs had killed Osama bin Laden in a firefight Pakistan. Closer to home, the reaction was far more subdued. Bin Laden, the Al-Qaida leader who masterminded the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, has eluded capture for almost a decade. “I believe he was an evil man,� Mayor Jac Siegel said on Monday. “You can’t kill people because they have a different ideology. I believe the world is a better place without that evil person here.� Siegel said he wanted to make it clear that “Islam is not evil and Muslims are not evil. This is clearly not a war with Islam or Muslims. People tend to think that way and that’s wrong.� Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, commended America’s military and intelligence community for tracking down bin Laden. “It was a great relief to hear the news that Osama bin Laden was taken after an almost decadelong hunt. No one could have received this news with greater relief than the families who lost their loved ones in the worst attack in our nation’s history,� Eshoo said in a statement. “When America decides to do something, we have the capacity and the tenacity to do so. We can finally say, ‘mission accomplished.’� Employees at three downtown Mountain View pubs said that it was business as usual Sunday night, even as throngs of people gathered in public spaces in Washington D.C. and New York City to celebrate the news of Osama bin Laden’s death. Maya Worley-Mann, a man-

Help us rescue lives in Japan.

City to share dispatch system with Palo Alto, Los Altos By Gennady Sheyner

ager at Tied House said that a patron broke the news to the rest of the restaurant and bar. “Oh, my God! Osama bin Laden is dead,� Worley-Mann said, quoting the patron. That was about the extent of the reaction, Worley-Mann said. “I think everybody was almost entranced by it.� Bartenders working Sunday night at Molly MaGee’s and St. Stephen’s Green — both located on Castro Street — said that crowds were no larger than usual. A bartender at Molly MaGee’s said that it took a while for the news to trickle into the bar, as the televisions inside had been tuned to sports, and that most of the patrons were sitting outside on the patio. The bartender, who asked not to be identified, said that a few patrons did order shots specifically to commemorate the occasion. Transit agencies around the country and in the Bay Area responded to the news by bulking up security measures. According to an official from the Valley Transportation Authority, local bus and train operators, as well as security officers will be on heightened alert. “On a regular basis we are all always looking for any suspicious behavior or packages,� said Jennie Loft, a VTA spokeswoman. “In light of what happened over the weekend we are even more vigilant.� V

W

hile other Peninsula cities are preparing to merge or outsource their public-safety departments, Mountain View, Palo Alto and Los Altos are pursuing a less drastic idea — a “virtual consolidation� of their emergency operations. The three cities have been working for the past three years on upgrades that would allow each department to effortlessly communicate with the others and provide backup service as needed. The project would also boost the cities’ ability to respond to incidents along their respective borders and provide redundancies for each dispatch system — a useful measure in the event one of the dispatch systems becomes inoperable, said Charles Cullen, director of technical services at the Palo Alto Police Department. Cullen, who updated the Palo Alto City Council on the effort Monday night, called virtual consolidation “an important and groundbreaking project� that will allow the cities to leverage the benefits of consolidation without the “upfront cost of a brick-andmortar facility.� By pooling their resources, Cullen said, the three cities were able to bid together on a common dispatch system that they would not be able to afford on their own. Last year, they selected the company Intergraph Corporation to design and install the new system, Cullen said. The upgrade will cost the three

cities a little more than $3 million, with Mountain View and Palo Alto each contributing roughly $1.3 million and Los Altos (which has a smaller population and no fire department) chipping in $740,000. The mutual-aid channel would be partially funded by a grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program. For Palo Alto, the consolidation project is part of a greater push to save money by working with neighbors around the region. Palo Alto City Manager James Keene has been working with his counterparts in neighboring cities for more than a year to see which types of services they can share to save money and improve efficiency. As he unveiled his proposed budget for fiscal year 2012 on Monday night, he cited the “virtual consolidation� project as a harbinger of the future. “We’ll be doing much, much more of that, as I see it,� Keene said. “We plan to expand our use of information technology to make us more efficient as an organization.� But while saving money is a major incentive, city officials also believe the project would improve response times for emergencyservice calls, Cullen said. The three cities aim to adopt a common 9-1-1 system that would allow them to respond to text messages, e-mail and videos — a system branded “Next Generation 9-1-1.� It would also allow each city to monitor calls just across its border and respond accordingly.

“There may be resources that are closer to south Palo Alto in Mountain View and Los Altos than our units up north and we think we can reduce response times and serve the public better,� Cullen said. Cullen said the cities hope to sign a contract for the joint public-safety systems in the next month and to begin installing and testing the new system later this year. The joint systems are scheduled to go live in spring 2012, he said. The project is nearing completion at a time when other cities in the region are planning more dramatic measures for reducing public-safety costs. San Bruno and Millbrae agreed last month to merge their fire departments. San Carlos, which had previously shared a fire department with Belmont, had flirted with outsourcing its fire department before deciding last week to merge it with Redwood City’s. Palo Alto officials praised the virtual consolidation effort Monday night, calling it a smart way to reduce money and improve service. Councilman Greg Schmid said it was an “exciting project.� Councilwoman Nancy Shepherd called it “great,� and Mayor Sid Espinosa, a leading proponent of regionalizing services, dubbed it a “no-brainer.� “It will provide economies of scale,� Espinosa said. “This was an area where there was a clear opportunity. There was a winwin for all the different communities. V

 

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â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  MAY 6, 2011


-PDBM/FXT MEDLION

Continued from page 6

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of the costs that doctors undertake are due to insurance companiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; regulation,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a lot of staff that is hired just for the insurance side of things. If the gym had to chase you down after every visit it would be quite taxing for them.â&#x20AC;? First a doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s billing department calls the insurer and gives them a specialized code â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one for the appointment itself and others for tests conducted or blood drawn. The insurance company then reimburses the doctors for each procedure. Sometimes the same insurer will pay different rates for the same procedure, depending on the individual patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policy. This process can take a long time, leaving doctors footing the bill until the insurance company finally reimburses them, he said. By eliminating the need for insurance specialists, MedLionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s system of â&#x20AC;&#x153;direct primary careâ&#x20AC;? saves Qamar somewhere in the neighborhood of 35 percent in operational overhead. The MedLion system is not entirely new. Prior to the 1970s, Qamar said, most people paid their doctors directly for primary care. Those who had health insurance paid into plans that were intended to keep them from going bankrupt in the event of a catastrophic accident or the onset of a deadly disease. These plans had high deductibles, and, because they were a lower risk to the insurance company, lower premiums. However, as the health insurance industry grew, it expanded into primary care. Premiums inched ever higher and the system became more convoluted each year. The direct care model never entirely disappeared, but as all-encompassing health plans gained in popularity, doctors who offered direct care began charging exorbitant membership fees for â&#x20AC;&#x153;V.I.P.â&#x20AC;? service. These doctors care for a small group of patients, and still make house calls, but charge hundreds, if not thousands, on a monthly basis. In fact, Qamar has a V.I.P. practice of his own, and if it werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for his experience caring for extremely wealthy patients as the house doctor for the Pebble Beach Resorts, he may have never founded MedLion Back in 2009 Qamarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who runs Qamar & Qamar Medical Practice, an insurance-based primary care office

in Monterey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; began noting a sharp decline in business, as many of her patients lost their jobs and subsequently lost health coverage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m taking care of the rich and famous. Why not scale it down to cater to the masses and help as many people out in the community as possible?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she said. By cutting out house calls and other V.I.P. services, and increasing his patient load, Qamar figured he could significantly lower the cost of offering

direct primary care. It worked, and the proof is in the opening of his second office, as well as in his optimism that MedLion will soon expand even further, he said. He hopes to open new offices in the near future and said he is open to either hiring doctors and nurse practitioners, or even franchising the MedLion model out to other states. Qamar is the first to acknowledge that MedLion is not a comprehensive health care plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not promising care for

the catastrophic,â&#x20AC;? he said, and recommended that anyone who chooses to become a member of MedLion should also look into a high-deductible health plan in case of the unexpected. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We try to teach our patients to think of the health insurance industry like the car insurance industry,â&#x20AC;? he explained. Car insurance companies pay for totaled cars or hospital bills those injured in wrecks. But the individual foots the bill for oil changes and blown gaskets. Americans need to be more

involved in the consumption of health care, Qamar said, and he sees MedLion, along with other growing direct primary care organizations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as Qliance in Seattle and Symbeo out of New Jersey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as a means to that end. It will be a challenge, Qamar said â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are creatures of habit, and for the past 20 years we have expected our insurance companies to take care of usâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but the sooner â&#x20AC;&#x153;we break the moldâ&#x20AC;? the better. V

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tion. Today, “the second kids find out, they share. They put it out there immediately and they don’t always think of the ramifications.” High school kids are acutely aware of, and concerned with, their image and how they are perceived by their friends and other students, McGuirk says. Being admitted to a venerable institution, like Berkeley, Stanford or Harvard provides “instant notoriety among your peers.” Adding the immediacy of Facebook to the college application process increases the amount of pressure students feel to succeed. Finding the funds But social media is merely one component of many amplifying the pressure felt by students these days, according to McGuirk. The ailing economy has dried up college funds and put parents out of work. “Circumstances change,” McGuirk says. “The college future that was once secure, isn’t anymore” — a fact that can be hard for an adolescent to wrap his or her mind around. Kline reported feeling guilty for being accepted to a prestigious and expensive school, because “money is tight” in his household right now. And even though he knows his parents could afford his SAT and SAT II tutoring, he seemed to wince when recounting how much it cost. If the job market is rough on the parents of high school students, it can prove even more daunting to the students themselves — especially those who are planning to pay their way through college. Pankonen, who is working part time right now, worries about how she will make enough money to support herself in the coming years, and Justin Sarmiento, a 17-year-old Mountain View senior who plans to major in nursing at Cal State East Bay, isn’t sure if he will be able to afford to live near campus or if he will have to commute. McGuirk does her best to help students like Pankonen and Sarmiento, coaching them on where to find scholarships and grants, and advising them to make financially prudent decisions. For example, Pankonen and McGuirk worked together to determine that it would be in her best interest to get the first two years of general education done locally at Foothill College before she applies to transfer to the University of California Santa Cruz, where she hopes to study to be an X-ray technician.

Other pressures While some students feel the financial strain of college weighing upon them, others, for whom money isn’t as much of an issue — either because they come from a wealthy family or have managed to secure financial aid — may feel an entirely different pressure, according to McGuirk. “I think there is some expectation from parents that their kids will go to a good school and they want their kids to do as well, if not better, than they did,” she says. “But if your mom or dad went to Cal or Stanford, you don’t have much room to grow.” For students who come to her office with all of their academic eggs in an Ivy League basket, McGuirk says she does her best to show them that they might find the education and experience they desire at any number of other schools. “I don’t think people have to stress as much as they do, given the fact that there are so many choices of colleges out there,” McGuirk says. “You are going to make you successful. The college you choose isn’t going to make you successful.” McGuirk counts herself, as well as the students she counsels, lucky, thanks to the healthy ratio of counselors to students in the Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District. While the American School Counselor Association recommends a ratio of one counselor to every 250 students, the reality is that the national average is 457-1. In California, a state that is suffering from a massive budget deficit, the ratio is close to double the national average at 814-1. However, in the Mountain View-Los Altos district the ratio is 358-1. It is a manageable number, according to McGuirk, who says that the most important aspect of an academic counselor’s job is understanding the students’ hopes and goals. “I think it’s huge,” she says. “I think that’s what my entire job is. If I don’t know them personally, it’s really hard to do my job well.” Despite all the stress that comes along with the college application process, all of the Mountain View High School students interviewed for this story are looking forward to the next big step. “It was definitely a stressful situation,” says Marisa Leone, a 17-year-old senior on her way to U.C. Santa Cruz. Writing essays and waiting for acceptance letters were the two most trying aspects of the process, she recalls. But now that she knows she has been accepted and her path is set, Leone says she is “really, really, really excited for college.” V


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MAY 6, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

11


              

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â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  MAY 6, 2011


-PDBM/FXT BUDGET

Continued from page 1

Costs outpace revenue For next year, city staff proposes to take $1,050,000 from the Google lease payment to fill an estimated $2.6 general fund budget gap. Relatively painless â&#x20AC;&#x153;operational efficienciesâ&#x20AC;? would save another $450,000, bringing the deficit is down to $1.1 million, which could be filled by keeping employee compensation from rising too much â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unions agree to it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really have a lot of confidence in getting the $1 million dollars we needâ&#x20AC;? from the unions, said Mayor Jac Siegel. General fund budget revenues are projected to grow $1.8 million next year, while expenses could grow by $4.6 million, $3.7 million of which comes from rising city employee compensation costs. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s employee retirement costs alone are projected to rise by $2.8 million next year. Health care costs would rise next year as well, by roughly $1 million. City employees are using their medical benefits more than average, explained finance department officials. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unions are likely to point to the Google lease payment, and $1.4 million in general fund revenue that is going unspent this fiscal year, which is not automatically applied to next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s general fund budget.

HANGAR 0NE

Continued from page 1

taken to a landfill. Lenny Siegel of the Save Hangar One Committee (SHOC) accepted the decision after participating in talks with NASA about the windows last week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is quite disappointing, but we are still in a position to ensure that Hangar One is restored,â&#x20AC;? said Siegel, director of the Center for Public Environmental Oversight, in an e-mail. The hangarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upper rows of windows are corrugated and wire-reinforced, making them costly to reproduce. They were made to withstand a hydrogen explosion, as hydrogen airships still existed when Hangar One was built in 1932 at Moffett Field to house the U.S.S. Macon airship. Work is still underway to begin removing the siding of the hangar, which was scheduled to begin in April. As of May 2, panels had yet to be removed, according to aerial photos taken by pilot and SHOC member Steve Williams. A contractor has undertaken the massive project of putting up indoor scaffolding

Instead, city policy is to put that money towards budget reserves or one-time expenses. With the city consistently underspending its annual budget, the practice was questioned by council member Laura Macias. Possible cuts Without concessions from the unions, city staff have listed possible cuts in three tiers of â&#x20AC;&#x153;increasing orders of severityâ&#x20AC;? if the council wants to maintain a structurally balanced budget. The first tier is most likely, and saves $675,000, in part by laying off a finance department assistant, a theater stagehand and the fire departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public outreach person, Jamie Garrett. Second tier options may be necessary without the $1 million reduction in the rise of employee compensation. That tier includes laying off a code enforcement officer, an accounting technician, a park ranger and a community services officer in the police department. Those tiers also offer options that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t involve layoffs, but many would eliminate vacant positions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salaries and we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t laid off employees,â&#x20AC;? Siegel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to.â&#x20AC;? City staff members say that if nothing is done to lower costs, the city would continue to run a deficit until 2015 while quickly burning through reserves. But if a â&#x20AC;&#x153;structurally balancedâ&#x20AC;? budto remove the siding, which the Navy wants to remove because of the PCBs, asbestos and lead contained in the siding. While NASA has requested $32.8 million to restore the Hangar, there are no guarantees it will be approved and there is and no telling how long Hangar One will be left a massive, bare skeleton. SHOC is calling on supporters of Hangar One to write letters to Sen. Diane Feinstein in support of Hangar One restoration funding. The National Trust for Historic Preservation has already written a letter to Feinstein and others, calling Hangar One a place of â&#x20AC;&#x153;national importance.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is an excellent surviving example of early twentiethcentury military planning, engineering, and construction in the Streamline Moderne style,â&#x20AC;? wrote Stephanie Meeks of the NTHP. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is emblematic of the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contributions to aviation and space advancement, as well as technology research and development.â&#x20AC;? In 1994 Hangar One was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and in 2008 was

get is achieved, revenues will cover expenses until 2015 when revenues may begin to exceed expenses until the next recession. Googleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $30 million City officials predict that the interest alone on Googleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $30 million lease payment would create $1.1 million a year in new general fund revenue. One option is to use that annual interest to fund city services for 52 years. Having that consistent revenue, â&#x20AC;&#x153;speaks to me,â&#x20AC;? Bryant said. But she and other council members said they were concerned that inflation would eventually make the $30 million worth far less than it is today. In 52 years the $30 million would be worth what $3 million is worth today, Siegel said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a real problem with that.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather see the money used more quickly to get us more buying power,â&#x20AC;? Siegel said, an opinion most council members appeared to agree with. Bryant said the council should periodically examine what the city should do with the money in the future, saying she had no interest in figuring out how to spend it all now. The $30 million Google lease payment presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;a rare opportunity to both support current needs while also funding service enhancements,â&#x20AC;? reported city staff, who recommend that 25 percent of the interest be used for â&#x20AC;&#x153;enhanced servicesâ&#x20AC;? beginning in 2012-2013.

 !  

V

placed on a list of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;11 Most Endangered Historic Placesâ&#x20AC;? in the U.S. by the national register. Hangar One will be discussed at the next Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board meeting at 7 p.m. on May 12 at the Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Avenue. E-mail Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

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                                   ! MAY 6, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

13


-PDBM/FXT ELECTION

Continued from page 1

Jay Gill, a proponent of the Los Altos School District’s Measure E says the tax is needed to address education cuts resulting from federal, state and local budgets being slashed. At about 10 p.m. Tuesday night, Gill said he was “cautiously optimistic,” that the parcel tax — expected to raise $2.3 million for the district over the course of its six-year life — would pass. He said it was still too early to call the election, however. “I’ll bite my nails a little bit,” Gill said. Ron Haley, a Los Altos Hills resident who led a campaign against Measure E, said he had his fingers crossed that his side would claim the majority of the last minute ballots cast on election day. “The unfortunate thing is that we’re behind,” he said. By Haley’s calculation, about

FIRE

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Dobbins from his work with the preschool. “He’s just a cornerstone of the school.” Firefighters arrived at the house to find smoke and flames coming through the front windows of the home, said Jaime Garrett a spokeswoman for the fire department. Dobbins’ daughter was transported to a local hospital and treated for smoke inhalation but she is doing fine now, according to Dobbins. The Dobbins also have a son, who lives in San Francisco and was not at home when the house caught fire. Poor said she is starting a donation fund to help the Dobbins family rebuild. Check the Voice website at mv-voice.com for more information on how to help. V

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deep impression on him. His neighbors across the way immediately took him and his family in, feeding them breakfast and offering moral support until the Red Cross could place them in a hotel. His wife’s colleagues from Foothill College, as well as families affiliated with the Mountain View Parent Nursery School — where Dobbins has worked for the past 21 years — have offered money, furniture and help in finding a new home. “He’s wonderful with the kids,” said Margaret Poor, who knows

90 more “no” votes would be enough to thwart the necessary two-thirds majority. An updated tally released Wednesday afternoon showed the margin closed slightly, from 67.3 percent on election night to 67.1 percent. About 1,000 students living in Mountain View attend the district’s seven elementary and two middle schools — roughly 25 percent of the entire student body. Homeowners in the district already are paying $597 a year for a parcel tax passed in 2002, and a bond issue assessment of about $600 per year on a home with an assessed value of $1 million. The Santa Clara County elections office reported Wednesday afternoon that the vote is 9,187 in favor to 4,509 opposed, with all 16 precincts reporting. An updated tally is due by 5 p.m. Friday, May 6. Check www.mv-voice. com for an updated story.

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011

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PUBLIC NOTICE FORMER NAVAL AIR STATION MOFFETT FIELD Restoration Advisory Board Meeting 

The next regular meeting of the Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) for former Naval Air Station (NAS) Moffett Field will be held on:

Thursday, May 12, 2011, from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at: Mountain View Senior Center Social Hall 266 Escuela Avenue Mountain View, CA 94040-1813 The RAB reviews and comments on plans and activities about the ongoing environmental studies and restoration activities underway at Moffett Field. Regular RAB meetings are open to the public and the Navy encourages your involvement. To review documents on Moffett Field environmental restoration projects, please visit the information repository located at the Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View, CA 94041, (650) 903-6337. For more information, contact Mr. Scott Anderson, Navy Base Realignment and Closure Environmental Coordinator at (619) 532-0938 or scott.d.anderson@navy.mil. Visit the Navy’s website: http://www.bracpmo.navy.mil/basepage.aspx?baseid=52&state=California&name=moffett

CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW

Public Hearing Notice Citizens Watchdog Committee on 2000 Measure A Program Expenditures

Results of Independent Compliance Audit on FY 2010 2000 Measure A Program Expenditures

Los Altos Lutheran Church ELCA

Pastor David K. Bonde Outreach Pastor Gary Berkland

9:00 am Worship 10:30 am Education Nursery Care Provided 650-948-3012

To include your Church in

Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-326-8210 ext. 6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com

460 S. El Monte Ave., Los Altos

www.losaltoslutheran.org

MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View Office Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189

PUBLIC HEARING: The Citizens Watchdog Committee (CWC) for the 2000 Measure A Transit Sales Tax Program (“Measure A”) is holding a ballot-required public hearing on FY 2010 Measure A expenditures to receive input from the community: Wednesday, May 11, 2011, at 6:00 p.m. County of Santa Clara Board of Supervisors’ Chambers 70 West Hedding Street, San Jose, CA 95110 (This location is served by VTA Light Rail and Bus Lines 61, 62, 66 and 181.) The public is encouraged to attend but for those unable, written comments will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. on May 11 by email to: board.secretary@vta.org or by mail to: Office of the Board Secretary, 3331 N. First Street, Building B-1, San Jose, CA 95134-1927. Sign language services will be provided. If additional interpreter services are required, please contact VTA Customer Service at least five days prior to the meeting at (408) 321-2300, TTY (408) 321-2330. Copies of Measure A Program documents and reports are available for public inspection from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays at the Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) offices at 3331 N. First Street, San Jose, CA in the Building B lobby. They are also available for viewing at local public libraries and at VTA’s website: www.vta.org (which includes accessible versions). Questions on the public hearing should be directed to: Stephen Flynn, Senior Management Analyst, at (408) 321-5720 or to stephen.flynn@vta.org. INDEPENDENT AUDIT: Fulfilling its ballot-defined responsibilities, the CWC commissioned an audit of the Measure A Program financial records and schedule for Fiscal Year 2010 (July 1, 2009 – June 30, 2010). Macias Gini & O’Connell, LLP, independent certified public accountants, conducted the compliance audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the U.S. and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards. They issued an unqualified, or “clean,” opinion on the financial schedule of the Measure A Program. Copies of the audit results and other related reports are available at the locations stated above and at www.vta.org.

10/04-7792

A Guide to the Spiritual Community

­{än®ÊÎÓ£‡xÈnäÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊUÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊ//9\Ê­{än®ÊÎÓ£‡ÓÎÎäÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊUÊÊÊÊÊÊÊÊwww.vta.org MAY 6, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

15


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■ EDITORIAL ■ YOUR LETTERS ■ GUEST OPINIONS

NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE

A shopping destination or another strip mall?

Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Photographer Michelle Le Photo Intern Nick Gonzales Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Alissa Stallings

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Gary Vennarucci

Advertising Advertising Representatives Judie Block, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 E-mail news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com E-mail letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   fax (650) 326-0155 E-mail Classified ads@MV-Voice.com E-mail Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com

M

ountain View residents who thought they were going to get a new, improved addition to the San Antonio Shopping Center after Sears goes away are very likely going to be disappointed. After an underwhelming performance at the City Council last week, including a request for a long list of changes in the project, developer Merlone Geier was sent away with instructions to come better prepared next time. Council member Ronit Bryant said the requests made it “clear as mud” what the project would be. “The worst thing is to vote on something and we don’t know what we are voting on. That I will not do,” she added. But the council may have lost sight of the big picture while they bicker about the small stuff in the mall’s plan for the property’s 16.3 acres owned by San Francisco developer Merlone Geier. For example: ■ For shoppers, instead of finding Santana Row-style boutique shops or a major department store, this remake of the mall will feature a new Safeway store, relocated from California Avenue, along with even more parking than the city requires. In addition, Rite Aid has pulled out of the shopping center plans. And there is a possibility that Target might jump ship and move from Showers Drive, near WalMart, to take up a large chunk of the development. In the 311,000 square feet of space reserved for retail there is room for a few more small shops and restaurants, but you get the idea. Don’t expect Macy’s, Nordstrom or Bloomingdales to move in anytime soon. ■ And then there is the huge housing component, up to 350 rental units in three, five-story buildings that will tower over the entire complex of almost exclusively one-story

The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome.

NGUESTOPINION

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

A mother looks back at the good times, and bad

Copyright ©2010 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

By Dale Dunlap NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM Post your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com E-MAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 964-6300

16

T

his time of year always finds me evaluating my mothering skills. Have I been the loving, caring parent I want to be? There are many examples that show that I have been. I remember the countless nights reading to my children in bed, especially through the long cold winters in Michigan. I remember always trying to transform an ordinary day to an extraordinary day, like the time we had a picnic under the dining room table while it snowed outside. But there are plenty of other examples, when I lost my temper

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011

and said horrible things that I can’t believe I said. Or I tried to be their friend instead of their parent, and caved in when I should have set stronger limits. Now that my children are adults, it’s easier to see the kind of mother I was. They are kind, they respect nature, and they always try to do the right thing. Even more importantly, they are happy. And when they get together, they tease me about the times I was a raving lunatic or embarrassed them in public. The fact that we can all laugh about it now is a wonderful Mother’s Day gift. Dale Dunlap lives on Pettis Avenue.

buildings. The housing could add up to nearly 300,000 square feet, depending on the size of the units. (For perspective, the transit-oriented Prometheus project under construction now on the former Minton’s site is only 203 units.) This concept will squeeze up to 350 families into a mall whose original focus was retail and now will have another purpose entirely. ■ One attraction for the housing tenants will be a one-acre park promised by the developer, who envisions a farmers market, a dog park, bike paths and a bocce ball court that would be open to the public. But to help pay for the 10 units of below-market-rate housing that can no longer be required for such projects, the developer has asked the city to reimburse 100 percent of the value of the park, which would substantially reduce the $5.5 million park in-lieu fee the city was expecting. Given this design, members of the City Council need to ask themselves why this type of project needs to be in the San Antonio Shopping Mall. Its five-story housing buildings along with Safeway and Target and acres of parking could be located in any good-sized strip mall in Mountain View. It is not easy to remake a 56-acre shopping center by upgrading 16.3 acres, or only one-third of the space. But one thing for sure, Safeway and Target are not going to draw destination shoppers from miles around when the same stores can be found near most neighborhoods on the Peninsula. The one-acre park is a nice touch, but other than that the Merlone Geier plan looks like just another development that could be built anywhere, but doesn’t go far enough to enhance the character of San Antonio Shopping Center.


7JFXQPJOU NLETTERS

The City of Mountain View Recreation Division invites you to the annual

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

LOOKING BEYOND BIN LADEN’S DEATH I’m not reassured by the administration’s claims about all the “justice” vis a vis the death of Osama bin Laden. I would be more assured that we were making progress in this regard if the administration were to tell us that warrant-less wiretapping, indefinite detention without trial, and executive assassination orders were being abolished. Bill Michel Ortega Avenue

Saturday May 14, 2011 8 a.m.—2 p.m.

Join over 100 sellers in one location!

at Rengstorff Park

ins Hot Barga ! ood & Good F

CALTRAIN BOARD DID THE RIGHT THING

201 South Rengstorff Avenue Mountain View, CA 94040 Questions? Call 650-903-6331

The Caltrain board of directors deserves praise for finding a way to avoid the drastic service cuts proposed a few months ago. Caltrain service is vitally important to thousands of people in the San Jose to San Francisco corridor, especially for Peninsula residents who attend San Francisco Giants home games. If Caltrain had gone through with its original proposed cuts, a parking nightmare would have been created around Pac Bell Park during Giants home games. Caltrain is also very important to the many commuters who use it to get to and from their jobs on at least a weekly basis. Air pollution would drastically increase if these riders switch to driving, which they probably would if Caltrain were to shut down. And this train service probably would have been forced to shut down for financial reasons if the original proposed cuts had been approved, because the Caltrain cuts would have further harmed the local economy, which would have in turn further reduced tax revenues needed to fund Caltrain operations. Michael Ludwig Carroll Street

FIRE DEPT. RESCUE WAS FAST, PROFESSIONAL One more reminder of why we love living in Mountain View is the skill and personal commitment from our Fire Department. We want to commend the entire overnight shift for their 4:20 a.m. rescue of our neighbors and their home in Old Mountain View. The speed and efficiency of the crew were impressive and professional. As things wound down, officers came by and were caring, concerned and thoughtful. Thanks and well done! Don and Gretchen McPhail Hope Street

STANFORD STROKE CENTER Committed to the highest standards of stroke care

Providing multidisciplinary stroke care for 19 years, the Stanford Stroke Center has led the way in establishing community standards of care. Stanford is consistently recognized as a leader in stroke treatment and research, with a comprehensive center pioneering medical, surgical and interventional therapies for treating and preventing stroke. MAY IS NATIONAL STROKE AWARENESS MONTH

COME MEET THE EXPERTS AT THE STANFORD SHOPPING CENTER (between Macy’s women and Louis Vuitton)

SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2011 10:00am – 3:00pm Stanford Hospital & Clinics’ staff will be providing free patient education, risk factor assesments, and blood pressure checks. We’ll see you there!

WARNING SIGNS OF A STROKE t Sudden numbness or weakness in face, arm or leg

(usually on one side) t Sudden trouble speaking or understanding others t Sudden trouble seeing out of one or both eyes t Sudden, severe headache with no apparent cause t Sudden dizziness, trouble walking, loss of balance or

coordination (especially if associated with any of the above symptoms) For any sign of stroke CALL 911

stanfordhospital.org/strokemonth 650.723.4448 MAY 6, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ RESTAURANT REVIEW ■ MOVIE TIMES ■ BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT

N R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

Small is a beautiful pizza FROM FLOUR TO HEAT, NAPOLETANA BAKES THE REAL THING By Sheila Himmel

I

MICHELLE LE

Pizza Margherita is topped with homemade roma tomato sauce, fresh mozarella, basil and extra virgin olive oil.

f you can walk to Napoletana Pizzeria, drop in for a genuine 12-inch Neapolitan pie, sit at the counter with a glass of wine and watch chef/owner Costas Eleftheriadis throw dough. If you have to drive, the good news is that parking is easy in Mountain View’s Cost Plus strip mall. Nestled in the corner, Napoletana takes the place of Cafe Mazeh, replacing pita with pizza but maintaining the homey, restful atmosphere. Never mind the energetic self-improvement going on the neighboring Bikram Yoga, Beauty Unlimited and Little Gym.

In Napoletana, the previous cafe’s mural of a fantasy San Francisco takes up one wall. A pile of Caputo flour sacks sits over by the brains of the operation, Costas (the name he prefers) and his wood-fired oven. Caputo pizza flour has a low ash content and a fine, silky texture. In very high-heat ovens like Costas has, it produces the classic Neapolitan crust: thin yet soft, crispy yet chewy, slightly charred. He is certified under the Associazione Vera Pizza Napoletana. VPN, says its website, “safeguards and promotes the culture of the real Neapolitan pizza worldwide.” What else makes it real? The

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If you would like to be listed in DINING ON THE TOWN please call Brent at the Voice at 964-6300.

PRIME RIB DINNER

Every Friday & Saturday Nights, starting at 5pm. Starting at $15.99 includes choice of a cup of soup or house salad, cornbread or garlic bread and a slice of pie for dessert (excludes Fresh Fruit Pies & Cheesecakes).

NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS Sunday-ThursdayÊUÊ-tarting at 5pm

All served with your choice of garlic or corn bread. Add a slice of pie for only $2 (excludes Fresh Fruit Pies & Cheesecakes).

Sunday:

Flat Iron Steak

Monday:

Lasagna

Tuesday:

Grilled Boneless Rainbow Trout

served with mashed potatoes & vegetables

served with rice & vegetables

Wednesday: Braised Lamb Shank

1099

$

served with mashed potatoes & vegetables

Thursday:

plus tax

Choose any Pasta Dish off our menu

Nightly Dinner Specials not valid on holidays and cannot be combined with any other offer, discount or coupon. Valid at Los Altos location only.

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE Purchase 1 regular priced entrée and two beverages and receive the second entrée, of equal or lesser value, for free. Good for up to 2 discounts for party of 4. Cannot be combined with any other offers, discounts or coupons. Not valid on any holidays. Valid only at Los ÌœÃʏœV>̈œ˜°ÊÊ œÊV>ÅÊÛ>Õi°ÊÊ Ý«ˆÀiÃÊäxÉ19É££°

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011


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Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re invited! Avenidas

Lifetimes of Achievement 2011

Sunday, May ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;, ď&#x2122;&#x2026;ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x201E;ď&#x2122;&#x201E; ď&#x2122;&#x2020;:ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x192; - ď&#x2122;&#x2C6;:ď&#x2122;&#x192;ď&#x2122;&#x192; pm Join us for a garden party honoring the signiďŹ cant professional and community contributions of seven seniors.

Jim Burch Betsy Collard Jan Fenwick Dick Henning Bill and Carolyn Reller Veronica Tincher Call (650) 289-5445 or visit www.avenidas.org for tickets.

MICHELLE LE

Napoletana Pizzeriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cappellini alla checca is angel hair pasta with fresh tomato, basil, extra virgin olive oil and garlic.

12-inch pies are baked for only 60 to 90 seconds at 850 to 900 degrees, which puffs them up. After baking, Costas sprinkles on a bit of olive oil. The only drawback is that if you get pizza to go, it deflates. (Again, note the importance of living nearby or staying there to eat.) Napoletana offers nine pizzas, running $11 to $15. Always a good test, the Margherita is an Italian flag of sweet tomato sauce, bubbling white housemade mozzarella cheese, and deep green leaves of fresh basil. On the Napoletana, add crumbly, tasty â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but not tongue-burning or fatty â&#x20AC;&#x201D; house-made sausage. Other combinations offer Italian ham, artichoke hearts, black olives, smoked mozzarella, Gorgonzola, ricotta, garlic, mushrooms and rapini. Appetizers include the obligatory fried calamari ($12) and a caprese salad ($11), a goodfor-sharing platter of thick and creamy house-made mozzarella

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slabs interspersed with large basil leaves and quarter-inch slices of tomato, on a bed of arugula drizzled in olive oil dressing, with real Parmesan shredded on top. One major problem: out-ofseason tomatoes. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a green salad, a Caesar, and a tricolor (arugula, Belgian endive, radicchio). Add $4 for grilled chicken. The recent soup of the day ($6) sang with silky asparagus and a lemony lilt among diced chicken, carrots and celery. Soup also features on the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu ($6), and a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye view of pasta. The entree menu is a lineup of pasta all-stars: penne with vodka sauce, fettuccine with minced beef and tomato sauce, rigatoni with Italian sausage, capellini with tomato. Linguine comes with four light meatballs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; if you like spicy, you may find these dull, but I appreciated the freshness. See NAPOLETANA, page 20

Since 1945 $)"3$0"-#30*-&3

2010

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Exp. 6/30/11 MAY 6, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

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MICHELLE LE

Caputo flour imported from Italy goes into the dough at Napoletana Pizzeria.

MICHELLE LE

Insalata tricolore combines arugula, Belgian endive, radicchio and shaved Parmesan with balsamic vinagrette dressing.

NAPOLETANA

Continued from page 19

Spaghetti carbonara also is refreshingly light, flaked with a generous amount of pancetta that stays moist with crisp edges.

Desserts come from Italy. Bravo for the creamy tiramisu and Illy coffee. The short, all-Italian wine list offers three whites and four reds, bottles from $20 to $34, glasses $7 to $13. Get a bottle. Also there are three styles of Italian beer,

and Stella Artois ($5). Open less than four months, Napoletana has been discovered. On a Tuesday night, it’s comfortably full of families, couples and a large party of friends and colleagues. Some must live nearby. Lucky them.

NDININGNOTES Napoletana Pizzeria: Reservations 1910 W. El Camino Real, Credit Cards Mountain View. (650) 969-4884. Alcohol

Website: www.napoletanapizzeria.com

Highchairs Wheelchair Access

Hours: Monday 5-9 p.m.; Tuesday-Thursday 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5-9 p.m.; Friday-Saturday 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5-10 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.-2 p.m., 5-9 p.m.

Banquet Outdoor Seating Noise Level

Bathroom Cleanliness Parking

fine excellent lot

Your most useful tool T H E S TA R O N E H O M E E Q U I T Y L I N E O F C R E D I T

RATES

AS LOW AS

(408) 543-5202 or toll free (866) 543-5202

*APR=ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE. YOUR RATE MAY BE HIGHER BASED ON CREDIT QUALIFICATION. RATE AND TERMS APPLY TO CALIFORNIA OWNER-OCCUPIED RESIDENCES. STAR ONE HOME EQUITY LINE IS A VARIABLE PRODUCT. THE MAXIMUM POSSIBLE RATE IS 18% AND THE MINIMUM POSSIBLE RATE IS 3.50%. YOU MUST PROVIDE ADEQUATE INSURANCE AND A CLEAN TITLE TO THE PROPERTY SO THAT THE STAR ONE EQUITY LINE WILL APPEAR IN SECOND POSITION. THE MAXIMUM STAR ONE REAL ESTATE LOAN(S) TO ANY MEMBER IS LIMITED TO $2 MILLION (CUMULATIVE TOTAL). THE AMOUNT OF THE CREDIT LINE AND THE AMOUNT OF THE FIRST TRUST DEED MAY NOT EXCEED 80% OF THE MARKET VALUE OF THE HOME UP TO $800,000. FOR LINES EXCEEDING $250,000 CLOSING AND APPRAISAL FEES MAY APPLY IN THE RANGE OF $800 TO $1200. FEES RATES, COSTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. MAXIMUM TERM OF THE LOAN IS 25 YEARS WHICH INCLUDES A 10 YEAR DRAW PERIOD AND A 15 YEAR REPAYMENT PERIOD. OTHER TERMS AND CONDITIONS MAY APPLY, CALL FOR DETAILS. THERE MAY BE AN EARLY CLOSURE FEE OF $500 FOR HOME EQUITY LINES CLOSED WITHIN THE FIRST TWO YEARS OF ORIGINATION. THE HOME EQUITY LINE RATE IS CALCULATED BASED ON PRIME RATE OR PRIME RATE PLUS A MARGIN IN THE RANGE OF 0.50% TO 1% DEPENDING ON YOUR CREDIT QUALIFICATION. †CONSULT YOUR TAX ADVISOR REGARDING YOUR ABILITY TO DEDUCT HOME EQUITY LINE INTEREST. EQUAL HOUSING LENDER. WE DO BUSINESS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FEDERAL FAIR HOUSING LAW AND THE EQUAL CREDIT OPPORTUNITY ACT.

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011


8FFLFOE

Spices for Health

NMOVIETIMES African Cats (G) ((1/2 Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue & Thu. at 1:55 & 7 p.m. Applause (1929) Stanford Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 6 & 9:10 p.m. Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13) Century 16: 1:20 & 6:50 p.m. Bill Cunningham New York Aquarius Theatre: 3, 5, 7 & 9 p.m. Cabin in the Sky (1943) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m. Cave of Forgotten Dreams (G) Century 16: 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 7:55 & 10:25 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 a.m. Fast Five (PG-13) Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6:10, 7:25, 8:20, 9:20 & 10:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 a.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:15 p.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11 & 11:45 a.m.; 12:30, 1:10, 1:55, 2:40, 3:25, 4:10, 4:50, 5:35, 6:20, 7:10, 7:50, 8:30, 9:20, 10:10 & 10:45 p.m. Gigi (1958) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Mon. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 3:25 p.m. Hanna (PG-13) Century 16: 3:50 & 9:40 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10:30 a.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:40 a.m.; 2:25, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) Century 16: 12:10, 2:20 & 4:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 a.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11 a.m.; In 3D at 1:10, 3:20, 5:30 & 7:40 p.m. Hop (PG) Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:30 a.m.; 4:15 & 9:25 p.m. Jumping the Broom (PG-13) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:45, 4:25, 7:20 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:35 a.m.; 2:25, 5:10, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m. The Love Parade (1929) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Mon. at 5:30 & 9:35 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Capriccio Century 20: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: Wed. at 6:30 p.m. Potiche Aquarius Theatre: 2:30, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Prom (PG) (1/2 Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 1:50, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:15 a.m.; 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:35 & 10:40 p.m. Rio (PG) (( Century 16: In 3D at 12:30, 3:20, 6:10 & 8:40 p.m.; Fri.Sun. also at 10 a.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 1:05, 3:35, 6 & 8:35 p.m.; In 3D at 11:50 a.m.; 2:20, 4:45, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Scream 4 (R) Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 9:50 p.m. The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) Stanford Theatre: Wed. & Thu. at 7:30 p.m. Something Borrowed (PG-13) Century 16: 11:05 a.m.; 1:40, 4:40, 7:40 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 4:55, 7:35 & 10:15 p.m. Source Code (PG-13) Century 16: 7:10 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: Fri.Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:50 a.m.; 2:15, 4:40, 7:15 & 9:35 p.m. Swing Time (1936) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 5:35 & 9:20 p.m. Their Eyes Were Dry Event Century 20: Mon. at 7 p.m. There Be Dragons (PG-13) Century 16: 1:10, 4:10, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m.; Fri.Sun. also at 10:10 a.m. Century 20: 11 a.m.; 1:50, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:20 p.m. Thor (PG-13) Century 16: Noon, 2:40, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 11:15 p.m.; In 3D at 11:20 a.m.; 12:40, 1:30, 2:10, 3:30, 4:30, 5, 6:20, 7:30, 8, 9:30, 10:20 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 & 10:40 a.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10:50 p.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 1:05, 3:50, 6:35 & 9:20 p.m.; In 3D (Fri.-Thu.) at 11:05 & 11:45 a.m.; 1:50, 2:30, 4:35, 5:15, 7:20, 8, 10:05 & 10:45 p.m.; Fri.Sun., Tue. & Thu. also at 12:25, 3:10, 5:55 & 8:40 p.m. Tyler Perryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Madeaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Big Happy Family (PG-13) Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 12:20, 2:55, 5:30 & 8:05 p.m. Water for Elephants (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 12:50, 3:40, 7 & 9:55 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 a.m. Century 20: Fri.-Sun., Tue. & Thu. at 11:25 a.m.; 2:15, 5, 7:45 & 10:30 p.m. Win Win (R) ((( Guild Theatre: 2, 5 & 8 p.m.

AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing at the Aquarius, visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

AFRICAN CATS --1/2

(Century 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;African Catsâ&#x20AC;? unfolds on the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, where the filmmakers seemingly trailed a pride of lions and a coalition of cheetahs. The story focuses on lion cub Layla getting steadily schooled in â&#x20AC;&#x153;the circle of lifeâ&#x20AC;? (by filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end, new cubs have arrived), cheetah â&#x20AC;&#x153;single motherâ&#x20AC;? Sita raising a litter of five, and savanna â&#x20AC;&#x153;kingâ&#x20AC;? Fang ruling the pride with tough but regal authority. Kids would doubtlessly learn more watching basic cable, but the spectacle is what it is, and the big screen adds majesty to it, enhanced by IMAX-style helicopter shots and bigger-than-life slo-mo of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the fastest creature on land â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a cheetah.â&#x20AC;? Rated G. One hour, 29 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C.

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(Century 16, Century 20) Class president Nova Prescott (Aimee Teegarden of TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friday Night Lightsâ&#x20AC;?) is in charge of the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s climactic celebration â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the prom. Things go from sweet to stressful for Nova when the storage room full of completed prom decorations catches fire. The schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s principal forces motorcycle-driving rebel Jesse Richter (Thomas McDonell) to help Nova redecorate for the upcoming dance. Can anyone else see where this is going? Prom might be a night to remember for high-schoolers, but â&#x20AC;&#x153;Promâ&#x20AC;? is a movie to forget for filmgoers. Rated PG for mild language and a brief fight. 1 hour, 43 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; T.H.

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RIO --

(Century 16, Century 20) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rioâ&#x20AC;? starts in the Brazilian rainforest, where baby Blu gets shanghaied by pet-trading smugglers. The blue macaw grows up as the pet of Minnesotan bookstore owner Linda (Leslie Mann), who â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like Blu (Jesse Eisenberg) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; lives comfortably off the social radar. That all changes with the arrival of Tulio (Rodrigo Santoro), a Rio-based bird scientist who has traveled across the globe to ask Linda to bring Blu home to mate with the last female of their kind: If Linda doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t agree, Bluâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s particular species will go extinct. A nervous Blu must shake a tailfeather on a blind date with restless parrot Jewel (Anne Hathaway). Human smugglers again intervene, with white cockatoo Nigel (Jemaine Clement) doing their dirty work. Attracted opposites Blu and Jewel gradually learn to see eye to eye over the course of their vertiginous adventures. Rated G for mild off-color humor. One hour, 36 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; P.C.

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS ---

(Century 16, Century 20). Told in a flashback, Jacob (Robert Pattinson) is a young Cornell veterinary science student. After receiving tragic news, he hops aboard a train in the darkness of the night and awakens to the world of the struggling Benzini Brothers traveling circus. The spectacle dazzles him, but he soon learns about the tawdry reality behind the sequined illusion and enters a forbidden love affair with the cruel ringmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife Marlena (Reese Witherspoon). Rated: PG-13 for moments of intense violence and sexual content. 2 hours. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S.T.

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May 18, 2011 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Shoreline 2690 Shoreline Boulevard Mountain View, CA 94043

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NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley MAY 6, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

21


(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

ART GALLERIES

New Work by Terri Ford Pastellist Terri Ford’s new work includes landscapes, seascapes and France-scapes. Through May 27, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Closes at 3 p.m. Sundays. Free. Viewpoints Gallery, 315 State St., Los Altos. www.viewpointsgallery.com Open Studios at Foothill College Student artists will display their work for sale: book arts, ceramics, drawing, painting, watercolor, photography, printmaking and graphic design. May 14-15, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Foothill College Fine Arts & Communications Department, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos. www.foothillartsociety.com Open Studios at Gallery 9 Five Gallery 9 artists exhibit work in Silicon Valley Open Studios: Joyce Savre, Shigemi Sanders, Kiyoco Michot, Rajani Balaram and Miyoko Mizuno. Through May 28, Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sun. noon-4 p.m. Gallery 9, 143 Main St., Los Altos. www.gallery9losaltos.com

AUDITIONS ‘Little Women: The Musical’ Los Altos Youth Theatre is holding auditions for “Little Women” May 14, 1-4 p.m. and May 16, 6-9 p.m. Call backs will be May 17, 6-9 p.m. Rehearsals will be May 23-July 14. Performances will be July 15-30. $265 Los Altos residents, $283 all others. No fee to audition. Hillview Community Center, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-947-2796. www.losaltosrecreation.org/audition.html

BENEFITS ‘Dinner with Divas’ “Dinner with Divas” is a benefit for JustREAD and JustMath, which provide tutoring support for local students. Singers Brenda Mittleman and Tara Priya will perform, and dinner and wine will be provided. May 7, 6-10 p.m.

$100 per seat. 12260 Kate Drive, Los Altos. www. justreadcenters.org

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS ‘Kid-Friendly Water-Wise Gardens’ Outdoor spaces for play and learning. Butterfly gardens, child-safe plants and materials. May 14, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. bawsca.org Energy Clearing This workshop will teach “energy-clearing” exercises to improve calmness and mood. Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Firefly Willows, 111 Main St, Suite D, Los Altos. Call 650-947-9300. www.meetup.com/bay-areametaphysics/events/16902031/

COMMUNITY EVENTS ‘Woman to Woman’ The Third Place presents reflections on the well-being of women, featuring guest speaker Rona Renner, RN, radio show host and founder of Interactive Parenting Media. 6 p.m. wine bar, heavy appetizers and dessert; 7:15 p.m. presentation. May 12, $15. Christ Episcopal Church, 1040 Border Road, Los Altos. Call 650-948-2151, ext. 115. woman2woman.eventbrite.com Mountain View High School Jazz Festival Jazz musicians from local schools, along with some special guests, will perform May 7, noon-5 p.m. Suggested donation: adults, $10, students and seniors $5. Mountain View High School, 3535 Truman Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-720-3032. Rummage Sale A two-day rummage sale, featuring items of all kinds, will be held Fri., May 13, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sat., May 14, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. All proceeds benefit local, global missions. Free. Los Altos United Methodist Church, 655 Magdalena Ave. , Los Altos. Call 650-948-1083.

CONCERTS

‘Chelle and Friends’ Chelle and Friends play R&B music at a Mother’s Day concert. Bring a blanket and picnic snack. Free face painting and special crafts to make for mom. May 8, 3-5 p.m. $15 per person in advance; toddlers under 2, no charge. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org ‘Swing in the Spring’ Chez Mana presents “Swing in the Spring,” an evening of music, dinner, exhibits and dance. Pianist Noam Eisen and his swing quintet performs. May 14, 6:30-11 p.m. $48 for concert and buffet, $25 for concert only. Fremont Hills Country Club, 12889 Viscaino Place, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-275-2439. blog. chezmana.com/?p=1441 CSMA Faculty Concert CSMA faculty concert featuring Amy Hsieh (cello), Anthony Doheny (violin), Mihail Iliev (bassoon) and Liz Poole (piano). May 6, 7-8 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA), 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend/ mohrgallery.htm Divisa Ensemble Divisa Ensemble presents chamber music for mixed winds and strings. They will be joined by the El Camino Youth Symphony’s “Windissimo” and “The Fine Ensemble,” two groups coached through ECYS’ Divisa Honors program. May 13, 8-10 p.m. $11. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts SecondStage, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www.divisaensemble.com

NHIGHLIGHT ‘WITH MUSIC, ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE’ 10th annual choral fest featuring choirs from all schools in the Mountain View Whisman School District. May 9, 5-8 p.m. Free. Shoreline Amphitheatre, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend/mohrgallery.htm

including using washing-machine water. For people age 16 and up. May 15, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $75 per person, $35 per senior, student, or limited income. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org

FAMILY AND KIDS Mother’s Day Family Concert CSMA Merit Scholarship Student Ensembles perform in this free Mother’s Day Concert. Featuring CSMA Early Music Minstrels, Brass Quintet (five trumpets), brother and sister piano duo Elaine and Eddy Liu, and singers Julia Rogers and Lauren Biglow. May 8, 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA), 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend/mohrgallery.htm

LIVE MUSIC ‘Native American Flute Music Meditation’ A performance of Native American flute music to accompany and assist with meditation and relaxation. May 6, 7:30-9 p.m. $20. Conscious Living Center, 2400 Wyandotte St., Suite C, Mountain View. Call 650-965-1152. www. consciouslivingcenter.org

OUTDOORS Beginner’s Botany Walk A walk focusing on wildflowers and plant identification, led by a botanist. May 7, 10 a.m.-noon. $12 per person. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org

ENVIRONMENT

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

Greywater Workshop Roy Nordblom III, early greenbuilder and sustainable-construction consultant, will teach about greywater methods,

‘Community HU’ HU (pronounced hue), an ancient name for God, can be sung by anyone for spiritual upliftment regardless of their beliefs

or religion, event organizers say. A group singing of HU will be held, followed by refreshments and conversation Friday, May 6, 7-8 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, 13 S. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 925-596-1696. ‘Holy Yoga’ This class offers a form of experiential worship; no prior experience with yoga needed. Class meets Wednesdays, 6:45-7:45 p.m. Free. Los Altos United Methodist Church, Children’s Center, 655 Magdalena Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-383-9322. www.laumc.org Insight Meditation South Bay Shaila Catherine and guest teachers lead a weekly Insight Meditation sitting followed by a talk on Buddhist teachings. Tuesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations accepted. St. Timothy’s/Edwards Hall, 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650-857-0904. imsb.org

SENIORS Book Club Meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month in the Conference Room. The next book for review is “The Gift of an Ordinary Day” by Katrina Kenison. The book for June will be “When Everything Changed” by Gail Collins. May 10, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330. Newcomers’ Group An orientation and tour of the Senior Center includes a review of classes, upcoming events, social services and general information. May 16, 2 p.m. Free. 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330.

SPECIAL EVENTS ‘UFOs and their Spiritual Mission’ A discussion of UFO sightings and their possible meaning. May 6, 7:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Community Center, 201 South Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. SharingForPeace.org

STOP TWO DEVELOPMENTS PLANNED FOR THE CUESTA ANNEX TODAY, the CUESTA ANNEX is a place of NATURAL BEAUTY, an ORCHARD with HISTORIC MOUNTAIN VIEWS, NATURAL WALKING TRAILS, NATIVE SPECIES, enjoyed by RESIDENTS, VISITORS and their PETS.

IF THE CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW ALLOWS PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTS, THE ANNEX WILL BE REPLACED WITH: s!4!,,#/--%2#)!,"5),$).' s!&)6%!#2%&//4$%%00)4 s0%2)-%4%23%#52)49&%.#).' s(/523!$!93%#52)49 ,)'(4).'!.$./)3% s#,%!2#544).'/&!,,-!452%0!2+).',/442%%3 Go to www.savethecuestaannex.blogspot.com, download the petition, sign it and follow mailing instructions

EMAIL SAVETHEANNEX@ME.COM and LET US KNOW WHAT YOU THINK. YOU MAY ALSO CONTACT THE AGENCIES:

Mountain View City Council

Santa Clara Valley Water District

Mtn View Historical Association

500 Castro St. Mtn. View, CA 94039-7546 www.ci.mtnview.ca.us/city_council/ email_council.asp

5750 Almaden Expwy San Jose, CA 95118-3686 www.valleywater.org

P.O.Box 252 Mountain View, CA 94042 www.mountainviewhistorical.org

Paid for by Save The Cuesta Annex 22

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011


(PJOHT0O 10th Annual Pathways Run/Walk The Los Altos Hills Pathways Run/Walk consists of 5K, 10K and 1-mile races. Courses are primarily hilly trail on the Los Altos Hills Pathways System. Register online. May 7, 9 a.m. $10-$30. Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-947-2518. lahpathwaysrun.org/ Blossom Mothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Day Celebration Blossom Birth is holding a Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day event featuring an open house, massage by VerdeTouch, portraits by Rosalinda, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Momsâ&#x20AC;? concert, door prizes and more. May 7, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. $40. Blossom Birth, 299 S. California Ave, Ste 120, Palo Alto. Call 650-321-2326. www.blossombirth.org Wine Tasting Event â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Napa Valley FirstGrowth: Stagâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leap Wine Cellarsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Estate Grown Cabernet Tasting.â&#x20AC;? This is a walk-around tasting event. May 6, 4-7 p.m. $24.71. Artisan Wine Depot, 400 A Villa St., Mountain View. Call 650969-3511. www.artisanwinedepot.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=EVENT-SLWC

SPORTS Charity Golf Classic The tournament will showcase the impact of Family and Children Servicesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; work with children, adults, and families in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, while raising funds to benefit these year-round services. The event will host approximately 100 golfers including a few celebrities. May 16, 12:30-9 p.m. $250 to play, $75 for after-party only. Los Altos Golf & Country Club, 1560 Country Club Drive, Los Altos Call 650-543-5412. www.fcservices.org

TALKS/AUTHORS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Maybe Your Robot Just Needs a Hugâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Studies in cognitive neuroscience reveal that emotions serve a functional role helping agents rapidly assess situations and select adaptive behavioral stances. May 17, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, NASA Research Park, Bldg 23, Moffett Field. Call 650-335-2852. www.cmu.edu/silicon-valley/ news-events/seminars/index.html Bharati Mukherjee Bharati Mukherjee shares â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Miss India,â&#x20AC;? her newest novel in which Anjali Bose moves to a high-tech city and is able to confront her past and reinvent herself. May 12, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc in Mountain View, 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www.booksinc.net SETI Institute Free Weekly Talks â&#x20AC;&#x153;Planetary observations with the James Webb Telescopeâ&#x20AC;? by Heidi Hammel. This evening talk is designed for audiences of all backgrounds. May 12, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-8100223. seti.org/talks Siva Vaidhyanathan Siva Vaidhyanathan discusses â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Googlization of Everything (And Why We Should Worry),â&#x20AC;? an examination of the ways people have used and embraced Google, and the growing resistance to its expansion across the globe. May 16, 7:30 p.m. Free. Books Inc in Mountain View, 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www.booksinc.net Stanford Breakfast Briefings In this session, Professor Harry Kraemer, Northwestern

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

University Kellogg School of Business, discusses values-based leadership and how to deliver outstanding and lasting results by doing the right thing. May 11, 7:30-9 a.m. $60. Stanford Faculty Club, 439 Lagunita Drive, Stanford. Call 650725-3330. breakfastbriefings.stanford.edu/ Steven Jones Steven Jones shares â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tribes of Burning Man: How An Experimental City in the Desert is Shaping the New American Counterculture.â&#x20AC;? May 11, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc in Mountain View, 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www.booksinc.net Technology and Society Committee Luncheon Forum Bart Anderson, an editor of the Energy Bulletin website and organizer of a transition town movement in Palo Alto, describes his work promoting community and personal responses to climate change and resource depletion. May 10, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. Lunch is $12. Hangen Szechuan Restaurant, 134 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-9697215. tian.greens.org/TASC.shtml

Let us provide daytime care for your aging loved one Daily Health Monitoring Exercise Arts  Socializing  Music

Therapies









Gardening Nutritious Lunches Local Transportation  ... and more! 

TEEN ACTIVITIES â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ramp â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Skate boarders will do demonstrations and high-school bands will battle. Open to all Mountain View middle and high school students. May 7, 3-6 p.m. Free. Mountain View Skate Park, 201 S. Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6410. www. mountainview.gov/city_hall/comm_services/ recreation_programs_and_services/teen_services.asp

         270 Escuela Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94040 (650) 289-5494 www.avenidas.org Call for your free tour today!

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2011 Sat. & Sun. May 21 & 22 Downtown Mtn. View Volunteers are needed for 3½ hour shifts to pour wine, beer, sodas, margaritas and sell tokens and glassware. Volunteers receive a free t-shirt and non-alcoholic drink coupon. Teams of couples, families, and friends are welcome.

Call 650-964-3395 or email alacarte.festival@gmail.com

New School Year Enrollment Pre-K (4 to 5 years) Sunrise Class Demonstration Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`>Ă&#x17E;]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;䣣Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;x\ääÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;\ääĂ&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x201C; .EW0RESCHOOL&ACILITY s$ANCE&ACILITY s!RT3CIENCE3TUDIO s'ROUP+EYBOARD s#HILDRENS,IBRARY s SF)NDOOR#LASSROOM s SF0LAYGROUND!REA s&2%%$AILY0ROFESSIONAL %NRICHMENT0ROGRAMS

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PUBLIC NOTICE 2020 URBAN WATER USE TARGET METHODOLOGY Pursuant to California Water Code (Division 6, Part 2.6), the Mountain View City Council will accept public comments and consider adopting a methodology for determining the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2020 urban water use target at their regularly scheduled meeting on:

Happy Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day

Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 6:30 p.m. City Council Chambers, Second Floor, Mountain View City Hall 500 Castro Street, Mountain View, California The 2020 urban water use target is one of several components to be included in the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 Urban Water Management Plan, which is currently being updated. California law requires that the community be given an opportunity to provide input on the implementation plan for achieving Mountain Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2020 urban water use target. Please call (650) 903-6216 or email conservewater@mountainview.gov if you have any questions.

THANK YOU FOR A LIFETIME OF LOVING AND CARING FD1041

THE CUSIMANO FAMILY COLONIAL MORTUARY 96 W. EL CAMINO REAL MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94043 650-968-4453 www.cusimanocolonial.com MAY 6, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

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Palo Alto Medical Foundation Community Health Education Programs Mountain View, 650-934-7373 Palo Alto, 650-853-2960

May 2011

For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit: pamf.org/register.

Lectures and Workshops Food, Inc PAMF Healthy Screenings Film Series Panel discussion after film led by Ed Yu, M.D., PAMF Family Medicine 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View Friday, May 27, 7 to 9 p.m., 650-934-7373 Devising a sustainable food system – one that is healthy, accessible, and affordable.

Is Your Blood Pressure Controlling You? A Conversation with...Lecture Series Presented by Nancy Jacobson, R.D., PAMF Nutrition Services Sunnyvale Public Library, 665 W. Olive Ave., Sunnyvale Wednesday, May 4, 7 to 8:30 p.m., 650-934-7373 This presentation is back by popular demand. Presented at the Sunnyvale Public Library in 2010, we have had so many requests that we decided to repeat this summer.

Robots, Lasers, & Plasma Energy: The Latest in Prostate Health Presented by Keith Lee, M.D., PAMF Urology, Surgical Oncology San Carlos Library, 610 Elm Street, San Carlos Monday, May 23, 7 to 8:30 p.m., 650-591-0341 x237

Skin Cancer Update For Your Health Lecture Series Presented by Tin Tin Tun, M.D., PAMF Dermatology 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View Wednesday, May 18, 7 to 8 p.m., 650-934-7373

– Eating Tips During Cancer Care Treatment – Exercise for Energy – men and women’s group – Expressions – Healing Imagery

– Healthy Eating After Cancer Treatment – Look Good, Feel Better – Qigong – When Eating is a Problem, During Cancer Treatment

Childbirth and Parent Education Classes – – – – – – – – –

Baby Safety Basics Breastfeeding Childbirth Preparation Feeding Your Young Child Infant and Child CPR Infant Care Infant Emergencies and CPR Introduction to Solids New Parent ABC’s – All About Baby Care

– – – – –

OB Orientation PAMF Partners in Pregnancy Prenatal Yoga Preparing for Birth/Fast Track Preparing for a Second Birth with Yoga: A Refresher – Sibling Preparation – What to Expect with Your Newborn

Living Well Classes – Mind/Body Stress Management

– Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction

Nutrition and Diabetes Classes Mountain View, 650-934-7177 s Palo Alto, 650-853-2961

– Diabetes Management – Healthy Eating with Type 2 Diabetes – Heart Smart (cholesterol management)

– Living Well with Prediabetes – Sweet Success Program (gestational diabetes)

Skin Cancers and Common Look-A-Likes

Weight Management Programs

Presented by Amy Adams, M.D., PAMF Dermatology 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Tuesday, May 10, 7 to 8:30 p.m., 650-853-4873

– Bariatric Surgery Orientation – Healthy eating. Active lifestyles. (pediatric programs, ages 2-6) – HMR Weight Management Program

Join us for a lecture and slide show of common and uncommon skin cancers, and other skin conditions that may mimic these disorders. There will also be a brief discussion of treatment options.

SleepBasics Dr. Marvin Small Memorial Parent Workshop Series Presented by Elizabeth Copeland, M.D., PAMF Pediatrics 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View Tuesday, May 10, 7 to 8:30 p.m., 650-934-7373 Let’s connect! facebook.com/paloaltomedicalfoundation twitter.com/paloaltomedical 24

Cancer Care

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MAY 6, 2011

– Lifesteps® – New Weigh of Life – Take Charge of Your Body

Support Groups – – – – –

AWAKE Bariatric Surgery Breastfeeding Cancer Chronic Fatigue

– – – – –

CPAP Diabetes Drug and Alcohol Kidney Multiple Sclerosis


Mountain View Voice 05.06.2011 - Section 1