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APRIL 29, 2011 VOLUME 19, NO. 16

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650.964.6300

INSIDE: WEEKEND | PAGE 12

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MountainViewOnline.com

Council balks at San Antonio project By Daniel DeBolt

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MICHELLE LE

Dr. Anna Wong tests out the single-incision surgery technique, with guidance from Dr. Homero Rivas, outside El Camino Hospital on April 25.

Cutting-edge medicine on wheels By Nick Veronin

D

octors at El Camino Hospital tried their hands at a relatively new surgical method Monday. The technique, known as single-incision laparoscopic surgery — or SILS — employs

a miniature camera, tiny light and a variety of tools attached to the ends of long wires, which allow surgeons to perform a wide array of procedures, such as appendectomies, hysterectomies, and hernia operations, all through a single opening in a patient’s belly button.

According to hospital doctors, as well as officials from the medical technology company running the event, the technique is gaining popularity in the field of minimally invasive medical procedures. See MOBILE SURGERY, page 9

City barks up new tree for animal control COUNCIL CONSIDERS MONEY-SAVING CONTRACT WITH SANTA CLARA-BASED AGENCY By Daniel DeBolt

T

he city is taking a serious look at switching from Palo Alto Animal Services to a Santa Clara-based service in order to save about $150,000 a year on animal control. City Council members were undecided in a study session Tuesday as to whether to renew a contract with the city of Palo Alto’s police department for animal con-

INSIDE

trol services. Switching to Silicon Valley Animal Control Authority would mean more animal services at less cost, though residents would pay slightly more for services and the shelter is located a few miles further away than Palo Alto’s, about 8.5 miles from City Hall. An example of SVACA’s increased services is that officers would be able to respond to Mountain View 12 hours a day, Monday through Friday, compared to Palo Alto’s

nine hours a day. SVACA has a new facility, while Palo Alto’s 1970s building needs costly upgrades, which have been put on hold since Sunnyvale canceled its contract with PAAS several years ago. A SVACA contract would also free up a Mountain View community services officer who investigates an average of 35 animal cases a year. See ANIMAL CONTROL, page 7

store. It was announced Tuesday that Rite Aid is no longer part of the project. In the last 40 minutes of the four-hour discussion, at around 11 p.m., council members gave some feedback on the project, adjusting building locations and street frontages, moving driveways and increasing park and sidewalk space, but not making the fundamental changes to the design that a number of residents suggested.

he City Council decided not to give final approval of a major redevelopment project at San Antonio Shopping Center Tuesday, saying that the design had clearly not been finished. Council members said they weren’t interested in approving the project Tuesday after a representative for the developer read a long list of changes that they wanted to be made to the project. The changes made it “as clear as mud” Lots of comments what the project would be, said “We feel the project has been really council member Ronit Bryant. City poorly designed and mismanaged,” staff had also proposed a number said Forrest Linebarger, CEO of of changes to the Vox Design Group, project just days calling the project before the meetstrip ‘We feel this project “another ing. mall” dominated The developer parking lots has been poorly by nearly talked and cars. Another the council into resident said the designed.’ approving the city could expect as FORREST LINEBARGER project, saying the much traffic from changes could be the project as the worked out with parking lots could city staff after the project’s approv- accommodate and another praised al. the council for making “walkability “What you are asking is for the and bikeability” a priority. Council council to “give carte blanche to members have also been less than staff” said Mayor Jac Siegel. Coun- enthusiastic about the large parkcil member Ronit Bryant was also ing lot Safeway requires right at the opposed. “The worst thing is to vote “gateway” corner of San Antonio on something and we don’t know Road and El Camino Real. what we are voting on,” Bryant said. Steve Rasmussen, owner of the “That I will not do.” nearby Milk Pail market, said he In the most ambitious redevel- was worried about being squeezed opment of San Antonio Shop- out of business by major parking ping Center since it was built in restrictions, as overflow parking the 1950s, San Francisco-based could take up the spaces his cusMerlone Geier has proposed the tomers use. redevelopment of one-third of the Resident Sandy Berry advocated 56-acre shopping center, a 16.3-acre for the newer-style Safeway as a portion that extends from Sears to cheaper alternative to driving to Rite Aid at the corner of San Anto- various specialty stores. She said nio Road and El Camino Real. she didn’t “have that kind of time” The “Village at San Antonio Cen- to not drive a car to the supermarter” would include a one-acre park, ket. She urged the council to listen 325 to 350 rental apartments and to the developer and the retailers 311,000 square feet of retail space, See SAN ANTONIO, page 7 including a new Safeway grocery

GOINGS ON 17 | MARKETPLACE 23 | MOVIES 16 | REAL ESTATE 26 | VIEWPOINT 11


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“I think it can be kind of harmful to those businesses that are downtown that sell similar products, because these people don’t have to pay much in the way of rent. However, I’m not against that type of business, as long as it’s in an area of town where there isn’t that type of competition.� Nick Chaput, owner of Dana Street Roasting Company

“I think they should be properly licensed and properly serviced by the health department and they should pay taxes to the city, too. We all have a right to be somewhere, but we all have to pay dues for running the city.�

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#   !  APRIL 29, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

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PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE You are invited to a public hearing where the Parks and Recreation Commission will discuss the Rengstorff Park Master Plan. The Rengstorff Park Master Plan project will provide a long-term vision and general development guide for the park and its facilities. The master plan will build upon recent improvements such as the Senior Center and Childcare Center and provide information to facilitate future decision making for park improvements and the Rock Church property on Escuela Avenue. The meeting will be held at the following time and location:

Wednesday, May 11, 2011 @ 7:00 p.m. Mountain View Senior Center 266 Escuela Avenue Mountain View At the meeting, City staff will provide an update on the project and request input from the Parks and Recreation Commission on the different park layouts. If you have questions, please contact Stephanie Williams, Project Manager, at (650) 903-6311 or by email at Stephanie.Williams@mountainview.gov.

4

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  APRIL 29, 2011


-PDBM/FXT MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Code inspectors reveal illegal, unsafe side of the city By Daniel DeBolt

C

NICK GONZALES

Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft, gave a wide-ranging talk at the Computer History Museum April 25.

The ‘Idea Man’ comes to town By Nick Veronin

S

pace enthusiasts, computer engineers, software designers, neurologists, astronomers, cancer survivors and aspiring entrepreneurs all had good reason to fork out $32 to attend Monday night’s event at the Computer History Museum. The conversation between Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and award-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas was the latest installment of the museum’s “Revolutionaries” series, which is meant to accompany the new exhibit, Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. The conversation was co-sponsored by Kepler’s, the independent bookstore in Menlo Park.

Allen talked with Vargas in support of his new book, “Idea Man,” which discusses the good and bad parts of his life. “I’ve had some great successes and some signature failures,” Allen told Vargas. Aside from becoming one of the richest men in the world through his creation of one of the most well-known companies on the planet, Allen is also a philanthropist. He has contributed significantly to, or founded, many large-scale projects, such as SpaceShipOne, which pioneered the first private flight into outer space; the Allen Institute for Brain Science, which has drafted the first comprehensive gene map of the human brain; the Allen Telescope Array, which has been used

by the University of California at Berkeley to scour the cosmos for signs of intelligent life; and the Experience Music Project, a critically acclaimed music museum in Seattle. He is also a survivor of lymphoma. Jonathan Devor, an astronomy hobbyist from Santa Clara, said he admires Allen’s work on the telescope array. “If he’s got something to say, I want to hear it,” Devor said. “He is a fascinating person.” The conversation began with a discussion of Allen’s early life and friendship with Bill Gates — a friendship that ultimately turned sour after Allen left Microsoft. “In retrospect, how lucky was I to have a partner as capable as Bill See PAUL ALLEN, page 10

SETI puts search for sentient life on hold By Nick Veronin

T

he Mountain View-based SETI Institute announced April 22 that it is powering down its array of antennae used to comb the cosmos for hints of intelligent extraterrestrial life. Jill Tartar, director of the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence Institute, said that cuts on the federal and state level, coupled with the recession, have resulted in a

dearth of funding at the University of California, Berkeley, which runs the antennae array for SETI. According to Tartar, U.C. Berkeley recently informed SETI that it cannot afford to operate the Allen Telescope Array — SETI’s field of large and small satellitedish-shaped antennae in Northern California, which is used to monitor space for transmissions, in the hopes of finding a signal that may have been broadcast intentionally

or inadvertently by sentient beings elsewhere in the universe. The university will put array, located at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory between Mount Lassen and Mount Shasta, into “hibernation,” meaning that no signals will be collected for SETI research. “A perfect storm” of cuts led to the U.C. Berkeley decision, Tartar said. There was the federal government’s inability to pass a budget, for one — “It’s hard to start new proj-

ity code inspectors gave a tour through some of the worst code violations in Mountain View, including storage lockers being used as homes and an apartment complex where trash was dumped in a swimming pool, at a presentation last week to the City Council. The presentation comes as the council considers various ways to cut the city budget in the long term. One second-tier budget cut proposed would lay off one of the city’s two code inspectors, Kelli Casale and Chris Costanzo Costanzo and Casale, who took turns making the presentation, said that about 75 percent of their work has to do with illegal dumping, front yard storage, vehicles parked on private property and sign violations. As a wave of foreclosures hit the country, Casale and Costanzo say they began to find large piles of garbage and unwanted furniture on the street outside of foreclosed homes. They’ve also begun to see more “hoarders,” people who can’t stop collecting things, filling their hallways with objects that could either catch fire or block an exit. Storage unit living One of the more troubling cases was the discovery of a 74-year-old woman living in a storage locker at Public Storage on Old Middlefield Way. There were reports from police, confirmed by managers, about as many as five others living in the storage lockers, including one other woman who left before code inspectors arrived. The elderly woman was last seen loading her things into a U-Haul truck heading for an unknown ects on a continuing resolution,” she said. Additionally, cuts from the National Science Foundation, which reduced its University Radio Observatory funding to Berkeley, forced the university to cut its staff at Hat Creek by about 90 percent. California’s budget woes also loomed large, as public universities across the state are feeling the impact of an estimated $25.4 billion budget shortfall. And complicating matters further, the recession has made it difficult to raise private money, Tartar said. Still, Tartar said, SETI is doing all

location, Casale said in a phone interview after the meeting. She had been sleeping on a recliner, which was so tightly packed into the small storage locker with her other possessions it didn’t fully recline, Costanzo said. She declined help from the Community Services Agency, Casale said. City Attorney Jannie Quinn said the company’s regional managers were unaware the storage units were being used for housing, which is prohibited by the city’s housing code. Casale and Costanzo say they each have 35 to 50 open code violation cases at any given time, requiring multiple site visits to resolve. That’s reasonable for ensuring the legality and safety of the city’s 14,566 housing units, 24 hotels and motels and numerous other properties. They receive 75 to 80 complaints a year about code violations. Costanzo called it an “adversarial” and “confrontational” job. Business owners are often unhappy about having to move a temporary sign off a sidewalk that could be bringing in business, one of the more common complaints. Costanzo said businesses have requested the ability to receive temporary permits for such signs. Casale presented the case of a Rock Street apartment building where she was “terrified” to find a drained pool being used as a “dumpster and toilet.” There was a large pile of garbage in it, including an old mattress. It turned out that the complex had been all but abandoned by a property owner who was set to redevelop the complex as row See CODE INSPECTION, page 6

it can to raise the money to keep the Allen Telescope Array — named after Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft — up and running. That includes seeking major funding sources as well as accepting private individual donations on its website, SETI.org. Tartar said that the work SETI is doing is highly valuable — even in trying economic times. “The human race has been asking this question for millennia,” she said. “We have been asking ourSee SETI, page 8

APRIL 29, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

5


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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  APRIL 29, 2011

-PDBM/FXT

A Sunnyvale woman was kidnapped by her ex-boyfriend outside of a Mountain View restaurant Friday, April 22, police said. The man threatened to kill the woman, 28, and took her back to his house before he ultimately agreed to let her go. Mountain View police arrested 28-year-old Servando Reyes at his home after the victim reported the kidnapping the next day, Mountain View police spokeswoman Liz Wylie said. The incident began at about 10 p.m. Friday night, outside of the Chaat Paradise restaurant in Mountain View. The victim, who was leaving the restaurant where she worked, had called her brotherin-law and asked him to pick her up, because, according to Wylie, Reyes was “not happy� with the breakup and the woman was fearful that her ex-boyfriend might confront her at her job. Her fears were confirmed as she was getting into her brotherin-law’s car: Reyes came up to the vehicle, and her brother-in-law attempted to speed off, Wylie said. The car hit a pole, which gave Reyes an opportunity to open the car door, throw his ex-girlfriend over his shoulder and drag her to his car, even as her brother-in-law attempted to physically stop Reyes – at one point punching him in the face. Reyes drove around “aimlessly� for about 45-minutes, Wylie said — “sometimes at a high rate of speed� and threatened to crash the car and kill himself along with his former girlfriend. Then Reyes drove back to his house with the victim. Meanwhile, the brother-in-law called his wife, the victim’s sister,

CODE INSPECTION Continued from page 5

homes. An explosion in the popularity of food trucks, which communicate with customers on Facebook and Twitter, has created a new challenge for code inspectors. The city has received half a dozen complaints about food trucks, including one from a restaurant about a truck that regularly parks on Ortega Avenue. “He’s taking my business away and doesn’t pay any rent,� was how Mayor Jac Siegel described that complaint. Recently a food truck set up a tent and a grill for several days in the parking lot of Clyde’s Liquors on El Camino Real, spurring Quinn to begin a study of revisions to the city’s 1958 “mobile canteen� ordinance this summer. “At what point does it become a (land) use?� Quinn said. It turns out that the temporary signs used by real estate agents

who drove to Reyes’ house, Wylie said. There, after a heated discussion with the victim’s sister as well as members of his own family — all of whom implored Reyes to let his ex-girlfriend go — he relented and the victim left with her sister. The incident was not reported until 10:22 p.m. on Saturday. “Domestic violence is something that is often times under-reported for various reasons,� Wylie said. Fear of retribution often plays a heavy role in the under reporting of such incidents, Wylie said. The victim decided to report the incident after Reyes went to her work the next day and waited for her to arrive. Reyes asked to talk to her, but she refused and a coworker convinced him to leave. “It is important that these things get reported because this could have ended very poorly for the victim,� Wylie said. “We can help people and we can help put people in contact with resources that can help get them out of these types of situations.� Police found Reyes at his home with a black eye. He was arrested without incident and charged with kidnapping and misdemeanor domestic violence. —Nick Veronin

FLASHER CHASES WOMAN Police arrested a man on attempted rape charges after he chased a woman while exposing himself Sunday evening. The 26-year-old Mountain View man, Jose Camacho, was quickly located after the incident was reported to police dispatchers at 5:16 p.m. on April 24, according to See CRIME BRIEFS, next page

to advertise open houses on the weekends are also illegal under the city’s sign ordinance, when not on private property. Adam Montgomery, government relations director for the Silicon Valley Association of Realtors, said Los Altos and other cities are more lenient and he urged Mountain View officials to follow suit. Council members were not critical of the code enforcement program in their remarks, though council member John Inks said he has been a critic of it. “Just the fact that people know we have code enforcement keeps them following the law,� Siegel said. “It does hold the city together,� said council member Laura Macias. “Of course you are going to get one or two unsatisfied customers.� Vocal critic Don Letcher, perhaps the most unsatisfied customer of all, called the program “abusive.� Letcher has been engaged in a multi-year battle with the city over the fate of his rental property. V


-PDBM/FXT NCOMMUNITYBRIEF

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CRIME BRIEFS

Continued from previous page

police spokeswoman Liz Wylie. The 28-year-old Mountain View woman was walking on Crisanto Avenue toward Escuela Avenue when she saw the man emerge from some bushes. The man’s genitals were exposed and he was touching himself, Wylie said, so the woman quickly crossed the street. The man followed her, so she started running and the man began running as well. She began screaming for help, so the man stopped following her, turned around and walked back

ANIMAL SERVICES Continued from page 1

Some were concerned it would take longer for SVACA to respond to calls about a stray dog or dangerous animal. Palo Alto’s average response time to Mountain View is 34 minutes while SVACA’s average response times to Campbell and Monte Sereno is 28 minutes. SVACA officials said the goal would be to have a truck dedicated to Mountain View for quick response times. On average, SVACA’s services will be slightly higher for residents. It

SAN ANTONIO

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because “they are the experts.” In response to calls for a wider sidewalk and building frontages along El Camino Real, she said “I don’t care what anybody says, El Camino Real will never be a nice place to walk.” “El Camino Real can be a perfectly pleasant place,” Bryant said, citing a popular cafe in Menlo Park as an example. “Saying this is the way it will always be... will not work.” Several council members supported an opportunity to implement the “Grand Boulevard” vision for a walkable El Camino Real with a 15 foot wide sidewalk along the project’s shops, replacing the less-than-10-foot-wide sidewalk proposed. Resident Jarret Mullen suggested a 24-foot-wide sidewalk. A 54-inch high wall at San Antonio Road and El Camino Real,

a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mountain View’s police and fire administration building, 1000 Villa St. The fire department is hosting the local event, part of a nationwide effort. It’s free, anonymous and no questions will be asked, fire officials said. Liquid medi-

cations need to stay sealed in their original containers, but other medicines may be removed. Syringes, intravenous solutions and medicine that’s injected will not be accepted. For information call Carrie Sandahl at 903-6224.

down Crisanto Avenue. Wylie said there were police officers in the vicinity who were able to respond quickly. The victim’s mother, who heard her daughter’s screams, followed Camacho as he walked down Crisanto and pointed him out to police who arrested him near the skate park in Rengstorff Park. Camacho was charged with indecent exposure and assault with attempt to rape — the second charge stemming from his action of aggressively following the victim, Wylie explained.

This incident is uncommon as far as indecent exposure cases go, Wylie said. Often, the perpetrator wishes to expose himself and that is all. “The vast majority of those people don’t progress to the next step,” she said. “This is an isolated incident,” Wylie said, but noted that police are investigating to see if any other similar events have occurred recently in the area. “We always tell people if something like that happens, the best thing to do is walk away from the person and call 911 right away or seek assistance from someone.”

would cost $42 to license an altered dog for three years, compared to $35 now charged by Palo Alto. Some services would be cheaper; SVACA would charge only $75 to spay or neuter a dog while Palo Alto charges between $100 and $215. Mountain View police commander Max Bosel said SVACA “is not a lesser qualified provider in terms of services” when compared to Palo Alto Animal Services. Council member Margaret AbeKoga noted another selling point: a Mountain View city official would have a seat on SVACA’s governing board at regular meetings, whereas Palo Alto, which also serve Los Altos and Los Altos Hills, only

meets with partnering cities on an as-needed basis. Council member Laura Macias appeared to be the staunchest defender of the Palo Alto animal services contract, saying that the city’s analysis has not taken into enough consideration the needs of the city’s pet owners who would appreciate the proximity of the Palo Alto shelter. She and other council members said they would like to discuss potential cost saving with Palo Alto before deciding to pull the city’s dollars away completely — something that would have a major financial impact on Palo Alto Animal Services, Bosel said.

designed to enclose a seating area from the busy intersection, was noted by Abe-Koga to be about as tall as she was. “Frankly, I think that’s offensive,” Bryant said of the height. “Three feet should do it.” Council members also supported an Environmental Planning Commission recommendation for shop entrances along El Camino Real, or at the very least, “something alive” such as store display windows, Bryant said.

below market rate units in the Minton’s redevelopment through the use of a development agreement. In return for the 10 below-market-rate apartments offered, the developer requested that the city reimburse 100 percent of the value of the one-acre public park in the project, rather than the typical 50 percent. That could lower the $5.5 million park in-lieu fee that would otherwise be required. The one-acre park, dubbed “San Antonio Green,” would bisect the property into northern and southern halves. The developer claims there is space in the park for a farmers market, a dog park, bike paths and a bocce ball court. Abe-Koga and others questioned the need for a one-way driveway circulating around the park, which several members said would not encourage use of the park. Some called for a two-way driveway on one side of it. It has been suggested that Target

Apartments and park The project includes three, fivestory apartment buildings, with either parking or retail on the first floor and with recreation areas in each building. The developer proposed on Tuesday to rent 3 percent of the units at below market rate, less than the 10 percent the city required before such “inclusionary zoning” was ruled illegal in Palmer vs. the City of Los Angeles. It was noted that Prometheus Real Estate Group eventually agreed to include

V

El Camino cedes ground to nurses union BENEFITS CLOSER TO WHAT THEY WERE BEFORE HOSPITAL BOARD IMPOSED CONTRACT By Nick Veronin

A

fter returning to the bargaining table with the nurses’ union, El Camino Hospital has partially reinstated one of the benefits that had initially been eliminated in the “last, best and final offer” contract the board of directors unilaterally passed in November. The reinstated benefit allows nurses to once again earn paid time off — or PTO — when taking time off. The contract passed in November made it so nurses would no longer earn PTO on their days off. “That was the biggest complaint that the nurses had about the imposed contract,” said Pat Briggs, president of the union, Professional Resource for Nurses, known as PRN. Starting in July, the PTO structure will return to the way it had been before November — almost. “It will not be completely back to the way it was before,” Briggs said. According to her, nurses used to earn paid time off when they were going to continuing education classes — a requirement — and during extended leaves of absence. In the newly revised contract nurses will not earn PTO in those instances. They will, however, earn PTO when on vacation and regular sick leave. The board imposed El Camino Hospital’s “last, best and final” offer on Nov. 10, after lengthy negotiations with the nurses’ union. The contract

may wish to move from Showers Drive into the northern portion of the site, where there would otherwise be space for three, 40,000 square foot retailer stores above a street-level parking garage. There was intense discussion about how to direct pedestrians through the Safeway parking lot, which had the developer defending a sidewalk-free design in the name of pedestrian safety, while some council members said there was room to remove a few parking spots to allow for pedestrians to comfortably walk through. Abe-Koga and others noted that the project already had more parking than the city requires. The Safeway would also have rooftop parking. The manager of Safeway on California Street said their land lease ends in 2016, and the store

was uniformly opposed by PRN and was called “unfair, unnecessary” and disrespectful by one of the nurses who addressed the board at November’s public board meeting. The board narrowly approved the contract in a split 3-2 vote. Administrators who spoke at the meeting in favor of passing the contract cited tough economic times. But Briggs said that in fighting for this benefit, the nurses were not asking for an unreasonable perk. “It is the standard in employment that you earn vacation time when you take vacation time,” she said. “We were below the standard. So, it really put us out of competition with the other hospitals in the area, and that put us at a grave disadvantage.” Charlene Gliniecki, vice president of human resources for El Camino, agreed with Briggs, noting in an e-mail that the hospital reconsidered its stance on nurse PTO in order to keep the hospital competitive with other hospitals in the area. “The hospital values the contribution nurses make to patient care and the relationship built over 10 years of negotiations based on our mutual interests,” Gliniecki wrote in the e-mail. When asked whether the change to the contract would be enough to repair the relationship between the El Camino administration and nurses, Briggs replied: “It’s a small step. That’s all I’d say.” V

is counting on the new location. Resident Doug Delong said it made more sense, traffic-wise, for Safeway to move to the California Street side of the shopping center, and said there was no good reason to have Safeway in the project, it just happened to be a place where a piece of real estate became available. Several union representatives and Safeway employees were there to defend the 200 “good jobs” slated for the new Safeway, an increase from the current 120 jobs at the California Avenue store. Merlone Geier said the new development would employ 900 people, and provide a “net increase” to the city’s sales tax revenue of $1.2 million. All of those employees would receive subsidized transit passes for three years from Merlone Geier. V

APRIL 29, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

7


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Students sow seeds of green CONSERVATIONIST IDEALS, PLANTED IN THE CLASSROOM, BLOOM AT HOME By Nick Veronin

A

local elementary school club is aiming to increase environmental awareness both at school and at home with a program that gives students the opportunity to swap eco-conscious deeds for prizes. If all goes according to plan, the program, which kicked off late last week, will get both children and their parents thinking green, and instill a sense of stewardship in the Theuerkauf Elemenatry community. On April 19, shrieks of joy filled the air during the mid-day recess at Theuerkauf. Children swung, hopped, bounced balls and darted about the sprawling playground. The entire school was engrossed in play — except for the small group

of students gathered in Room 15. It wasn’t detention or study hall. It was the weekly meeting of the Green Team, led by volunteer Theuerkauf mom Sharon Gloster. Every Tuesday, nine fifth-graders willingly give up their lunch recess to learn about conservation and think up ways to get their fellow students, as well as Theuerkauf parents, to adopt more eco-friendly practices. On this day, Gloster, along with fifth-grade teacher and Green Team co-chair Lynn Moorehead, were making plans for a special assembly to be held April 21, the day before Earth Day. The students were going over their role in the upcoming assembly and eating lunch. Juan Arias, one of the Green Team fifth-graders, said he often reminds his friends to recycle and

reuse what they can. Teaching his friends how to conserve, he said, makes him feel “good and warm inside.” “I wanted to help the school recycle and use less waste,” said Sami Jones, another Green Team member. “I think that we need to get more people to start helping the earth and caring more.” These are exactly the types of sentiments Gloster wants to nurture in the Green Team. She hopes these children will spread their ideals to friends and family, she said. “Reading, writing, bike riding, swimming and taking care of the Earth,” Gloster said, lumping the conservationist ethos in with the other basic lessons of childhood. “If you get yourself programmed early on, you just don’t think twice about it. We want their habits to

be oriented toward saving and conserving right off the bat. This is their Earth.” At the April 21 assembly, students of every grade at Theuerkauf gathered to watch teachers dressed as polar bears act in a skit intended to show how climate change is disrupting the habitat of animals living in the Arctic. The students were also given yellow booklets filled with “Cool the Earth Action Coupons” that can be cashed in for rewards if they are brought back to school signed by a parent. Each coupon represents the completion of a green task, like biking to school instead of driving, waiting until the dishwasher is full before running it, taking shorter showers and packing lunches with reusable containers. Students win trading cards emblazoned with green-themed characters and occasionally a card that can be redeemed for a bigger prize. “The goal is to collect them all,” Gloster said. Every coupon gets

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entered into the lottery drawing for the grand prize. Because the tasks on the coupons often require a parent’s supervision — elementary-aged students aren’t generally in charge of running the washing machine or adjusting the thermostat, Gloster observed — parents inevitably get drawn in to the conservation game. “That’s the good thing about the coupons — it forces the families and the parents to get involved with the campaign,” she said. “Really, kids can only do so much.” The coupon booklets, along with the trading cards and other prizes — even the script for the play and the polar bear costumes that the teachers wore at the assembly — were all provided for free by Cool the Earth, a Marin-based, non-profit organization founded in 2007. Cool the Earth receives funding from public agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, as well as from other sustainability oriented organizations, like the Conservation Corps North Bay and The Climate Project. Jenny Jedeikin, director of communications for Cool the Earth, said about 160 schools — most of them in the Bay Area — have implemented their Action Coupons program. In addition to developing school programming, Cool the Earth has worked with Wells Fargo and the Girl Scouts. “We are inspiring kids and their families to take actions to decrease their carbon emissions to combat climate change,” Jedeikin said. She seconded Gloster’s observation that children are often the most effective catalyst of change in the behavior of parents. “When kids become inspired to make changes they are actually a very behavior-changing mechanism within a family.” V

SETI

Continued from page 5

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ APRIL 29, 2011

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(usually on one side) t Sudden trouble speaking or understanding others t Sudden trouble seeing out of one or both eyes t Sudden, severe headache with no apparent cause t Sudden dizziness, trouble walking, loss of balance or

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selves how we fit into the cosmos for as long as we’ve had recorded history.” Taking a long view of human history, Tartar spoke whimsically about the potential for SETI to bring about a fundamental paradigm shift in human consciousness. “Ultimately, I think SETI is incredibly important to help people everywhere step back a bit and look at themselves, and look at humanity, with a more cosmic perspective,” Tartar said. “From space you don’t see international borders.” Tartar believes that if SETI were to find conclusive evidence of intelligent life beyond Earth, it would “trivialize the differences between humans overnight.” V


-PDBM/FXT MOBILE SURGERY Continued from page 1

Weighing in at about 40 tons and measuring 85 feet in length, a massive big rig parked its 18 wheels behind El Camino Hospital on April 25. Inside the 1,200-square-foot trailer, there was a small screening room and a larger demonstration floor. Doctors were invited to come to the “mobile operating truck,” watch an orientation video and then move into the next room to try the Covidien SILS technology hands-on. The El Camino demonstration is just one of 90 stops the Covidien Innovation Tour will be making in cities across the country, according to Chuck Flora, regional manager for the surgical technology company. Single-incision laparoscopy had been considered impossible by many medical professionals as recently as four years ago, and many surgeons remain skeptical about the practicality of operating through one tiny opening. But, as Flora tells it, the technique is not only possible, it is the wave of the future. Traditional laparoscopy, the predecessor to single-incision, required multiple incisions to be made up and down a patient’s torso, to allow doctors access to internal organs from various angles. The new technology, however, allows for a much broader range of motion — all through a single entry point in a patient’s belly button. The SILS multiple-

instrument access port, a round plug that is inserted into the belly button incision, has three holes arranged like the grips of a bowling ball. These allow for the insertion of the laparoscopy instruments, which have been improved, and allow doctors to move small scissors and grabbers a full 360 degrees around, as well as up, down and side-to-side slightly more than 180 degrees. Both patients and doctors are fans of the technique, Flora said, for a variety of reasons. “The patients like it because the cosmetic effects are that it looks like you didn’t have surgery,” Flora said. “We’ve also heard from surgeons that there is faster recovery time and perhaps less pain associated with the procedure.” Dr. Patricia Rogers, a gynecologist and surgeon practicing at El Camino, said she was dubious of the claims made in the invitation she received to the Covidien truck. “I couldn’t believe you could do surgery through one incision,” Rogers said. “The angles didn’t sound like they would work.” After working with the instruments, however, Rogers said she is convinced. She is planning on making some time to train with the technology and may start performing SILS procedures herself. Rogers agreed with Flora that patients usually prefer fewer incisions, as it means fewer scars. “But what people have to remember is that they have just had a big organ removed,” and just because things look good on the outside, doesn’t necessarily

mean they can jump right off the operating table and go on a 10-mile hike. She added, that while doctors generally want to please their patients, laparoscopy “has a pretty steep learning curve. Nobody likes a steep learning curve.” If Rogers had her druthers, she said all surgeries would be wideopen surgeries, where visibility is better and the chance of error is lower. However, Dr. Homero Rivas, assistant professor of minimally

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as an academic and physician to see other people performing this surgery.” But convincing others to adopt the technique can be tricky. “The No. 1 barrier to adoption is changing the mindset of surgeons,” Rivas said. “When I was introduced to this concept, I said, ‘This is nonsense.’” But after taking a closer look at the problem with colleagues, “We found out it is something very doable, something very safe, and it brings a valuable proposition to patients,” he said.

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invasive surgery at Stanford, said that fewer incisions does translate to a quicker recovery by reducing the psychological trauma that often accompanies large scars, and by lowering the risk of those incisions becoming infected. Rivas, it should be noted, was working with Covidien at the El Camino stop — demonstrating how to use the SILS equipment. But Rivas said he is not invested in the company in any way, insisting that as a medial innovator, “it is actually very rewarding

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NOBITUARY

WENDELL E. BROWN, MOUNTAIN VIEW DOCTOR A memorial service for Dr. Wendell E. Brown, who ran a family medicine practice in Mountain View for 36 years, is set for 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 30, at First Presbyterian Church of Mountain View, 1667 Miramonte Ave. Dr. Brown died April 1 in Cupertino. He was 91. Born in Conway, Massachusetts on the family farm, he grew up in Amherst. After high school, Dr.

Brown attended Peddie Prep School in Hightstown, New Jersey and then the University of M a s s a c husetts. He went Dr. Wendell Brown on to medical school at Temple University in Philadelphia, then interned at St. Luke’s hospital in San Francisco. After serving a tour in Korea as an officer in the U.S. Army Medical

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PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE You are invited to a public hearing where the Parks and Recreation Commission will discuss the Rengstorff Park Master Plan. The Rengstorff Park Master Plan project will provide a long-term vision and general development guide for the park and its facilities. The master plan will build upon recent improvements such as the Senior Center and Childcare Center and provide information to facilitate future decision making for park improvements and the Rock Church property on Escuela Avenue. The meeting will be held at the following time and location:

Wednesday, May 11, 2011 @ 7:00 p.m. Mountain View Senior Center 266 Escuela Avenue Mountain View At the meeting, City staff will provide an update on the project and request input from the Parks and Recreation Commission on the different park layouts. If you have questions, please contact Stephanie Williams, Project Manager, at (650) 903-6311 or by email at Stephanie.Williams@mountainview.gov.

 

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â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  APRIL 29, 2011

Corp, he started his family practice in Mountain View in 1950. He retired in 1986. A resident of Los Altos and then Cupertino for 61 years, he was very involved in his community, his family said. He was a member and past president of the Mountain View Kiwanis, a member of the Masons Mountain View De Anza Lodge #194, and a member and elder of the Mountain View First Presbyterian Church. Dr. Brown served on the boards of the United Way, Mountain View Savings and Loan, and the Santa Clara Mental Health Board. He was also a member of the committee that provided leadership in the building of El Camino Hospital. Dr. Brown was preceded in death by his wife, Ruth. He is survived by his four sons, Geoff, Randy, Gordon and Roger; 13 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Kiwanis Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fund, or El Camino Hospital Foundation. Online tributes and condolences may be sent to: www. cusimanocolonial.com

PAUL ALLEN

Continued from page 5

Gates?â&#x20AC;? he asked rhetorically. Vargas then asked Allen about some of his ventures and his thoughts on the future of technology. Tablet computers will be big, Allen said, noting that catching up to Appleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s iPad is not impossible, but that it will be difficult. He also said that artificial intelligence technology is poised to grow in ways that are hard to imagine at the moment. When asked about his thoughts on mortality and fight with cancer, Allen replied: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I consider myself very lucky.â&#x20AC;? After the talk, Allen fans lined up to get copies of his book signed. Ray Ewan, a 48-year-old from San Francisco, said that Allen was an inspiration for him as a child. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was just following his passion and he ended up creating something great,â&#x20AC;? Ewan said of Allen. Lenny Khazan, a 12-year-old, waited with his sister for Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very interested in computers and technology,â&#x20AC;? Lenny said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I find it fascinating.â&#x20AC;? It is an attitude Allen surely would appreciate. During his conversation with Vargas, a Mountain View High school alum and former Voice intern, one of the moments that got the biggest laugh from the audience was when Allen recalled: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bill and I would literally dive in dumpsters for sheets of codeâ&#x20AC;? that had been thrown out by computer labs. He had one word for the way he viewed that code back then: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beautiful.â&#x20AC;? V


7JFXQPJOU

■ EDITORIAL ■ YOUR LETTERS ■ GUEST OPINIONS

NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

Will Hangar One be left to rust away?

N S TA F F Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Photographer Michelle Le Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Alissa Stallings

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Gary Vennarucci

Advertising Advertising Representatives Judie Block, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 E-mail news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com E-mail letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   fax (650) 326-0155 E-mail Classified ads@MV-Voice.com E-mail Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. Copyright ©2010 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM Post your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com E-MAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 964-6300

T

he worst-case scenario is unfolding now for those who want to preserve Hangar One. Last week, a U.S. Navy contractor began to remove the toxic siding or “skin” of the 200-foot tall hangar in a project that will last into the new year. When complete, it will leave the Hangar’s massive and well-preserved skeleton exposed to the elements, at least until money is found to install new siding, a job that could cost up to $32.8 million based on what President Obama put in NASA’s budget for next year. But it is not clear that Congress will approve any Hangar One funding for next year, given the budget-cutting battles being waged between the president and the Republican majority in the U.S. House of Representatives. If allowed to go uncovered, it would be a sad end to this noble structure, which serves as a landmark for Moffett Field and is visible for miles in any direction. Preservationists have long worried about leaving the hangar’s skeleton exposed for an extended period. Bill Wissel, of the Moffett Field Historical Society, told the Voice last week: “Without the protective siding, the structure will be exposed to the elements and will begin to deteriorate pretty quickly,” bringing up the issues of visual blight and safety concerns. He fears that it would not be long before “public opinion shifts NLETTERS

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

COMBINING TRAINS IS A BAD IDEA The plan advanced by Rep. Anna Eshoo, state Sen. Joe Simitian and Assemblyman Rich Gordon to run high-speed rail trains from San Jose to San Francisco on Caltrain tracks is woefully misguided. It is fatally flawed due to severe safety, operational, and engineering problems. If, in their words, they really want high-speed rail “to be able to connect and interface in a seamless fashion with local transit systems,” then there is only one solution, and it is not theirs. There must be no high-speed rail trains on Caltrain tracks because they are dangerously incompatible with present trains and at-grade road crossings. High-speed rail should, at best, end in San Jose and its passengers transfer to existing Caltrain Baby Bullet trains for trips up and down the Peninsula. Why? That is why Caltrain built the baby bullets — for fast transportation from San Jose to San Francisco within the safe speed limits of Caltrain tracks. Now that is seamless — and safe. This obvious solution would preserve the safe rail and automobile transport status quos on the Peninsula and also obviate the need

for crazy and destructive decisions, such as closing Castro Street and other vital at-grade Peninsula Caltrain crossings. For seamless integration and safety and cost control, it’s a no-brainer. William R. Hitchens Sunnyview Lane

HIGH-SPEED TRAINS NOT SUITED FOR CALTRAIN CORRIDOR The high-speed rail proposal by Rep. Anna Eshoo, state Sen. Joe Simitian, and Assemblyman Rich Gordon is narrowly directed at avoiding lawsuits from the city of Palo Alto and wealthy Atherton residents, and fails to address the fundamental problem with the current high speed rail design. The fundamental problem is that the current Southern Pacific right-of-way going straight through the downtowns of all the small midPeninsula cities is not well suited to the way the major transportation corridors have developed since it was originally established in the mid-1800s. Building a high-speed rail line there, or even simply upgrading Caltrain within the current rightof-way, will not address the prob-

and there will be an outcry for complete demolition. That’s the ‘demolition by neglect’ concern that everybody has been voicing for the past few years.” Indeed, anyone concerned about saving Hangar One has seen it ‘die by a thousand cuts’ in recent years. Most buildings inside the hangar have been destroyed, while the historically significant “cork room,” which was used to store the USS Macon’s fragile helium cells back in the 1930s, has been only partially preserved. One recent concession stands out: The Navy announced in March that it was working with NASA to keep the hangar’s unique wire-reinforced corrugated windows in place while the siding is removed. The deal is not final, but it is hoped the Navy can work around the windows, which were designed to withstand the explosion of a 1930s airship filled with hydrogen. In better economic times it would be difficult, but not impossible, for the local Congressional delegation to find federal funding to preserve this historic hangar. Today, we’re not so sure. But we hope that somehow, whether through a major government grant or a generous gift from a local corporation or philanthropist, funds will materialize to prevent this iconic structure from wasting away. It is far too important to meet such an ignoble fate. lems of impact on the cities’ downtowns, lack of integration with other transportation modes, and lack of space for a mid-Peninsula station of the magnitude needed for the high-speed rail line. The basic design needs to be revisited from the start. An alternate design, such as along the Highway 101 corridor, would result in a better integrated system with much better services. Building on an elevated viaduct over parts of the freeway — the cheapest option and the one most favored by the California High Speed Rail Authority — would raise fewer issues than along the current route. Integration with air hubs at San Francisco and San Jose airports would be much easier, and a large, multi-service mid-Peninsula station could be built at Moffett Field, where there is plenty of land adja-

cent to 101, and parking, traffic, and integration with light rail would be much less of an issue than in a midPeninsula city downtown. Maintaining the current rightof-way merely avoids the land acquisition problem rather than solving it, since even if the rail line is kept to the current right-of-way, additional land will be needed for a mid-Peninsula station, to say nothing of the impact of a viaduct or grade-separated line on the downtowns of the mid-Peninsula cities. Rather than accepting this weak compromise, the mid-Peninsula cities should insist that the California High Speed Rail Authority return to the basic requirements, and design a system that fits the Peninsula as it is today, rather than as it was in the mid-1800s. James Kempf Foxborough Drive

APRIL 29, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

11


8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

â&#x2013;  RESTAURANT REVIEW â&#x2013;  MOVIE TIMES â&#x2013;  BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT

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Do-it-yourself dining GINSENG BBQ & TOFU OFFERS DINNER AND A SHOW FOR DINERS WHO LIKE TO PLAY CHEF By Ruth Schechter

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MICHELLE LE

Beef bi bim bob at Ginseng BBQ & Tofu is sizzling purple rice topped with vegetables and meat and crowned with an egg.

or those of you who still like to play with your food, I have a socially acceptable suggestion: Go Korean. Ginseng BBQ & Tofu allows you to cook your own food on a gas grill fitted right into the table. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all very civilized â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a server brings you your platter of marinated meat, chicken or pork, and you and your party can take it from there. Of course, there are several selections in which the kitchen does the preparation. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something about cooking over a hot grill that makes food taste better, and the whole process is

pretty entertaining. Ginseng has a modern vibe: Walls are colored cinnabar and mustard, and the high ceilings are networked with oversized industrial stainless steel vents. Centered in each table are two stainless grill covers (the circular one is no longer used as the menu has changed since the restaurant opened in 2008). While the dinner menu is not especially long, there is a good variety of different cuts of meat to sample, from pork belly to short ribs and brisket. After you place your order the server uncovers the grill and turns up the heat. Within minutes, the meat is ready to sizzle. That means that

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-PDBM/FXT heaping platter of beef bulgogi ($13) or chicken bulgogi ($13) gets prepared just the way you like it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; unless you get distracted from your duties and forget to move things around with your chopsticks. Generally your meal stays fresh and literally hot off the grill. Bulgogi is thinly sliced meat marinated in a mix of soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, ginger, chili, sugar and green onions. While the big appeal at Ginseng is the hands-on approach to dinner, most dishes can also be prepared and brought out bubbling on a cast-iron skillet. For variety, we ordered the pork golgogi ($12) from the kitchen and enjoyed the simple, spicy preparation almost as much as our own efforts. The tofu soup ($10) was a generous cauldron of flavorful broth still actively boiling and loaded with chunks of silken tofu and mushrooms. Be warned about spice levels: We were relieved we settled for mild heat since even the sissy level had a lot of zing. Be sure to try the seafood pajun ($10) a delectable egg pancake studded with scallions, shrimp and vegetables. Served on a bamboo steamer, it was crisp on the outside, creamy on the inside, and

1704 Miramonte Ave., Suite 6, Mountain View   swww.genacu.com

Jungho Jang, MSOM Chinese Medicine of Beijing University UN Oriental Medicine Unit

MICHELLE LE

Chicken bulgogi at Ginseng is offered as do-it-yourself or made in the kitchen.

one of the tableâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite dishes. Meals are served with an assortment of small dishes known as banchan, which can be used as condiments or eaten as snacks. While the selection was colorful â&#x20AC;&#x201D; theoretically these dishes are supposed to cover the gamut of flavors and textures â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ours tended to be bland and added little to the meal. Our little dishes of dipping sauces, fish cake, kimchee, broccoli, mung sprouts and potatoes were largely left untouched. Servings are very generous, and most of the golgogi must be

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ordered for two, so Ginseng is best with a group. The restaurant also offers an all-you-can-eat option for $18 a person. However, because of the layout of the grill, people on one side of the table will be saddled with doing most of the cooking unless you are friendly enough to skip good manners and just start reaching across the table. While grill-your-own is not offered at lunch, there are several variations of dohl soht bi bim bob ($9.95) an immense stone pot

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â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  APRIL 29, 2011

Presented by

  



  




-PDBM/FXT GINSENG

Continued from page 13

consisting of a bottom layer of rice, shredded carrot and zucchini, bean sprouts and meat, topped with a fried egg. Mixing the ingredients scrambles NDININGNOTES

Ginseng BBQ & Tofu 475 Castro St., Mountain View. 650-967-3913 Hours: Lunch Mon.-Fri. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Dinner daily 5:30-10 p.m. Price Range: Lunch $7.95-$9.95 Dinner $10-$18

the egg inside the sizzling bowl and mixes the flavors together beautifully. The pork lunch box ($6.95) is an oversized bento with compartments for deeply seasoned bits of pork, purple rice, an iceberg salad, tasty jap chae (cellophane noodles stirfried in sesame oil) and one cold, dry and inedible dumpling. Service was attentive initially, and our server was very patient about explaining the nuances of Korean cooking to the ignorant. However once the table started

to get loaded up, we were pretty much left on our own. Our water glasses remained unfilled, our dishes uncleared, and we had to almost beg for our check. Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mon. Just because Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m doing the cooking doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean I want to be ignored. Other than the poor follow-through in service, Ginseng BBQ & Tofu offers a great value in flavor and do-ityourself tableside entertainment. V

A Guide to the Spiritual Community Los Altos Lutheran Church ELCA

Pastor David K. Bonde Outreach Pastor Gary Berkland

9:00 am Worship 10:30 am Education Nursery Care Provided 650-948-3012

To include your Church in

Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-326-8210 ext. 6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com

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street

MICHELLE LE

The beef bulgogi lunchbox at Ginseng comes with rice, jap chae noodles, green salad and a dumpling.

Introducing

Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View OfďŹ ce Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189

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APRIL 29, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

15


8FFLFOE NMOVIETIMES African Cats (G) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:30, 2:45, 5:05, 7:35 & 9:50 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 a.m. Century 20: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:25 & 9:55 p.m.; Sat. also at 10 a.m. Arthur (2011) (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 2:15 p.m.; Fri.-Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 7:35 p.m. Atlas Shrugged: Part 1 (PG-13) Century 16: Fri.-Wed. at 11:10 a.m.; 1:35, 4:25, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Bill Cunningham New York Aquarius Theatre: 1, 3, 5, 7 & 9 p.m. The Conspirator (PG-13) Century 20: Fri. & Sun.-Wed. at 11:05 a.m.; 4:30 & 9:55 p.m.; Sat. at 4:30 & 9:55 p.m.; Thu. at 11:05 a.m. CinèArts at Palo Alto Square: 4:25 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri. also at 1:30 & 10:05 p.m.; Sat. also at 10:05 p.m.; Sun.-Thu. also at 1:30 p.m. Fast Five (PG-13) Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6:10, 7:20, 8:30, 9:30 & 10:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10 a.m. Century 20: Fri., Sat. & Mon.-Thu. at 11 & 11:45 a.m.; 12:30, 1:10, 1:55, 2:40, 3:25, 4:10, 4:50, 5:35, 6:20, 7:10, 7:50, 8:30, 9:20 & 10:45 p.m.; Sun. at 11 & 11:45 a.m.; 12:10, 1:10, 1:55, 2:40, 3:25, 4:10, 4:50, 5:35, 6:20, 7:10, 7:50, 8:30, 9:20, 10:10 & 10:45 p. The Grateful Dead Movie Event Century 20: Thu. at 7:30 p.m. The Greatest Movie Ever Sold (PG-13) CinèArts at Palo Alto Square: 2, 4:40 & 7:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:30 p.m. Hanna (PG-13) Century 16: 11:15 a.m.; 1:55, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 2:25, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil (PG) Century 16: Fri.-Sun. at 10 a.m.; In 3D Fri.-Thu. at 2:20, 4:30, 6:40 & 8:50 p.m.; Sat. at 10 a.m.; In 3D Fri.-Sun. also at at 12:10 p.m. Century 20: Fri. & Sun.-Thu. at 11 a.m.; In 3D Fri.-Thu. at 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40 & 9:50 p.m.; Sat. at 10:55 a.m. Hop (PG) Century 16: Fri., Sat. & Mon.-Thu. at 11:05 a.m.; 1:25, 3:45, 6:20 & 8:40 p.m.; Sun. at 4, 6:20 & 8:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 1:50, 4:15, 7 & 9:25 p.m. Jane Eyre (2011) (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: 1:05 & 4:05 p.m.; Fri.-Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 7:05 & 9:55 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10:10 a.m. Limitless (PG-13) Century 20: Fri. & Sun.-Wed. at 1:55 & 7:20 p.m.; Sat. at 7:20 p.m.; Thu. at 1:55 p.m. The Lincoln Lawyer (R) Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; Fri.-Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 4:50 & 10:15 p.m. Memphis Broadway Musical Century 16: Sat. & Tue. at 7:30 p.m.; Sun. at 12:30 p.m. Century 20: Sat. & Tue. at 7:30 p.m.; Sun. at 12:30 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Il Trovatore Century 20: Sat. at 10 a.m. CinèArts at Palo Alto Square: Sat. at 10 a.m. Potiche Aquarius Theatre: 2:30, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Prom (PG) Century 16: 1:50, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10:55 a.m.; Mon.-Thu. also at 11 a.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:45, 1:45, 3:15, 4:25, 5:45, 7:05, 8:15, 9:35 & 10:45 p.m.; Sat. also at 10:10 a.m.; Tue. also at 10:15 a.m. The Reluctant Debutante (1958) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Mon. at 5:40 & 9:15 p.m. Rio (PG) (( Century 16: 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40 & 10:05 p.m.; In 3D at 3:55, 6:30 & 9 p.m.; Fri.Sun. also at 10 a.m.; In 3D Fri.-Sun. also at 10:40 a.m. & 1:20 p.m.; In 3D Mon.-Thu. also at 11 a.m. & 1:25 p.m. Century 20: 1:05, 3:35, 6 & 8:35 p.m.; In 3D at 11:50 a.m.; 2:20, 4:45, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m.; Sat. also at 10:25 a.m.; Tue. also at 10:30 a.m.

Mentor Quote: “He was not planning to go to college, now he is at Foothill.”

Royal Wedding (1951) Stanford Theatre: Fri.-Mon. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 3:55 p.m. Scream 4 (R) Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:40 p.m. Something Borrowed (PG-13) Century 20: Thu. at 12:01 a.m.

Providing volunteer mentors & tutors for our community youth

OUR KIDS NEED YOU: BE A MENTOR OR TUTOR Join us and volunteer in the Los Altos and Mountain View Schools

Please Contact: Carole Dorshkind 650-641-2821 or email us at Info@pngmvla.org WWW.PNGMVLA.ORG 16

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ APRIL 29, 2011

Source Code (PG-13) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2:05, 4:30, 7:10 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:15, 4:40, 7:15 & 9:35 p.m. Thor (PG-13) Century 16: In 3D Thu. at 12:01 a.m. Century 20: In 3D Thu. at 12:01 & 12:02 a.m. Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Big Happy Family (PG-13) Century 16: 1:40 & 4:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sun. also at 10:50 a.m.; 7 & 9:35 p.m.; Sat. also at 10:50 a.m.; Mon.-Thu. also at 11 a.m.; 7 & 9:35 p.m. Century 20: 2:55, 5:30, 8:10 & 10:40 p.m.; Fri., Mon., Wed. & Thu. also at 11:15 a.m.; 12:20, 1:45, 4:20, 6:55 & 9:30 p.m.; Sat. also at 11 a.m.; 12:20, 1:30 & 4 p.m.; Sun. also at 11:15 a.m.; 1:45, 4:20, 6:55 & 9:30 p.m.; Tue. also at 11:15 a.m.; 12:20 & 1:45 p.m. Water for Elephants (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 1:10, 2:10, 4:10, 5:10, 7:20, 8:10 & 10:15 p.m.; Fri.-Sun. also at 10:20 a.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:50, 2:15, 3:40, 5, 6:30, 7:45, 9:15 & 10:30 p.m.; Sat. & Tue. also at 10:05 a.m. Win Win (R) ((( Guild Theatre: 2, 5 & 8 p.m. AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing at the Aquarius, visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

AFRICAN CATS --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) “African Cats” unfolds on the Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, where the filmmakers seemingly trailed a pride of lions and a coalition of cheetahs. The story focuses on lion cub Layla getting steadily schooled in “the circle of life” (by film’s end, new cubs have arrived), cheetah “single mother” Sita raising a litter of five, and savanna “king” Fang ruling the pride with tough but regal authority. Kids would doubtlessly learn more watching basic cable, but the spectacle is what it is, and the big screen adds majesty to it, enhanced by IMAX-style helicopter shots and bigger-than-life slo-mo of “the fastest creature on land — a cheetah.” Rated G. One hour, 29 minutes. — P.C.

ARTHUR -1/2

(Century 20) Russell Brand assumes the role of booze-guzzling playboy Arthur Bach, heir to a seemingly endless fortune. Even Arthur’s lifelong nanny, Hobson (Helen Mirren), can’t coax maturity out of the reckless lush. Arthur’s mother (Geraldine James) threatens to cut him off unless he agrees to marry Susan Johnson (Jennifer Garner), the power-hungry daughter of a developer (Nick Nolte). Arthur reluctantly goes along with his mother’s wishes but secondguesses himself when he falls for aspiring writer Naomi (Greta Gerwig). What’s an alcoholic spendthrift to do? And, more importantly, do you care? Rated PG-13 for some drug references, sexual content, alcohol use throughout and language. 1 hour, 45 minutes. — T.H.

RIO --

(Century 16, Century 20) “Rio” starts in the Brazilian rainforest, where baby Blu gets shanghaied by pet-trading smugglers. The blue macaw grows up as the pet of Minnesotan bookstore owner Linda (Leslie Mann), who — like Blu (Jesse Eisenberg) — lives comfortably off the social radar. That all changes with the arrival of Tulio (Rodrigo Santoro), a Rio-based bird scientist who has traveled across the globe to ask Linda to bring Blu home to mate with the last female of their kind: If Linda doesn’t agree, Blu’s particular species will go extinct. A nervous Blu must shake a tailfeather on a blind date with restless parrot Jewel (Anne Hathaway). Human smugglers again intervene, with white cockatoo Nigel (Jemaine Clement) doing their dirty work. Attracted opposites Blu and Jewel gradually learn to see eye to eye over the course of their vertiginous adventures. Rated G for mild offcolor humor. One hour, 36 minutes. — P.C.

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS ---

(Century 16, Century 20). Told in a flashback, Jacob (Robert Pattinson) is a young Cornell veterinary science student. After receiving tragic news, he hops aboard a train in the darkness of the night and awakens to the world of the struggling Benzini Brothers traveling circus. The spectacle dazzles him, but he soon learns about the tawdry reality behind the sequined illusion and enters a forbidden love affair with the cruel ringmaster’s wife Marlena (Reese Witherspoon). Rated: PG-13 for moments of intense violence and sexual content. 2 hours. — S.T.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley


(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

ART GALLERIES

COMMUNITY EVENTS

CONCERTS

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brush Playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; by Steve Curtiss Traditional oil painting combined with an offbeat sense of humor by Los Altos artist Steve Curtiss. Subjects include cats, the history of art, still lifes and peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cultural habits. Through April 30, Tue.-Sat. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun. noon-4 p.m. Gallery 9, 143 Main St., Los Altos. www.gallery9losaltos.com â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Paths through the Global Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Photographer and writer Leo Rubinfien has developed four projects over many years. This exhibition presents between six and 12 photographs from each project. Through May 1, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Cantor Arts Center, 328 Lomita Drive, Stanford. El Carmelo Art Fair El Carmelo Art Fair will have jewelry, greeting cards, blown glass and more, plus home-cooked snacks and live music. April 30, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. El Carmelo Elementary School, 3024 Bryant St., Palo Alto. Call 650-326-5854. www.elcarmelo.paloaltopta.org/ documents/2010-2011/Art_Fair_Flyer.pdf

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stanford GSB Open for Businessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Stanford Graduate School of Business invites the community to celebrate the completion of its new home. Knight Management Center Open House features food samples, music, debate and more. April 29, 2-5 p.m. Free. Knight Management Center, Stanford, Serra Street at Campus Drive Loop, Stanford. www.gsb.stanford.edu/about/knightopen/OHOnly.html Friends Nursery School Carnival A carnival featuring food, crafts, games, silent auction and more. Proceeds support the scholarship program at Friends Nursery School. April 30, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Friends Nursery School, 957 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-856-6152. pafns@sbcglobal. net Friendship Forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Indonesia Event Three Stanford students from Indonesia will present scenes of their country and culture through slides. May 1, 2-4 p.m. Free. Los Altos Library, 13 So. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 650-961-3539. www.ffsfba.org Gamble Garden Plant Sale A selection of plants will be for sale April 29 and 30, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 650-329-1356 ext. 201. www.gamblegarden. org Mountain View High School Jazz Festival Jazz musicians from local schools, along with some special guests, will perform May 7, noon-5 p.m. Suggested donation: adults, $10, students and seniors $5. Mountain View High School, 3535 Truman Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-720-3032. Peace and Social Justice Fair The May Day Peace and Social Justice Craft and Information Fair will be held Sun., May 1, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. First Presbyterian Church Palo Alto, 1140 Cowper St., Palo Alto. Call 415-265-9058. www.peaceandjustice.org/maydayfair Spring Boutique at Downtown Community Center Multi-vendor event will benefit the Downtown Streets Team. Vendor displays include jewelry, baskets, art decor, bath and body items, teas, chocolates and more. April 30, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. All Saintsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Church, 555 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 650-322-4528 ext. 303. www.asaints.org

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;An Afternoon of Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The South Bay Community Orchestra performs May 5, 3-4 p.m. Free. 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650903-6330. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Chelle and Friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Chelle and Friends play R & B music at a Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day concert. Bring a blanket and picnic snack. Free face painting and special crafts to make for mom. May 8, 3-5 p.m. $15 per person in advance; toddlers under 2, no charge. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Chichester Psalmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Leonard Bernsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work sung in Hebrew by Los Altos United Methodist Church Chancel Choir, together with The Choral Project, under direction of Daniel Hughes with organ and percussion, at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. worship services. May 1, 9:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free. Los Altos United Methodist Church, 655 Magdalena Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-948-1083. www.laumc.org â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sounds for the New Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sounds for the New Worldâ&#x20AC;? features performances by the Topaz Classique Ensemble with Palo Alto musicians/teachers Mimi Dye and Iris Fraser as well as a new Palo Alto youth orchestra, The Topaz New World Youth Orchestra. Reception follows. May 1, 3-5 p.m. $10-50. All Saints Episcopal Church, 555 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 650-380-0961 cell. www.topazmusic.org â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stabat Mater: San Francisco Mandolin Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SFMO performs the sung mass â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stabat Materâ&#x20AC;? by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi. Soprano Susan Gundunas and mezzo-soprano Twila Ehmcke are soloists. April 30, 4-5:30 p.m. $15/$10 at door; $12/$7 online. All Saints Episcopal Church, 555 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 510-649-9519. www.sfmandolin.org/concerts.shtml Fortnightly Music Club Concert Piano duet, vocal, violin/piano duo and piano/string quartet featuring works of Mozart, Schumann, Beethoven and Faure. May 1, 8 p.m. Free. Lucie Stern Community Center Ballroom, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www.fortnightlymusicclub.org Master Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra Concert David Ramadanoff presents MSCOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final spring concert, an all-Beethoven event. The program includes Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Egmont Overture,â&#x20AC;? Piano Concerto No. 5, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Emperor,â&#x20AC;? with piano soloist Hans Boepple, and Symphony No. 7 in A

BENEFITS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hear for Japanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A benefit concert by Capriccio Chamber Orchestra in support of the Japan disaster-relief efforts. Suggested $35 donation payable to JCCCNC in support of Northern Japan Earthquake Relief Fund. All proceeds will go to Japan for relief efforts. May 5, 5:30-7 p.m. Bloomingdaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stanford, 1 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto. Call 650-963-9428. capricciomusic.org Ayelet Waldman at the Circle of Support Author Ayelet Waldman will speak at the May 5 Circle of Support Breakfast benefiting Family and Children Services. Waldmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s topic will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monkey Bars and Mood Swings: The Journey of a Bipolar Mother.â&#x20AC;? May 5, 8-10:30 a.m. $75. Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel, 4290 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. Call 650-543-5412. www.fcservices.org

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Talking, Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Not Listeningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Learn what to do when children are not following directions and understanding limits. Tue., May 3, 7-9 p.m. $35. Parents Place, 200 Channing Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-688-3040. www.parentsplaceonline.org/peninsula/classes/im-talking-theyre-notlistening-3-10-years â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Starting Your Summer Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Learn to transplant basil, chard, cucumbers, tomatoes and much more, and germinate corn, lettuce, squash, bean and carrot seeds. April 30, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $31. Common Ground Garden Supply and Education Center, 559 College Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-493-6072. startingyoursummergarden. eventbrite.com/ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Understanding your Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Temperamentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Learn the nine traits that make up temperament and how to modify parenting skills and change the environment to help support a childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique growth and development. May 5. Pre-registration required. Noon-2 p.m. $35. Parents Place, 200 Channing Ave., Palo Alto. Call 650-688-3040. www.parentsplaceonline.org/ peninsula/classes/going-flow-understanding-yourchilds-temperament Energy Clearing This workshop will teach â&#x20AC;&#x153;energy-clearingâ&#x20AC;? exercises to improve calmness and mood. Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Firefly Willows, 111 Main St, Suite D, Los Altos. Call 650-9479300. www.meetup.com/bay-area-metaphysics/ events/16902031/ Tai Chi Classes Beginner classes for all ages and fitness levels in Taoist Tai Chi Society(R) Internal Art of Tai Chi Chuan. Classes run every Saturday. 9-10:30 a.m. First class is free. St. Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto. california. usa.taoist.org The Founder Conference Guy Kawasaki, the founders of AngelList, Evernote and 600 entrepreneurs will be present at The Founder Conference for entrepreneurs. May 3, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. $150. Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. thefounderconference.com

NHIGHLIGHT 10TH ANNUAL PATHWAYS RUN/WALK The Los Altos Hills Pathways Ruwn/Walk consists of 5K, 10K and 1-mile races. Courses are primarily hilly trail on the Los Altos Hills Pathways System. Register online. May 7, 9 a.m. $10-$30. Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-947-2518. lahpathwaysrun.org/

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ramp â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Skate boarders will do demonstrations and high-school bands will battle. Open to all Mountain View middle and high school students. May 7, 3-6 p.m. Free. Mountain View Skate Park, 201 S. Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6410. www. mountainview.gov/city_hall/ comm_services/recreation_ programs_and_services/ teen_services.asp major. Reception with the artists at intermission. May 1, 2:30 p.m. Tickets $5-20. Los Altos United Methodist Church, 655 Magdalena Ave., Los Altos. www.mastersinfonia.org Stanford Invitational Choral Festival Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memorial Church Choir and Chamber Chorale, and their guests the University of California at Berkeley Chamber Choir, the Masterworks Chorale of San Mateo, and the boys and young men ensemble from the Ragazzi Boys Chorus, perform April 29, 8 p.m. Free. Memorial Church, Memorial Way, Stanford. Call 650-725-2787. music.stanford.edu/Events/calendar.html Stanford Taiko Stanford Taiko performs as they prepare to depart for the Intercollegiate Taiko Invitational at UCLA and Zenshin Daikoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th Annual Taiko Festival on Maui. May 7, 8 p.m. $5-$10. Free to Stanford students. Dinkelspiel Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive, Stanford. Call 650-725-2787. www.stanfordtickets.org/tickets/calendar/view. aspx?id=3769

Undergraduate Awards Concert A program honoring and featuring outstanding Stanford music students. May 6, 8 p.m. Free. Campbell Recital Hall, 541 Lasuen Mall, Stanford. Call 650725-2787. music.stanford.edu/Events/calendar. html

DANCE Singles Weekend in the Silicon Valley Single professionals of all ages are invited to a mixer April 29. Dressy attire recommended. 8-11:45 p.m. $20. Sheraton Hotel, 625 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. Call 415-507-9962. www.thepartyhotline.com

ENVIRONMENT â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Running Dry: Down the Colorado Riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Explorer Jonathan Waterman talks about following Continued on page 19

David Ramadanoff presents Master Sinfonia Chamber Orchestraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Spring Concert With Hans Boepple

Let us provide daytime care for your aging loved one Daily Health Monitoring Exercise Arts  Socializing  Music

Therapies









Gardening  Nutritious Lunches Local Transportation  ... and more!

Tickets:

Beethoven

Egmont Overture

Gen Admission $20

Beethoven

Piano Concerto No. 5, Hans Boepple, piano

Beethoven

Symphony No. 7 in A major

Seniors (60+)

$16

Youth

$5

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         270 Escuela Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94040 (650) 289-5494 www.avenidas.org Call for your free tour today!

by Ginny Kavanaugh and Joe Kavanaugh of Coldwell Banker, Portola Valley. Visit them at www.kavanaugh.com

Saturday, April 30 at 8:00 pm Valley Presbyterian Church 945 Portola Rd., Portola Valley (Reception follows) Sunday, May 1 at 2:30 pm Los Altos United Methodist Church 655 Magdalena at Foothill Expressway, Los Altos (Reception at intermission) APRIL 29, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

17


Camp Connection

GUIDE TO 2011 SUMMER C AMPS FOR KIDS

Team Esface Elite Basketball Skills Clinics

Athletics

Woodside/ Redwood City

Riekes Summer Camps — A world of opportunity and fun-filled learning. Ages 9-18. Strength & conditioning, speed & agility, sport specific training, skills development, professional coaches, pre & post evals, leading edge methods, latest equipment. Sessions run from June through August. www.riekes.org 650-364-2509

Spring Training (April-May). High-energy, high-level basketball training for ages 6-16. Use your offseason as a time to develop your basketball skills and IQ with the unparalleled coaching staff of Team Esface. Learn the fundamentals of the game, offensive attack moves and advanced footwork through dynamic drills and competitions led by young, positive coaches including former Division 1 athletes. April and May. Two days per week. Sibling and group discounts available. More information and sign up at: www.teamesface.com 1-888-537-3223

Bay Area Equestrian Center

YMCA of Silicon Valley

Athletic Fitness – “Train with the Best”

Menlo Park

Woodside

At Wunderlich County Park Stables. Kids 8-15 have outdoor fun joining BAEC for horse camps. Camps focus on caring for and riding horses so come ready to ride and have fun learning good horse care. www.bayareaequestrian.net 650-446-1414

California Riding Academy’s Camp Jumps For Joy!

Menlo Park

Join us this summer for fantastic and fun filled week with our beautiful horses and ponies! Each day Campers have riding instruction, learn horse care, create fun crafts and play with our kids’ jump course. During the week we learn beginning vaulting, visit our Full Surgical Vet Clinic, and meet our miniature horses. Voted the best horse camp by discerning young campers. Choose English, Western or Cowboy/Cowgirl. Register and pay online at: www.californiaridingacademy.com 650-740-2261

Camp Jones Gulch

La Honda

Join the fun this summer! Camp Jones Gulch offers friendship and growth to kids ages 6-16. Enjoy our Traditional Camp or Mini, Horse, Surfing, Leadership and Travel Camps. One- and two-week sessions. Limited financial assistance available. www.campjonesgulch.org 415-848-1200

Champion Tennis Camps

Atherton

Peninsula

Say hello to summer fun at the YMCA! Choose from enriching day or overnight camps in 35 locations: arts, sports, science, travel, and more. For youth K-10th grade. Includes weekly fieldtrips, swimming and outdoor adventures. Accredited by the American Camp Association. Financial assistance available. www.ymcasv.org/summercamp 408-351-6400

Academics Delphi Academy

Harker Summer Programs

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics - focusing on math, language arts and science - and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for-credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Swim, Tennis and Soccer also offered. www.summer.harker.org 408-553-0537

iD Tech Camps - Summer Tech Fun!

Don Shaw’s Volleyball Training Academy

iD Teen Academies

Sunnyvale

Santa Clara

Have your best summer ever at Delphi Academy’s summer camp! Ages 5-13. Full Day Camp. Morning academics with experienced teachers, afternoon activities, day trips, camping trips, swimming, sports, crafts, activities, and a lot of fun! www.bestsummerever.org 408-260-2300

CTC programs provide an enjoyable way for your child to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. Our approach is to create lots of fun with positive feedback and reinforcement in a nurturing tennis environment. Building self-esteem and confidence through enjoyment on the tennis court is a wonderful gift a child can keep forever! Super Juniors Program, ages 4 - 6. Juniors Program, ages 7 - 14. www.alanmargot-tennis.net 650-400-0464

Stanford

Ages 7-17 create video games, iPhone apps, C++/Java programs, websites and more. Weeklong, day and overnight programs held at Stanford, UC Berkeley, Santa Clara, UCLA and others. Also special Teen programs held at Stanford in gaming, programming and visual arts. Free year-round learning! Save with code CAU22L. www.internalDrive.com 1-888-709-TECH (8324)

Stanford

Join former Stanford University Men’s and Women’s head coach, Hall of Famer and 4-time NCAA Champion Don Shaw this summer at our camp for HS GIRL’s July 13th, 14th & 15th and for HS BOY’s July 18th, 19th & 20th. This camp gives players, who have the desire, the chance to improve their skills and learn proven techniques that will help them become more consistent and enhance their chances to play at a higher level. www.mvvclub.com 408-329-0488

Teens spend two weeks immersed in the dynamic world of video game creation at iD Gaming Academy, computer science/application development at iD Programming Academy or photography/filmmaking at iD Visual Arts Academy. Overnight programs held at Stanford, Harvard, MIT and others. Week-long programs for ages 7-17 also available. Free year-round learning! Save w/code CAU22T. www.iDTeenAcademies.com 1-888-709-TECH (8324)

Earl Hansen Football Camp

International School of the Peninsula camps offered in French, Chinese, Spanish or ESL for students in Nursery through Middle School. Three 2-week sessions, each with different theme. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language proficiency. www.istp.org 650-251-8519

Palo Alto

Learn the fundamentals of football with Earl Hansen, Palo Alto High School and State Champion coach. This is a non-contact camp where kids develop fundamental skills with proven drills and techniques. Full practices in the mornings with 7 on 7 games in the afternoon. July 11 to 15 @ Palo Alto High School. Ages 10 to14. Lunch provided daily. www.earlhansenfootballcamp.com 650-269-7793

Jefunira Camp

Palo Alto

Celebrating our 20th year of Jefunira Camp summer fun in 2011! Come join us for some good old fashion summer fun! Our combination of an exceptional college aged staff and innovative, inclusive programming will create a memorable summer experience for your child. Programming for children ages 4-13. Pre and post camp care offered. www.jefuniracamp.com 650-291-2888

Kim Grant Tennis Academy Summer Camps

Palo Alto/Menlo Park/ Redwood City

Fun and Specialized junior camps for Mini (3-5), Beginner, Intermediate 1 & 2, Advanced and Elite Players. Weekly programs designed by Kim Grant to improve players technique, fitness, agility, mental toughness and all around tennis game. Camps in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Redwood City. Come make new friends and have tons of FUN!! www.KimGrantTennis.com 650-752-8061

Matt Lottich Life Skills Basketball Camp

Woodside/ Redwood City

ISTP Language Immersion

Palo Alto

Mid-Peninsula High School Summer Program

Menlo Park

Mid-Peninsula High School offers a series of classes and electives designed to keep students engaged in learning. Classes Monday-Thursday and limited to 15 students. Every Thursday there’s a BBQ lunch. The Science and Art classes will have weekly field trips. www.mid-pen.com 650-321-1991 ext. 110

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable! www.sfhs.com/summer 650-968-1213 ext. 446

SuperCamp

Stanford/San Jose/Berkeley

SuperCamp is the summer enrichment program that parents and kids love! Now in our 30th year and with over 56,000 graduates worldwide, we’ll give your son or daughter the skills, added confidence, motivation and character direction to flourish. Junior Forum, incoming 6th-8th graders; Senior Forum, incoming 9th-12th graders. Located at Stanford, San Jose State, UC Berkeley and 6 other prestigious schools nationwide. www.supercamp.com 800-285-3276

MLLS offers high-level, high-energy basketball instruction for ages 6-16. This summer we celebrate the 8th year!! With two to three “leagues” in each session, young beginners to advanced elite players get to learn fundamental skills, advanced footwork and valuable life lessons from an unparalleled staff of Pro and Collegiate level players. Camps at Woodside Elementary and Sequoia High School. Early bird, multi-session, and group discounts available. www.mllscamp.com 1-888-537-3223

Synapse School & Wizbots

Nike Tennis Camps at Stanford University

TechKnowHow Computer & LEGO Camps Palo Alto/Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Stanford

Come join the fun this summer and get better! Dick Gould’s 42nd Annual Stanford Tennis School offers day camps for both junior and adults, June 11-16. Weekly junior overnight and extended day camps offered June 19-Aug 12 for boys & girls ages 9-18 and run by Head Men’s Coach John Whitlinger and Head Women’s Coach Lele Forood. There is a camp option for everyone! www.USSportsCamps.com/tennis 1-800-NIKE CAMP (645-3226)

Spring Down Camp Equestrian Center

Portola Valley

Spring Down camp teaches basic to advanced horsemanship skills. All ages welcome! Daily informative lecture, riding lesson, supervised hands-on skill practice, safety around horses, tacking/untacking of own camp horse, and arts/crafts. www.springdown.com 650-851-1114

Stanford Water Polo Camps

Stanford

Ages 7 and up. New to the sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or full day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, position work, scrimmages and games. https://stanfordwaterpolocamps.com 650-725-9016

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. www.sfhs.com/summer 650-968-1213 ext. 446

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camps designed to provide players with the opportunity to improve both their skill and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff. www.sfhs.com/summer 650-968-1213 ext. 446

18

For more info see our online camp directory at PaloAltoOnline.com/biz/summercamps Please call us at 650.326.8210 for other camp advertising opportunities

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ APRIL 29, 2011

Menlo Park

Cutting-edge, imaginative, accelerated, integrated, and hands-on academic summer enrichment courses with independent in-depth and project-based morning and afternoon weeklong programs for children ages 4-12: Young Explorers, Thinking Math, Leonardo da Vinci’s Inventions, Nature Connections, Girls’ & Soccer Robotics, and more! www.summerinnovation.com 650-866-5824 Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-14! Courses include LEGO and K’NEX Projects with Motors, NXT Robotics, 3D Modeling, and Game Design. Many locations, including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, and Sunnyvale. Half and all day options. Early-bird and multi-session discounts available. www.techknowhowkids.com 650-474-0400

Woodland School Summer Adventures

Portola Valley

For kindergarten through 8th grade. Offers academics, sports, field trips and onsite activities. June 27 - July 29 www.woodland-school.org 650-854-9065

Write Now! Summer Writing Camps

Palo Alto/Pleasanton

Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new!) Media Production. Call or visit our website for details. www.headsup.org 650-424-1267, 925-485-5750

Arts, Culture, Nature and Other Camps Bay Area School of Performing Arts- Summer Day Camps 2011

Palo Alto

Two fun and comprehensive programs offered in 1, 2 or 3 weeks for ages 4 and up touching every aspect of Music,Theater and Dance: Improvisation, Musical Theatre, Play Production and Stage Performance. July 5-July 22 and July 25-August 12 (Full day and Half Day) 9-3pm M-F, Performance each week! 824 San Antonio Rd., Palo Alto www.baperformingarts.com 650-561-4146 (continued on next page)


-PDBM/FXT Summer at Saint Francis

Continued from page 17 the Colorado River from its high mountain sources to a dry mudflat just across the Mexican border. Part of the Peninsula Open Space Trustâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 Wallace Stegner Lecture Series. May 2, 8 p.m. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www.openspacetrust.org/lectures

FAMILY AND KIDS

Registration now open for Jefunira Camp 2011!

sports & activity

middle school

freshman experience

s#ELEBRATINGOURTHANNIVERSARYOF *EFUNIRA#AMPFUN sGOODOLD FASHIONSUMMERFUN sEXPERIENCED CARINGCOLLEGEAGED STAFF sPREANDPOSTCAMPCAREOFFERED sPROGRAMMINGFORCHILDRENTO

high school

May Fete Parade May Fete is Northern Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parade and this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theme is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Books are Hidden Treasures: Dig in!â&#x20AC;? The event will also feature a Reading and Literacy Fair on Lytton Plaza from 9-11 a.m. After the parade, visitors may attend the PiE Fair at Addison School. May 7, 9-11 a.m. Free. Downtown Palo Alto, Emerson and University, Palo Alto. Call 650-463-4900. www. cityofpaloalto.org/recreation PAMPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Rummage Sale PAMPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Rummage Sale is open to the public selling gently used childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing, toys, equipment and maternity items. April 30, 9 a.m.-noon. Free for PAMP members, $5 per family for nonmembers. Cubberley Community Center Pavilion, 4000 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. Spring Festival for Preschoolers Little Acorn School festival includes childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games, face-painting, bouncy house, bake sale and more. All proceeds go to support educational programs at the nonprofit school. April 30, 9-noon. Little Acorn School , 1667 Miramonte Ave. , Mountain View.

  sWWWJEFUNIRACAMPCOM

HEALTH advanced sports

Free Skin Cancer Screening El Camino Hospital dermatologists will conduct a skincancer screening. Pre-registration is required, call 800-216-5556. April 30, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. El Camino Hospital, Melchor Pavilion, 2490 Hospital Drive, Mountain View. Call 650-988-3225. www. elcaminohospital.org/calendar

201114 S P AM 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Aug C R M E ps J u n e SUM am ly C

k Wee

LIVE MUSIC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Native American Flute Music Meditationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A performance of Native American flute music to accompany and assist with meditation and relaxation. May 6, 7:30-9 p.m. $20. Conscious Living Center, 2400 Wyandotte St., Suite C, Mountain View. Call 650-965-1152. www.consciouslivingcenter.org Natalia Gutman & Konstantin Lifshitz Cellist Natalia Gutman and pianist Konstantin Lifschitz perform May 5, 8-10 p.m. $40 members and students, $45 nonmembers 24 hours in advance. Continued on next page

beea pa artt of it now

Register online at

www.sfhs.com/summer G U I D E TO 2011 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

Camp Connection

Continued from previous page

Arts, Culture, Nature and Other Camps Bay Area School of Performing Arts- Summer Day Camps 2011

Palo Alto

Two fun and comprehensive programs offered in 1, 2 or 3 weeks for ages 4 and up touching every aspect of Music,Theater and Dance: Improvisation, Musical Theatre, Play Production and Stage Performance. July 5-July 22 and July 25-August 12 (Full day and Half Day) 9-3pm M-F, Performance each week! 824 San Antonio Rd., Palo Alto www.baperformingarts.com 650-561-4146

Camp Jano India

Mountain View/Santa Clara

Celebrate Indian culture, languages, arts, festivals, literature, cuisine, and leaders. Weekly themes are brought to life through related arts, dance, games, projects, stories and theatre in a very unique, exciting, creative, interactive, and structured style. June 13-August 5. Age 5 to 14. www.janoindia.com 650-493-1566

Camp F.U.N. (Friends with Unique Needs)

Palo Alto

A nurturing environment for kids with challenges to experience the fun of summer camp. Led by therapists at Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Health Council. Ages 5-12, full days, Mon-Fri, three sessions. Small groups. Financial aid available. www.chconline.org 650-688-3625

Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, American Idol Workshop, more! Twoweek sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org 650-917-6800 ext. 0

Creative Arts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Express Yourselfâ&#x20AC;?

Menlo Park

Riekes Summer Camps â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A world of opportunity and fun-filled learning. Ages 9-18. Rock camps, Hip Hop, recording, filmmaking, animation, B&W and digital Photography, graphic arts, comic book creation, Photoshop, magazine publishing. Sessions run from June through August. www.riekes.org 650-364-2509

Nature Awareness â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x153;Explore Our Natural Worldâ&#x20AC;?

s Mini (3-5yrs) Specialized developmental programs

s Beginner

s Intermediate 1 s Intermediate 2 s Advanced s Elite

CertiďŹ ed coaches, Structured programs, Fitness and agility training, Mental toughness, Point play and Tons of FUN!

650-752-8061 Fx: 650-472-9281

w w w. K i m G r a n t Te n n i s . c o m BE THE EXCEPTION!

Registration opens Feb 1, 2011

Menlo Park

Riekes Summer Camps â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A world of opportunity and fun-filled learning. Ages 6-18 and families. Learn awareness & survival skills, explore Monterey Bay, deep redwoods & coastal marsh. Surf camp. Family Festival. AFCANA Combo Camps combining fitness, arts & nature. Sessions run from June through August. www.riekes.org 650-364-2509 APRIL 29, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

19


CHAMPION TENNIS CAMPS got r a M n a Al ce 1978 sin

K-12 SUMMER LEARNING MORNING ACADEMICS ¡ AFTERNOON ACTIVITIES MATHÂ&#x2030;LANGUAGE ARTSÂ&#x2030;SCIENCEÂ&#x2030;DEBATEÂ&#x2030;AND MORE!

Grades K-6

Summer Camp +

Grades 6-12

Summer Institute

JULY 25-AUGUST 12 AGES 4-14 Atherton Tennis Center

www.alanmargot-tennis.net

65O-4OO-O464

OTHER PROGRAMS

Outstanding summer programs for over 50 years

Registration open 408.553.0537 l campinfo@harker.org Held on our beautiful lower and upper school campuses

summer.harker.org

Photography Sports & Tech Robotics & more

HELD AT 60 PRESTIGIOUS UNIVERSITIES NATIONWIDE:

Stanford Santa Clara St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College UC Berkeley UCLA Princeton & more! ALSO, TEEN SUMMER PROGRAMS HELD AT STANFORD!

iD GAMING ACADEMY

iD PROGRAMMING ACADEMY

iD VISUAL ARTS ACADEMY

internalDrive.com 1-888-709-TECH (8324) Save with code CAU22V 20

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  APRIL 29, 2011

ON STAGE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Camping with Henry and Tomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; In 1921 Warren G. Harding, Henry Ford and Thomas Edison get marooned in the Maryland woods in Mark St. Germainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camping with Henry and Tom.â&#x20AC;? Awaiting rescue, the great minds clash over everything from politics to personal philosophies in this â&#x20AC;&#x153;factionalâ&#x20AC;? story. April 7-30, 8 p.m. $24-32. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-9410551. www.busbarn.org â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Owl and the Pussycatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Peninsula Youth Theatre presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Owl and the Pussycat.â&#x20AC;? April 29-30, $8. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6000. www.pytnet.org

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

FORGE NEW FRIENDSHIPS Summer Resident Camps YMCA CAMP JONES GULCH

App Dev Web Design Filmmaking

$50 at the door. Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 650-223-8664. www.paloaltojcc.org/arts

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Peninsula Peak to Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Explore the redwoods, foothills, Stanford University, and Old Palo Alto. Choose a 5, 10, or 25 km course and find up to two dozen checkpoints in parks and places along the way. April 30, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $5 to $45. Palo Alto High School, 50 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto. Call 510-681-6181. terraloco.com Beginnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Botany Walk A walk focusing on wildflowers and plant identification, led by a botanist. May 7, 10 a.m.-noon. $12 per person. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org Gamble Garden Spring Tour â&#x20AC;&#x153;Outdoor Living in Palo Alto: Fine Landscape Design for California Lifestyles,â&#x20AC;? a tour of five private gardens and boutique at Gamble Garden. Friday and Saturday, April 29 and 30, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $35 prior to event, $40 day of. Gamble Garden, 1431 Waverley St., Palo Alto. Call 650-329-1356 ext. 201. www. gamblegarden.org

Contact us for a personal tour!

Game Design 3D Modeling Programming

Continued on next page

OUTDOORS

¡ Tennis and Soccer Camps ¡ Swim Lessons ¡ English Language Institute for International Students

THE WORLDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S #1 TECH CAMP FOR AGES 7-18!

-PDBM/FXT

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FOR MORE INFO: ZZZ.campMRQeVJXlcK.RUJ We offer Traditional and 0ini &ampV +orVe 6Xrf /eaderVKip and Travel &ampV

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Holy Yogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; This class offers a form of experiential worship; no prior experience with yoga needed. Class meets Wednesdays, 6:45-7:45 p.m. Free. Los Altos United Methodist Church, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center, 655 Magdalena Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-3839322. www.laumc.org Insight Meditation South Bay Shaila Catherine and guest teachers lead a weekly Insight Meditation sitting followed by a talk on Buddhist teachings. Tuesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. Donations accepted. St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/Edwards Hall, 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View. Call 650-857-0904. imsb. org

SENIORS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Big Bingoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Big Bingo will be held in the Social Hall the first Monday of each month. 1 p.m. Free. 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-9036330. Book Club Meetings are held the second Tuesday of the month in the Conference Room. The next book for review is â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gift of an Ordinary Dayâ&#x20AC;? by Katrina Kenison. The book for June will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;When Everything Changedâ&#x20AC;? by Gail Collins. May 10, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330.

SPECIAL EVENTS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Style 2011â&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Palo Alto Art Center Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wearable Art Show and Sale returns on April 30. Featuring clothing, jewelry and accessories from more than 38 artists and live models. $10 (free for PAACF members). Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. www. paacf.org/style/ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;UFOs and their Spiritual Missionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A discussion of UFO sightings and their possible meaning. May 6, 7:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Community Center, 201 South Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. SharingForPeace.org Mars Lecture NASA Research Park will host a free lecture, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Packing for Mars: Challenges and Oddities of a Human Mission to Mars,â&#x20AC;? May 3. The Lecture features Dr. Pascal Lee, planetary scientist at the Mars and SETI Institutes, and Mary Roach, author of the recent bestseller â&#x20AC;&#x153;Packing for Mars.â&#x20AC;? 7-9 p.m. Free. NASA Conference Center Building 3, Moffett Field. researchpark.arc.nasa.gov/ Safety Faire Hosted by the Palo Alto/Stanford


-PDBM/FXT Continued from previous page Citizen Corps Council. Event will feature 32 nonprofit booths, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area, emergency equipment. May 1, noon-4 p.m. Free. Stanford Shopping center, El Camino , Palo Alto. Call 650-321-8933. www.cityofpaloalto.org/ccc Stanford Historical Society House & Garden Tour An architectural sampler of Stanford: annual tour by the Historical Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historic Houses Project. Features three pre-1930 houses from the San Juan Neighborhood and two 1936 residences that blend house and garden. Architects: A. B. and Birge Clark, Charles K. Sumner and Frank Lloyd Wright. May 1, 1-4 p.m. $25 before April 16; $30 after April 16 and on day of tour. Stanford , 560 Wilbur Way, Stanford. Call 650-7253332. histsoc.stanford.edu/programs.shtml

A place where horses and humans can come together to learn and beneďŹ t from each other.

TEEN ACTIVITIES Club 201 Middle School Dance The last Club 201 Dance of the school year. Open to all Mountain View Middle School students. Purchase a VIP card after school at The Beat (Graham Middle School), Beyond the Bell (Crittenden Middle School), or the Mountain View Community Center. April 29, 7-9:30 p.m. $3 in advance, $5 at the door. Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. Call 650903-6410. www.mountainview.gov/city_hall/ comm_services/recreation_programs_and_services/teen_services.asp Math Festival for Youths at Stanford At the Julia Robinson Mathematics Festival, students in grades 6-12 are invited to a day covering a wide variety of math topics. Students will circulate among activity tables as they test their math skills on puzzles, games and problems. Register in advance. May 1, 8:45 a.m.-1 p.m. $10 fee per student or free, by requesting a fee waiver. Stanford University, Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center, 326 Galvez St., Stanford. Call 510-642-0143. tinyurl. com/JRMFStanford2011 Teen Open Gym Teen Open Gyms are open every Saturday night for various sports. Middleschool and high-school students only; bring student ID. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Whisman Sports Center, 1500 Middlefield Road, Mountain View. Call 650-903-6410. Teen Open Mic Night Teen open mic night, sponsored by the City of Mountain View Recreation Division and Youth Advisory Committee. April 30, 7-10 p.m. Free. Red Rock Coffee, 201 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6410. www. mountainview.gov/city_hall/comm_services/recreation_programs_and_services/teen_services.asp

3PRING#AMP

April 11-15 April 18-22

/NE$AY -INI#AMPS

April 16, June 25, August 20, October 15

Academics, Horseback Riding, Art, Music, Gymnastics, Computers, Sports, Onsite Presentations and Field Trips

Call now for Summer Adventure information.

3UMMER#AMPS June 13-17, June 20-July 1, /NE7EEK July 11-22, July 25-August 5, 3ESSIONS!VAILABLE August 8-19, August 22-26 s$IVERSE,ESSON0ROGRAMs$AYSA7EEKs%VENINGS (OLIDAYS s503AFEAND+IND,ESSON(ORSES

725 Portola Rd., Portola Valley (650) 851-1114 www.springdown.com

360 La Cuesta Drive, Portola Valley, Ca 94028 sWWWWOODLAND SCHOOLORG

Team Esface Presents The 8th Annual

att lottich life skills B A S K E T B A L L C A M P 2 0 11

A RT , B I O L O G Y , C O M E D Y W O R K S H O P , D R A M A , E N G L I S H , M AT H , SAT P R E P , S PA N I S H , V O L L E Y B A L L & C O L L E G E E S S AY W R I T I N G

learn. play. excel.

MLLS offers High-Level, High-Energy basketball instruction for ages 6-16. With two to three â&#x20AC;&#x153;leaguesâ&#x20AC;? in each session, young beginners to older elite players learn fundamental skills, advanced footwork and valuable life lessons from an unparalleled staff including Pro and Collegiate level players. Session I

June 20 - June 24

Session II

June 27 - July 1

Session III

July 11 - July 15

Session IV

July 11- July 15

$25 OFF

Session V

July 18- July 22

Session VI

July 18 - July 22

Use code: PAW2011 when registering

Location: Woodside Elementary School Location: Woodside Elementary School Location: Woodside Elementary School Location: Sequoia High School

Location: Woodside Elementary School

summer school June 27-July 28, 2011 www.mid-pen.com WWW . MID - PEN . COM

This year all Camp sessions will run from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM from Mondays to Fridays.

Classes of 5-15 students. Open to students from other schools (grades 9-12). Science & Art ďŹ eld trips weekly. BBQ lunch included every Thursday

Location: Sequoia High School

E: Info@mllscamp.com | T: (888) 537-3223

Mid-Peninsula High School

log on to www. mllscamp .com today!

Bay Area Equestrian Connec tion LLC

SUMMER HORSE CAMPS 

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Come experience Summer Horse Camps at Wunderlich County Park Stables!

CONTACT: Nicola Willits

(650) 321-1991 x110

1340 Willow Road, Menlo Park

Wunderlich County Park Stables

Presents

VOLUNTEERS Wetlands Field Trips Volunteers are needed to help guide students during two-hour field trips as part of the Wetlands Discovery Program. Students learn about the wetlands and the animals that live there (especially birds). Thursdays and Fridays, 9:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Free. Charleston Slough and Mountain View Baylands, Terminal Boulevard, Mountain View. Call 408-252-3740. www.scvas.org

Kindergarten through 8th Grade

2011 Horsemanship Camps

TALKS/AUTHORS â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Alison Owings discusses â&#x20AC;&#x153;Indian Voices: Listening to Native Americans.â&#x20AC;? May 4, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc - Palo Alto, 74 Town & Country Village, Palo Alto. www.booksinc.net â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Search for Waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; David Freyberg, prof. of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Watering the Farm: Old and New, Near and Farâ&#x20AC;? at the free public meeting of the Palo Alto Historical Assn. on Sunday, May 1, 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Lucie Stern Community Center, 1305 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto. SETI Institute Free Weekly Talks â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tracking and Mitigating Meteoroid Threats to Spacecraftâ&#x20AC;? by Sigrid Close, Stanford University. This week, find out how future spacecraft will tackle the threat of meteroid collisions. May 4, noon-1 p.m. Free. SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-810-0223. seti.org/talks Zen Master Les Kaye Les Kaye is the abbot of the Kannon Do Zen Center. While studying and practicing Zen, he worked in the hi-tech, corporate world for more than 30 years. He will present, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joyously Through the Days, his newest book. April 30, 11 a.m. Free. Kannon Do Zen Center, 1972 Rock St., Mountain View. Call 480-235-5877. kannondo.org

June 27 - July 29

â&#x2DC;&#x2026; 27 YEARS AND STILL GOING STRONG â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

Woodside, California

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APRIL 29, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

21


22

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ APRIL 29, 2011


Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com E-MAIL ads@fogster.com PHONE 650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX N BULLETIN

BOARD 100-199 N FOR SALE 200-299 N KIDS STUFF 330-399 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-599 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 800-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997 The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media has the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

fogster.com THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

Bulletin Board

Swim Team Try out www.art4growth.com

140 Lost & Found Cat Found Lost Calico Cat-Reward! Lost Cat- Calico

115 Announcements

Runaway Cat!

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

145 Non-Profits Needs

Wear a paperclip on your collar during the Days of Remembrance, may 1-8, to honor Holocaust victims, to oppose racism, prejudice, anti-Semitism, and hate crimes. paperclipcampaign.com (AAN CAN)

Rummage sale for Japan relief

Bird Sitting available

feed homeless cats (PA or MV)

Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA)

Library Volunteers Needed

Dance Instruction

Museum Volunteers

Foothill College Plant Sale

NASA cats need fosterers

Free DVD

Who Looks Up to You?

Donations Needed! Knitters Wanted please donate your used books St. Anthony’s Dining Room Needs

150 Volunteers Conversation partners needed

Free Reiki to the community! Huge Used Book Sale May 14-15

Top-notch Panel on Education5/7

130 Classes & Instruction Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura.us.com (Cal-SCAN) High School Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www. SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN) HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www.continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN) GERMAN Language Class Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

133 Music Lessons A Piano Teacher Children & Adults Ema Currier (650)493-4797 Barton-Holding Music Studio Next 6 week “singing for the non-singer” class starts April 28. Call Laura Barton 650/965-0139 FUN Piano Voice Violin Guitar Hope Street Music Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650) 961-2192 Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529 McCool Piano Studio 566-9391MP Near Burgess Gym Menlo Park Piano Lessons Taught in your home. Member MTAC & NGPT. Specializing in beginners. All levels welcome. Karen, (650)367-0307 or The Manzana Music School Lessons in Palo Alto on Guitar, Violin, Vocals, Fiddle, Banjo, or Mandolin. Call us at: 650 799-7807 www.ManzanaMusicSchool.com

135 Group Activities CHILDREN’S ENTERTAINER Silicon Valley Singles Weekend

PA: 398 Sheridan Ave., 4/30, 9-5 Jerusalem Baptist Church Spring Rummage Sale. (x-Ash). Palo Alto, 2177 Webster St, April 30, 8-3 Moving Sale: Furniture, housewares, baby clothes and accessories, books and other misc. items Palo Alto, 240 Colorado Avenue, April 30th, 8AM-3PM Palo Alto, City-wide, June 4, 8am - 2pm

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts Chevrolet 1974 Camaro - $6000

NEW - CoPilot Trailer/Jogger - $200

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered Are you looking for mature Nanny

Redwood City, Quartz St, ONGOING

Debbie’s Family Day Care - RWC

215 Collectibles & Antiques

Do you live in College Terrace?

Antique Cherry Buffet - $495 Antique Repo Secretary Desk - $85.00 or Disney’s Donald Duck Framed 50’s - $25.00 Rare! 35 Years Disneyland Watch - $65.00 Rare! 35 Years Disneyland Watch - $60.00 Rare! Disneyland Light Bulb - $20.00 SPORTS MEMORABILIA: 80s-’10

EXPERIENCED, LOVING NANNY Little Ages Need a Babysitter/Summer Nanny? P/T Nanny & Pet Sitter Available Small Family Child Care We accept kids from 0 to 8. Our location is near El Camino and Arastradero in Palo Alto. Call 650-813-1896, cell 408-598-7569 Sweet and Outgoing Babysitter

Sweet! Vitctor Victola - $450.00

Top Nanny for Hire Excel. refs. 650/233-9778

Vintage Bakelite Purse - $30

Violin Teacher

VINTAGE ROCK T-SHIRTS: 80s

International Recorder Festival St. Anthony’s Easter Meal 2011

Mountain View, 784 Hans Ave, April 30, 7am-1pm

220 Computers/ Electronics HDMI CABLE FOR BLUE RAY NEW $10.00 IBM Selectric II Typewriter - $350 Kicker L7 & 1400 Watt RMS Amp $1000

345 Tutoring/ Lessons Chess Lessons for kids and adult French,Spanish Lesns. 6506919863 One-to-One Tutoring Service Stanford-Educated Expert Tutors

350 Preschools/ Schools/Camps

Chevy 1974 Camaro - $6000 650-

LASER PRINTER/COPIER: Xerox

Harley 2006 Sportster XLR - $5000

235 Wanted to Buy

202 Vehicles Wanted

We are hiring (khalid0321)

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery Coupons, Your Choice. Noah's Arc, No Kill Animal Shelters. Advanced Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, IRS Tax Deduction. Non-Runners. 1-866-912-GIVE. (Cal-SCAN)

237 Barter

Donate Your Car Children's Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child's Life Through Research and Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy and Tax Deductible. Call 1-800252-0615. (Cal-SCAN)

2 Teak Armchairs - $700

BOY 18mon clothes 30+items

BEAUTIFUL QUALITY - $1

BOY/GIRL NEW OUTFITS,SHOES,FURN

Bookcase - $60 obo

Girl toysBratz,Barbie dressup$10

BOOKS-for your entire family - 50¢ & up

Jackets6mon-3 years$5

coffee table - $150

NEW CoPilot Trailer/Jogger

Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales LA: 461 Orange Av., Fri., 5/6, 9-3, Sat., 5/7, 9-2 LOS ALTOS FOOTHILLS CHURCH ENORMOUS RUMMAGE SALE Fri., Best Selection Sat., Great Values Designer clothing/Treasures/Bks. 461 Orange Ave. (bet El Monte & Main Menlo Park, 123 E Creek Drive, April 30th, 8-2 Menlo Park, 955 Sherman Av., April 30, & May 1, 8 am-4 pm Mountain View, 291-296 Tyrella Avenue, April 30 & May 1, 8-2 Multi-Family yard sale. Saturday, April 30 & Sunday May i, 8am to 2pm A lifetime of treasure & variety, TV, Space Shuttle tiles, photography & darkroom equipment, couch, patio furniture (2 sets) household goods, kids items/toys, backpacking/camping equipment, antiques, cross bow, photo studio props, Mac computer, stereo equipment, Akai reel to reel tape recorder, plumbing fixtures, goodies galore & so much more.

something for all

240 Furnishings/ Household items

Ethan Allen Cherrywood Furniture $2300 set Mahogany Secretary Desk New Low $79.00 or

Art classes/camps/Art Parties Horseback Riding Camps & Lessons Webb Ranch (650)854-7755

355 Items for Sale 4 YearsSnowsuit Really warm$20 4Y Boy clothes30+items$40 Art classes/Art Parties

Stuffed animals 2 bags full$20 Sweet Baby Girl Wall Hanging $20

Nice 6 ft. Brown Sofa - $20.00 Silk Hanging Scrolls Two Chinese silk hanging scrolls, $200 ea. Will sell separately. 408/375-1329 Wanted entire estate or house - $Cash

425 Health Services

Wow! Nice 6 Foot Bown Sofa - $19.95

Diabetes/Cholesterol Weight Loss. Natural Product for Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and Weight. Physician recommended, backed by Human Clinical Studies with amazing results. Call to find out how to get a free bottle of Bergamonte! 888-615-9598. (Cal-SCAN)

Wow! Nice 6 Foot Bown Sofa - $29.00

245 Miscellaneous antiques and more ... cheap - $1 BARGAINS APLENTY - $1 CANON CHARGER & 4L BATTERY $15.00 CRYSTAL DECANTER: Signed FREE FIREWOOOD & MULCH Mixed Firewood-Seasoned & Split - $150. POSTERS: French Movie, Batman Pre-Teen Girls Clothing - $2.00 or L VINTAGE VINYL: Elec./Rock/DJ

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment FISHING ROD & REEL COMBO GRAPHITE TENNIS RACQUET

Engineering Mobile Iron, Inc. has openings for Software Engineer and Software Engineer (Build & Release Engineer) in Mountain View, CA. Send resume to 815A East Middlefield Rd., Mountain View, CA 94043 or email to jobs@mobileiron.com. Visit www.mobileiron.com for job detail. Multimedia Advertising Sales The Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media are seeking smart, articulate and dedicated experienced and entry-level sales professionals who are looking for a fast-paced and dynamic work environment of people committed to producing outstanding journalism and effective marketing for local businesses. You will join our staff of talented journalists, designers, web programmers and sales people in our brand new “green” Palo Alto headquarters building in the vibrant California Ave. business district. As a Multimedia Account Executive, you will contact and work with local businesses to expand their brand identity and support their future success using marketing and advertising opportunities available through our 3 marketing platforms: print campaigns, website advertising & email marketing. The ideal candidate is an organized and assertive self-starter who loves working as a team to beat sales goals and possesses strong verbal, written, persuasive and listening interpersonal skills and can provide exceptional customer service. Duties, responsibilities and skills include: * Understands that the sales process is more than taking orders * Has a strong understanding of how consumers use the Internet * Can effectively manage and cover a geographic territory of active accounts while constantly canvassing competitive media and the market for new clients via cold calling * Can translate customer marketing objectives into creative and effective multi-media advertising campaigns

Mahogany Secretary Desk New Low $85.00 or

Wow! Nice 6 Foot Bown Sofa - $10.00

Computers Sr. Member of Technical Staff sought by Delphix Corp. in Menlo Park, CA. Design software features. Resume to HR, 275 Middlefield Rd. #50, Menlo Park, CA 94025. Indicate ref# 6683.2.

Joint and Muscle Pain Sufferers: Clinically proven all-natural supplement helps reduce pain and enhance mobility. Call 888-589-0439 to try Hydraflexin RISK-FREE for 90 days. (Cal-SCAN)

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Career Center Coordinator Mtn. View-Los Altos UHSD Full time, apply online at www.mvla.net/Personnel/Pages/ default.aspx

* Ability to understand and interpret marketing data to effectively overcome client objections * Understands the importance of meeting deadlines in an organized manner * Can manage and maintain client information in our CRM database system, is proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel and has knowledge of the Internet and social media * Ability to adapt objectives, sales approaches and behaviors in response to rapidly changing situations and to manage business in a deadline-driven environment Compensation includes base salary plus commission, health benefits, vacation, 401k and a culture where employees are respected, supported and given the opportunity to grow. To apply, submit a personalized cover letter and complete resume to arenalds@embarcaderopublishing.com

GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS APRIL 29, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

23


MARKETPLACE the printed version of

THE PENINSULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

fogster.com

Restaurant Cafe Borrone is bustling and we are seeking friendly, enthusiastic, hardworking individuals w/great personality to enrich the exp. of staff and customers. Flex. full- and part-time food servers, kit. and dishwasher positions avail. Weekends a must. No exp. needed, just a love for people, food and hard work. Please apply in person, 1010 El Camino Real, MP.

540 Domestic Help Wanted Teen Companion We would like to hire a college student or grad student (or even a recent high school graduate) to act as a driver and companion for our 15 year old daughter. Hours would be after school til 6 pm Monday through Thursday @ $20/hour. More hours during the summer. Call Maureen at 650 739 0209

550 Business Opportunities All Cash Vending Route! Be Your Own Boss! Investment as low as $4995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN)

560 Employment Information Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram. net (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN) Driver: Local Orientation Recessoin Proof freight! 2012 Trucks! LOCAL Orientation. Daily or Weekly Pay! Hometime Choices! F/T or P/T. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 1-800-414-9569. www.DriveKnight.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers - ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-46 cpm. 300 Newer Trucks. Need 2 months CDL-A Driving Experience. 1-877-258-8782. www.MeltonTruck.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: CDL Training Career Central. No Money Down. CDL Training. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator Earn up to $51k *Lease Trainers Earn up to $80k 1-877-369-7126. www.CentralDrivingJobs.net (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: Reefer Solo Lessee Average $1.12/mile (+ fuel surcharge). Paid CDL Training Available & Benefits! Call Prime Today! 1-800-277-0212. www.PrimeInc.com (Cal-SCAN) Merchandisers Hiring Resets in Fremont, Fresno, Yreka, Merced and Roseville. www.ApolloRetail. com and click Apply Here. (Cal-SCAN) Sales: Guys and Gals 18+. Travel the country while selling our Orange peel product. Training, Hotel and Transportation provided. Daily cash draws. Apply today leave tomorrow. 1-888-872-7577. (Cal-SCAN)

Business Services 615 Computers Boomer Vengeance Give PCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a chance! We offer technical support for baby boomers and beyond. Networking, problem troubleshooting, software install/uninstall, virus removal and much more! Personalized documentation. Satisfaction guaranteed. 855.4.I.DIG.IT (855.443.4448) boomervengeance.com.

624 Financial Cash Now! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-494-9115. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (Cal-SCAN)

645 Office/Home Business Services Advertising - Best Kept Secret A business card sized display ad 140 California community newspapers. Reach 3 million+ Californians. Cost $1,550.$1.33 cost per thousand. Free brochure (916)2886019; www.Cal-SDAN.com (Cal-SCAN)

24

Classified Advertising 240 California community newspapers reaching over 6 million Californians. 25-words $550 works out to 18 cents cost per thousand! FREE email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SCAN. com (Cal-SCAN)

650 Pet Care/ Grooming/Training All Animals Happy House Pet Sitting Services by Susan Licensed, insured, refs. 650-323-4000

Stewart Electric Stewart Electric Lic # 745186 Experienced Residential Electrician Free Qâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Guaranteed results! C 408 368-6622 B 745-7115

751 General Contracting

748 Gardening/ Landscaping Beckys Landscape Weeding, weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree prune, clean ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Demolition, excavation. Driveway, patio, deck installs. Power washing. 650/493-7060

Home Services

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION

703 Architecture/ Design Design/Permits One stop for your remodel/design needs. Comp. plans incl structural engineering and energy compliance (T-24). ADW 650-969-4980

710 Carpentry Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475 Ramoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand wood carving Hand carved: Pilasters, columns, corbels, pedestals, mantels, tables, chairs,. Your designs, are welcomed. Satisfaction guaranteed. 10 yrs exp. 650-222-2722 rcampo28@my.smccd.edu

715 Cleaning Services Mariaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housecleaning 18 Years exp. Excellent refs. Good rates, own car. Maria, (650)679-1675 or (650)207-4609 (cell) AC Housecleaning Residential/Commercial. Move in/ out, offices, more. Good rates. 11 years exp. Please call 650/678-4792. www.achousecleaning.com

Asuncion Yanet House Cleaning

Jody Horst

Artist

856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080 JRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Maintenance Residential clean up, trimming, new lawn and sprinkler installations. 16 yrs exp. Great refs. Jose, 650-743-0397 LANDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maintenance*New Lawns*Clean Ups*Tree Trimming*Wood Fences* Power Washing. 17 years experience. Senior Discount 650-576-6242 Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477. Marioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. 650/365-6955; 995-3822

Olgaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housecleaning Res./Com. Wkly/mo. Low Rates. Local Refs. 25 years Exp. & Friendly. I love My Job! Ins. (650)380-1406

Orkopina Housecleaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;The BEST Service for Youâ&#x20AC;? Bonded

Since 1985

Insured

%TrustworthyDetailed %Laundry,Linens %WW#Blinds % " " !  Clean-up % #Wash %  Work

(650)962-1536- Lic. 020624

est.

SINCE 1980

650-906-7712 or 650-630-3279

Marlem HouseCleaning House, Condos, Apartments, Office, Move-in, Move-Out, Free Estimates. Good References. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Serving All The Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;? 650-380-4114 or 650-389-3327

Free

Creating Gardens of Distinction

! !!        Franciscaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deep Housecleaning Experienced, Refs. 650-669-0628 or 650-701-0703

LIC# 354206

             ďŹ  

       

650-208-3891

WWW.PTALAND.COM

LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859

Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden Service

                  

(650)969-9894 Cherish Your Garden

Shubha Landscape Design, Inc. (650) 321-1600

LIC #852075

QDInstallation S P alkways DArborLighting IFGardening

www.orkopinacleaningservice.com

www.ShubhaLandscapeDesign.com

VICTORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLEANING

Urielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gardening Clean up, haul, maint., poison oak, free est. 650/862-1378 Uriel

Weekly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bi-Weekly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monthly

Vidal Gardening & Landscaping Bi-Weekly, twice a month clean up. Tree removal. Fences, retaining walls, new lawn irrigation systems. Gutter cleaning. Free est., excel. refs. 650-771-0213

Residential & Commercial Affordable Rates - Free Estimates We provide all supplies

650-279-5978/650-930-0064 730 Electrical Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  APRIL 29, 2011

NOTICE TO READERS It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board

WEEKLY MAINTENANCE TRIMMING/ PRUNING, TREE SERVICE, STUMP GRINDING, CLEAN UPS, AERATION, IRRIGATION, ROTOTILLING. ROGER: 650.776.8666 Wegmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s By Design

$ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $! www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti

A

J O HN STO N

70% Recycled

LARGE TRUCKS ,&(,'*-Trees LARGE/small JOBS Free Estimate Insured

815 Rentals Wanted

A Junk Hauling Service Residential & Commercial. Yard clean-up service. Large & Small jobs. 650-771-0213

ESTATE CARETAKER NOW AVAILABLE

Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

767 Movers SHMOOVER

Garyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Remodel Kitchen & bath remodels + more www.garysremodel.com (408) 420-1661

754 Gutter Cleaning O.K.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Raingutter Service

757 Handyman/ Repairs AAA HANDYMAN AND MORE

Repair     

  

Lic.# 468963

Since 1976 Licensed & Insured

650-222-2517

ABLE HANDYMAN FRED CompleteHomeRepair Maintenanc  emodelin ProfessionalPainting Carpentr Plumbing Electrical CustomCabineDesign Deckence  AnMuchMore 30 Years Experience

650.529.1662 3.27

HANDY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edâ&#x20AC;? MAN

 $!$   #$$ #"#! FREE ESTIMA     

ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274

KENSIL SERVICE COMPANY General Repairs   

 Small Jobs OK

(650) 965-4112 Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Maintenance Plumbing, Painting, Tile and wall repair. Free Est. No job too small. Senior discount. 25 years exp. 650/669-3199

Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292 STYLE PAINTING Commâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l/Res. Full service painting and decorating. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

787 Pressure Washing Discount Pressure Washing Decks * Patios * Driveways Becky, 650/493-7060

789 Plaster/Stucco Exterior Stucco Patching Windows & Doors. Crack Repair. 30 yrs. exp. (650)248-4205

795 Tree Care

Palo Alto

TREE SERVICE

             25 yrs ExpLic & Ins. #819244 (650) 380-2297

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Menlo Park, 1 BR/1 BA - $1000wPrkg Menlo Park, 1 BR/1 BA - 2350.00 Menlo Park, 2 BR/2 BA - $2900/mont Palo Alto, 3 BR/2.5 BA - $ 3500 Portola Valley (and Environs), 1 BR/1 BA - $1,500

Small Jobs Welcome Local, refs., 25 years exp., trusted, reliable. 650/218-8181

Redwood City, 2 BR/2 BA - $2750/mo

759 Hauling

803 Duplex

a J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, appliances, garage, storage, etc, clean-ups. Old furniture, green waste and yard junk. Licensed & insured. FREE ESTIMATES 650/368-8810

Long-Term Rental Needed Tenant - Caretaker: $1000

820 Home Exchanges FULLY FURNISHED NEW 2 BEDROOM/2

825 Homes/Condos for Sale

LICENSE CAL. T-118304

771 Painting/ Wallpaper

PL/PD STATE LIC# 608358

3 bed 2 bath

MOOVERS 327-5493

www.cjtigheconstruction.com

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms

HAULING 

650-327-HAUL 415-999-0594

(650) 799-5521

650-322-7930

Sunnyvale, 4 BR/2 BA - $3,150/mon

cell:

Serving the Peninsula since 1975/Owner-Operated!

Since1990!

Palo Alto, 4 BR/3 BA - $4,500 for

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

   "

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS          

Palo Alto, 3 BR/2.5 BA - $3500

San Carlos, 2 BR/1 BA - $1,800.00

Sunnyvale Sixplex, 2 BR/1 BA - $1200. mon

805 Homes for Rent Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3,950 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $ 4000/mon

Haines, Alaska, 3 BR/3 BA Own a piece of the last frontier. Beautiful newly constructed home at Porcupine Crossing in Haines, Alaska. View moose and bears from your front porch and fish for wild Alaskan salmon just steps from your front door. More Pictures and Information at www.hainesrealestate.com Menlo Park, 2 BR/1 BA - $710,000 Woodside, 4 BR/3 BA

840 Vacation Rentals/Time Shares Timeshares: Sell/Rent for cash!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for Cash! Over $95 Million Dollars offered in 2010! www.SellaTimeshare.com (877) 554-2098 (Cal-SCAN) Monterey Dunes Beach House 650-598-7047

Northstar Tahoe Family Retreat 5Br 650-598-7057

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage El Paso, TX Own 20 acres - $0 Down. $99/month. ONLY $12,900 Money Back Guarantee, No Credit Checks, Owner Financing. Free Color Brochure. 1-800-343-9444. www.20AcreRanches.com (Cal-SCAN) Nevada: Sacrifice Sale Nevada's 3rd Largest Lake 1.5 hours South of Tahoe on California border, 1 acre Bold Lake View/Access $24,900 (was $49,900). 1 acre Bold Lake Front $89,800 (was $149,900). Very rare gorgeous homesites, central water, paved roads. Awe inspiring views. Owner says sell! 1-888-705-3808. (Cal-SCAN) Quality Land Investments Adirondacks and Upstate NY 5 acres starting at $12,995. 5 acres of land w/cabin for $29,995. Large tracts on gorgeous flowing, canoeable rivers -$39,995. Tired of the break even CD's & risky markets? Retirement accounts dropping? We have over 100 inexpensive, quality properties including timberland, lakes & ponds, farmland, and beautiful clear rivers all fully guaranteed, approved, surveyed, insured, and buildable. Beautiful country side, one of a kind year round, recreational paradise. See a large selection at www.LandandCamps.com. Let us help you by calling 1-800-229-7843. Ask about buying land in your IRA!! (Cal-SCAN)

PLACE AN AD ONLINE: fogster.com E-MAIL: ads@fogster.com PHONE: 650/326-8216


MARKETPLACE the printed version of

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

1VCMJD/PUJDFT

995 Fictitious Name Statement

HACHI JAPANESE FUSION TAPAS & ROBATA GRILL FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 549392 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Hachi Japanese Fusion Tapas & Robata Grill at 1711-B El Camino Real, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): MIDORI GROUP INC. 1919 Fruitdale Ave. Apt K750 San Jose, CA 95128 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on March 21, 2011. (Voice April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011)

CUSTOMER RUSH MARKETING FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 549227 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Customer Rush Marketing at 800 West El Camino Real, Ste., 180, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): ATON INTERNATIONAL, INC. 800 West El Camino Real, Ste. 180 Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 03/11/2011. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on March 16, 2011. (Voice April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011) TOFU STUDIOS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 549078

The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Tofu Studios at 260 Higdon Ave., Apt. #2, Mountain View, CA 94041, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): AMITABH JOSHI 260 Higdon Ave., Apt. #2 Mountain View, CA 94041 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on March 11, 2011. (Voice April 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011) ADMIXIUM FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 549324 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Admixium at 173 Sierra Vista Ave., Apt. 7, Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by:

fogster.com

A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): WESLEY SMITH 173 Sierra Vista Ave., Apt. 7 Mountain View, CA 94043 GREGORY POWEL 173 Sierra Vista Ave., Apt. 7 Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on March 18, 2011. (Voice April 15, 22, 29, May 6, 2011) PharMerica FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 550312 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: PharMerica at 145 East Dana Street, Suite B, Mountain View, CA 94041, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): PMC Pharmacy Services, LLC 1901 Campus Place Louisville, KY 40299 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 01/26/2009. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa

Clara County on April 12, 2011. (Voice April 29, May 6, 13, 20, 2011) PREMIER SMOG FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 550143 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Premier Smog at 101 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): JONATHAN FU 131 Cerro Drive Daly City, CA 94015 ERWIN VON BITONIO 39 Grandview Ave. Daly City, CA 94015 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 04/15/2011. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on April 8, 2011. (Voice April 29, May 6, 13, 20, 2011) PDR AND WINDSHIELD REPAIR FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 549910 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: PDR and Windshield Repair at 2245 Latham St., Apt. 2, Mountain View,

CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): JESUS CONTRERAS 2245 Latham St., Apt. 2 Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner has not yet begun to transact business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on April 4, 2011. (Voice April 29, May 6, 13, 20, 2011)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: April 7, 2011 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: MIDORI GROUP INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 1711 W El Camino Real Ste. B Mountain View, CA 94040-2454 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 - ON-SALE BEER AND WINE EATING PLACE (Voice April 22, 29, May 6, 2011)

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE COMBINING THE REACH OF THE WEB WITH PRINT ADS REACHING OVER 150,000 READERS! Now you can log on to Fogster.com, day or night, and get your ad started immediately (except for employment and business ads) free of charge online. You automatically get a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!

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APRIL 29, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

25


LIFELONG MOUNTAIN VIEW RESIDENT & AREA SPECIALIST

INCREASE YOUR EXPOSURE

DIANE SCHMITZ Realtor (650) 947-2955 www.DianeSchmitz.com dianeschmitz@serenogroup.com

Get your name known in the community. Showcase your listings to thousands of potential buyers and sellers.

DRE # 01235034

WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS Is Quality Important to You?

s9VONNE(EYLs

wo! er of T w o P e Th

Direct (650) 947-4694 Cell (650) 302-4055 DRE# 01255661



        

Are you staying current with the changing real estate market conditions? We offer the one online destination that lets you fully explore: s)NTERACTIVEMAPS s(OMESFORSALE s/PENHOUSEDATESANDTIMES s6IRTUALTOURSANDPHOTOS s0RIORSALESINFO s.EIGHBORHOODGUIDES s!REAREALESTATELINKS sANDSOMUCHMORE

Call Rosemary at the Mountain View Voice 650-964-6300

s*EFF'ONZALEZs

Direct (650) 947-4698 Cell (408) 888-7748 DRE# 00978793

EMAIL TOYVONNEANDJEFF AOLCOM s www.yvonneandjeff.com

/URCOMPREHENSIVEONLINE GUIDETOTHE-IDPENINSULA REALESTATEMARKETHASALL THERESOURCESAHOMEBUYER AGENTORLOCALRESIDENTCOULD EVERWANTANDITSALLINONE EASY TO USE LOCALSITE

126 Holly Ct., Mountain View Op en 1-4 Sund p.m ay .

Agents: 9OULLWANTTOEXPLOREOURUNIQUEONLINEADVERTISINGOPPORTUNITIES#ONTACTYOURSALES REPRESENTATIVEOR7ALTER+UPIEC 603ALES-ARKETINGAT  X ORWKUPIEC PAWEEKLYCOMTODAYTOlNDOUTMORE

Explore area real estate through your favorite local website: s s s s s

7HISMAN3TATION#OMMUNITY "EDROOMS"ATHS !PPROXIMATELY 3Q&T  #AR!TTACHED'ARAGE 2ARE&LOORPLANTHAT/FFERS,EVELS OF,IVING3PACE s 5PGRADED,IGHT&IXTURES s 5PGRADED4ILE&LOORIN0OWDER 2OOM!ND+ITCHEN s 0ERGO&LOORIN%NTRYWAY

s #ENTRAL(EATING!IR#ONDITIONING s )NDOOR,AUNDRY2OOMW3INK!ND #ABINETS s "EAUTIFUL2ELAXING"ALCONY s 0REMIUM,OCATION&ACINGTHE0ARK s 2EFRIGERATOR 7ASHERAND $RYERARE)NCLUDED s ,IGHTAND"RIGHT

TheAlmanacOnline.com MountainViewOnline.com PaloAltoOnline.com And click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;real estateâ&#x20AC;? in the navigation bar.

4HE!LMANAC/NLINECOM

-OUNTAIN6IEW/NLINECOM

0ALO!LTO/NLINECOM

List Price: $599,000

INTERO REAL

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My clients expect the bestâ&#x20AC;Ś

CUPERTINO | OPEN SUNDAY 1:30-4:30

An unwavering commitment to excellence in service Shelly Potvin, M.A. 10982 SWEET OAK ST.

$595,000 Stunning single level unit at desirable Glen Oaks complex! 2 BR 2 BA New paint, car650.917.7994 650.917.7994 pet, lighting.Vaulted ceiling. Light ďŹ lled kitchen w/ granite counters. Sliding doors lead spotvin@cbnorcal.com to bright, secluded courtyard.Attached 2 car garage. Great complex with many amenispotvin@cbnorcal.com ties. Close to shopping, 280/85. Great schools:West Valley, Cupertino, Homestead. www.ShellyPotvin.com www.ShellyPotvin.com

SHELLY POTVIN

The best negotiating, the best insight on market values, the best service, the best representation, and the best marketing. So as part of my comprehensive marketing plan for my clients, I use the Mountain View Voice. The Voice gives my listings the exposure they need and the best open house results. Their staff are top notch professionals, flexible, and creative which allows me to prepare and present my clientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property in a professional manner that is result driven. Additionally, I rely on The Voice as a primary player in my own marketing, with their team always willing to help create the right ad for the right occasion. Whether you want to promote a listing or increase your own market presence, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go wrong with the Mountain View Voice, and for wide range coverage running ads in conjunction with their other papers is a sure fire way to get maximum exposure in multiple areas!

Tori Ann Corbett BROKER ASSOCIATE #00927794 167 SOUTH SAN ANTONIO ROAD LOS ALTOS, CA 94022 (650) 996-0123

30+ years

Celebrating

of selling

t h at m a ke s se n se $ $ $

GARY HERBERT 650.917.4222

www.siliconvlyhomes.com gherbert@cbnorcal.com 26

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  APRIL 29, 2011

1ST PLACE

GENERAL EXCELLENCE California Newspaper Publishers Association

We will work to help your business grow! For Advertising information, please call Walter Kupiec, Vice President Sales & Marketing at (650) 223-6570


BEAUTIFUL HOME IN PEACEFUL SETTING

65 Evandale Ave #C | Mountain View Open House Saturday and Sunday, 1:30pm - 4:30pm

3TIR7EX7YR

148 HAMILTON AVENUE, MOUNTAIN VIEW

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PAT JORDAN

Virtual tour at: www.65Evandale.com ª Spacious townhouse in a quaint 4 unit complex ª 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths w/1 master suite ª New carpeting in bedrooms. ª Private walled in front yard & large backyard w/lawn ª Living room w/large picture window & laminate floor ª Separate dining room w/sliding door to backyard ª Detached one car garage with auto opener ª Inside laundry area w/full size washer & dryer hookups ª Regular sale. Not a short sale or REO. ª Approx. 1,440 sq ft of living space (per county tax records) ª Theuerkauf Elementary, Crittenden Middle & Mountain View High School (buyers to verify with school districts)

Ric Parker

CRB, CRS

650.793.4274 RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE

DRE#: 00898319 email: californiajordan@yahoo.com www.patjordan.com | www.alwaysthinkresale.com

803 Runningwood Circle

Direct: (650) 917-4281 rparker@cbnorcal.com

www.RicParker.com DRE #00992559

Mountain View

HOA Dues ONLY $100.00 per month

Offered at:

$489,000 Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed. Buyers to verify.

Sat

Huff Elementary

& S Open un 1:3 0-4

This move-in ready home is the one youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been waiting for!

:30

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Elizabeth Thompson, Realtor

650-949-8508 www.ElizabethThompson.com Elizabeth.Thompson@cbnorcal.com Dre# 01382997 APRIL 29, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

27


9 Turnberry Court Half Moon Bay, Ocean Colony

The Secret is Out! An easier drive to work than from most Peninsula locations! Work Silicon Valley by day and get away from it all each night. A short commute through majestic redwoods and sparkling ocean vistas brings you to your executive retreat on the golf course. 5BD/3.5BA luxury home overlooks the 15th tee and 11th fairway. Blocks to the Ritz Carlton and beach. 4,700 sq. ft. with the finest appointments.

Offered at $1,395,000

www.9TurnberryCourt.com

Elizabeth Thompson, Realtor 650-949-8508 www.ElizabethThompson.com Elizabeth.Thompson@cbnorcal.com Dre# 01382997

OPEN SAT & SUN 10:30-4:30 PM

185 Eldora Drive

-Z -YMfUZS 4[YQ

like no other in downtown Mountain View!

This home should have it’s own HGTV show! An incredible restoration-remodel honoring the home’s original structure while incorporating all of the amenities necessary to today’s modern lifestyle. Meticulous attention to detail throughout. A few things that you won’t want to miss… ■A true Cook’s Kitchen ■Hewn Granite Countertops

KIM COPHER Coldwell Banker Los Altos - San Antonio

kim.copher@cbnorcal.com www.justcallkim.com Direct: 650-917-7995 DRE License Number: 01423875 28

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ APRIL 29, 2011

■Restored & Double-hung

Sash Windows

■Formal Dining Room

■Glorious Hardwood Floors

■Sun Room

■Tankless Water Heater

■4 Expansive Bedrooms

■All New Wiring & Plumbing

■Luxurious Master Suite

■Custom Roof

■2-1/2 Bathrooms

■2 Car Attached Garage

IF YOU DON’T BUY IT, I WILL! Offered at $1,485,000

No one knows your neighborhood like your neighbor


   

  MURLAGAN AVENUE            

HUGE 9,375 SQ. FT. LOT

4 BEDS

2 BATHS

 LU N DY L A N E   

3 B EDS

2 BATH S

    

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1,576 SQ. FT.

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LOS A LTOS SC H O O L S

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#1 AGENT 2010: combined sales in MV, LA & LAH* APRIL 29, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

29


711 Sierra Vista Avenue, Mountain View

217 Ada Avenue #52, Mountain View

FOR SALE

Open House – Saturday 4/30 and Sunday 5/1 from 1:30 – 4:30pm

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY

1:30 - 4:30 pm

Affordable Excellence Beautifully expanded and remodeled 3-bedroom, 2-bath home with abundant natural light throughout. Chef’s kitchen features top-of-the-line appliances including Viking stove, ample counter and cupboard space and spacious dining area. Living/dining room opens to expansive patio and yard. Many upgrades throughout this home. Approximately 1,480 sq ft of living space with lot size of 7,920 sq ft. Offered at $809,000

W

elcome to an immaculate home ideally located in the highly sought-after Ada Park complex. This stunning, single-level 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom home boasts 1,338 +/- square feet of living space situated on a 1,421 +/- square foot lot. Gourmet cook’s kitchen with tile countertops and backsplash, high-end appliances, breakfast area, and abundant cabinetry. Spacious, light-filled living room featuring a wood-burning fireplace with tile surround and sliding glass-doors leading to the inviting rear grounds. Savor the outdoors in the well-manicured, serene backyard with a lush lawn area, an array of colorful plants, and a private patio area. Complex features a sparkling pool, hot-tub, and an attractive children’s play area. Convenient to Mountain View Schools: Landels Elementary, Crittenden Middle, and Mountain View High.

Jim Nappo 650.906.5775

List Price - $539,000

jim@nappo.com diamondcertified.org

650 947 4780 HBloom@InteroRealEstate.com www.HowardBloom.com DRE# 00893793

Jimmy Nappo 650.861.7661

jimmy@nappo.com

apr.com | LOS ALTOS | 167 S. San Antonio Road | www.nappo.com

Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

STROLL TO VILLAGE OF LOS ALTOS

PICTURE PERFECT LOS ALTOS CHARMER

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553 TYNDALL STREET

1544 KATHY LANE

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167 S. San Antonio Rd., Los Altos, CA 94022 30

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ APRIL 29, 2011

judybogard@aol.com DRE# 00298975

Offered at $1,895,000 www.1544KathyLane.com SHERI HUGHES 650.209.1608 shughes@apr.com DRE# 01060012


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31


0

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Sat

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0

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4:30

30-

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SUNNYVALE

2045 YALE ST $775,000 2 BR 2.5 BA Updated kit, spacious living area w/firepl, private patio & oversized attached 2-car gar.

455 HOMER AV $1,150,000 1685 CALIFORNIA ST $699,000 3 BR 2.5 BA Bright updated townhome with private 2 BR 1 BA Meticulously updated bungalow with rooftop deck. Expanded eat-in kitchen. 2 fireplaces. gorgeous eat-in kitchen. Close to Castro St. and train.

1149 JAMESTOWN DR $849,000 3 BR 2 BA Beautifully updated home on large corner lot in desirable Cherry Chase neighborhood.

Zach Trailer

Stephanie Hewitt

Alan Huwe

Sat

&

Sun

650.325.6161

0

-4:3

1:30

Sat

MOUNTAIN VIEW

&

Sun

650.325.6161

Barb Zuckerwise

0

-4:3

1:30

Sat

MOUNTAIN VIEW

&

Sun

650.325.6161

0

-4:3

1:30

Sat

MOUNTAIN VIEW

803 RUNNINGWOOD CIRCLE $1,099,000 658 CHURCH STREET $974,000 4 BR 3 BA 4 bedroom + office/3 bath,2399 sq.ft home 2 BR 2 BA Hdwd flrs, frplc, din rm, remod kit w/nook, in Heatherstone community w/pool & tennis courts lg rooms, remod baths, walkable dwntwn locale

Pat Jordan

Elizabeth Thompson

CAMPBELL GREAT LOCATION!

LOS ALTOS HILLS $399,888

2 BR 2 BA Spacious condo in a great location! Close to commute routes and surrounded by greenery! Rod Creason 650.325.6161

EAST PALO ALTO RARE GEM IN THE GARDENS!

$399,000

3 BR 1 BA Beautiful Gardens home w/ 10k+ lot, updated kitchen & bath, hdwd flrs & new paint/carpets Clara Lee 650.328.5211

716 N SAN ANTONIO ROAD SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,695,000 4 BR 3.5 BA Master suite & sitting area.Full guest cottage completed.2car garage.Built 2005. Terri Couture 650.941.7040

$1,998,000

5 BR 5 BA Unique open flrpln w/approx.900 SF cntrl great rm(kit-fam rm)-Cherry flrs Jerry Haslam 650.948.0456

555 CLARK CT SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,695,000

4 BR 3.5 BA Entertain,live,& work in this incredible functional yet elegant home in heart of Los Altos Susanne Bohl 650.941.7040

569 UNIVERSITY AV SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,575,000

3 BR 2 BA Charming Monterey Colonial!New granite kitchen within the last year or 2. Jo Buchanan & Stuart Bowen 650.941.7040

LOS ALTOS HILLS EXQUISITE HOME, BAY VIEWS $4,285,000 4 BR 4.5 BA Pristine custom home w/guest cottage. Privacy, prime location, Palo Alto schools. Stephanie Hewitt 650.325.6161

24040 OAK KNOLL CIRCLE SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$3,198,000

5 BR 5.5 BA Imagine living in your own amazing villa w/a personal vineyard,Bay & hill views. Jo Buchanan & Stuart Bowen 650.941.7040

12374 MELODY LN SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$2,695,000

5 BR 4 BA Rare! Over 5,000 newly remodeled at end of a cul de sac on over 1 acre! Palo Alto schls Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

24632 OLIVE TREE LN SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$2,599,000

5 BR 3 BA Fabulously updated home with a beautiful gourmet kitchen. Terri Couture 650.941.7040

14176 STANFORD CT SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$2,550,000

5 BR 4.5 BA Beautiful Hm w/Western Hills vw.Virtual tour www.EllenBarton.com Close to Stanford Ellen Barton 650.941.7040

800.558.4443 32

12220 MENALTO DR SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$2,295,000

Nancy Adele Stuhr

MENLO PARK 2145 AVY AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$724,850

2 BR 2 BA Spacious 1-level condo. Generous LR, DR, Master. Hi ceilngs, HW flrs. Lovely patio. Garage. Dan Ziony 650.325.6161

26726 MOODY RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30

NEAR BURGESS PARK $2,350,000

4 BR 4 BA Amazing four bedroom, 4 bath California Contemporary nestled in a wooded 2+ acres. Jo Buchanan & Stuart Bowen 650.941.7040

$1,995,000

5 BR 4.5 BA This is a nature and animal loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream home w/an half acre of flat land.5BD/4.5BA Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

0 EASTBROOK AV SAT/SUN 10 - 6

$1,795,000

Eastbrook lot will be open and unattended.Please pick up a flyer & call the listing agent Jamie & Phyllis Carmichael 650.941.7040

UNIQUELY PEACEFUL RETREAT

$1,298,000

MOUNTAIN VIEW

$1,925,000

4 BR 2.5 BA Newer, beautifully updated single-story home in desirable Allied Arts near the creek. Barb Zuckerwise 650.325.6161

825 SHARON PARK DR SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,890,000

3 BR 2.5 BA +Office. Beautifully updtd gorgeous landscaping Lg. LR, DR & lot. Great location Fereshteh Khodadad 650.325.6161

1145 SAXON AV SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,639,000

3 BR 3 BA Ranch-style hm on quiet st. Close to downtown MP. Library. Private backyard w/large spa. Jennifer Piccinini 650.325.6161

1020 SHERMAN AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,199,000

4 BR 2 BA This charming home near Downtown Menlo Park features stepping stones & towering trees. Nana Spiridon/Tom Huff 650.325.6161

1701 STONE PINE LN SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,049,000

2 BR 2.5 BA Updated 3-level townhm w/high-end finishes.Vaulted ceiling, lrg private patio, chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kit Zach Trailer 650.325.6161

BEAUTIFUL SPACIOUS HOME

$898,000

3 BR 2.5 BA Beautiful, spacious 3-level home. Walls of glass. Large, bright kitchen w/breakfast rm. Ken Morgan/Arlene Gault 650.328.5211

$1,199,000

4 BR 3 BA A fabulous new Mountain View singlefamily home. 4 bedrooms*3 full baths* Bubb Elm! Kim Copher 650.941.7040

$989,000

4 BR 2.5 BA Spacious-Light & airy detached home in the Crossings-4 Bd-2.5 BA-Separate family room. Letty Guerra 650.941.7040

$785,000

Spacious duplex in Mtn.View! Each unit has 2 bedrooms,1 bath, & garage! BY APPT. ONLY! DiPali Shah 650.325.6161

262 ANDSBURY AVENUE SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$599,000

3 BR 2 BA Soaring ceilings,gleaming floors,Large,open spaces,updated throughout.Master w/patio. Aileen La Bouff 650.948.0456

65 EVANDALE AV #C SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$489,000

3 BR 2.5 BA Spacious townhouse in small 4 unit complex. New Carpet.Low HOA dues of $100.1 car garage. Ric Parker 650.948.0456

END UNIT W/INSIDE LAUNDRY

$269,000

1 BR 1 BA One level w/no one above or below, FP, remod kit w/granite,slate flrs,new appliances,patio Greg Stange 650.325.6161

PALO ALTO $3,995,000

$5,295,000

5 BR 5.5 BA Traditional 2-story on lovely tree lined street. Spacious kit, lrg. family rm, 1st flr BR. Alan & Nicki Loveless 650.325.6161

509 HALE ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30

2 BR 1 BA Beautiful 1 BR + Den currently used as BR. Enjoy the quiet & comfort of this lovely home. Kathleen Jarvis Pasin 650.325.6161

4195 OAK HILL AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

PA REDWOODS PENTHOUSE $2,898,000

4 BR 3 BA Large home +1BR apt on a closed-in 1 acre lot. Oak floors, 2 fireplaces. Horses permitted. Dorothy Gurwith 650.325.6161

865 WAVERLEY ST SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$2,849,000

$1,675,000

3 BR 2 BA Tastefully Renovated. Built-in hutch in dining rm. HW flrs. Granite counter tops. A/C. Debbie Nichols 650.325.6161

656 GEORGIA AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,650,000

5 BR 3 BA Located in the Green Acres II neighborhood,walking distance Gunn High. Vicki Geers 650.941.7040

585 SALVATIERRA ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,618,000

4 BR 3 BA Craftsman Style with interesting architectural features on a large lot. Dante Drummond 650.325.6161

586 COLLEGE AV #A SAT/SUN 1 - 4

$1,248,888

5 BR 3.5 BA Price Reduced! Beautiful, newly constructed craftsman style College Terrace home. Ginna Lazar 650.325.6161

310 POE ST SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$895,000

2 BR 2.5 BA Lovely Downtown PA Townhome. Updated kitchen, private patio, bright living spaces, pool. Zach Trailer 650.325.6161

$845,000

3 BR 3 BA Elegant 2-year new townhome, with many green, built-in, energy efficient features. Judy Shen 650.328.5211

2150 HANOVER ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$799,000

7 BR 6.5 BA Exceptional Crescent Park Estate. 3 story home - 7 beds, 6.5 baths, on 18,600 sf lot. Pool Leannah Hunt & Laurel Robinson 650.325.6161

2 BR 1 BA Charming, remod 1930s bungalow. New kit w/granite, cabinets. New BA w/custom tile, HW flr. Tim Trailer 650.325.6161

1734 WEBSTER ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30

777 SAN ANTONIO RD #67 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$3,998,000

$3,998,000

8 BR 6 BA Elegant Remodeled Craftsman Style in Prime Old PA. 7 beds + guest house, 10k sf lot. Leannah Hunt & Laurel Robinson 650.325.6161

4250 EL CAMINO REAL #D237 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $425,000

4 BR 3.5 BA Beautiful Arts & Crafts home. Full restoration & addition completed in 2007. Tim Trailer/Zach Trailer 650.325.6161

3712 HERON WY SUN 2 - 5

PALO ALTO 259 COLERIDGE AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

Los Altos, 95 First Street 650.948.0456 Los Altos, 496 First Street 650.948.8050 Los Altos, San Antonio Rd. 650.941.7040

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  APRIL 29, 2011

$1,250,000

959 WAVERLEY ST SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

865 FOREST AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

DUPLEX IN MOUNTAIN VIEW!

301 UNIVERSITY DR SAT 1:30 - 4:30

650.941.7040

1610 SARA LN SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

MENLO PARK 5 BR 4.5 BA Spectacular custom-built home with overthe-top amenities and amazing high tech features. Janie & John Barman 650.325.6161

Melanie Johnson

650.948.0456

3 BR 3 BA A fabulous new Mountain View singleFAMILYHOMEBEDROOMSsFULLBATHSs"UBB%LM Kim Copher 650.941.7040

105 LAUREL WAY SUN 1 - 4

$4,188,000

$2,745,000

5 BR 4.5 BA Victorian-inspired elegance. Formal LR & DR. Separate 1BR apt above detached 2-car gar. Zach Trailer 650.325.6161

1 BR 1.5 BA Built in 1989, this secluded, private home has breathtaking views of Open Space Preserve. Leannah Hunt & Laurel Robinson 650.325.6161

A MODERN MASTERPIECE

$674,888

2 BR 2 BA Gorgeous, remodeled cottage-style townhm located w/in lush setting - off of Alma St. Julie Spillane 650.325.6161

300 MARIPOSA AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

1428 MIRAVALLE AVENUE 5 BR 4.5 BA Stunning 5-yr-old.

PALO ALTO

5 BR 3 BA +Office. Tranquil home w/views of the hills. Acre+ w/pool Niloo James 650.325.6161

11824 HILLTOP DR SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

LOS ALTOS

568 SHIRLYNN CT SUN 1 - 4

650.941.7040

0

-4:3

1:30

LOS ALTOS

148 HAMILTON AV $839,000 3 BR 2 BA Oasis-like setting. Updated kit & BAs, HW flrs, vaulted ceilings & views from every room. 650.325.6161

&

Sun

650.948.0456

$599,000

3 BR 2 BA End unit in South Palo Alto has bright and spacious LR with view of open space Barbara Sawyer 650.325.6161

Š2011 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell BankerÂŽ is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage OfďŹ ce Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC. DRE License # 00313415

$425,000

1 BR 1 BA PA Redwoods Penthouse, Amble through tranquil gardens & Redwood groves to back of complex. Jeff Beltramo 650.325.6161

PORTOLA VALLEY 346 WAYSIDE RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,149,000

3 BR 2 BA Beautifully updated approx. 1500/ SF Desirable wooded Portola Valley location and schools. Zach Trailer 650.325.6161

SAN JOSE 4556 ENCANTO WAY SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$834,000

3 BR 2.5 BA Gorgeous Hm w/great schools*Located on a quiet street w/view of reach luscious hills Afsie & Sia 650.948.0456

TUSCANY HILLS PARADISE!

$425,000

2 BR 2.5 BA 8 years old immaculate Tuscany Hills Condo with lots of Upgrades! Jeff Beltramo 650.325.6161

SANTA CLARA 3447 BELLA VISTA AV SAT/SUN 1 - 4

$599,000

3 BR 2 BA 75K of upgrades. Beautifully remodeled kitchen w/granite counter tops, custom cabinetry. Cesar Cervantes 650.328.5211

2460 MICHELE JEAN WY SAT/SUN 1 - 4

$539,000

3 BR 2 BA Spacious townhome. Near commute routes & Pruneridge Golf Club. Parklike grounds & pool. Ginna Lazar 650.325.6161

NEAR WILCOX HIGH, PARKS!

$370,000

3 BR 1 BA Corner lot. Newer paint, dual paned windows, tile flrs, bonus rms, xtra storage, conv loc. Fabiola Prieto 650.325.6161

SARATOGA 14170 TEERLINK WAY SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$2,650,000

4 BR 3.5 BA Nestled in the prestigious Saratoga Hills is this 4400 sq.ft home w/a contemporary flair. Deepa Rangan 650.941.7040

SUNNYVALE 1342 ELEANOR WAY SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$740,000

3 BR 2 BA Ideal for large family, in-laws, or live in main house and collect rent from sep units. Melanie Johnson 650.941.7040


Mountain View Voice 04.29.2011 - Section 1