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Amusebouche and bubbly WEEKEND | P.13 MARCH 18, 2011 VOLUME 19, NO. 11

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Hospital donations jeopardized by CEO’s ouster BOARD’S ACTION RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT TRANSPARENCY AT EL CAMINO HOSPITAL By Nick Veronin

closed session lasted two hours.

month after El Camino Hospital abruptly announced that it would terminate CEO Ken Graham’s contract at the end of the fiscal year, June 31, many at the hospital remain perplexed, and even vexed by the news. Judging from the sentiments expressed by three people — a member of the El Camino Hospital Foundation’s board, the head of the nurses’ union at the hospital, and a Los Altos resident — there are many reasons fueling the confusion and anger that surround Graham’s ouster. However, one complaint stands out: the perceived lack of transparency about the impetus behind the decision. “I felt that it was very unprofessionally done,” said Willem P. Roelandts, a board member of the El Camino Hospital Foundation, the fundraising arm of the hospital. Roelandts said that he and other foundation board members were frustrated, angered and “dumbfounded” by the decision, which the foundation did not learn about until after it had been made public. “The foundation board was not told ahead of time or even asked their opinion,” he said — a move he felt was inconsiderate. Roelandts was frustrated further when members of the hospital board came to a foundation board meeting to explain their decision and field questions. “They couldn’t explain why,” Roelandts said, noting that the

Donors drop out The decision has hurt the foundation’s fundraising ability, Roelandts said, adding that he and his colleagues have already received calls from donors asking if the hospital is faltering. He said he is sure the foundation will lose out on money as a result of Graham’s termination. “The way that Mr. Graham was basically fired — it really created doubts,” he said. “It is very difficult to collect money when there is an impression that the hospital is in trouble.” That perception is particularly frustrating for Roelandts, who said that, in his opinion, nothing could be further from the truth. “El Camino Hospital is probably the finest hospital in the region. Mr. Graham has really done a lot of things.”

A

MICHELLE LE

Passengers prepare to board the 2:33 p.m. Caltrain headed north at San Antonio station.

Regional deal may help Caltrain avert cuts By Sue Dremann

D

rastic cuts to Caltrain rail service are likely to be averted, Steve Heminger, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission’s executive director, told the commission’s Planning and Allocations Committee Wednesday, March 9.

The commission is working with Caltrain’s financing partners — Santa Clara County’s VTA, San Mateo County’s SamTrans and San Francisco’s Muni — to cobble together a financing deal that would help the 147-year-old rail line avoid a $30 million operations deficit starting July 2. Caltrain officials have warned

that they would slash the number of trains, reduce the schedule to weekday peak-commuter times only, and close up to seven stations along the San Jose to San Francisco route, including Mountain View’s San Antonio station. Service to points south of San See CALTRAIN, page 9

Local relief efforts for Japan disaster victims IMAGES, REPORTS OF DEVASTATION HIT HOME IN MOUNTAIN VIEW By Nick Veronin

T

he images of destruction and descriptions of devastation coming from across the Pacific are both horrifying and humbling. “Those pictures from Japan really got to me,” said Norm Gorblat, a Mountain View resident. “For a second, I thought it could be us.”

INSIDE

The raw human emotion and empathy stirred by the magnitude 9.0 temblor and subsequent tsunami that pummeled northern Japan on March 11, has prompted many locals to ask how they might help. “The Mountain View Fire Department has received requests from community members interested in helping with relief efforts

to support the victims,” said Jaime Garrett, spokeswoman for the fire department. The fire department is recommending that those who want to help donate money to the Red Cross. Garrett said people can do this by texting “REDCROSS” to 90999, which will give $10 to See JAPAN RELIEF, page 6

GOINGS ON 19 | MARKETPLACE 20 | REAL ESTATE 22 | VIEWPOINT 12

Shocking statement At the hospital board meeting on March 9, Roelandts, along with several others, publicly expressed their distaste with the decision to fire Graham. And while most of the board, along with the CEO himself, did not publicly respond, one board member did. Dave Reeder, who voted against firing Graham, said that he could not disclose what was discussed in closed sessions. Then he said something that shocked one Los Altos resident who had come to the meeting in the hopes of getting his questions about Graham’s See EL CAMINO CEO, page 7


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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011


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T O W N

Asked in Downtown Mountain View. Pictures and interviews by Peter Maxwell

In light of the quake and tsunami in Japan, do you think your city is prepared for a disaster? “I don’t think we are prepared for an earthquake. I plan on keeping flashlights, camping supplies, food and stuff like that handy just in case.” Brian Bruessow, Mountain View

“I’m definitely not prepared myself. It makes me nervous. I’m not sure if the city is prepared for an emergency. They should definitely double-check their preparedness.”

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4 “Those pictures from Japan really got to me, for a second I thought it could be us. But no, I don’t think we could be prepared for something like that.” Norm Gorblat, Mountain View

“No, I do not think we are ready for something like Japan. The most the city can do now is to be aware. And you’ve got to get all the stuff you need, like food and water, and a place to meet if people lose their homes.” Sean Gee, San Carlos

“I doubt Mountain View is prepared. We need to organize escape routes, people need to store food and water. But in the case of a huge disaster, there is no way to prepare for the kind of damage that could happen to the city. We should definitely look to make these preparations though. Japan was a warning.” Tod Zimmerman, Mountain View

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Have a question for Voices Around Town? E-mail it to editor@mv-voice.com MARCH 18, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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The Mountain View Voice is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011


-PDBM/FXT MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Senior health services all under one roof EL CAMINO SAYS NEW SENIOR HEALTH CENTER WILL IMPROVE CARE, LOWER COSTS Nick Veronin

E

MICHELLE LE

TAKING FLIGHT

Jacob Jelley, 3, soars above the ground, thanks to push from his mom Katy. A short break in the rainy weather gave the youngster a chance to enjoy the swings at Eagle Park on March 15.

Japan quake: could it happen here? By Nick Veronin

T

he massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake and ensuing tsunami that rocked Japan last week has people all over the Bay Area and California thinking about the next big one. Though experts from the United States Geological Survey said that residents of inland, bay-bordering cities, such as Mountain View aren’t at risk from a tsunami, the prospect of a major earthquake is very real. “On the Peninsula, the fault

we worry about the most is the San Andreas Fault,” said Dr. Tom Holzer, an engineering geologist, who works out of the Menlo Park offices of the USGS. “That fault is the one we think can cause the largest magnitude earthquake in the Bay Area.” According to Holzer, geologists think that the San Andreas, at its most forceful, might produce a magnitude 8.0 temblor, much lower than the recent quake in Japan. In sheer magnitude, Holzer said, an earthquake triggered by the motion

of the San Andreas would likely produce less shaking. However, it would also be less violent because of the type and size of the fault. The unnamed Japanese fault, Holzer said, is part of what is known as a “subduction zone” — an area where two tectonic plates meet and one is forced beneath the other. The San Andreas, on the other hand, is a “strike-slip” fault, where two tectonic plates are moving parSee QUAKE, page 8

l Camino Hospital’s board of directors recently approved funding for a new health center that will focus on preventative care for local seniors on Medicare. The Senior Health Center, scheduled to open this fall, will bring together a wide variety of specialists who will use the latest in medical technology to manage seniors’ chronic conditions, according to Cal James, the El Camino official spearheading the project. But while James said the new center will provide higher quality care at a lower cost through integration of services and elimination of redundancies, a local doctor is concerned that the new center will only serve to drive up costs and further fragment senior care. “It’s not going to be better care for Medicare patients — no way,” said Dr. Josephine Magnuson, who runs a private practice in Mountain View. “This is the next thing to make money for the hospital.” At their March 9 meeting the, the El Camino board unanimously approved the $2.3 million project, giving hospital CEO Ken Graham the go-ahead to spend up to $1.4 million to revamp an existing building on Grant Road and $900,000 to purchase equipment. James, chief of strategy and business at El Camino, said the new center’s approach to senior care will be more comprehensive than anything currently available in or

around Mountain View. It aims to keep local elderly men and women out of the emergency room, and will ultimately save money, both for the hospital and for insurance providers, he said. He said that the Senior Health Center is sorely needed to care for a growing and increasingly underserved population of elderly in Mountain View and the surrounding area, who are reliant on Medicare and unable to get adequate treatment. “There are seniors that are growing old at an alarming rate,” James said. “These folks are underserved because a fair number of physicians here in Mountain View do not accept Medicare patients because they aren’t adequately compensated for their care.” Medicare reimbursement rates do not cover the costs associated with caring for seniors, James said, especially those individuals who suffer from multiple chronic illnesses — such as diabetes, obesity and heart disease. Most doctors, James said, would like to treat these patients, but it is simply infeasible for them to do so. Magnuson, who has practiced internal medicine in Mountain View since 1984, is skeptical. While she acknowledged that low Medicare reimbursement rates are a real problem for doctors, Magnuson said that private insurance reimbursement is often just as inadequate. See SENIOR, page 10

Zimbabwe Run: education and exercise, all for a good cause By Peter Maxwell

T

he Sustainable Living Foundation has a philosophy about charity — it should be direct, engaging and two-fold. “I like direct, concrete philanthropy,” said Ellen Clark, co-founder of the foundation. “I like philanthropy that shows exactly where your money goes.” To the Clarks, philanthropists ideally give a little cash, but take away much more from the experience. There are no ties, no tuxedos or gowns, and certainly no quick-mouthed, barely-intelligible

auctioneers. The Clarks prefer their philanthropy down-to-earth and sweaty. And that’s why for the past 11 years the Clark family has hosted the Zimbabwe Run, a fair and set of races for kids that support a Zimbabwean orphanage and celebrate things that are important in the African nation: health, food, music, art, and charity. The Zimbabwe Run will be held on Sunday, March 27, at St. Joseph’s School, 1120 Miramonte Ave. in Mountain View. The fair begins at noon, and the races start at 1 p.m. The last race of the day is named for Kate Wakerly, the founder of

the Voice. The Zimbabwe Run holds true to the Clark family philosophy, “Money isn’t the only thing,” said Clark “and the kids come back with an education about Africa and they experience charity at their own level.” The Zimbabwe Run’s fair is free to the public, and the 12 scheduled races are open to all ages with a $5 registration fee. The races vary in length: 220 yards for preschoolers, one-half mile for kindergartners and up, and a series of mile-long races aimed at grade-school through adult runners.

Colin Mack, 15, surges past Gray Mavhera to win the race at last year’s Zimbabwe run. See ZIMBABWE RUN, page 8

MARCH 18, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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County rolls out new emergency text alerts Santa Clara County introduced a new, easy-to-use text message number to help residents receive emergency alerts in the event of a disaster. The initiative was prompted by last week’s 9.0-magnitude earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan that caused a tsunami and killed thousands of people there before traveling across the Pacific Ocean and briefly elevating surf levels along parts of the California coast. In 2009, the county launched AlertSCC, a regional automated emergency notification tool that provides instant safety informa-

tion to residents in the event of an emergency or disaster via text message, e-mail, or home or business phone using 411 and 911 databases. But because so many people are becoming more reliant on their cell phones, the county today announced a text number, 32075, to reach more members of the community. The feature also benefits residents who have a language barrier. According to David Figueroa Ortega, Mexico’s consul general in San Jose, with the 32075 text number, it is not necessary to provide a name or house number but

only the word “alertscc,� a street name and a ZIP code. Residents will receive messages notifying them about the location of shelters, for example, where to get medical assistance and food, and areas to avoid because of street closures and downed bridges. To sign up for the feature, either text 32075 or visit www.alertscc. com. The Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors and local officials announced the text message feature at a news conference in San Jose on Monday, March 14. —Bay City News Service

NOBITUARY

Joe D. Archibeque, Mountain View educator Joe D. Archibeque, an educator and counselor at Graham Middle School in Mountain View, died March 3. He was 94. Born in Durango, Colorado in 1916, Archibeque was a World War II veteran who served in the U.S. Navy. He graduated from San Diego State University with a master’s degree in social sci-

ences and earned his counseling credentials. He was a resident of Belmont since 1973. During his 16-year tenure at Graham Middle School, he filled the role of teacher, counselor, baseball and volleyball coach, and school board member. He taught public speaking, drama, history and Spanish. During the summers, he worked in public relations at Idyllwild

School of Music and the Arts. In his free time, he loved to read, paint and write, his family said. Archibeque is survived by Modrite Archibeque, his wife of 38 years; and two daughters, Melissa and Nicole. A memorial service was held March 12 at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church in Belmont. Donations may be made to schoolforce.org or mvef.org.

LARRY’S

JAPAN RELIEF

Continued from page 1

the humanitarian organization and be charged to their cellular phone account. Residents may also give to the Mountain View Buddhist Temple, which is organizing a fundraising drive of its own. Glenn Kitasoe, president of the temple, said that there are many Japanese people living in Mountain View and throughout the Peninsula, and that for some of the temple’s congregants, the disaster hit very close to home — literally. “Most of us have family ties — either relatives or some acquaintances in Japan,� said Kitasoe, a Buddhist of Japanese decent. “Luckily, most everyone in the temple has family that was either not affected or they are OK.� Because of those ties, and simply because, as a religious organization the temple frequently does humanitarian work, Kitasoe said the Mountain View Buddhist Temple will be accepting donations that will be sent to help the Japanese recovery effort. “Whether they are Buddhists, or any religion,� he said of those impacted by the Japanese disaster, “there are people in need and we would like to help.� The temple is asking for donations during its Sunday services and will accept donations from anyone in the community. Kitasoe said checks should be made out to the Mountain View Buddhist Temple. Information is available on the temple’s website, www.mvbuddhisttemple.org. When the temple stops collec-

tions on April 20, they will pool the money and send it to the Buddhist Churches of America, headquartered in San Francisco; the Buddhist Churches of America will in take all the money from its member temples throughout the country and send the funds to help the Japanese people. Although the northeastern coast of Japan suffered major destruction, much of the southern part of the country — including Mountain View’s sister city, Iwata, — was not hit nearly as hard. In fact, a group of students from Iwata, scheduled to arrive in Mountain View on March 17 as part of an exchange program with the Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District, have not cancelled their trip as a result of the quake. Iwata, which is located in the Shizuoka Prefecture of Japan, sits roughly 350 to 400 miles from the quake’s epicenter, about 100 miles south of Tokyo. “There wasn’t nearly the amount devastation in Iwata that northern Japan felt,� said William Blair, an English teacher from Mountain View High School and head coordinator for the Iwata visit. However, another local Japanese exchange program, between middle schools in Palo Alto and Tsuchiura — a Palo Alto sister city located about 200 miles north of Iwata in the Ibaraki Prefecture of Japan — cancelled their trip after a 6.0 magnitude temblor rattled their city on March 11. They were scheduled to arrive in Palo Alto on March 12. V

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The City of Mountain View will be ushing the water system south of Cuesta Drive in April, 2011. Flushing helps to maintain water quality by removing accumulated sand and sediment from water lines. Signs and barricades will be posted in neighborhoods the day before ushing begins. Flushing south of Cuesta Drive is anticipated to be complete by May 15, 2011. If you would like more information about the City’s water system ushing program or have questions or concerns while City personnel are in your neighborhood, please contact the Public Services Division at (650) 903-6329 or visit the City’s website at www.mountainview.gov.


-PDBM/FXT EL CAMINO CEO Continued from page 1

termination answered. “I’m not sure I understand why we did what we did,” Reeder said. “Most of us will probably never know why that decision was made. But the majority of the board decided they wanted a different CEO.” “That didn’t make any sense,” Gary Krikorian said, referring to Reeder’s statement. Krikorian, a retired child psychologist living in Los Altos, said he came to the meeting after reading about Graham’s ouster in the local news media. “It seemed unusual to me,” he said, referring to the 3-2 decision to dismiss Graham. “That tells me there were some issues.” He said that he feels a certain ownership of the hospital, not only because he pays taxes to support its operations but also because it is likely where he or his wife will go if they fall ill. Krikorian said he was upset to see how unwilling the board had been to disclose the reasoning behind its decision. “The hospital belongs to us,” he said, paraphrasing a quote he had read from long-time hospital booster Norma Melchor. “The truth should come out.” Tight-lipped board The tightly worded official statement announcing Graham’s termination — when it did speak of Graham’s tenure — spoke about it favorably. Wesley Alles, chairman of the board, focused on Graham’s accomplishments in comments included in the statement. He noted that the CEO headed the organization during its re-designation as a nurse Magnet Hospital and was there for the establishment of the Center for Advanced Radiosurgery. During his time at El Camino, Graham oversaw the construction of the new, seismically sound, state-of-the-art hospital building, as well as the acquisition and opening of the Los Gatos campus, facts not mentioned in the release. That’s not to say that Graham didn’t also hit some rough patches during his time at El Camino. Graham presided over one of the toughest financial periods El Camino has faced in more than a decade. In July 2010 the hospital began its current fiscal year in the red and in September announced that about 140 employees, including service workers, nurses, and administrators, would likely lose their jobs. However, while some administrative positions ultimately were cut, thanks to negotiations, buyouts and a massive shuffling of positions, no nurses or service workers were forced to leave. And

although the fiscal year started bleakly, the hospital appears to be on track to turn a profit by the end of June. It is possible that Graham’s handling of the crises may have led to his ouster, according to Ron Shinkman, the publisher and editor-in-chief of Payers and Providers —a weekly publication covering healthcare business and policy news in California. Shinkman said that it can be quite a juggling act to earn the favor of physicians, nurses unions, service workers unions, patients, the community and board members all at the same time. “If you aren’t pleasing these constituencies, they may try to force you out.” Yet, despite calls for an explanation, the board has remained mum. In response to a request to speak to members of the foundation board about Graham’s departure, hospital spokeswoman Chris Ernst wrote in an e-mail, “the employment agreement was terminated without cause. ... As with any personnel matter and as part of the mutual nondisparagement clause within the employment agreement, further discussion on this matter would be in conflict of the agreement.” Financial turn-around Pat Briggs, president of the El Camino nurses union, said that in some ways she was surprised by the decision. “The surprise is that the hospital has gone through quite a financial turnaround in the last few months,” Briggs said. “Since the June financials, there has been a significant turnaround in financial stability.” The union leader said that she has not been surprised by the board’s lack of communication with the public regarding its decision. “The board has a huge lack of transparency,” Briggs said, criticizing the board for making the majority of its decisions in closed session and holding its meetings in a way that is confusing for the public and the press. The El Camino Hospital board made the decision to discontinue Graham’s contract during a closed session portion of its Feb. 9 meeting. It announced the decision at the end of the closed session, at about 10:20 p.m. Alles, Patricia Einarson, MD, and Uwe Kladde voted in favor of the decision; Reeder and John Zoglin were opposed. Briggs said holding closed sessions that go late into the night, means that when the board finally reconvenes into open session, most, if not all, of the public has gone home and does not hear about any significant decisions made in private.

Roelandts would not speculate about what specifically prompted the board to dismiss Graham, but he did say that, broadly speaking, it appeared that the reasons were

“political.” Whatever the case, Roelandts said he wishes the board would have given the foundation at least some warning.

“We are the people who bring in the money; at least they should treat us with a little bit more respect,” he said. V

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7


-PDBM/FXT added, not the shaking itself.

QUAKE

Continued from page 5

allel to each other. In the case of both types of fault, the friction created by a major movement is what causes a quake. But the plates that recently moved off the eastern shore of Japan had about three times the surface area grinding against each other than the San Andreas would. Nearby faults Holzer said geologists believe the Hayward Fault, which runs up through the East Bay, is due for a significant event, which could register as high as 6.7 on the Richter scale. While damage from such a temblor on the Hayward Fault — which is also a strike-slip fault — would be “catastrophic� in the East Bay, damage to the Peninsula would likely be “moderate,� Holzer said. Two small faults, which could be described as wrinkles created by the San Andreas, run through parts of Mountain View. However, the Monte Vista fault isn’t likely to shake very hard, Holzer said, and it doesn’t appear to shake very often. The most significant damage from the Monte Vista fault would likely come from the ground beneath roads and buildings being offset, he

‘Don’t lose sleep’ While it is certain that a quake will eventually hit the Bay Area, another USGS scientist said, residents in inland, bay-bordering cities like Mountain View need not worry about a tsunami. “I wouldn’t want your readers to lose a lot of sleep over that,� said Tom Brocher, director of the earthquake science center for the USGS. “The seismic hazards are what they need to worry about, rather than the tsunami.� Brocher, who is based in Menlo Park, said that the narrow opening of the bay, along with its shallow depth, means that it would be highly unlikely for tsunami waters to do much damage to inland areas in the Bay Area, even in cities like Mountain View that abut the bay. Coastal cities are the most at risk from a tsunami, Brocher said. He also said that the Bay Area faults, such as the Hayward and San Andreas, aren’t likely to cause a tsunami. “In this part of California, the tsunami risk is mainly related to distant earthquakes,� he said. Large tsunamis are created by subduction zone faults, he said. When those faults experience a major shift, the earth can suddenly drop or rise rapidly. If that happens

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with an underwater fault, that water will be shoved with great force and may result in a tsunami. To illustrate his point, Brocher said that the massive 1906 earthquake, that razed much of San Francisco, only generated a swell of about 4 inches. However, he said, that doesn’t mean Mountain View residents shouldn’t worry about the damage caused by a strong temblor. Building codes Modern California building codes mean that most Bay Area homes built after the 1970s are fairly safe, Holzer said — even when coming up against a quake like the one in Japan. “Believe it or not, you could design to withstand that,� he said, comparing buildings that comply with earthquake code to rubber bands. “Think of the tremendous stretching you can get with a rubber band. What you’ve got to do is design a building with those kinds of properties, so it’s able to recover when the ground shaking causes it to sway back and forth.� Such properties have been built into the new El Camino Hospital building, according to Ken King, chief administrative services officer for the hospital. He said the hospital is designed to remain functional even after a

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major quake. The foundation of the hospital extends 9 feet down into the ground below it, and the massive columns that support the structure — weighing roughly one ton for every foot — are embedded 5 feet into the foundation. At its upper floors, the hospital’s internal structure is designed to sway to absorb motion, King said. “Anything that moves within the building is designed to move without crashing into any other part of the building.� Pipes are designed to stay fully functional even if separate floors move at different rates and different directions during a temblor; backup power is designed to remain continuous, King said. “We are one of the few hospitals in the state to be designed with the latest California building codes,� King said. Other dangers A building’s structural integrity is not the only thing one must consider when preparing for an earthquake, however, Holzer said.

ZIMBABWE RUN Continued from page 5

Coursing throughout the fair and the races is a distinctly Zimbabwean cultural vibe. Two Zimbabwean bands will be performing while runners snack on sadza, an authentic food made of cornmeal that is predominant in Zimbabwe. Local student artists from the community will also be exhibiting their African-themed artwork: clay sculptures, masks, paintings. Other arts and crafts will be on display as well. The Batsirani foundation, a group of Zimbabwean mothers of disabled children, will have authentic Zimbabwean arts and crafts available for sale. And each of the races will have its own mascot, men and women in giraffe and lion suits running around, guiding runners, and doubtlessly cursing the heat. Supplementing this distinct Zimbabwe flavor will be the presence of Gray Mahvera, professional cross-country runner and Zimbabwe native. Since 2008, the 41-year-old from Los Angeles has been coming to the Zimbabwe Run to support the cause started by the Clarks. Mahvera is a seasoned runner. This February at the USA Cross Country Championships in San Diego he ran an 8K race in 26:38 and took second place. However, the Zimbabwe Run is as full of surprises as it is charity. Last year Mahvera finished in second place in the mile run when he was bested, by one second, by Colin Mack, a sophomore from St. Francis High School. Mahvera blamed the U-turn in the race, which is there to keep the course on school grounds

“There is a big ‘but,’� he said — “non-structural components.� Tall shelves, hanging lamps, plumbing and furniture are just a few things that could be damaged or cause damage. “All nonstructural features, unless they’re secured, those can be quite lethal in an earthquake,� he said. Ultimately, an individual or family disaster plan could make all the difference, said Jaime Garrett, public information officer for the Mountain View Fire Department. For help devising such a plan, call the fire department at 9036365, Garrett said. The county offers AlertSCC. com, where residents can sign up for automated alerts on their telephones, cell phones and e-mail accounts. The Mountain View Fire Department also has Facebook and Twitter accounts, where emergency information would be posted. In the event of an emergency, information would also be available on local radio and television — KFFH 87.9 FM and KMVP Channel 15. V

— “Everyone knows the legs of a 15-year-old are more flexible going around a U-turn than those of a 40-year-old — especially a 40-year-old who just drove from Los Angeles,� Mahvera said about his finish last year. Clark says the outcome of the races reinvent the Zimbabwe Run every year, and this year Mahvera is determined to best Mack. As in previous years, all proceeds from this event will go to the Mukumbi Orphanage in Zimbabwe. The orphanage is home to about 100 children who need amenities like working toilets, solar cookers and a fence to ward off raiding baboons. Last year’s event brought in $27,000 in money the orphanage used to acquire an electric generator. The shoe drive will also be there this year. Fair goers can donate gently worn shoes to children in Zimbabwe, who often cannot afford them and cannot attend school without them. The genesis of the Zimbabwe Run began in the 1990s when Clark’s son Bill began living in Zimbabwe as a teacher. After visiting her son, Ellen Clark fell in love with the country and its people, but her heart was wrenched by the poverty and poor living conditions in the south African country known for its high occurrence of HIV/AIDS and the dictatorial oppression of its government. The Clarks have another charity program at work in Paraguay. They accept direct donations to help provide farm land and gardens for a group of students and families to sustain and harvest. Information and race sign-ups at www.zimbabweparaguay.org. V


-PDBM/FXT

High schools in good shape, for now By Nick Veronin

H

alfway through their fiscal year the local high schools are in better financial shape than administrative officials had anticipated, according to a report presented to the district’s board of trustees on Monday. According to the 2010-11 Second Interim Report, which the Mountain View-Los Altos Union High School District’s board of trustees approved at their March 14 meeting, the district took in more revenue than had been anticipated and spent more than had been budgeted for in the first eight months of the fiscal year. The amount the district took in exceeded the amount it spent by more than $1 million. The district took in about $1.8 million more than expected. The

CALTRAIN

Continued from page 1

Jose’s Diridon station would be eliminated, cutting off residents from Gilroy, Morgan Hill and San Martin, if all of the proposed cuts are implemented. But Heminger said fare and parking increases, changes to its upcoming expiring contract with Amtrak and potentially using some money

majority of the surplus came from state and federal sources, as well as from the district’s fundraising organization, the MVLA High School Foundation. Mountain View-Los Altos also spent about $686,000 more than officials had budgeted. The increased expenditures were made to cover rising costs of employee health care plans and to account for unspent money from the previous year — which, due to tricky public sector financing protocol, was in the bank but wasn’t included in the first draft of the budget. That puts the high school district about $1.1 million ahead of where they had projected they would be by this time. The report took into account revenue and expenditure information from July 1 through reserved for Caltrain electrification might be options for a temporary fix. He also outlined a plan for VTA and Muni to pay $8.9 million in reimbursement funds the agencies owe SamTrans for fronting the purchase of the rail’s right-of-way in 1991. “We’re close to putting together a near-term, two-year plan to avert some of the deep service cuts proposed,” Randy Rentschler, the commission’s spokesman, said.

Feb. 28. The report also included a multiyear projection that anticipated the district would add 77 students next year and 150 by the 2012-13 school year. That growth, the report estimated, would require five additional certificated positions — teachers and non-administrators with some form of certification or credential — at an approximate cost to the district of $106,000 per position. Overall, the report was positive, Joe White, associate superintendent of business services, said. “Although we are deficit spending, the current projection demonstrates that the district will still be able to meet its current financial need through 2012-2013,” he said. “Which is really the key.” But “there are going to be some cuts — no two ways about it,” he said. The decision about which cuts will be made is up to the Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers Board, which manages Caltrain, he added. Rentschler said he could not specify how the funding deal will work out. “We have a list of possibilities we’re looking at but we don’t have a prioritized list,” he said.

There are still some unknowns in the near future, White said. Gov. Jerry Brown has proposed sweeping cuts and new taxes to deal with the state’s budget crisis, and his promise to keep kindergarten through 12th-grade public education off

the chopping block is very much dependent upon many of those proposals getting onto the June ballot and then passing. “As of right now,” White said, “we are waiting to see what happens in June.” V

SUMMER 2011

n n o e C c p t i on m a C

ATTENTION PARENTS!

Find the camps for your kids this summer in our newspapers and peninsula websites. We have all the camps you could possibly want!

Palo the ed by ice oduc w Vo n pr n Vie catio untai publi and Mo c ecial A sp Almana The

Also, pick up a copy of the Camp Connection magazine at family-oriented retailers on the Peninsula.

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ATTENTION BUSINESS OWNERS AND MANAGERS:

Do you want to generate more business from online marketing, but don’t know where to start? The Mountain View Voice will host FREE seminars for business owners and managers who want to learn more about social media, internet marketing and e-commerce to make it easier and more affordable to successfully market your business online. The one-hour seminars will be held Thursday, March 31 at 7:30am, 10:30am, and 1:30pm in the St. Tropez room of the Crowne Plaza Cabana Hotel, 4290 El Camino Real, Palo Alto Space is limited — registration is necessary. To register or for more information, call (650) 223-6587 or e-mail info@ShopMountainView.com 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto info@ShopMountainView.com Shop Mountain View is a community partnership of the Mountain View Chamber of Commerce, City of Mountain View, Hometown Peninsula, Mountain View Voice and MountainViewOnline.com

MARCH 18, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

9


-PDBM/FXT NCOMMUNITYBRIEFS

CHAT WITH ELECTED OFFICIALS The League of Women Voters is hosting a meet-andgreet with elected officials for the people of Mountain View and Los Altos, a chance to rub elbows and shoot the breeze with their legislators over coffee. The event is set for Sunday, March 20, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Los Altos Youth Center, located at 1 North San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Local residents are invited to discuss policy and raise questions and concerns to a variety of community leaders. “It’s an annual event for the public to get to know their elected officials,” said Gabrielle

Tiemann, Voter Service Director for the League of Women Voters. A portion of the allotted time will be given for the officials to give a short speech as well. Representatives from the following offices will be there: members of the Mountain View Whisman school board and the Mountain View City Council; Jeff Rosen, the district attorney for Santa Clara County; members of the Los Altos and Los Altos Hills school board and city council;,a member of the Foothill-De Anza community college district; a member of the La Purissima Water District; and a member of the Mid-Peninsula Open Space district. —Peter Maxwell

Mountain View Whisman School District (K-8) ENROLLMENT 2011-2012 BEGINS FEBRUARY 1 DISTRICT OFFICE 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

SENIOR HEALTH Continued from page 5

Magnuson said, she does not turn away patients even if she knows that treating them will cost more than she will be reimbursed. James contends that Magnuson is in the minority in this regard. He noted that many doctors continue to treat regular patients as they age into Medicare, but often end up turning away new Medicare patients. “These physicians are wonderful people,” James said, “but they have to stay in business, they have to keep their doors open.” If all goes as James plans, the Senior Health Center will function as a hub through which elderly Medicare patients can access doctors, nurses, psychiatrists, social workers, dieticians, pharmacists and other senior-oriented health professionals. Having all these specialists working on the same individual under one roof will have many benefits, James said. Better communication among doctors and pharmacists means certain patients will have a more finely tuned prescription drug regimen. Patients won’t have to go to an entirely separate office to talk to a mental health expert or to get dietary counseling.

Magnuson countered that gathering a multiplicity of specialists under one roof will give the hospital more opportunities to order expensive tests for these seniors. “From the patient’s point of view, if insurance pays for it, they say, ‘let’s go for it,’” she said. “There is nothing to keep the specialists from laughing all the way to the bank.” James, on the other hand, said that the Senior Health Center will streamline treatment, cut down on unnecessary procedures and medications, and is certain it will run at a loss — due mostly to low Medicare reimbursements. And although El Camino will have to eat that loss, he said, he is hopeful that the money the hospital spends on seniors may ultimately be more than offset by unnecessary readmissions and visits to the ER. He also anticipated that Medicare will ultimately benefit from the center, as fewer unnecessary tests, procedures and prescriptions will be ordered. To ensure that seniors stay out of the hospital, James said that doctors and nurses will follow many of the center’s patients home — in a manner of speaking. He said that certain patients will be asked to take home digital devices that will help doctors

Kinder Info Site Visits and Open Houses throughout the month of January

More information: 650.526.3500, ext. 1001 www.mvwsd.org (Enrollment Info)

CHARMING COTTAGES OF PALO ALTO Twentieth annual house tour

FRIDAY, APRIL 1 & SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 2011 11:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.

You care about your aging parents. And yet, sometimes, you just don’t know the best way to help them, especially when they are trying to remain independent. Seniors Helping Seniors® in-home services is an exceptional program of care and caring that matches seniors who want to provide services with those who are looking for help. UÊi>Ê«Ài«ÉVœœŽˆ˜} Uʈ}…ÌʅœÕÃiŽii«ˆ˜} UÊ œ“«>˜ˆœ˜Ã…ˆ« UÊœLˆˆÌÞÊ>ÃÈÃÌ>˜Vi UÊÀœViÀÞÊŜ««ˆ˜} UÊ*iÌÊV>Ài UÊ9>À`Ê7œÀŽ

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Media Sponsor: Palo Alto Weekly and Palo Alto Online ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011

V

Caring for Older Parents

MVWSD offers: Castro DI (English-Spanish) Monta Loma CEL (parent participation) Stevenson PACT (parent participation)

10

monitor their health remotely. Those who agree may take home a dedicated cell phone that doctors or nurses will use to send them reminders to take medication, or they may have a scale equipped with Bluetooth capability, that will send daily weight measurements back to the center. James is even hopeful he might raise the funds to get some patients iPads that allow them to have video chat check-ups with nurses. This will be of great benefit to certain seniors on Medicare who may have trouble taking care of themselves, James said. It isn’t enough for a doctor to hand a frail elderly person a prescription or a recommendation for a specialist and then send him on his way, without any follow through. “This is far different than a senior walking into a doctor’s office, having their appointment and walking out without any kind of continuity,” James said of the center. “I’m not trying to make it sound like it’s a panacea, because it’s not, but I can’t think of a better model for the care of my aging parents,” he said. “We’ve got to find a way to make senior care affordable. If we’re going to control health care costs, this kind of care is going to be mandatory.”

tomschwartz@shsmidpeninsula.com

www.seniorshelpingseniors.com/ MidPeninsula


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Go to pamf.org Learn more about the Palo Alto Medical Foundation Enroll in My Health Online Download the free MyChart health app

Sutter Health's online patient services are powered by MyChart, licensed from Epic Systems Corporation, © 1998 to 2009. Patent pending.

MARCH 18, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

11


7JFXQPJOU NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Intern Peter Maxwell Photographer Michelle Le Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Alissa Stallings

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Gary Vennarucci

Advertising Advertising Representatives Judie Block, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 E-mail news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com E-mail letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   fax (650) 326-0155 E-mail Classified ads@MV-Voice.com E-mail Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 per year, $100 per 2 years are welcome. Copyright ©2010 by Embarcadero Media Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM POST your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com E-MAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 964-6300

12

Council faces another budget challenge

W

ith ongoing employee expenses expected to jump $3.2 million next year, and the outlook for more of the same in the years ahead, the City Council must decide soon how much it can press to reduce pension benefits and costly work rules. If not, facing an estimated $2.1 million budget deficit next year, the council must continue to chop away at city services, possibly laying off police officers. In his first draft of next year’s budget, City Manager Kevin Duggan assumes $1 million in pension and benefit savings, as well as an additional $900,000 from increasing land lease revenue and fees charged for city services. And although most council members were generally supportive of the budget proposals, some said adding nearly $1 million in fees after significant increases last year may be going far. But without additional income from fees and leases, the city will have to adopt portions of the suggested staff cuts included in the Tier Three plan that would save $2.1 million. The worst case scenario presented to the council includes lay offs of 16 employees and elimination of up to nine vacant full-time positions. Tier One cuts would save only $637,000 by laying off a stagehand at the Performing Arts Center, a public education specialist at the fire department and a police community services officer. It would also eliminate a vacant weed-abatement worker position. To save $1 million, the additional cuts in Tier Two would eliminate two community service officers, a vacant police records specialist position, a deputy fire marshal and four other positions, ranging in savings from $97,000 for a parks maintenance officer to $39,000 for an accounting technician. In addition to the Tier One and Two cuts, Tier Three would eliminate five police community service officers and lower the union-contract minimum staffing levels in the fire department for a savings of $600,000. There are other ways to reduce the city’s costs, although those mentioned would either fall short of making a real dent in the deficit, or be difficult to implement. For example, Councilman Mike Kasperzak suggested that the city should look for ways to combine delivery of services with other cities, noting that fire departments have been merged and library services can be contracted out to the county. The city is talking to Palo Alto about reducing the cost of the animal control contract, but could farm out the services to another provider in southern Santa Clara County and probably save more. Potential savings for this change could be significant, but probably would not be as user-friendly to residents and probably would not make a large impact on the deficit. Outsourcing the city’s fire department should be considered, but such a move would present a huge political challenge and almost certainly would be strongly opposed by most members of the department. In prior budget years, the city already has done more than many of its peers in getting employees to share more benefit costs, but in this down economy, city revenues are not as robust as in prior years, and certainly not enough to cover the increased employee expenses. So it will be up to the council to decide whether to mount a major initiative to roll back employee benefits or continue to lay off staff members, with a resulting cut in the level of services delivered to Mountain View residents. It will not be an easy decision.

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011

■ EDITORIAL ■ YOUR LETTERS ■ GUEST OPINIONS

NLETTERS

VOICES FROM THE COMMUNITY

FRAIL ELDERLY AT RISK WITH MEDI-CAL CUTS Thank you for the article about how state budget cuts could impact local operation of adult day care. As an advocate for seniors, as well as being a rehabilitation registered nurse, I have seen first hand how important the adult day care programs are in the Bay Area, including Avenidas in Mountain View and Senior Focus in Burlingame. They have provided the necessary therapy, nursing care, support and structure that the frail elderly and seniors living with Alzeimer’s disease, dementia or stroke injuries need to allow them to continue to live in their homes with family. It would be a tragedy to see Medi-Cal funding eliminated for these medically necessary services, and I believe it would not reduce costs, but would only shift and increase costs within other areas of the Medi-Cal budget. Pam Conlon-Sandhu, chair Mountain View Senior Advisory Committee

MORE OPINIONS ON MARIJUANA In the March 4 Voices Around Town column, which asked respondents if they agree with the City Council’s decision to ban medical marijuana dispensaries indefinitely, more demographic variety was needed to paint a clear picture of how people feel. I personally am horrified that we would even consider dispensaries, given the lack of organization and clear regulation required to make this a workable situation for those “in need” vs. those who want to have an excuse to sit around and stay high. I live next to someone who is of the latter persuasion and I can assure you that it is destroying her life. She has a horrible cough, par-

ties a lot, is not helping her medical problem and is unable to work because she smokes. It is a lifestyle changer and the comments you posted in the Voices are indicative of the lack of reality the public is able to maintain. I would love for someone to interview people who actually know about the downside, rather than just speculate. I am grateful that the city voted it down and I would have protested against any dispensaries opening in our fine city. We have a need everywhere to push for regulation and make sure that doctors are not handing over a free pass to abuse drugs. Drugs can be useful but not unless they are monitored and regulated. Marijuana should be treated just like any other prescription drug and include an expiration date. Jan Chapman, Middlefield Road

PARK THE CAR AND SAVE CALTRAIN As a resident of Mountain View and the Bay Area, I think it is vital to prevent Caltrain service from being seriously diminished. Reliable public transportation is vital to all aspects of our lives. The argument that it should pay for itself would only be valid if our streets, roads and freeways paid for themselves. They do not. Our taxes pay for them. The problem is that most people think and act as if they were born joined at the hip to their cars. People look at free and well-maintained streets and roads as a given. They don’t look beyond that. It is essential to our quality of life in general and the environment in particular that we begin to expand our view. Political and business leaders acting in concert could and should save Caltrain. George Schuttinger Sierra Vista Avenue


8FFLFOE MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

â–  RESTAURANT REVIEW â–  MOVIE TIMES â–  BEST BETS FOR ENTERTAINMENT

N R E S TA U R A N T R E V I E W

Plenty of polish THE NEW GRAVITY WINE BAR AND BISTRO IMPRESSES WITH FINE FOOD AND A SLEEK INTERIOR By Dale F. Bentson

G

ravity, the new wine bar and bistro on Emerson Street in Palo Alto, is impressive for many reasons. The interior is sleek and refined, the service knowledgeable and friendly, and the food both arresting and exceptionally well-prepared. Gravity also has a prime spot just a halfblock off University Avenue. It’s the site of longtime restaurant fixture Maddalena and the subsequent, quickly departed Melt Ultra Lounge. Rob Fischer, owner of the Palo Alto Creamery, Reposado and others, opened Gravity in mid-December. “I’ve always wanted to do a wine bar that served really good food, not just charcuterie and cheese plates,� he said. “It’s just as much about good beer as good

wine. The food menu isn’t long but it’s all high quality,� he added. “We’ve got a hot chef.� Andy Phillips, formerly sous-chef at the Restaurant at Wente Vineyards in Livermore, is the exceptional talent in the kitchen. Gravity’s chic downstairs interior has hardwood floors, bar-high tables and chairs of wood and aluminum. Too-dim pendant lamps and small print make reading the menu difficult. Upstairs is the same motif, but more spacious, with lower tables and chairs, and exquisite windows in the front overlooking Emerson Street. It’s sophisticated and inviting. At each dinner, we were presented with an amuse-bouche from the chef while squinting at the menu. On two visits, it was a morsel of the eggplant caponata; another time it was slices of sopressata salami. Each amusebouche was accompanied by a taste of still or

VERONICA WEBER

Gravity’s vanilla panna cotta is sweet and feather-light.

bubbly wine. Steak tartare with quail egg ($10) was coarsely ground, perfectly seasoned raw beef. The tiny quail egg atop served to bind the meat and added a richness to the tasty appetizer. Another fine starter was pate de

Dining Town on

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Champagne ($10): two generous slices of coarse ground pork pate. It had just-made lush flavors and came with cornichons, grainy mustard and toast points. No better See GRAVITY, page 14

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Happy Hours Mon-Fri 4pm-6pm.

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SAN FRANCISCO HERB & NATURAL FOOD CO. If you would like to be listed in DINING ON THE TOWN please call Brent at the Voice at 964-6300.

47444 Kato Road, Fremont 4OLLs0HONEs&AX www.herbspicetea.com MARCH 18, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

13


8FFLFOE

Avenidas presents the 4th Annual

Housing Conference Saturday, April 2, 8:30 am - 3 pm

Keynote address, “I’m Not Ready Yet!� by Donna Robbins, author of Moving Mom & Dad

Discover... Š What the local housing options are Š How to remain safely in your own home Š The tricks to staying sane when selling your home Š How to create order out of cluttered chaos Thanks to Presenting Sponsor Nancy Goldcamp, Coldwell Banker

For more info or to register, call (650) 289-5445 or visit www.avenidas.org

Where age is just a number VERONICA WEBER

Andy Phillips, Gravity’s executive chef, plates the duck confit.

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GRAVITY

Continued from page 13

way to start a dinner. Appetizers can be tailor-made with both charcuterie and cheeseplate selections available in three sizes each, $6-$18.

Warm Brussels sprouts salad ($8) was dotted with pancetta and grapefruit slivers. The sprouts were, happily, cooked through. Al dente is fine for most vegetables but not sprouts. The citrus and bacon played well off one another. The delightful fritto misto ($12) was crispy fried shrimp, scallops,

NDININGNOTES

Gravity 544 Emerson St., Palo Alto 650-327-3161 gravitywinebar.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. 4-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 4-11 p.m.

Reservations Credit Cards Alcohol Takeout Highchairs Wheelchair Access Banquet Catering Outdoor Seating Noise Level Bathroom Cleanliness Parking

moderate excellent city lots

calamari and lemon slices. The lemon balanced out the seafood and added just a touch of pucker to the dish. Burrata ($7), a fresh Italian cheese made from mozzarella and cream, was just that: creamy, but not runny. With abundant flavor spread on accompanying toast points, it was like eating cheese pudding. Gravity’s entrees include filet and frites ($19), a fork-tender piece of meat. This was not steak frites, which is a less worthy cut of beef. This was filet, perfectly grilled to my request. The fries were hot and crisp and there were plenty of them. Braised beef short ribs ($16) provided plenty of well-browned, long-cooked, fork-tender, juicy meat. Overcooked cuts of beef can be stringy — this wasn’t. The creamy-sweet mascarpone polenta that accompanied highlighted the beef. Duck confit is a preserved duck leg cooked in its own fat. Here, the duck was served with

Do You Suffer From Cancer-Related Bone or Tissue Pain? El Camino Hospital and UCSF are seeking adult patients who have cancer-related pain in their bones or tissues for a research study to determine the effectiveness of a program to help patients and family caregivers manage cancer pain. Participants will receive education in their homes regarding their pain medicines, pain management, and techniques for managing side effects. You may be eligible to participate if you: UĂŠ Ă€iĂŠ>}iĂŠÂŁnĂŠÂœĂ€ĂŠÂœĂ›iĂ€ UĂŠ >Ă›iĂŠV>˜ViÀ‡ÀiÂ?>ĂŒi`ĂŠÂŤ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂŠÂ­iĂ?VÂ?Ă•`ˆ˜}ĂŠÂ˜iÀÛiĂŠÂŤ>ÂˆÂ˜ÂŽĂŠ UĂŠ LÂ?iĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂ€i>`]ĂŠĂœĂ€ÂˆĂŒiĂŠ>˜`ĂŠĂƒÂŤi>ÂŽĂŠ ˜}Â?ÂˆĂƒÂ… Participants will be reimbursed for their time. To see if you are eligible or to learn more, call: UCSF Cancer Pain Management Research OfďŹ ce 415-476-4516, Ext. #1

14

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  MARCH 18, 2011


8FFLFOE Umbrian lentils: a smaller, multihued, meatier, firmer-whencooked lentil. These were quite different than the usual mushy green lentils encountered in soups and stews. The dish ($14) was sauced with a delicious cabernet-fig reduction. Meaty and tender, the sauteed chicken thighs ($12) were served with a farro pilaf. Farro is slightly nutty in flavor, firm and somewhat chewy. The grain is very popular in Italy. At Gravity, it made a great textural contrast to the mahoganycolored, crisp chicken. Grilled lamb sausage merguez ($12) was served with pickled cucumbers, onions and French fries. Merguez is a piquant but not overly hot North African-styled sausage. The toasted house-made bun made the dish a big hit. For desserts, apple tart tartin ($6) was excellent, not cloyingly sweet but scented and delectable. Chocolate pot de creme ($6) was pudding par excellence. Honey ricotta crostata ($7) with candied kumquats was seriously wonderful: flaky, creamy, savory and sweet. The best panna cotta I’ve ever eaten was in Bra, Italy, home of the Slow Food movement. I’ve never had panna cotta quite as delicate as that, although throughout Italy the dessert is marvelous. Local restaurants make panna cotta either too watery, too jiggly or too custardy. I’d never had one like in Italy — until now. Gravity’s vanilla panna cotta ($7) was superb. It was feather-light and barely congealed, and melted on contact with the tongue. Then it filled the mouth with sweet vanilla-y cream. Just wonderful. Gravity’s wine list is not lengthy, nor does it include any high-priced, high-quality, boutique wines. Rather, the wines are approachable, complement the food, and won’t stretch the pocketbook too far. Corkage fee is $25 for those bringing a special bottle. At some point, the wine list will need to add some serious labels. The food coming from the kitchen far outshines what is currently being poured from the bottle. Wines are sold by the glass, carafe or full bottle. Various wine flights are offered including a dessert wine flight. I stuck with wines by the glass and will quote

Thieves hid behind a fake chimney to cut a hole in the roof of a Brooklyn bank, then made off with the contents of 60 safe-deposit boxes. Heavy duty blowtorches were used to cut the hole in the roof. A neighboring business owner, whose surveillance camera was stolen a week earlier, commented, “I warned them (the bank), but they just didn’t take me seriously.”

–New York Post/Feb.24, 2009

VERONICA WEBER

The duck confit at Gravity is served with Umbrian lentils and drizzled with figs simmered in a cabernet reduction.

those prices. The wines were relatively inexpensive, retail-wise, and the pours were generous, about 6 ounces. Selections were global. I enjoyed a fruity Quinta de Cabriz Branco from Portugal ($9), a solid Iron Horse Chardonnay ($12) from Sonoma, an inky Tempranillo from Spain’s Bodegas Volver ($10), and a sprightly Beaujo-

lais Villages ($12) from France. Glasses ranged from $8 to $14. Beers were from American microbrews, along with some specialty European selections. Gravity has a talented chef in the kitchen, experienced management, prime location, contemporary decor and top-notch service. I can’t imagine anything but success for this operation. V

A Guide to the Spiritual Community Los Altos Lutheran Church ELCA

Pastor David K. Bonde Outreach Pastor Gary Berkland

9:00 am Worship 10:30 am Education Nursery Care Provided 650-948-3012

To include your Church in

Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-326-8210 ext. 6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com

460 S. El Monte Ave., Los Altos

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Student Quote: “She has been helping me plan my courses for the first year in college.”

Providing volunteer mentors & tutors for our community youth

OUR KIDS NEED YOU: BE A MENTOR OR TUTOR Join us and volunteer in the Los Altos and Mountain View Schools

MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH

VERONICA WEBER

Gravity’s dining room.

Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View Office Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189

Please Contact: Carole Dorshkind 650-641-2821 or email us at Info@pngmvla.org WWW.PNGMVLA.ORG MARCH 18, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

15


8FFLFOE

FREE COMPOST WORKSHOP

NMOVIETIMES The Adjustment Bureau (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 3:20, 5, 7:55, 9:20 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:40 a.m.; 2:15, 4:50, 7:30 & 10:05 p.m. Battle: Los Angeles (PG-13) (1/2 Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 12:10, 2:05, 3:05, 4:50, 6:10, 7:35, 9:10 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:50, 2:10, 3:40, 5, 6:30, 7:45, 9:20 & 10:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 10:15 a.m. Beastly (PG-13) Century 16: 7:10 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m.; 4:40 & 9:30 p.m.

Learn how to turn your grass, leaves and kitchen scraps into nutritious soil for your garden . and get a compost bin at a discounted rate.

FREE COMPOST WORKSHOP IN MOUNTAIN VIEW

Saturday September - 12 12NOON NOON Saturday April 2, 15, 10AM - 12 -NOON Saturday September 19, 10AM 10AM

Community Center at Rengstorff Park Pre-Registration Required Register by calling the Rotline at (408) 918-4640 or visit www.ReduceWaste.org for a class schedule. Brought to you by:

CITY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW

Cedar Rapids (R) ((( Century 20: 2 & 6:55 p.m. CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 4:45 & 7:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 1:45 & 7:20 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:35 p.m. Certified Copy Aquarius Theatre: 2, 4:30, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Gnomeo & Juliet (G) ((( Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 4:45 & 9:15 p.m. Century 20: 8:35 p.m.; In 3D at 6:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 11:50 a.m. & 4:10 p.m.; In 3D Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 1:55 p.m. The Golden Arrow (1936) Stanford Theatre: Thu. at 6:10 & 8:55 p.m. Hall Pass (R) ((( Century 20: 10:45 p.m. It’s Love I’m After (1937) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 7:30 p.m. Just Go With It (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:20, 5:05, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m. Justin Bieber: Never Say Never (G) Century 20: In 3D at 12:05, 5 & 9:45 p.m. The King’s Speech (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2:15, 4:55, 7:40 & 10:25 p.m. CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 4:20 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sun.-Thu. also at 1:30 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 10 p.m. The Last Lions (PG) Century 16: 11:35 a.m.; 1:50 & 4:10 p.m. Limitless (PG-13) Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 12:20, 1:55, 2:55, 4:40, 5:40, 7:25, 8:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:15, 1:50, 2:55, 4:25, 5:25, 7, 8, 9:35 & 10:35 p.m. The Lincoln Lawyer (R) Century 16: 11 a.m.; noon, 1:45, 2:45, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30, 8:40 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:40, 2:10, 3:25, 4:55, 6:10, 7:40, 9:05 & 10:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 10 a.m. Lord of the Dance 3D Century 20: Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15 & 9:40 p.m. Mars Needs Moms (PG) Century 16: 2:30 & 7 p.m.; In 3D at 11:15 a.m.; 1:30, 3:50, 6:05 & 8:20 p.m. Century 20: 2:45 & 7:25 p.m.; In 3D at 11:20 a.m.; 1:35, 3:55, 6:15, 8:30 & 10:45 p.m. The Merry Widow (1934) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Mon. at 5:40 & 9 p.m. The Metropolitan Opera: Lucia di Lammermoor Century 20: Sat. at 10 a.m. CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: Sat. at 10 a.m. The Music Never Stopped (PG) Aquarius Theatre: 2:30, 5, 7:30 & 9:55 p.m. Of Gods and Men (PG-13) (((1/2 Guild Theatre: Noon, 2:45, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. One Hour with You (1932) Stanford Theatre: Sat.-Mon. at 7:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 4:10 p.m. Paul (R) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 12:30, 2:10, 3:10, 4:55, 6:05, 7:45, 9 & 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 12:35, 2, 3:05, 4:35, 5:35, 7:10, 8:10, 9:40 & 10:40 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. also at 10:10 a.m. Rango (PG) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 12:40, 1:35, 4:20, 6:15, 7:05 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 12:10, 1:45, 2:50, 4:20, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:50 & 10:40 p.m. Red Riding Hood (PG-13) (1/2 Century 16: 11:25 a.m.; 2, 4:35, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 12:30, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7:55, 9:15 & 10:20 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Satan Met a Lady (1936) Stanford Theatre: Thu. at 7:30 p.m. That Certain Woman (1937) Stanford Theatre: Fri. at 5:45 & 9:10 p.m. True Grit (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:05 a.m.; 1:40, 4:15, 7:15 & 10 p.m. Unknown (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 20: 1:55 & 6:50 p.m. AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing at the Aquarius, visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com -Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

16

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) This free adaptation of Philip K. Dick’s 1954 short story “Adjustment Team” posits a world in which extra-natural “adjusters” play social architect, making sure that the right things happen and the wrong don’t, without the knowledge of everyday humans. Matt Damon plays “bad boy” U.S. Rep. David Norris. A chance run-in with Elise (Emily Blunt) inspires Norris to put authenticity before image: But who is that fedorawearing man lurking in the vicinity? It’s an adjuster named Harry (Anthony Mackie), tasked with keeping David and Elise apart in accordance with The Plan. When David accidentally becomes aware of The Plan, he becomes trapped in his head: How can life ever be the same, and how can he ever forget about the enchanting woman who changed his life? Norris argues with the adjusters and ultimately he rebels, trying to outwit his masters by finding and winning Elise. Rated PG-13 for brief strong language, some sexuality and a violent image. One hour, 39 minutes. — P.C.

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES -1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) A meteor shower off the coast of Tokyo turns out to be the first salvo in an alien invasion. With San Francisco and San Diego conquered, Los Angeles is the last bastion of the West Coast. Only the U.S. Marine Corps can save us now! Aaron Eckhart plays Marine Staff Sergeant Michael Nantz, who just turned in his retirement papers. For good measure, Nantz carries survivor’s guilt from recently losing his platoon overseas, including the brother of one of his newly assigned charges. The rest of Nantz’s new unit is full of characters with Conspicuous Reasons They Can’t Die, including unclaimed virginity and an imminent wedding. Rated PG-13 for sustained and intense sequences of war violence and destruction, and for language. One hour, 54 minutes. — T.H.

HALL PASS ---

(Century 20) Fans of the Farrelly brothers’ raunchy — and riotous — films will find more of the same with this unapologetic adult chuckler. Longtime married couple Rick (Owen Wilson) and Maggie (Jenna Fischer) have settled into something of a relationship rut. Rick sneaks glances at attractive women who stroll by, and Maggie feigns sleep when Rick is in the mood for sex. Their married pals Fred (Jason Sudeikis) and Grace (Christina Applegate) are in a similar stale state. Maggie and Grace decide to give their men each a “hall pass” — a week off marriage, no questions asked. Encouraged by their oddball buddies, Rick and Fred set Continued on next page

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley

NMOVIEREVIEWS Read more reviews online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com.


8FFLFOE Continued from previous page

out for a week of single-guy debauchery. Meanwhile, Maggie and Grace enjoy a much-needed break themselves, partying with the hunky coach and players of a college baseball team. Rated R for crude and sexual humor throughout, language, some graphic nudity and drug use. 1 hour, 38 minutes. — T.H.

OF GODS AND MEN ---1/2

(Guild) Based on a true incident in 1996 involving a clash between Algerian monks and Islamic fundamentalists, the film invites a consideration of the social roles of religion and how the unseen and unheard (namely God) provide unlikely justification for radically diverse social action. The encroachment of Islamic radicals on the peaceful countryside presses a thorny question to the monks: With direct conflict inevitable, should they stay true to their commitment to serve the local needy, or abandon the monastery and return to the safety of France? Rated PG-13 for a momentary scene of startling wartime violence, some disturbing images and brief language. Two hours, two minutes. — P.C.

RANGO ---

(Century 16, Century 20) Young’uns will still take a shine to the hero of “Rango� — a chameleon that’s part Kermit the Frog, part street-corner kook (and all Johnny Depp). The film begins with the wild-eyed chameleon, a legend only in his own mind, a dreamer whose play-acting is contained within the four glass walls of a terrarium. A

spill onto a desert highway forces the lizard out of his comfort zone. A couple of Hunter S. Thompson allusions later, the Hawaiianshirt-clad hero wanders into the desert and arrives at the severely depressed town of Dirt. Given the prime opportunity to reinvent himself, the chameleon bluffs a heroic persona, calling himself “Rango�. Since Dirt is in the midst of a severe water shortage (what’s left will be gone in just days), a hero fills a vital need. “People have to believe in something,� says the turtle Mayor (Ned Beatty), who appoints Rango as the new sheriff. The comedy comes from the chameleon’s ironically dubious adaptability and unearned confidence. Rated PG for rude humor, language, action and smoking. — P.C.

RED RIDING HOOD -1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) A vicious werewolf has tormented the residents of a medieval village for the better part of two decades. The terrified villagers regularly offer up sacrificial livestock to appease the mysterious beast, but when it kills a human girl the residents are spurred to action. Village holy man Father Auguste (Lukas Haas) enlists the aid of werewolf hunter Brother Solomon (Gary Oldman), who plans to end the wolf’s violent reign. Stuck in the middle is Valerie (Amanda Seyfried), the gorgeous daughter of a local lumberjack (Billy Burke) and secretive housewife (Virginia Madsen). Valerie is desperately in love with the dark and brooding Peter (Shiloh Fernandez). Valerie also has an unusual connection with the werewolf, who Solomon claims could be anyone in the village. Rated PG-13 for violence and creature terror, and some sensuality. 1 hour, 49 minutes. — T.H.

Spring Art Classes

UNKNOWN --1/2

(Century 20) Will the real Dr. Martin Harris please stand up? Identity theft kicks it up a notch in “Unknown,� a not-bad thriller starring Liam Neeson. Neeson plays Harris ... or does he? Yes, it’s that sort of movie. In Berlin to speak at a biotechnology summit, the doctor runs an errand away from his wife and takes an unscheduled plunge off an overpass. Awakening from a four-day coma, Harris experiences memory loss and what may or may not be severe cognitive confusion. When he attempts to step back into his responsibilities, he finds his wife Liz (January Jones) with another man (Aidan Quinn), a man who insists that he’s Dr. Martin Harris. Rated PG-13 for violence and action, and brief sexual content. One hour, 53 minutes. — P.C.

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17


Camp Connection

GUIDE TO 2011 SUMMER C AMPS FOR KIDS

Harker Summer Programs

Athletics

Athletic Fitness – “Train with the Best”

Menlo Park

Riekes Summer Camps — A world of opportunity and fun-filled learning. Ages 9-18. Strength & conditioning, speed & agility, sport specific training, skills development, professional coaches, pre & post evals, leading edge methods, latest equipment. Sessions run from June through August. www.riekes.org 650-364-2509

Bay Area Equestrian Center

Woodside

At Wunderlich County Park Stables. Kids 8-15 have outdoor fun joining BAEC for horse camps. Camps focus on caring for and riding horses so come ready to ride and have fun learning good horse care. www.bayareaequestrian.net 650-446-1414

Camp Jones Gulch

La Honda

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics - focusing on math, language arts and science - and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for-credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Swim, Tennis and Soccer also offered. www.summer.harker.org 408-553-0537

iD Tech Camps - Summer Tech Fun!

Stanford

Ages 7-17 create video games, iPhone apps, C++/Java programs, websites and more. Weeklong, day and overnight programs held at Stanford, UC Berkeley, Santa Clara, UCLA and others. Also special Teen programs held at Stanford in gaming, programming and visual arts. Free year-round learning! Save with code CAU22L. www.internalDrive.com 1-888-709-TECH (8324)

iD Teen Academies

Stanford

Join the fun this summer! Camp Jones Gulch offers friendship and growth to kids ages 6-16. Enjoy our Traditional Camp or Mini, Horse, Surfing, Leadership and Travel Camps. One- and two-week sessions. Limited financial assistance available. www.campjonesgulch.org 415-848-1200

Teens spend two weeks immersed in the dynamic world of video game creation at iD Gaming Academy, computer science/application development at iD Programming Academy or photography/ filmmaking at iD Visual Arts Academy. Overnight programs held at Stanford, Harvard, MIT and others. Week-long programs for ages 7-17 also available. Free year-round learning! Save w/code CAU22T. www.iDTeenAcademies.com 1-888-709-TECH (8324)

Champion Tennis Camps

ISTP Language Immersion

Atherton

CTC provides an enjoyable way for your Junior to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. The 4-6 year olds have fun learning eye-hand coordination and building self-esteem! www.alanmargot-tennis.net 650-400-0464

Jefunira Camp

Palo Alto

Palo Alto

International School of the Peninsula camps offered in French, Chinese, Spanish or ESL for students in Nursery through Middle School. Three 2-week sessions, each with different theme. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language proficiency. www.istp.org 650-251-8519

Mid-Peninsula High School Summer Program

Menlo Park

Celebrating our 20th year of Jefunira Camp summer fun in 2011! Come join us for some good old fashion summer fun! Our combination of an exceptional college aged staff and innovative, inclusive programming will create a memorable summer experience for your child. Programming for children ages 4-13. Pre and post camp care offered. www.jefuniracamp.com 650-291-2888

Mid-Peninsula High School offers a series of classes and electives designed to keep students engaged in learning. Classes Monday-Thursday and limited to 15 students. Every Thursday there’s a BBQ lunch. The Science and Art classes will have weekly field trips. www.mid-pen.com 650-321-1991 ext. 110

Kim Grant Tennis Academy Summer Camps

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable! www.sfhs.com/summer 650-968-1213 ext. 446

Palo Alto/Menlo Park/ Redwood City

Fun and Specialized junior camps for Mini (3-5), Beginner, Intermediate 1 & 2, Advanced and Elite Players. Weekly programs designed by Kim Grant to improve players technique, fitness, agility, mental toughness and all around tennis game. Camps in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Redwood City. Come make new friends and have tons of FUN!! www.KimGrantTennis.com 650-752-8061

Matt Lottich Life Skills Basketball Camp

Woodside/ Redwood City

MLLS offers high-level, high-energy basketball instruction for ages 6-16. This summer we celebrate the 8th year!! With two to three “leagues” in each session, young beginners to advanced elite players get to learn fundamental skills, advanced footwork and valuable life lessons from an unparalleled staff of Pro and Collegiate level players. Camps at Woodside Elementary and Sequoia High School. Early bird, multi-session, and group discounts available. www.mllscamp.com 1-888-537-3223

Spring Down Camp Equestrian Center

Portola Valley

Summer at Saint Francis

SuperCamp

Stanford/San Jose/Berkeley

TechKnowHow Computer & LEGO Camps

Summer at Saint Francis

Write Now! Summer Writing Camps

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camps designed to provide players with the opportunity to improve both their skill and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff. www.sfhs.com/summer 650-968-1213 ext. 446

Team Esface Elite Basketball Skills Clinics

Woodside/ Redwood City

Spring Training (April-May). High-energy, high-level basketball training for ages 6-16. Use your offseason as a time to develop your basketball skills and IQ with the unparalleled coaching staff of Team Esface. Learn the fundamentals of the game, offensive attack moves and advanced footwork through dynamic drills and competitions led by young, positive coaches including former Division 1 athletes. April and May. Two days per week. Sibling and group discounts available. More information and sign up at: www.teamesface.com 1-888-537-3223

YMCA of Silicon Valley

Peninsula

Say hello to summer fun at the YMCA! Choose from enriching day or overnight camps in 35 locations: arts, sports, science, travel, and more. For youth K-10th grade. Includes weekly fieldtrips, swimming and outdoor adventures. Accredited by the American Camp Association. Financial assistance available. www.ymcasv.org/summercamp 408-351-6400

Academics Delphi Academy

Santa Clara

Have your best summer ever at Delphi Academy’s summer camp! Ages 5-13. Full Day Camp. Morning academics with experienced teachers, afternoon activities, day trips, camping trips, swimming, sports, crafts, activities, and a lot of fun! www.bestsummerever.org 408-260-2300 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011

Palo Alto/ Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-14! Courses include LEGO and K’NEX Projects with Motors, NXT Robotics, 3D Modeling, and Game Design. Many locations, including Palo Alto, Menlo Park, and Sunnyvale. Half and all day options. Early-bird and multi-session discounts available. www.techknowhowkids.com 650-474-0400

Woodland School Summer Adventures

Mountain View

Mountain View

SuperCamp is the summer enrichment program that parents and kids love! Now in our 30th year and with over 56,000 graduates worldwide, we’ll give your son or daughter the skills, added confidence, motivation and character direction to flourish. Junior Forum, incoming 6th-8th graders; Senior Forum, incoming 9th12th graders. Located at Stanford, San Jose State, UC Berkeley and 6 other prestigious schools nationwide. www.supercamp.com 800-285-3276

Spring Down camp teaches basic to advanced horsemanship skills. All ages welcome! Daily informative lecture, riding lesson, supervised hands-on skill practice, safety around horses, tacking/untacking of own camp horse, and arts/crafts. www.springdown.com 650-851-1114 Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. www.sfhs.com/summer 650-968-1213 ext. 446

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For more info see our online camp directory at PaloAltoOnline.com/biz/summercamps Please call us at 650.326.8210 for other camp advertising opportunities

Portola Valley

For kindergarten through 8th grade. Offers academics, sports, field trips and onsite activities. June 27 - July 29 www.woodland-school.org 650-854-9065

Palo Alto/Pleasanton

Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new!) Media Production. Call or visit our website for details. www.headsup.org 650-424-1267, 925-485-5750

Arts, Culture, Nature and Other Camps Camp Jano India

Mountain View/Santa Clara

Celebrate Indian culture, languages, arts, festivals, literature, cuisine, and leaders. Weekly themes are brought to life through related arts, dance, games, projects, stories and theatre in a very unique, exciting, creative, interactive, and structured style. June 13-August 5. Age 5 to 14. www.janoindia.com 650-493-1566

Camp F.U.N. (Friends with Unique Needs)

Palo Alto

A nurturing environment for kids with challenges to experience the fun of summer camp. Led by therapists at Children’s Health Council. Ages 5-12, full days, Mon-Fri, three sessions. Small groups. Financial aid available. www.chconline.org 650-688-3625

Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, American Idol Workshop, more! Two-week sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org 650-917-6800 ext. 0

Creative Arts – “Express Yourself”

Menlo Park

Riekes Summer Camps — A world of opportunity and fun-filled learning. Ages 9-18. Rock camps, Hip Hop, recording, filmmaking, animation, B&W and digital Photography, graphic arts, comic book creation, Photoshop, magazine publishing. Sessions run from June through August. www.riekes.org 650-364-2509

Nature Awareness –“Explore Our Natural World”

Menlo Park

Riekes Summer Camps — A world of opportunity and fun-filled learning. Ages 6-18 and families. Learn awareness & survival skills, explore Monterey Bay, deep redwoods & coastal marsh. Surf camp. Family Festival. AFCANA Combo Camps combining fitness, arts & nature. Sessions run from June through August. www.riekes.org 650-364-2509


(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

ART GALLERIES

‘Eye Can Dance’ Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) presents “Eye Can Dance,” an exhibition of works by Brian Caraway. The exhibition will feature paintings and mixed media. Through March 27, Free. Mohr Gallery, Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) at Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. www.arts4all.org/attend ‘Land in Color’ Palo Alto resident and pleinair artist Karen White presents “Land in Color.” Through April 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sun. free Viewpoints Gallery, 315 State St., Los Altos. Call 650-941-5789. www. viewpointsgallery.com

BENEFITS Children’s Corner Family Concert The annual family concert to benefit Children’s Corner Preschool will be held at the Los Altos Community Center and feature Jump for Joy Music and Nick Barone Puppets. A light dinner will be served. March 26, 4-6 p.m. $15 in advance and $20 at the door. Los Altos Youth Center, 1 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos. Call 650-948-8950.

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS Basic Links and Wraps Step-by-step techniques for how to form wire into loops and make wraps. Tools and materials are not included in the price. March 21, 6-8:30 p.m. $60. Global Beads, 365 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-9677556. www.globalbeads.com

CLUBS/MEETINGS Mountain View Tennis General Meeting

The Mountain View Tennis Club general meeting is open to all current members and new members are able to join the club at the event. The catered event will include a guest speaker and door prizes from local restaurants. March 23, 6-8:30 p.m. $30 for Mountain View residents and $40 nonresidents. MV Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. mvtc.net Palo Alto Scrabble Meetup A group meets to play casual games of Scrabble each Thursday, 7-9 p.m. Free. Palo Alto CafÈ, 2675 Middlefield Road, Palo Alto.

COMMUNITY EVENTS Sheep-Shearing Day Kids can watch sheep be sheared and herded by sheepdogs, and create wool crafts. March 20, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $10 per person. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org

EXHIBITS ‘An Observer’s Notebook’ Exhibition of art work by students and faculty of Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) Art4Schools program. Students from many local public and private schools will have work on display. Through March 21, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Mountain View City Hall Rotunda, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www.arts4all.org Prints and Paintings by Colleen Sullivan The Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts presents prints and paintings by local artist Colleen Sullivan. Mon., Wed. and Fri. through April 11, noon-1 p.m. Free. 500 Castro St., Mountain View. www.ci.mtnview.ca.us/ mvcpa/schedule.html

LIVE MUSIC

The Jack Conway Trio Ms. Juanita Harris and The Jack Conway Trio perform classic jazz. March 19, 8-10 p.m. Free. Dana Street Roasting Company, 744 W. Dana St., Mountain View. Call 650-823-9387. www.jackconwaytrio.com Women of Song Benefit Concert The women of Be a Dear and Donate a Brassiere, an organization dedicated to collecting undergarments for disadvantaged women, will be celebrating International Women’s Month with a benefit concert featuring The Women of Song, a group of four Bay Area singer/songwriters. March 18, 8 p.m. $10/$15. Red Rock Coffee, 201 Castro St., Mountain View.

‘Free Range Kids’ An evening with Lenore Skenazy, author of “Free Range Kids: Why Does the Idea of an Old-Fashioned Childhood Sound So Radical?” Community social at 6 p.m.; Presentation at 7 p.m. March 24, 6-8 p.m. $10 suggested donation. Christ Episcopal Church, 1040 Border Road, Los Altos. Call 650-948-2151, ext. 115. freerangekids. eventbrite.com

ON STAGE ‘BASHERT! Meant-to-Be’ “Bashert!” means “destined” in Yiddish. A new play featuring 16 true how-we-met stories from WWII to present gathered by local playwright Caryn Huberman Yacowitz. Thirteen actors, age 15 to 80, bring these stories to life in this benefit show followed by gala reception. March 20, 5-7 p.m. $25 prior/$35 at the door. Congregation Beth Am, 26790 Arastradero Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 408-374-8331. ‘Rikki Tikki Tavi’ Brave mongoose Rikki Tikki Tavi battles to keep the garden free from Cobras in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s stage adaptation of the Rudyard Kipling classic. March 25-26, See website for times. $8. Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6000. www.pytnet.org ‘Seussical Jr.’ Los Altos Youth Theatre presents “Seussical Jr.” March 11-26, March 18, 19, 25 and 26 at 7:30 p.m. March 19, 20 and 26 at

2 p.m. $10 - $15 Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-941-0551. losaltosrecreation.org ‘The Wiz ‘ Graham Middle School’s spring 2011 Musical: “The Wiz.” March 24, 25 and 26. 6:30-9 p.m. $7 youth, $10 adult. Graham Multipurpose Room, 1175 Castro St., Mountain View. graham.mvwsd.org/

OUTDOORS Wild Foods of Hidden Villa Discover some of California’s wild edible plants. Ethnobotanist Jolie Egert leads a guided walk that explores the edible plants of Hidden Villa. For ages 12 and up. March 19, 10 a.m.- noon. $20 per person. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www.hiddenvilla.org

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY ‘Holy Yoga’ This class offers a form of experiential worship; no prior experience with yoga needed. Class meets Wednesdays, 6:45-7:45 p.m. Free. Los Altos United Methodist Church , Children’s Center, 655 Magdalena Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-3839322. www.laumc.org Robert Cusick Robert Cusick has meditated since 1997 and serves as a counselor at KARA, a Palo Alto based organization that provides grief support for children and adults. March 22, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Insight Meditation South Bay St Timothy’s Episcopal Church, Edwards Hall, 2094 Grant Road, Mountain View. www.imsb.org

H ELLER I MMIGRATION L AW G ROUP Employment-based, Family/Marriage & Investor Visas

NO WORRIES.

A Full-Service Immigration Law Firm Serving the SF Bay Area & Silicon Valley for 25+ years PERM Labor Certification N EB1/NIW Self-Petitions Green Cards, H1B and Work Permits Engineers, IT/Computer fields, Scientists/Researchers HR/Corporate, Business & Individual Clients

Free Attorney Consult! 650.424.1900 N greencard1.com Nheller@greencard1.com

Now is the time to relax and enjoy life.

Call today to schedule a personal tour of our beautiful community located in the foothills where Los Altos meets Cupertino. 650-944-0190

As a resident-owned community, The Forum offers unique equity ownership and continuing care that allows you to plan for a secure future. You can retire in style with luxury living in a vibrant, friendly environment at The Forum Retirement Community. No worries.

23500 Cristo Rey Drive Cupertino, CA 95014 650-944-0100

www.theforum-seniorliving.com RCFE# 435200344 COA# 174 A Smoke Free Community MARCH 18, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com E-MAIL ads@fogster.com PHONE 650/326-8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX N BULLETIN

BOARD 100-199 N FOR SALE 200-299 N KIDS STUFF 330-399 N MIND & BODY 400-499 NJ OBS 500-599 NB USINESS SERVICES 600-699 NH OME SERVICES 700-799 NFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 800-899 NP UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997 The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors. Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media has the right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

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fogster.com THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE

Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

Bulletin Board 115 Announcements PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) Art Exhibit & Reception Bird Sitting available Co-Dependents Anonymous (CoDA)

135 Group Activities BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP CHILDREN’S ENTERTAINER www.art4growth.com

140 Lost & Found Lost Cat- Calico Lost calico, mostly white with black and orange spots. REWARD. 650-963-4955 Lost Cat- white with spots Cat lost, mostly white with spots of black and brown. Lost on Carmelita Dr, near Grant/El Camino. REWARD. (650) 996-4560 or (650)963-4955 Runaway Cat!

145 Non-Profits Needs

Donate Your Car, Truck, Boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales RWC: 1228 Douglas Ave., 3/18, 11-2; 3/19, 9-1 Big Rummage Sale benefits Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. CASH ONLY. (Just south of Woodside Rd., bet. Broadway and Bayshore Frwy.) 650/497-8332 or during sale 650/568-9840 Stanford, Arrillage Center For Sports & Recreation, 3/26-3/27

Shari’s Berries Mouthwatering gourmet strawberry gifts fresh for all occasions! 100% satisfaction guaranteed. Delivered nationwide. SAVE 20% on Dipped Berries! Visit www.berries.com/berries or Call 1-888-903-2988. (Cal-SCAN) Vonage Phone Service Unlimited Calls in U.S. and 60 Countries! No annual contract. $14.99 For 3 Months! Then ONLY $25.99/mo. Plus FREE Activation. Call 877-881-2318. (Cal-SCAN) Wine of the Month Club Send the gift of wine all year long! 2 Bottles each month from award-winning wineries around the world. Call 888-682-7982 and get FREE SHIPPING! (Cal-SCAN) 4 large mature Cymbidium Orchids - $1

DONATE YOUR UNWANTED CELL PHONES

215 Collectibles & Antiques

Donations Needed!

1930’s Style Mickey Mouse Framed - $5.00

BARGAIN BONANZA - $1

Knitters Wanted

Antique Milk Shake Mixer - $20.00

BASS ALE BEER TAP HANDLE:

Palo Alto Stories

please donate your used books

Disney’s Donald Duck Framed 50’s - $25.00

CANON CHARGER & 4L BATTERY - $15.00

Sahaja Meditation Free Workshop

150 Volunteers

Fun! Org. 1951 Home Repairs Mag - $6.00

Canon 35 MM Camera - $40.00

Fun! Org. 1952 Build It Yourself - $25.00

Community Cell Phone Collectors

CRUTCHES: Adj. Aluminum Lg.

Gorham Flatware set - $4500.00

130 Classes & Instruction

CRYSTAL DECANTER: Signed

feed homeless cats (PA or MV)

MANY ANTIQUES AND VINTAGE CHEAP - $1

FREE FIREWOOOD & MULCH

Library Volunteers Needed

Mickey Mouse Holiday Animation - $30.00

IRRESISTIBLE COLLECTION - $1

Airlines Are Hiring! Go to aviation maintenance college for free! Tuition paid for the best. H.S. Grad w/good grades and proven work history. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866) 859-6378. (Cal-SCAN)

Mentors Needed

Org. 1942 Make 14 Lamp Bases Mag - $6.00

Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura. us.com (Cal-SCAN)

155 Pets

MEETING ROOM AVAILABLE Private room in business setting. Plenty of parking. Convenient and quiet. Perfect for conferences, classes, networking groups, large or small meetings. Room set up can be customized for your needs. For info and pictures: clocktowercoffee.com

Free DVD Free Movies and Games on Gudagi Free Reiki to the community! Huge Used Book Sale March 12-13

Spring Down Horse Show March 6th

High School Diploma Graduate in 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www. SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN) HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www.continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

Museum Volunteers NASA cats need fosterers Nature Volunteer in Schools

Adopt a AKC White Labrador Puppy AKC Boxer puppies 1 Brindle & 2 red fawns,first two rounds of shots,all papers 408-406-4696 $700.00 each AKC white labrador puppies for sale Family oriented, mellow, pure breed. Born 1/8/2011 Call: 650-947-1254 Lost Cat- white with spots Lost Calico, mostly white with black and brown spots, dark tail. Short-hair. May have blue collar. (650) 996-4560 or (650) 963-4955.

GERMAN Language Class Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

133 Music Lessons A Piano Teacher Children & Adults Ema Currier (650)493-4797 Barton-Holding Music Studio Next 6 week “singing for the non-singer” class starts Jan. 13. Call Laura Barton 650/965-0139

Org. 1960’s Mary Poppkins Book - $6.00 Org. Disneys Donald Duck Straws - $20.00 Org.Star Wars 8 x10 Autograph - $25.00 Rare! 35 Years Disneyland Watch - $65.00 Rare! Disneyland Light Bulb - $20.00 Rare! Org. 30’s D. Duck Glass - $25.00 SHOT GLASS CHECKERS: 25 Pcs. SPORTS MEMORABILIA: 80s-’10 Vintage Bakelite Purse - $30 VINTAGE ROCK T-SHIRTS: 80s Vintage Treasure Market 2011 - $5/ticket We Are Hiring (jawad0321) - 123 We Are Hiring (syedali) - 1234567890

220 Computers/ Electronics Asian Scales. Looking For Franch - $70 HANDSFREE HEADSET: 2.5mm

For Sale 201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts BMW 1995 540i - $ 3750 Chevrolet 1974 Camaro - $6000

FUN Piano Voice Violin Guitar Guitar Lessons 650-224-3550 beg/int all styles your home $60 Hope Street Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650) 961-2192

HDMI CABLE FOR BLUE RAY NEW - $15.00 IBM Selectric II Typewriter - $350 LASER PRINTER/COPIER: Xerox

235 Wanted to Buy Diabetic Test Strips Wanted. Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don't throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN)

60s-70s Toys: Star Wars Back Pack - Jansport - $30.00

Mixed Firewood-Seasoned & Split - $150. POSTERS: French Movie, Batman Pre-Teen Girls Clothing - $2.00 or L Stetson Western Hats - $35.00 Telephoto Camera Case - $25.00 VINTAGE VINYL: Elec./Rock/DJ Western Boots - $55-$100 Whacker-Compactor - $ 750

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment

350 Preschools/ Schools/Camps Horseback Riding Camps & Lessons Webb Ranch (650)854-7755

355 Items for Sale 4 YearsSnowsuit Really warm $20 4Y Boy winterclothes30+items $40 Art classes/Art Parties Art classes/Easter Workshops Baby comforter/blankets2bags BOY 18mon clothes 30+items ELMO talking plush chair$15 Girl toysBratz,Barbie dressup$10 Jackets6mon-3 years$5 Stuffed animals 2 bags full$20 Toys for baby 6mon-3yearsBagfull VHS VideosThomas,Ninja,Boyvideos

420 Healing/ Bodywork Remote Energy Healing Repair tears in energy field, charge chakras, remove negative energy, toxins, static electrics, heavy metals. Restore Physical body frequencies. Psychic clearing. ACamurlu@gmail.com 973.931.7137 (AAN CAN)

425 Health Services Acorn Stairlifts Trouble getting up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help if you Call Now! Discounts available on your new Acorn Stairlift. Please mention this ad. 1-877-896-8396. (Cal-SCAN) Toren Psychological Services - $800 to $1200 for a

German Hiking Boots (Men) - $45.00 OBO GRAPHITE TENNIS RACQUET SOFTBALL BAT: Ten Pro Alumin THREE RACQUETBALL RACQUETS:

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered

2 Teak Armchairs - $700

After School Care/Driver Avail

2-4 poster, cannonball twin beds - $200.00

Are you looking for mature Nanny

Cherry Dining Table w/ 6 Chairs - $350

Debbie’s Family Day Care - RWC

Futon mattress and wood frame - $185

EXPERIENCED, LOVING NANNY

Girls Bedroom Furniture - $350.00

Little Ages

Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529

Infiniti 2008 EX35 Journey 11’460 mile ultraGentlyUsed garagd incl nuGarminGPS 650-868-0608

Lenox Solitaire Platinum-Banded - $ varies

NannySitter Available

NICE WOOD STORAGE BOXES - $50

Sweet and Outgoing Babysitter

Porthole Clock - $100.00

Manzana Music School Lessons in Palo Alto on Guitar, Violin, Vocals, Fiddle, Banjo, or Mandolin. Call us at: 650 799-7807 www.ManzanaMusicSchool.com

202 Vehicles Wanted

Queen Futon. Hardwood Frame - $95

Top Nanny for Hire Excel. refs. 650/233-9778

Singer Sewing Machine - $175.00

Violin Teacher

245 Miscellaneous

McCool Piano Studio 566-9391MP Near Burgess Gym Menlo Park

Donate Vehicle Receive $1000 Grocery Coupons, Your Choice. Noah's Arc, No Kill Animal Shelters. Advanced Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, IRS Tax Deduction. NonRunners. 1-866-912-GIVE. (Cal-SCAN)

340 Child Care Wanted

Piano Lessons Taught in your home. Member MTAC & NGPT. Specializing in beginners. All levels welcome. Karen, (650)367-0307 or

Donate Your Car Children's Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child's Life Through Research and Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy and Tax Deductible. Call 1-800-252-0615. (Cal-SCAN)

FOGSTER.COM

Stanford-Educated Expert Tutors

FISHING ROD & REEL COMBO

240 Furnishings/ Household items

FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-904-3558 (AAN CAN)

One-to-One Tutoring Service

Nanny needed in Menlo Park

345 Tutoring/ Lessons Chess Lessons for kids and adult French,Spanish Lesns. 6506919863

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Administrative Associate Housekeeper Happy disposition for happy family. Exp, strong wk ethic, eye for detail, organized, refined, smart, flnt Eng, fine laundress. Local wk refs. M-F, 9-5, Woodside. Excl. salary. Fax resumes 650-851-4433

550 Business Opportunities All Cash Vending Route Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN) IN NEED OF A BOOK KEEPER The services of a book keeper is needed on part time basis.Interested applicants only contact Mr Pettie for details: Email: pettieling01@gmx.com

PLACE AN AD ONLINE: fogster.com E-MAIL: ads@fogster.com PHONE: 650/326-8216

GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011


MARKETPLACE the printed version of

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM 560 Employment Information $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) Computer Work Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847. (Cal-SCAN) Drivers - 17 Needed Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits. New Trucks Ordered! Need CDL-A and 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www.MeltonTruck.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers - New Pay Package Hiring Class-A CDL Flatbed Drivers for Regional and OTR Lanes. Solos, O/OP's and Teams. Top Pay, Great Equipment. 1-888-801-5614. www.SystemTrans.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers - Teams or Solos looking to Team. $2,000 sign on bonus for OTR teams, pet program, 1,500+ Avg. Length of Haul, and much more! 1-866-2327399. www.SoCalDrivers.com (Cal-SCAN) Drivers: Paid Training and a Stable Career! No Credit Check! No Experience required! Trainers Earn 49c/ MILE! 1-888-417-7564. CRST EXPEDITED www.JoinCRST.com (Cal-SCAN) Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) Sales: Guys and Gals 18+ Travel the country while selling our Orange peel product. Training, Hotel and Transportation provided. Daily cash draws. Apply today leave tomorrow. 1-888-872-7577. (Cal-SCAN)

Business Services 602 Automotive Repair

Classified Advertising 240 California community newspapers reaching over 6 million Californians. 25-words $550 works out to 18 cents cost per thousand! FREE email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SCAN.com (Cal-SCAN)

650 Pet Care/ Grooming/Training

615 Computers Boomer Vengeance Give PC’s a chance! We offer technical support for baby boomers and beyond. Networking, problem troubleshooting, software install/uninstall, virus removal and much more! Personalized documentation. Satisfaction guaranteed. 855.4.I.DIG.IT (855.443.4448) boomervengeance.com.

624 Financial Investor Wanted $35,000 needed for computer start up located in Redwood City. Call Patrick 415-283-9117 Note Investment 6 percent ret., paid monthly, 50%LTV, secured on Woodside income property. Owner/agent Jim 650-851-7300

645 Office/Home Business Services Advertising - Best Kept Secret A business card sized display ad 140 California community newspapers. Reach 3 million+ Californians. Cost $1,550.$1.33 cost per thousand. Free brochure (916)288-6019; www.Cal-SDAN.com (Cal-SCAN)

FOGSTER.COM

751 General Contracting

Beckys Landscape Weeding, weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree prune, clean ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Demolition, excavation. Driveway, patio, deck installs. Power washing. 650/493-7060

All Animals Happy House Pet Sitting Services by Susan Licensed, insured, refs. 650-323-4000

Home Services 703 Architecture/ Design Design/Permits One stop for your remodel/design needs. Comp. plans incl structural engineering and energy compliance (T-24). ADW 650-969-4980

710 Carpentry Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

715 Cleaning Services AC Housecleaning Residential/Commercial. Move in/ out, offices, more. Good rates. 11 years exp. Please call 650/678-4792. www.achousecleaning.com

Asuncion Yanet House Cleaning ! !!       

650-906-7712 or 650-630-3279

Francisca’s Deep Housecleaning Experienced, Refs. 650-669-0628 or 650-701-0703 Marlem HouseCleaning House, Condos, Apartments, Office, Move-in, Move-Out, Free Estimates. Good References. “Serving All The Bay Area� 650-380-4114 or 650-389-3327

Bedford Autobody AUTO ACCIDENT? SMASH! OOPS! CRUNCH! NEED HELP? GET 20% OFF CALL 650-961-4100 WWW.BEDFORDAUTOBODY.COM

748 Gardening/ Landscaping

Olga’s Housecleaning Res./Com. Wkly/mo. Low Rates. Local Refs. 25 years Exp. & Friendly. I love My Job! Ins. (650)380-1406

Orkopina Housecleaning “The BEST Service for You� Bonded

Since 1985

Insured

%TrustworthyDetailed %Laundry,Linens %WW#Blinds % " " !  Clean-up % #Wash %  Work

(650)962-1536- Lic. 020624

www.orkopinacleaningservice.com

VICTOR’S CLEANING

Residential & Commercial Affordable Rates - Free Estimates We provide all supplies Weekly — Bi-Weekly — Monthly

650-279-5978/650-930-0064 719 Remodeling/ Additions Domicile Construction, Inc.

General Contractor T 415 999-3143 650 366-8335 www.domicileconstructioninc.com since 1990 lic #627843

730 Electrical Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

fogster.com

Jody Horst

Artist

856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080

NOTICE TO READERS It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb. ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION $ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $! www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti    "

(650) 799-5521

JR’s Garden Maintenance Residential clean up, trimming, new lawn and sprinkler installations. 16 yrs exp. Great refs. Jose, 650-743-0397 LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maintenance*New Lawns*Clean Ups*Tree Trimming*Wood Fences* Power Washing. 17 years experience. Senior Discount 650-576-6242 Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477. Mario’s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. Free est. 650/365-6955; 995-3822

Creating Gardens of Distinction SINCE 1980

LIC# 354206

             ďŹ  

       

650-208-3891

WWW.PTALAND.COM

LANDSCAPE CONSTRUCTION R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859

Sam’s Garden Service

                  

(650)969-9894 Cherish Your Garden

Shubha Landscape Design, Inc. (650) 321-1600

LIC #852075

QDInstallation S P alkways DArborLighting IFGardening www.ShubhaLandscapeDesign.com Uriel’s Gardening Clean up, haul, maint., poison oak, free est. 650/862-1378 Uriel Vidal Gardening & Landscaping Bi-Weekly, twice a month clean up. Tree removal. Fences, retaining walls, new lawn irrigation systems. Gutter cleaning. Free est., excel. refs. 650-771-0213 WEEKLY MAINTENANCE TRIMMING/ PRUNING, TREE SERVICE, STUMP GRINDING, CLEAN UPS, AERATION, IRRIGATION, ROTOTILLING. ROGER: 650.776.8666

IT’S EASY TO PLACE YOUR AD VIA THE INTERNET. JUST GO TO —

www.MountainViewOnline.com

A Junk Hauling Service Residential & Commercial. Yard clean-up service. Large & Small jobs. 650-771-0213 Frank’s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

650-322-7930 PL/PD STATE LIC# 608358

www.cjtigheconstruction.com Gary’s Remodel Kitchen & bath remodels + more http://www.garysremodel.com/ (408) 720-0800

754 Gutter Cleaning O.K.’s Raingutter Service

757 Handyman/ Repairs AAA HANDYMAN AND MORE

Repair        

Lic.# 468963

Since 1976 Licensed & Insured

650-222-2517

ABLE HANDYMAN FRED CompleteHomeRepair Maintenanc  emodelin ProfessionalPainting Carpentr Plumbing Electrical CustomCabineDesign Deckence  AnMuchMore 30 Years Experience

650.529.1662 3.27

HANDY

“Ed� MAN

 $!$   #$$ #"#! FREE ESTIMA     

ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274 Small Jobs Welcome Local, refs., 25 years exp., trusted, reliable. 650/218-8181

759 Hauling a J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, appliances, garage, storage, etc, clean-ups. Old furniture, green waste and yard junk. Licensed & insured. FREE ESTIMATES 650/368-8810

A

J O H N STO N

70% Recycled

LARGE TRUCKS ,&(,'*-Trees LARGE/small JOBS Free Estimate Insured

650-327-HAUL 415-999-0594

cell:

HAULING 

Are You Value Affordablility More Important That Safety? New Construction Means Stronger, Safer Structure, Built Per New Codes!, 2 BR/2.5 BA Negotiable Atherton, 4 BR/3 BA Furnished,available 4/1-5/31. Furnished, 2 BR/1 BA - $2975month

767 Movers Armandos Moving Homes, Apartments, Storage. Full Service moves. Serving the Bay Area for 20 yrs. Licensed & Insured. Armando, 650-630-0424. CAL-T190632

SHMOOVER

MOOVERS LICENSE CAL. T-118304

Serving the Peninsula since 1975/Owner-Operated!

Great Location, New Spacious Palo Alto 2+ Br/2.5 Ba New Duplex Home For Rent , 2 BR/2.5 BA - New Constr Great Location, New Spacious Palo Alto 2+ Br/2.5 Ba New Duplex Home For Rent, 2 BR/2.5 BA - Negotiable Midtown Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA Negotiable Pal Alto, 4 BR/2 BA - $3700. Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $ 4000/mon

327-5493 771 Painting/ Wallpaper Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292 STYLE PAINTING Comm’l/Res. Full service painting and decorating. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

Since1990!

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS          

805 Homes for Rent

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

779 Organizing Services End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

787 Pressure Washing Discount Pressure Washing Decks * Patios * Driveways Becky, 650/493-7060

790 Roofing Al Peterson Roofing since 1946

Specializing in  ng        

650-493-9177

795 Tree Care

Palo Alto

TREE SERVICE

             25 yrs ExpLic & Ins. #819244 (650) 380-2297

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios

Palo Alto, 5+ BR/2.5 BA 6k/month. No Pets/smk,650-248-9378 Redwood City, 2 BR/1 BA - $1895/mo

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

810 Cottages for Rent Los Altos, 1 BR/1 BA Garden cottage close to downtown Los Altos. Incl. all utilities, garbage, cableready, street parking. Extra storeroom. No pets. Available now. 1 month’s rent sec. deposit. Call 650-949-1752 email pbekker@aol.com Redwood City, 1 BR/1 BA The ultimate getaway to call HOME! This sunlit 1br-1ba Au Pair is located on a huge tree covered site in beautiful Emerald Hills.Enjoy the country breeze as you sit on your own private deck, at your private entrance. Enjoy scenic views of the Hills above Redwood City. New Refrigerator, Washer & Dryer Conveniently located in a serene,quite,neighborhood in the Roy Cloud School District on Vernal Road near Lakeview! Easy access to Highway 280 from Farm Hill Blvd. Cat considered with pet deposit.For more info call 408.209.6424 acci4700@gmail.com Woodside, 1 BR/1 BA Guest house central Woodside. Great views. W/D, garage. Incl. utilities, pool, tennis ct., security, cleaning dep. Year lease. $2300 mo. Refs, credit report. 650-851-1683

815 Rentals Wanted ESTATE CARETAKER NOW AVAILABLE Long-Term Rental Needed Nice Tenant &or Caretaker - $1000

820 Home Exchanges FULLY FURNISHED NEW 2 BEDROOM/2 NEW 2 BEDROOM/2 New luxury executive duplex home

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Belmont, 4 BR/3 BA - $969,000 Mountain View, 3 BR/2 BA - $108000 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $1,098,000 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $998,000 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $1,299,000

Menlo Park, 2 BR/1 BA - $1,780/mon

Palo Alto, 5+ BR/3.5 BA - $1,988,000

Mountain View, 1 BR/1 BA - 1195.00 /m

840 Vacation Rentals/Time Shares

Palo Alto , 2 BR/2.5 BA - Negotiable Palo Alto, 2 BR/1 BA - $1895/mo Palo Alto, 3 BR/3 BA - $3950 Redwood City - Farm Hills, 3 BR/ 2 BA Remodeled first floor condo on culde-sac w/ convenient access to 280. No pets, non-smokers. $2,500/mo. 650-743-7359

803 Duplex Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - Negotiable

Timeshares: Sell/Rent for cash!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/ Rent Your Unused Timeshare for Cash! Over $95 Million Dollars offered in 2010! www.SellaTimeshare.com (877) 554-2098 (Cal-SCAN) Monterey Dunes Beach House 650-598-7047 Northstar Tahoe Family Retreat 5Br 650-598-7057

Sunnyvale Sixplex, 2 BR/1 BA - $1200. mon

MARCH 18, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

21


MARKETPLACE the printed version of

fogster.com

1VCMJD/PUJDFT 995 Fictitious Name Statement MIDTOWN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 548830 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Midtown Engineering and Surveying at 501 Moorpark Way, Space 127, Moutain View, CA 94041, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): KENNETH K. YANG 501 Moorpark Way, Space 127 Mountain View, CA 94041 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on June 2002. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on March 7, 2011. (Voice March 11, 18, 25, Apr. 1, 2011) MIXEDESIGNS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 548598 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Mixedesigns at 100 N. Whisman Road, Apt # 4011, Mountain View, CA 94043, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): JOANA VIEIRA DE MAGALHAES 100 N. Whisman Road, Apt #4011 Mountain View, CA 94043 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 1st. March 2011. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on March 1, 2011. (Voice March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2011)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 10-0152410 Title Order No. 10-8544609 APN No. 189-22-063-00 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 12/18/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by E. VON KOESTNER, dated 12/18/2007 and recorded 12/27/07, as Instrument No. 19693959, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office

of the County Recorder of Santa Clara County, State of California, will sell on 04/01/2011 at 10:00AM, At the Market Street entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 190 North Market Street , San Jose, Santa Clara County, CA at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any of the real property described above is purported to be: 1812 FORDHAM WAY, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA, 94040. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $904,787.74. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. DATED: 03/01/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281 8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.128153 3/04, 3/11, 3/18/2011 Voice

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

It’s all at your ďŹ ngertips: MountainViewOnline.com/real_estate Mounta

LIFELONG MOUNTAIN VIEW RESIDENT & AREA SPECIALIST

Call Alicia Santillan (650) 326-8210 x6578 ĂŒÂœĂŠ>ĂƒĂƒÂˆĂƒĂŒĂŠĂžÂœĂ•ĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂžÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŠÂ?i}>Â?ĂŠ>`Ă›iĂ€ĂŒÂˆĂƒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠÂ˜ii`ĂƒÂ°

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  MARCH 18, 2011

Open Sunday 2-4

DIANE SCHMITZ Realtor (650) 947-2955 www.DianeSchmitz.com dianeschmitz@serenogroup.com

Open Sunday 1:30-4:30

OLIVE TREE, LAH

 $ 0,



DRE # 01235034

An unwavering commitment to excellence in service

GRANGER AVE, LA

CHURIN DR, MV

  

  

Open Sat / Sun 1:30-4:30

Shelly Potvin, M.A. 650.917.7994 spotvin@cbnorcal.com

www.ShellyPotvin.com

LIME DRIVE, SUNNYVALE # ++1#,  $"#)+#)) Open Sunday 1:30-4:30

W. EDITH, LA  

Do You Know?

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HANS AVENUE, MOUNTAIN VIEW . ,-+% $"#)+#))(+(-0(

OPEN SUNDAY

UĂŠĂŠ/Â…iĂŠÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ6ˆiĂœĂŠ6œˆViĂŠÂˆĂƒĂŠ>`Â?Ă•`ˆV>ĂŒi`ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠ ÂŤĂ•LÂ?ÂˆĂƒÂ…ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒĂžĂŠÂœvĂŠ->Â˜ĂŒ>ĂŠ Â?>Ă€>° UĂŠĂŠ"ÕÀÊ>`Â?Ă•`ˆV>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂˆÂ˜VÂ?Ă•`iĂƒĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠˆ`‡*iÂ˜ÂˆÂ˜ĂƒĂ•Â?>ĂŠ VÂœÂ“Â“Ă•Â˜ÂˆĂŒÂˆiĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœ]ĂŠ-ĂŒ>˜vÂœĂ€`]ĂŠÂœĂƒĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂƒĂŠ >˜`ĂŠÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ6ˆiĂœÂ° UĂŠĂŠ/Â…iĂŠÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ6ˆiĂœĂŠ6œˆViĂŠÂŤĂ•LÂ?ÂˆĂƒÂ…iĂƒĂŠiĂ›iÀÞÊĂ€Âˆ`>Þ°

Open Sat / Sun 1-4

21675 Regnart Road , Cupertino Beautiful hill views in desirable west of Bubb neighborhood. Newly remodeled over 2300 sq.ft. home. Three spacious bedrooms plus a master suite. Excellent Cupertino Schools.

Offered at $1,328,000

TERRI COUTURE

Coldwell Banker   $IRECTs  &AX terri.couture@cbnorcal.com www.terricouture.com

LYELL ST, LOS ALTOS

OWENS CT. MV

    

  

 ‡/26$/726   ‡/26*$726  ‡6$5$72*$   ‡6$17$&58= WWW.SERENOGROUP.COM #$,$(!)+'-$)(0,,.**&$ 1+ &$& ,).+ ,& ,,,)$-  &$ / ,-#$, $(!)+'-$)(-) )++ -.-#,()-/ +$2 -#$,$(!)+'-$)((,,.' ,()& "& + ,*)(,$$&$-1!)+$-,.+1.1 +,,#).&$(/ ,-$"- -# , $,,. ,-)-# $+)0( ,-$,!-$)( + ()+).*  




        

INCREASE YOUR EXPOSURE

3412 CHURIN DRIVE, MTN VIEW N E PE SAL

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WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS

Is Quality Important to You? of Two! r e w o P e Th LOVELY RANCH STYLE HOME IN WAVERLY PARK!

Get your name known in the community. Showcase your listings to thousands of potential buyers and sellers.

Call Rosemary at the

o o o o o o o  #!  % """#!

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Direct (650) 947-4694 Cell (650) 302-4055 DRE# 01255661

650-964-6300

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INTERO REAL

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BETH TOMPKINS (650) 947-2907 beth@serenogroup.com www.bethtompkins.com  

Nobody Knows Your Neighborhood Like Your Neighbor

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COMING SOON!

MOUNTAIN LAUREL COURT

Want Results? Call Howard! PENDING SALE With 6 Offers

937 San Clemente Way, Mountain View

Highly desired West Court Townhome Gorgeous 2 bedroom home with soaring vaulted ceilings, huge master suite and much more coming soon. Open oor plan of this unit is ideal for casual or formal entertaining. Well maintained West Court complex with pool and spa is located just minutes form Google, Microsoft, downtown Mountain View, Caltrain, parks and many local restaurants.

PENDING SALE With 8 Offers

1875 San Luis Ave, Mountain View

KEVIN KLEMM

Offered at $549,900

diamondcertiďŹ ed.org

650.269.6964

kevin.klemm@cbnorcal.com DRE# 01857018

Offered at $760,000

Mountain View Educational Foundation

Member of the Realtor Advisory Council for the MVEF’s Realtors for the World Ahead Program

650 947 4780 HBloom@InteroRealEstate.com www.HowardBloom.com DRE# 00893793 MARCH 18, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

23


Vicki Geers

Fabulous Listings by Vicki Geers

161 S. Antonio Road, Los ALtos 650.917.7983 vicki@vickigeers.com

SE OU :30 N H :30-4 E OP AY 1 ND SU

Tree Top Hideaway With Amazing Windows...5/6 bedroom, 4 bath home on nearly 1.25 acres tucked into a private cul de sac. Unique home with walls of windows and glass ceilings capturing gorgeous views. Private ofďŹ ce with impressive built-ins and panoramic views. Downstairs level with exible rooms including bed/bath. Deck access from nearly all rooms and skylights throughout. Curved windows, glorious sunroom, red oak ooring. Park-like setting with seasonal creek. Palo Alto schools and bus stop down the street to Gunn high. Offered at $2,695,000

Wonderful Home Offers Everything...Completely updated home! 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, granite and cherrywood kitchen with top appliances, bay windows, skylights, custom window treatments, new roof, a/c, tankless water heater. Fab entertainment system with drop down screen, projector and surround sound. Expanded master with sitting area and huge jetted tub. Everything you need is done! Wonderful backyard with new landscaping, lawn, deck, patio, and perfect area for a play structure. Stocklemeir Elementary and Cupertino Middle Schools. Offered at $995,000

27729 Briones Court, Los Altos Hills

SE OU 4:30 N H 1:30E OP SUN & A S T

574 Belfast Court, Sunnyvale

SE OU 4:30 N H 1:30E OP SUN & A S T

12374 Melody Lane, Los Altos Hills

11824 Hilltop Drive, Los Altos Hills

N

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M

CO

Ideal Location, Tons Of Potential...Lovely pastoral home on a cul de sac with city lights views. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 bath on an acre lot. Updated with fresh paint, new carpeting, sunny kitchen with a breakfast bay and access to a covered patio. Spacious bedrooms, family room with built ins, huge living room/dining room ensemble, and views of your verdant grounds. UnďŹ nished lower level is totally customizable to your needs. Expansive backyard is a landscaper’s dream! This home offers a wonderful Hills location with access to the best of Los Altos. 4,348 sq. ft. home approximately. Top Los Altos Schools. Offered at $2,195,000

Great Horse Property...Nature and animal lover’s dream home! 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths spread over 2 levels on an acre + lot. ReďŹ nished wood oors, 3 ďŹ replaces, 2 family rooms, remodeled kitchen, cathedral ceilings, new driveway and front decking. Sunroom with amazing treetop and hill views. Beautiful master with updated bath. Lavish use of stonework throughout. Large bonus room with wet bar. Nestled in an oak grove with horse corrals and possible stables. Abundant land to use as you desire. Ideal home for those looking for an escape from the daily pace. 3,360 sq. ft. home approx. Top Los Altos Schools Offered at $2,195,000

BY APPOINTMENT

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:30 – 4:30 P.M.

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:30 – 4:30 P.M.

OPEN SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:30 – 4:30 P.M.

716 N. San Antonio Road, LOS ALTOS

1070 Nottingham Way, LOS ALTOS

325 Pettis Avenue, MOUNTAIN VIEW

232 Delphi Circle, LOS ALTOS

s "EAUTIFULCUSTOMHOMEBUILTIN

s #USTOM BUILTHOMEINTHE(IGHLANDS

s 3TUNNINGCUSTOMHOMEAPPROX SQFT

s 3TUNNINGREMODELEDHOMEWITH%UROPEANAMBIANCE

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s 3EPARATE BEDROOMGUESTHOUSEWITHKITCHEN

s $ESIGNER APPOINTEDTHROUGHOUT

s ,EVELLOTOFAPPROX SQFT

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s &RONTANDREARTERRACES SPARKLINGPOOLANDSPA s $ESIRABLE.ORTH,OS!LTOS ACCESSTOTOPSCHOOLS

Offered at $1,378,000 www.325PettisAve.com

10 0

YTD 3/15/10

YTD 3/15/11

$0.5 $0

YTD 3/15/10

YTD 3/15/11

11

12

6 3 0

YTD 3/15/10

YTD 3/15/11

$3.0

Average Price

$2.5 $2.0 $1.5 $1.0 $0.5 $0

YTD 3/15/10

–––– MOUNTAIN VIEW –––– 40 35 30

Number of Sales

38 31

25 20 15 10 5

YTD 3/15/11

0

YTD 3/15/10

YTD 3/15/11

Average Price

$1.0 $0.8 $0.6 $0.4

$990,855

$1.0

9

Number of Sales

$894,516

31

20

12

$2,755,472

30

$1.5

–––– LOS ALTOS HILLS ––––

Average Price

$1,594,996

42

$2.0

$1,593,984

YEAR-TO-DATE

40

Number of Sales AVERAGE PRICE IN MILLIONS

Our Markets

50

$2,268,318

–––– LOS ALTOS ––––

A Look at

Offered at $2,798,000 www.232DelphiCircle.com

AVERAGE PRICE IN MILLIONS

Offered at $2,598,000 www.1070NottinghamWay.com

AVERAGE PRICE IN MILLIONS

Offered at $2,695,000 www.716NorthSanAntonio.com

$0.2 $0

YTD 3/15/10

YTD 3/15/11

650.947.4798

Pam@PamBlackman. com www. PamBlackman. com INTERO CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE, TOP 1%

24

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  MARCH 18, 2011

DRE# 00584333

496 First Street, Suite 200 Los Altos, CA 94022 Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.


{S O L D} OFFERED AT $785,000

3 BEDS

2.5 BATHS

2 0 8 0 M A R I C H W AY # 2 2 M O U N TA I N V I E W

2-STORY TOWNHOME

DAV I D T R OY E R #1 AGENT 2010: combined sales in MV, LA & LAH*

APPROX. 1,667 SQ. FT.

 % %  # " $      ! !

MARCH 18, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

25


Coming on the market next week‌

AT &

S OPEN

S

:30 UN 1

0

– 4:3

Open Sat. 26th & Sun. 27th 1:30 to 4:30

Charming home in Downtown Mountain View Located on a block of delightful homes only a short stroll from the Library and other downtown attractions this home offers two bedrooms, one bathroom, dining nook with cottage style windows, living room with bay window, front sitting porch, a one car “pass-through� garage and best of all, a HUGE back yard!

2503 Alvin Street, Mountain View 1 1 1 1

Desirable Monta Loma Neighborhood 1 Floor-to-ceiling windows and fireplace in living room Classic Eichler, contemporary design 1 Located near shopping, commute Updated kitchen and baths routes, train station, and not far Large, private lot with lush garden from Downtown! views

3 Bdrm/2 Bath Offered at $780,000

Move in and enjoy, or build your dream home!

Offered As-Is at $595,000

Tori Ann Corbett

Broker Associate 650.996.0123 | DRE # 00927794 www.ToriSellsRealEstate.com

Mountain View Neighborhood Specialist

650.575.8300

web: www.nancystuhr.com

Calif. DRE 00963170

277 HANS AVENUE, MOUNTAIN VIEW Lis t Pr ice $ 899, 000 "EAUTIFULBEDROOMBATHROOMHOMEIN-OUNTAIN6IEWlS SOUGHTAFTER#UESTA0ARKNEIGHBORHOODCLOSETOPARKS TENNIS SHOPPING THE9-#! "UBB%LEMENTARY3CHOOL!0) SCORE ANDOFCOURSENEARBYDOWNTOWN-OUNTAIN6IEW ,ARGE PRIVATEREARYARDWITHLAWNPATIOAREA-ANYUPGRADES INCLUDEADELIGHTFULLYUPDATEDKITCHENWITHSPARKLINGGRANITE COUNTERTOPS NEWSTAINLESSSTEELAPPLIANCESANDINFORMAL DININGAREA$UALPANEWINDOWSTHROUGHOUTANDNEWROOF INSTALLEDIN$ECEMBER o o o o o

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MICHAEL ADAMS (650) 947-7100 www.Adams321.com

O PEN S AT & S U N 1 - 4

michael@adams321.com $2%

C ALL US TODAY FOR A FREE MARKETING ANALYSIS OF YOUR HOME - 650 947 7100

TIM PROSCHOLD tim@adams321.com $2%

www.HomesofMountainView.com | www.CuestaPark.com | www.VarsityPark.com | www.OldMountainView.com | www.WaverlyPark.com 4HISINFORMATIONWASSUPPLIEDBYRELIABLESOURCES3ALES!SSOCIATEBELIEVESTHISINFORMATIONTOBECORRECTBUTHASNOTVERIÙEDTHISINFORMATIONANDASSUMESNOLEGALRESPONSIBILITYFORITSACCURACY"UYERSSHOULDINVESTIGATETHESEISSUESTOTHEIROWNSATISFACTION

26

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  MARCH 18, 2011


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27


n Su

:30 0-4 1:3

n Su

SUNNYVALE

3 BR | 2 BA

0 -4:3 :30 1 un t/S Sa

:30 0-4 1:3

PALO ALTO

2 BR | 1 BA

PALO ALTO

4 BR | 3 BA

1342 ELEANOR WAY $740,000 Ideal for large family, in-laws, or live in main house and collect rent from sep units.

1549 ALMA ST $850,000 Secluded Private Home in the Walter Hays Elem District. Fenced Yard, Hwd Flrs, Fireplace

872 CLARA DR $1,888,000 Stunning Meditteranean built in '06. Located on tree-lined street in Midtown.

Melanie Johnson

Leannah Hunt & Laurel Robinson

Sharon Witte

650.941.7040

650.325.6161

:30 0-4 3 : n1 Su

:30 0-4 3 : t1 Sa

MOUNTAIN VIEW

2 BR | 1 BA

1685 CALIFORNIA ST $769,000 Meticulously updated bungalow with gorgeous eat-in kitchen. Close to Castro St. and train. Barb Zuckerwise

:30 0-4 3 : n1 Su

MOUNTAIN VIEW

2 BR | 2.5 BA

108 BRYANT ST #44 $619,000 Beautiful End Unit Condo located 1 Block off Castro Street. Alan Huwe

650.948.0456

650.325.6161

CUPERTINO 21675 REGNART RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.325.6161

LOS ALTOS HILLS

5 BR | 4 BA

12374 MELODY LN $2,695,000 Rare! Over 5,000 newly remodeled at end of a cul de sac on over 1 acre! Palo Alto schls Vicki Geers

LOS ALTOS HILLS 10831 MORA DR $1,328,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

MOUNTAIN VIEW PALO ALTO 1678 BEGEN AV 2150 BRYANT ST $1,199,950 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,999,000 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.941.7040

SAN JOSE 112 S 3RD ST $4,995,000 SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$418,000

4 BR 2.5 BA Nice hill views in desirable west 3 BR 2.5 BA Approximately 2800 sq. ft. on 1 4 BR 2.5 BA MUST SEE! One story remodeled 4 BR 3.5 BA Stunning home on approx 10,000sf 2 BR 2.5 BA 2-story end unit.2 Master suites. of Bubb neighborhood.3 new baths.Excellent acre.3 Bedrooms,2.5 baths + Large Family Room Cuesta Park home with Chef's kitchen. lot in Old Palo Alto. Formal LR & DR. Granite kitchen counter tops.Gas frpl LR.Inside Pooneh Fouladi 650.325.6161 schools Mickey Shaevitz & Ellen Barton 650.941.7040 Zach Trailer 650.325.6161 laundry. Terri Couture 650.941.7040 0 EASTBROOK AV SPRING INTO ACTION! $965,000 509 HALE ST Karen Quaid 650.941.7040 3 BR 2 BA Private paradise-delightfully remodeled SAT/SUN 10 - 6 $1,795,000 & expanded!Family rm Kit w/cathedral ceiling. SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $3,998,000 LOS ALTOS MUST SEE, GREAT PRICE $315,000 Eastbrook lot will be open and unattended.Please Joanne Fraser 650.941.7040 7 BR 6.5 BA Exceptional Crescent Park Estate. 1578 PLATEAU AV pick up a flyer & call the listing agent 3 story home- 7 beds, 6.5 baths, on 18,600 sf 2 BR 2 BA 2 bedrooms-plus den-approx:1571 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,649,000 Jamie & Phyllis Carmichael 650.941.7040 DUPLEX IN MOUNTAIN VIEW! $785,000 lot. Pool sqft.Views from living room Spacious duplex in Mtn. View! Each unit has 2 4 BR 3.5 BA Peaceful retreat in sought after Leannah Hunt & Laurel Robinson 650.325.6161 master bedroom-1 car garage BAY AND MT. DIABLO VIEW $1,650,000 bedrooms,1 bath, & garage! BY APPT. ONLY! Country Club area.Beautifully updated hm in 3 BR 2 BA Timeless Mid-Century Modern Gem DiPali Shah Letty Guerra 650.941.7040 650.325.6161 918 COWPER ST priv.setting on Expansive Acreage Of Usable Knoll.Aging SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $3,795,000 2503 ALVIN STREET Alan Huwe 650.948.0456 Gracefully. 5BR 3.5BA Dwntwn/Professorville Victorian SANTA CLARA

528 PALM AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

Vivi Chan

650.941.7040 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

$1,499,000

MENLO PARK 4 BR 2.5 BA Charming 4BD/2.5BA home with 1 bed/1 bath backyard cottage and park like FRENCH INSPIRED ELEGANCE $3,595,000 gardens. 4 BR 3.5 BA Gracious floor plan. Terrific Kit/FR. 6 J. Buchanan & S. Bowen 650.941.7040 yr young home. 12,000 sqft lot near downtown. Nancy Goldcamp

650.325.6161

$780,000

3 BR 2 BA Contemporary w/mahogany walls, renovated in 2007 w/best of contemporary/ 4469 LAFAYETTE ST foot-friendly cork flrs, lg windows, updt kit/ modern finishes. $749,950 Zach Trailer 650.325.6161 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 baths, lg lot Nancy Adele Stuhr 650.948.0456 A VICTORIAN STYLE GEM! $2,095,000 4 BR 3 BA Room to Grow in this Gated 2 BR 2.5 BA Elegant Victorian Stlye 4 large Community,Corner Unit w/Ground 4th 290 LAURA LN SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $749,000 bed/2.5 bath, Separate dining room, formal liv- Bdrm,Large Loft & Sep Fam Rm 3 BR 2 BA Pretty remodeled hm w/lrg kit, tile ing room. Tina Kyriakis 650.941.7040 baths, bonus rm, & outside workshop/storage Pooneh Fouladi 650.325.6161 building. 586 COLLEGE AVE A & B

LOS ALTOS HILLS 1020 SHERMAN AV 10869 MORA DR SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,199,000 SUNNYVALE SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $4,795,000 4 BR 2 BA This charming home near Downtown Pat Jordan 650.325.6161 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,288,000EA 4 BR 4 full BA + 2 half Stunning gated home w/ Menlo Park features stepping stones & towering 418 MOUNTAIN LAUREL CT 5 BR 3.5 BA Each. Beautiful, new Craftsman style SPACIOUS BIRDLAND BEAUTY $1,298,000 bay views on approx. 1.65 ac.Tour @ www.seven- trees. SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $675,000 homes. 5 BR 3.5 BA Rare exec home on cul-de-sac, 3 pondsmoradrive.com Mickey Shaevitz & Ellen Barton

650.941.7040

DiPali Shah/Doris Messina 650.325.6161 2 BR 2.5 BA Brand new kitchen,private backyard. Rick Tipton/Dorothy Gurwith 650.325.6161 car gar, office, dwnstrs bdrm/bath, central A/C,

$1,049,000 Wood floors,soaring ceilings,large living area. 650.941.7040 2 BR 2 BA Stylish remodeled home w/ character & Elizabeth Thompson $3,198,000 instant appeal. Designer finishes thoughout. BRIGHT & SPACIOUS W/YARD $649,000 5 BR 5.5 BA Imagine living in your own amazing Judy Decker 650.325.6161 3 BR 2.5 BA High ceilings, granite kitchen, dining villa w/a personal vineyard,Bay & hill views. BEAUTIFUL SPACIOUS HOME $898,000 area, private yard, attached 2 car garage Jo Buchanan & Stuart Bowen 650.941.7040 650.325.6161 3 BR 2.5 BA Beautiful, spacious 3-level home. R. Brendan Leary 14176 STANFORD CT Walls of glass. Large, bright kitchen w/breakfast 201 ADA AVENUE #35 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,750,000 rm. SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $699,000 5 BR 4.5 BA Beautiful Hm.Virtual tour http:// Ken Morgan/Arlene Gault 650.328.5211 3 BR 2.5 BA Unit in the back of the complex. Spacious living rm w/fireplace & French doors to www.tourfactory.com/657913.Close to Stanford 341 O'CONNOR ST rear deck Ellen Barton 650.941.7040 24040 OAK KNOLL CIRCLE SUN 1:30 - 4:30

23423 TOYONITA RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30

OLD WORLD CHARM

SUN 1:30 - 4:30

24632 OLIVE TREE LN SAT/ SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.325.6161

2145 AVY AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

27729 BRIONES COURT SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

Zach Trailer

3712 HERON WY SAT/SUN 2 - 5

650.328.5211

$995,000

650.325.6161 4 BR 2 BA Completely updated home!Granite and cherrywood kitchen with top appliances,bay

$845,000 windows.

3 BR 3 BA Elegant 2-year new townhome, many Vicki Geers green built w/energy efficient features. 630 ANTIOCH TERRACE

650.328.5211

$725,000

SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.941.7040

$450,000

1 BR 1 BA One level w/no one above or 2 BR 2 BA Lux Condos in Dwntwn PA. Exceptionl 2 BR 2.5 BA You will love this 3-level townhome,only below, FP, remod kit w/granite,slate flrs,new amenities. Pool, fitness rm, guest apts, 55+ com- 6 years new,featuring 2 bedrooms,2.5 baths. 650.328.5211 appliances,patio Jo Buchanan & Stuart Bowen 650.941.7040 munity

Greg Stange

650.325.6161 J. Jackson/B. Sawyer

$768,000 SPACIOUS, GREAT LOCATION $85,000

2 BR 2 BA Spacious 1-level condo. Generous LR, 2 BR 2 BA Beautiful mobile home located in 55+ $2,599,000 DR, Master. Hi ceilngs, HW flrs. Lovely patio. Park. Many custom features. Spacious floor plan. 5 BR 3 BA Fabulously updated home with a beauti- Garage. Deborah Greenberg 650.328.5211 ful gourmet kitchen. Dan Ziony 650.325.6161

Terri Couture

Cup schls

$995,000 Clara Lee 2 BR 2.5 BA Lovely Downtown PA Townhome. 574 BELFAST COURT Updated kitchen, private patio, bright living spacSAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 es, pool.

$874,900 Royce Cablayan 650.948.0456 Judy Shen 3 BR 2 BA Beautifully updated. Refinished END UNIT W/INSIDE LAUNDRY $335,000 ELEGANT LIFESTYLE! $2,725,000 hardwood floors. Skylights. Master suite.

23423 Toyonita Rd 5 BR 4.5 BA Beautifully 2-car garage. updated with views. Three fireplaces, custom Ken Morgan/Arlene Gault work throughout

Owen Halliday

310 POE ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30

PALO ALTO SAT 1:30 - 4:30 $699,000 1308 HARKER AV $2,195,000 2 BR 2 BA Gorgeous, remodeled cottage- SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.941.7040 21 WILLOW RD #41

3903 MIDDLEFIELD RD #B SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30

650.325.6161 1225 VIENNA DR #213

SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $151,100 $575,000 3 BR 2 BA Luxury mobile home in beautiful park.

2 BR 2 BA Open floorplan reflects the friendly High ceilings throughout. spirit of this condo! Merrian Nevin

Rod Creason

650.325.6161

650.941.7040

MAGNIFICENT MARY MANOR $145,000

QUIET & COMFORT $435,000 2 BR 2 BA Updated manufactured home in ter$5,498,000 2 BR 1 BA Beautiful 1 BR + Den currently used

4 BR 3 BA Lovely pastoral home on cul de sac with style townhm located w/in lush setting - off 6 BR (5 en suite + 2.5 BA) Beautiful 5900sf new as BR. Enjoy the quiet & comfort of this lovely rific neighborhood. A great condo alternative! Over 1400sf city lights views.On an acre lot. of Alma St. home in PA’s most culturally rich neighborhood. home.

Vicki Geers

650.941.7040 Geraldine Asmus

650.325.6161 Lan L. Bowling

650.328.5211 Kathleen Jarvis Pasin

650.325.6161 Janie & John Barman

©2009 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC. DRE License # 00313415

28

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ MARCH 18, 2011

650.325.616


Mountain View Voice 03.18.2011 - Section 1