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Huge hearty breakfast WEEKEND | P.13 JANUARY 14, 2011 VOLUME 19, NO. 2

650.964.6300

INSIDE: MOVIES | PAGE 16

MountainViewOnline.com

Funds for schools or jobs downtown? GOVERNOR’S BUDGET CUTS THREATEN CITY’S PLAN FOR NEW GROCERY STORE By Daniel DeBolt

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MICHELLE LE

Cheryl Burke, an Atherton resident who vaulted to fame on TV’s “Dancing with the Stars,” leads local teens in a salsa dance class Jan. 10. The event at Burke’s newly expanded Mountain View studio was a fundraiser for the Police Activities League.

Mixing it up with some salsa By James Tensuan

C

heryl Burke’s dance studio hosted a strange mix of guests on Mon-

day, Jan 10. Teenagers, city council members, dancers and police were lingering along the mirrored walls of the newly expanded studio on Shoreline

Boulevard, owned by Burke of “Dancing with the Stars” fame. This is The Dance Club See BURKE, page 11

Council approves controversial WiMAX tower atop church, near preschool By Daniel DeBolt

T

he City Council on Tuesday approved a wireless data tower atop First Presbyterian Church, despite claims from neighbors that it is illegal under the city’s zoning code. A group of neighbors concerned with possible health effects oppose the cell tower like structure in a

INSIDE

new church steeple at Miramonte and Cuesta streets. They said that a “common sense” reading of the code showed that such a tower is not allowed in the city’s residential areas. The tower for Clear Wire LLC would use new “WiMAX” technology to transmit data to WiFienabled computers and phones. The City Council disagreed, voting 4-1 to approve the tower,

with Margaret Abe-Koga opposed. Mayor Jac Siegel recused himself because he owns a home nearby, while Vice Mayor Mike Kasperzak recused himself partway through the meeting when he realized that Sprint, which he owns stock in, owns 51 percent of Clear Wire. Councilwoman Laura Macias See WIMAX, page 6

GOINGS ON 18 | MARKETPLACE 19 | REAL ESTATE 21 | VIEWPOINT 12

ome City Council members would like to subsidize a grocery store downtown, but Gov. Jerry Brown’s budget, announced Monday, might pose a problem for that. Brown’s proposal to tackle the state’s $25 billion shortfall with budget cuts and tax increases includes the elimination of redevelopment agencies across the state. Brown wants to permanently shift the taxes that flow to the city’s redevelopment funds to schools and other local services, but Mountain View City Council members may object to that in their meeting next week. The council happens to be voting on whether to extend the downtown redevelopment agency (RDA), which is one of the oldest in the state — it’s set to expire after 40 years this June. Last year the council discussed extending the downtown RDA for two years to subsidize a long-desired grocery store on a cityowned lot at California and Bryant streets. Mayor Jac Siegel said that extending the downtown RDA would help create jobs downtown through its funding of future projects, including the “neighborhood serving” grocery store downtown. But with funding for basic state and city services scant these days, Brown proposes to get rid of redevelopment agencies altogether. The agencies, for the purposes of economic development, have shifted property taxes away from school, city and county services for decades. If Brown’s proposal is approved by the legislature Mountain View would lose the downtown RDA, its only redevelopment agency and one that has funded improvements

since 1969. By concentrating property taxes on parking, sidewalks and lights, it helped increase downtown property from a total assessed value of $22 million in 1969 to $418 million last year. Had the downtown RDA gone away entirely last year, there would have been another $700,000 in property tax revenue for core city services such as police and the See BUDGET, page 9

K-12 spared, colleges slashed in Brown’s budget By Nick Veronin

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ov. Jerry Brown’s state budget proposal drew positive reactions from school officials in local elementary, middle and high schools. However, representatives from the Foothill-De Anza College Community College District, as well as from the Community College League of California, were far less enthusiastic. While the governor announced that primary and secondary schools would not be cut under his plan, community colleges, along with both state university systems, will take cuts of $400 million and $500 million respectively. Brown has been nothing if not blunt in his attempt to slash $12.5 billion in state See SCHOOLS, page 9


            

 

 

                    

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 14, 2011


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Have a question for Voices Around Town? E-mail it to editor@mv-voice.com JANUARY 14, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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-PDBM/FXT NCRIMEBRIEFS

WOMEN FEND OFF PURSE-SNATCHERS A pair of women fended off a group of men who tried to steal their purses as they were walking in front of the Hampton Inn and Suites at 390 Moffett Blvd., police said. At about 2:15 a.m. on Jan. 9, the women, a 41-year-old from Rocklin and a 46-year-old from Visalia, were approached by three men who attempted to grab the pair’s purses, said Liz Wylie, public information officer for the Mountain View Police Department. Both women suffered minor injuries to the face and extremities in the ensuing scuffle, Wylie said. One of the women was struck in the face and fell to the ground in the struggle. She got up and ran into the Hampton’s lobby for help. The suspects fled without the purses, which

were found laying on the sidewalk and street when police arrived. The strap of one of the purses was torn off, Wylie said, but nothing was missing from either woman’s bag. Both victims had small cuts and scratches from the dust-up but they both declined medical attention. The assailants were last seen running southbound on Moffett Boulevard. Police detained two men shortly after the incident, but released them because “it all happened so fast,” the two women were unable to tell whether the detainees were the would-be robbers, Wylie said.

PAIR THREATENS MAN A man and a juvenile were arrested on Jan. 6 after allegedly threatening a man with a metal pipe and a hand gun as he walked

on Latham Street toward Chiquita Avenue at around 6:45 p.m., police said. The victim was not injured. The victim told police that he saw a group of men approaching him, said Liz Wylie, a spokeswoman for the Mountain View police. The man crossed the street, and the group began yelling at him, she said. One member of the group crossed the street and came up to the man and held a pipe in a threatening manner, getting close enough to strike. The second assailant approached the victim, pulled a pistol on him and threatened to kill him, Wylie said. The victim later identified two men whom police located in front of the Tropicana Lodge, Wylie said. Police arrested 21-year-old David Villasenor of Palo Alto, charging him with brandishing a firearm and making terrorist threats. The juvenile, a 15-year-

old from Mountain View, was charged with brandishing a weapon and violating his probation. Villasenor was taken to the main jail and the 15-year-old was taken to juvenile hall. Wylie said the police do not know why the men decided to threaten the man.

PUZZLING BURGLARY Police are puzzling over how a burglar managed to get into an apartment located in the 2000 block of W. El Camino Real on Jan. 5.

The apartment, which was locked when its tenants left it at 9:45 a.m., was found ransacked when they returned at around 5:45 p.m., police spokeswoman Liz Wylie said. The victims, a husband and wife, along with a friend who was staying with the couple, reported that more than 50 items of jewelry were stolen, along with an iPhone, four laptops, a Sony Playstation, a Nintendo Wii, numerous games for both systems, two digital cameras, clothing and a gym bag. See CRIME BRIEFS, page 11

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The Mountain View Voice is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 14, 2011


-PDBM/FXT MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

City names interim city manager

Sarge’s new lease on life BINKLEY GETS JOB WITH HIS LAWYER, DECLARED LEGALLY SANE

By Daniel DeBolt

By Daniel DeBolt

T

he City Council has asked the city’s freshly-hired assistant city manager, Melissa Stevenson Dile, to take over as interim city manager when Kevin Duggan retires in April. “I’m honored that they asked me to do this,” Dile said. “My role is going to be helping us as an organization keep moving forward on key issues. I think the public is going to see very little change in the next few months, until a new city manager is hired.” Dile, a 41-year-old San Jose resident, was hired by Mountain

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MICHELLE LE

Computer scientist Frances Allen speaks at the preview of the Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing exhibit at the newly renovated Computer History Museum.

Exploring a digital ‘Revolution’ RENOVATED COMPUTER MUSEUM CAPTURES TWO MILLENNIA OF COMPUTING ight flooded into the spacious 5,000-square-foot lobby of the Computer History Museum on Tuesday, Jan. 11, bouncing off of the pristine white terrazzo tile floor and stainless steel surfaces, and illuminating the already brightened faces of the curators and guests of honor who gathered two days in advance of institution’s grand reopening. The new 25,000-square-foot exhibit, “Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing,” guides visitors through a series of rooms filled with artifacts, photography, video, audio and interactive dis-

plays — all of which are related to computers and high technology. It opens to the public Thursday, Jan. 13. After viewing an introductory film, visitors to the new exhibit are ushered into an area filled with antiquated computing tools, such as an abacus and a device known as “Napier’s bones.” Elaborate computing charts are replaced by punch-card and tape-driven analog computers; machines the size of a sport utility vehicle give way to silicon wafers the size of a Belgian waffle; soon enough, visitors to Revolution are peering through a microscope at a chip the size of a lady bug,

as a placard reminds passersby of Moore’s Law. “The number of transistors and other components on integrated circuits will double every year for the next 10 years,” it proclaims. Moving through the exhibit, as the chips get more compact, the devices in which they are used become more recognizable as common household items. What begins with gargantuan machines that would be difficult to fit into a two-car garage ends with a slew of devices that most people use every day — perhaps without ever giving a second thought to the decades of

“The finance director and is working closely with Kevin to bring a budget strategy to council before he leaves,” Dile said. “Hopefully council will be prepared to endorse a budget strategy a little earlier.” Before coming to Mountain View, Dile had last worked as assistant city manager in Fremont for four years. Before that she worked for the city of Morgan Hill for 15 years in various capacities, including assistant to the city manager and human resources manager. Much like her predecessor Nadine Levin did in 1990, Dile is being asked to run the city temporarily only months after being hired. Dile

is not seeking the city manager job herself, she said. “I would love to be city manager at some point. It’s not the right time for me personally,” she said. Dile got her start in city government in Morgan Hill as an analyst in the city manager’s office, after college. Of all the things a future city official could chose to study at Mills College in Oakland, Dile chose Medieval European History, with a minor in government. She was thankful to be hired by a city manager that was willing to train her, she said. She eventually earned a master’s degree in public administration from San Jose State

University in 1996. With a father in the U.S. Air Force, Stevenson said she was born in Sacramento but grew up various places, including the Central Valley, Maine, Nebraska and Okinawa, Japan. She attended high school in Omaha. Now that she’s landed in Mountain View, “I hope to be here quite a long time,” Dile said. “I was sorry to hear about Kevin’s retirement because I’ve really enjoyed working with him,” she said. “But there are great staff here and great services. There has been a strong history of respectful

By Nick Veronin

L

Melissa Dile

View in September for a new job that combines the role of assistant city manager with employee services director. Combining the two roles was a cost-saving measure after former head of employee services, Kathy Farrar, retired last year after 38 years. When Dile takes the helm in April, her biggest challenge will be helping the council approve a city budget by June, which will likely require some difficult budget cuts. The city manager usually plays a major role in the budget process, giving presentations and fielding difficult questions from the council. It’s a job that Duggan is famously good at, but Dile said she’s got a number of years of experience working on city budgets. In order to get through the budget and the city manager transition smoothly, Dile said city management is working to get a budget strategy together earlier than usual.

See MUSEUM, page 10

See CITY MANAGER, page 10

ormer Army Ranger Sargent Binkley is well on his way to a new life since he robbed a Mountain View Walgreens five years ago for painkillers to numb his Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and pain from a hip injury. After serving a 10-month sentence at Atascadero state mental hospital last year, 35 year old Los Altos resident got a job in his defense attorney’s office, and last Friday a Santa Clara County judge declared him legally sane. “Friday was very big day for Sarge,” said his attorney, Chuck Smith, who gave Binkley a job in his office last summer. “This thing has worked out so well for him. He was facing more than Sargent Binkley a dozen years in state prison.” In 2006, Binkley robbed the Walgreens pharmacy at El Camino Real and Grant Road for painkillers with an unloaded gun. His father, who found the stash of painkillers, had Binkley turn himself in. Binkley faced 12 to 15 years in prison for the crime, but was able to serve 10 months in a mental hospital instead because a jury found him guilty but legally insane. Though he had completed his sentence last year, he was still “technically insane,” at least in a legal sense. A Santa Clara County judge changed that last Friday, and wished him well in his new life as a legally sane citizen. Smith said he got to know Binkley well during the landmark court battle, and Binkley seemed a good fit for the job when he needed to replace his file clerk. “Obviously, for what I accomplished for him, I knew he was going to be loyal to me, quite frankly,” Smith said. “If I said ‘Get your ass Sunday morning at 9 o’clock to do something,’ I knew he was going to be here because I’m the reason he’s not in prison,” Smith laughed. “He works hard for me.” Binkley agreed. “Chuck Smith was very gracious. I owe that man See BINKLEY, page 9

JANUARY 14, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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-PDBM/FXT WIMAX

Continued from page 1

said that the zoning code paragraph in question may not be clear or “elegant� but it is “adequate.� The Council also decided to clarify the zoning code to show that WiMAX and cell towers are legal in residential areas, a process which will take several months. City Attorney Janie Quinn said it was the council’s “quasi-judicial role� to figure out how a “reasonable person� would interpret the code. The council had the option to interpret the zoning code the way neighbors have and reject the tower’s application, said Zoning Administrator Peter Gilli. Illegal towers? In the appeal of Gilli’s approval of the tower last year, opponents noted that “communication facilities� were listed as an allowed use in commercial zones, but not in residential zones. They believed that was enough to make the tower illegal. But the zoning code also says that “land uses not listed in a particular zoning district are not allowed in that district except where otherwise provided by section D,� which is a paragraph that caused further disagreement. The question was whether Section D’s final sentence allowed the

WiMAX tower: “Satellite and cellular telephone antennas are subject to Section A36.52 (Design Review) in those zone districts requiring such review for new structures.� Opponents said it clearly did not, but council members disagreed. Council member Ronit Bryant said she had asked several people to read Section D to gather opinions on its clarity, and she came to the conclusion that it was clear enough that such towers were allowed. Abe-Koga was the only member who appeared to support neighbors, saying, “I get it,� about their concerns. Quinn said existing towers in residential area would be considered “legal nonconforming� if the council decided to interpret the zoning code the way neighbors had. The city has approved six cell towers in residential areas since 1996, including several at Saint Francis High School. Over 100 others are in commercial and industrial pockets throughout the city, Gilli said. There are also over 100 Google WiFi antennas on light poles in residential areas. Everyone at the meeting agreed that the language in the zoning code was outdated. “I know a piece of broken code when I see it,� said one neighbor who is an attorney. It refers to satellite dishes and cellular towers, but makes no reference

to newer technologies. Gilli said it was fair to interpret it as allowing the WiMAX tower, which is “functionally similar� to those listed. Health concerns While the neighbors and city officials argued over what the zoning code, the real concern for many is that such a tower may have radiation-related health effects on the neighborhood, 200 feet away, and the Little Acorn preschool that houses 70 children at the church, only 50-75 feet away. Even if that were untrue, such fears would lower property values, neighbors said. But health effects were not discussed Tuesday because the Federal Communications Commission does not allow the city to reject a cell tower for concerns over radiation, unless radiation levels are demonstrated to be over FCC limits. A study by applicant Clear Wire showed that radiation would be well below those limits, and city officials said they see no reason to doubt that study. As a concession, Clear Wire has promised to monitor radiation levels before and after the tower is constructed, and parents of children at Little Acorn preschool, which is subsidized by the church, would not be financially penalized if they decided to withdraw their kids. V

SCHOOLS

Continued from page 1

spending, saying there would be lots of ugly cuts, with on exception. “Schools have borne the brunt of spending reductions in recent years, so this budget maintains funding at the same level as the current year,� Brown said in a press release. Donna Campbell, president of the teachers union in the Mountain View Whisman School District, said she was pleased with the announcement. “If he can get through this budget crisis without any additional cuts that would be absolutely fabulous,� Campbell said. Scott Lay, president and CEO of the Community College League, acknowledged Brown for his forthrightness, but nonetheless insisted that the League will resist the proposed cuts of $400 million to community colleges in California, which he said were unfair. “This will have the effect of reducing math and science classes, particularly at our colleges serving the most vulnerable students,� Lay said. The League hopes to help “rework this proposal so that we can focus on the important task of informing the

public of the impact of the overall balanced approach the governor has identified,� he said. If the proposed budget were to be implemented without changes, Foothill-De Anza would stand to lose about $10.9 million in funding, and it would force the district to drop enrollment by about 4,400 students at time when the University of California and California State University systems “are likely to further tighten admissions and direct more students to community colleges,� said district spokeswoman Becky Bartindale, In his memo, Erik Skinner, the executive vice chancellor for programs at the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, reminded his colleagues that at this point proposed budget is just that — proposed. The proposal is built on the assumption that voters will approve $12 billion in taxes in a special June election. Striking a glass-half-full tone, Skinner wrote that while the cuts come on top of $520 million in cuts to California community colleges last year and that “community college districts are already wrestling with brutal budget choices,� if Brown succeeds in moving the state toward a balanced budget, “it may be worth the pain.�

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A SEASON FOR THE AGES

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Don’t have Season Tickets? Make your 2011 Season Tickets deposit now by calling 1-800-STANFORD or online at GOSTANFORD.COM JANUARY 14, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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-PDBM/FXT

Incision-free cancer surgery at 91 By Nick Veronin

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itting on a faded champagnecolored loveseat — decorated with a floral pattern and a variety of well-worn throw pillows — Jean Stuetzle and her husband Al speak in absolutes, without the slightest hint of apprehension, about what the future holds. Although Jean doesn’t have the energy to dance just yet, Al explains, that is only temporary. The couple will dance “when she gets better.” To hear the two discuss Jean’s rehabilitation, you might assume they are talking about a sprained ankle. In fact, at the age of 91, She is making a strong recovery from a non-invasive type of lung cancer surgery. Stuetzle, who has lived in Mountain View with her husband for more than 16 years, was diagnosed with cancer in April and treated in June. And while the cancer was discovered at a fairly late stage, especially for someone her age, she is currently getting around fine with a little help from her cane and Al’s surprisingly strong 92-year-old arms. A stack of papers rests in the seat of the wheelchair, which is gathering dust in the corner of the Stuetzle’s home.

The Stuetzles have been married for 71 years. They met as teenagers living on the same block in Queens Village, Long Island, N.Y., and were introduced after Al, who had taken a liking to Jean, continued to deliver free papers to her house on his route as a paperboy. “My father asked, ‘Why do we keep getting the paper?’” Jean recalls with a smile, as her family did not subscribe to the periodical Al delivered. “It worked,” Al says, shrugging and smiling. The two were married in 1940 when they were both 21. After bouncing around the country a bit, they settled in California and raised four children — two boys and two girls. Al worked as a stained glass maker, Jean worked as a homemaker, occasionally taking a job in retail. Jean was diagnosed with cancer, quite by accident, when she went in for a computerized tomography scan of her stomach at El Camino. The couple could have gone to Stanford for treatment right away, but decided to wait for a few months for a new machine that would be at El Camino Hospital soon. “It was the newest and the best,” Al says of the couple’s decision to

MICHELLE LE

Jean Stuetzle, at home with husband Al, is recovering from CyberKnife surgery.

wait for the CyberKnife — the name brand for a non-invasive surgical technique, which uses beams of highly concentrated electromagnetic radiation to zap cancer cells in patients deemed too fragile to undergo traditional surgery. Dr. Bob Sinha, president of Western Radiation Oncology, is a CyberKnife operator at El Camino. He pilots the machine, composed of a large robotic arm — the very same type of robotic arm used in automobile assembly lines — and a linear accelerator, which generates powerful, cancer-ablating photons. A computer, which is synced with X-ray monitors and the photonblasting robot arm, tracks the

minute movement of cancerous growths as a patient breathes in and out — adjusting its algorithm accordingly. If a patient coughs, Sinha says, the robotic arm adjusts, keeping its cancer killing beam trained on the tumor. Patients remain awake during the procedure, which Stuetzle says is painless. Doctors have been using photons to fight cancer since the 1960s, Sinha says, but in the past decade they have become incredibly advanced. Prior to the ‘60s, Sinha says, the only recourse available to someone suffering lung cancer was to undergo traditional surgery. Doctors would cut a patient open

and physically remove the tumor. Traditional surgery is still the most effective and preferred method for younger, more resilient patients. However, for elderly patients such as Stuetzle, or those with heart conditions, opening up the chest cavity is extremely risky. Beginning in the 1960s, surgeons discovered that they could treat certain kinds of cancer — lung, liver and pancreatic, for example — using photons. “Cancer does not like photons,” Sinha explains. Early forms of this treatment exposed a lot of tissue to electromagnetic radiation, however, which meant the process took as many as 30 sessions to complete. Over the past decade, these techniques have improved, and their “effectiveness has gone way up,” Sinha says. Advancements in the field have allowed doctors to focus their photons with “sub-millimeter” precision, which, in turn, has made it possible to more than double the power of the beams used without impacting non-cancerous tissue. And the more powerful the beam, the shorter the treatment. Stuetzle’s treatment was done in three 30-minute bursts. The Stuetzles, who grew up during a time when having a radio was a novelty, say they were amazed See CYBERKNIFE, next page

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 14, 2011


-PDBM/FXT BUDGET

Continued from page 1

library, while the city’s elementary and middle schools would have received another $832,000 in property tax revenue. Siegel said the council needs to consider whether extending the RDAs life makes sense for the community. “What else do we need to do or what should we do before this is totally gone,” he said. The downtown wouldn’t be left completely high and dry by Brown, however. He proposes an amendment to the state constitution that would allow the city to continue funding economic redevelopment and infrastructure projects through more easily attainable voter-approved bonds. Those bonds would only require a 55-percent approval from voters instead of the twothirds vote now required. City officials say that would mean a time consuming extra step in economic redevelopment projects when it’s often the case that “time is of the essence,” said economic development director Ellis Berns. But it could also mean a new funding source for projects in other areas of the city.

BINKLEY

Continued from page 5

my life and working for him is an honor.” “I enjoy it to a degree,” he added. “If anyone is telling you they like their work they are lying,” he laughed. Binkley, who attended Los Altos High School, played for the Mountain View Marauders football team and graduated from West Point military academy, was held up by other veterans as a poster child in the landmark case for soldiers with PTSD in the criminal justice system. Psychiatrists testified at the trial that Binkley developed PTSD during his time in Bosnia, haunted by the smell of the mass graves. He developed an addiction to painkillers after suffering a hip injury in Honduras that he said “never healed quite right.” When asked what he was thinking when he decided to rob Walgreens, he said he had few other options besides suicide. His hip

CYBERKNIFE

Continued from previous page

with the CyberKnife treatment. “I think it’s marvelous,” Jean says. That sense of wonder is not lost on Sinha, who says that even when he was in medical school in the early 1990s, he “had no expectation that we would be able to advance this quickly.” Back when he was in school, Sinha says, only about 20 percent

Brown’s plan would eliminate RDAs in June, but cities would continue to receive funds to pay off RDA debts. If all of the RDA money went to paying off the downtown’s debts if would take about eight years to clear, city officials say. City officials remind everyone that the improvements made possible by the downtown district has raised the entire city’s property values, and hence, property tax revenue for schools. But in his budget proposal, Brown told cities that “RDAs were not intended to become a permanent source of business subsidies” and that their original intent was to “relieve blight” in a “limited amount of time.” If the council decides not to extend the downtown RDA, the city’s core services, schools and the county could begin receiving additional property taxes in 2019, when bond payments finish, city officials said last year. But that may be delayed under Brown’s proposal. Brown proposes to use the funds “freed up” from RDAs in 2011-12 to fund the state’s general fund services, including schools and MediCal. Since last year the council has

pain, increasing anxiety and PTSD were causing a “complete lack of sleep,” he said. He said he also felt that he wasn’t getting any help from the VA. It all boiled down to: “’Maybe I should do this to try and help myself,’” he said. While Binkley’s story has been told many times in the media, he says, “I hope it hasn’t defined me as a person.” “In March of 2006 I thought I was all alone,” he said. “I truly thought that. But going through this process I saw hundreds of people speak on my behalf. That was so positive. It enabled me to get through the process.” Binkley still sees a therapist at Palo Alto’s VA hospital because his PTSD “hasn’t magically disappeared,” he said. But he’s grateful for his new lease on life. After working in Smith’s offices for several months, he’s thinking about going to law school. Smith recently promoted him to be his legal assistant. V

been considering an extension of the downtown RDA for up to two years. That extension is currently allowed by the state because it borrowed nearly $2 million from the downtown RDA this year and last year, said finance director Patty Kong. Other than the impact on the downtown RDA, city officials said their preliminary analysis of the governor’s proposals has yet to find any other significant impacts on the city. While there has been lots of talk about shifting funds and responsibilities to local governments, that appears to mostly have to do health and human services, which the county would take on, Kong said. While the downtown RDA would go away under Brown’s proposal, it is unclear whether it would end another special tax district, a much more lucrative one of the city. Shoreline tax district untouched? “The governor has a tough nut to crack,” said Vice Mayor Mike

Kasperzak. “Everybody is going to have a sacred cow.” If Mountain View has a sacred cow it’s the Shoreline Community Fund, which functions like an RDA to pay for Shoreline Park maintenance and improvements to the surrounding area, now home to Google. It was created by special state legislation with no sunset clause, meaning it could exist forever. Whether Brown would do away with the Shoreline Community is uncertain, but so far city officials are pointing out that his budget proposal specifically mentions RDAs, which would exclude the Shoreline Community. However, last year the state took $1.7 million from the Shoreline Community, along with raiding the state’s RDAs, to help meet its obligation to schools. Finance director Patty Kong said the Shoreline District was addressed by the state as a unique authority, not an RDA. Elementary school officials

have been eyeing the Shoreline Community, which pulls in $5 million in taxes that would otherwise go to the city’s local elementary and middle schools annually. City officials have defended the Shoreline Community however, saying that has created a neighborhood that is now the city’s “economic engine.” It has funded the Stevens Creek and Permanente Creek trails, the creation and maintenance of Shoreline Park and a new fire station on Shoreline Boulevard to be constructed this year, among other things. But it appears that the new governor has a different view. “The expansion of redevelopment agencies has gradually shifted property tax away from schools, counties, special districts, and city general purposes,” Gov. Brown’s budget proposal states, adding that “the state’s investment in local economic development and redevelopment agencies is less critical than other activities.” V

656 Lytton Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650) 617-7384 INDEPENDENT SUBSIDIZED SENIOR HOUSING WAITING LIST TO OPEN MONDAY, JANUARY 24TH, 2011 THROUGH FRIDAY, JANUARY 28TH, 2011. Lytton Gardens is pleased to announce the opening of our Single & Couple Waiting Lists for our Lytton I and Lytton II Facilities. Lytton Gardens offers subsidized housing for extremely low and very low-income seniors and mobility impaired applicants. TO BE ELIGIBLE: Single and couple applicants one must be 62 years of age or older, or 18 years of age or older and mobility impaired. Maximum annual income for single applicant must be less than $36,250.00 Maximum annual income for couple applicants must be less than $41,400.00 Rent will be 30% of your adjusted monthly income. Assets (Real Estate, CDs, Stocks, and Bonds, etc.) will be converted to income at 2% or actual % of income. You or a close family member *must live, or work, in the designated area of Palo Alto, Redwood City, East Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Stanford, Portola Valley, Woodside, Atherton, Mountain View, Los Altos or Los Altos Hills. TO APPLY: Applications will be distributed at Lytton Gardens Senior Communities, 656 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, on January 24th, 26th, and 28th, 2011 from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., and on January 25th, and 27th, 2011 from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Applications must be returned by mail to Lytton Gardens, P.O. Box 51907, Palo Alto, CA 94303, no later than February 18th, 2011. Applications postmarked after February 18th, 2011 cannot be considered and will be returned to sender. Selection will be made by a lottery process to determine applicants’ order on the waiting list. Names will be chosen between March 14th, 2011 and March 18th, 2011. Copy of your Social Security card must be attached to your application.

of lung cancer tumors were ever fully ablated by photon treatment. Today that number is around 90 percent, and the tests so far indicate that Stuetzle falls within that percentile. “It’s hard to even say how gratifying it is,” Sinha says. The Stuetzles, it seems, would agree: since her surgery, Jean exercises on a stationary bike several days a week and, according to Al, “She eats as good a meal as I do.”

APPLICANTS’ AUTHORIZATION AND CONSENT FOR RELEASE OF INFORMATION, SECTION 214, AND HUD FORMS 9887 & 9887A, MUST BE FILLED-OUT, SIGNED AND ATTACHED TO YOUR APPLICATION, OR WE WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ACCEPT YOUR APPLICATION. *Family Member includes: Grandparent, Parent, Children & Siblings. Grandparent in Law, Parent in Law, Children in Law & Siblings in Law. Lytton Gardens Senior Communities does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, handicap, ancestry, medical condition, veteran status, sexual orientation, AIDS, AIDS related condition (ARC), in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its federally assisted programs and activities. Gery Yearout, Executive Director and HUD Housing Administrator, 656 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301 (650) 617-7372 has been designated to coordinate compliance with nondiscrimination requirements contained in the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s regulations implementing Section 504 (24 CFR Part 8 dated June 2, 1988). TDD/TYY 1-800-735-2922

V

JANUARY 14, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

9


-PDBM/FXT

Shooting won’t keep Eshoo from public By Sue Dremann

M

eeting face to face with the public is “the one of the most basic functions relative to democracy,” U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, said by phone on Monday, Jan. 10. Her district includes Mountain View. And although she will remain cautious, the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona on Saturday, Jan. 8, won’t stop her from meeting with her constituents, she said. Eshoo condemned the polemics in today’s politics, which she said has contributed to a climate of violence that resulted in the shooting of 18 people, including Giffords.

Six people died after a 22-year-old man, Jared Loughner, fired 31 shots at Giffords, her staff and members of the public who had gathered for a “town hall” meeting with the congresswoman at a Safeway supermarket. Giffords remains hospitalized in critical condition following brain surgery after she was shot through the head. “Leaders can either lead or mislead. ... When you have candidates’ faces as a target for shooting, we’ve gone too far. ... I hope this tragic event causes people to think — and to think hard,” she said. Eshoo said her office has reported many suspicious incidents during her tenure in Congress, which have been investigated by the Capitol

police. At times, local law enforcement has been involved when applicable. The decision as to what is a credible threat is up to the Capitol police, she said. But members of the U.S. House of Representatives are not provided with security — something that surprises many of her constituents, she said. Top House leaders do have some security, but “rank-and-file members are not protected, whether we are in the airport or standing in line at the supermarket,” she said. Eshoo said that lack of security in today’s vitriolic political climate has given her pause. She thinks about her vulnerability every time she walks from the parking lot across

Actor Rainn Wilson hits the book circuit By Daniel DeBolt

A

ctor Rainn Wilson, who plays an egomaniacal paper salesman in the TV show “The Office,” spoke at a packed Books Inc. on Castro Street last Thursday to pitch his new book, “Soul Pancake.” Unlike his character in the Office, Wilson displays a major interest in art, philosophy and

spirituality with the new book which probes life’s big questions. Part of his message is that people may not always be able to achieve happiness, but they can achieve “deep soul satisfaction,” he said. “Don’t even get me started on happiness,” Wilson said to the crowd at Books Inc. “Cotton candy and Disneyland, that’s happy.” While happiness may not always be achievable, “I do think you can

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MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH Sabbath School: 9:30 a.m. Saturday Services: Worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups: 10-11 a.m. Pastor Kenny Fraser, B.A.M. DIV 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View Office Hrs. M-F 9am-1pm www.mtviewda.adventistfaith.org Phone: 650-967-2189 10

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 14, 2011

achieve deep soul satisfaction.” He said he wanted the book’s name to irreverently include the name of a food that would make you want to “dig in and chew on life’s big questions.” Because he also wanted to make a website, he looked for domain names not taken. “Spirit Taco” was in use, unfortunately. Other possibilities included “Transcendent Tapas.” Wilson’s presence itself seemed to be almost enough to make the crowd laugh. One man yelled out, “Will you have dinner with me?” His answer, in an ironic tone, was: “Definitely, we’re definitely meet-

MUSEUM

Continued from page 5

toil that made them possible. “Our world runs on computers,” said John Hollar, president, CEO and curator of the museum. Hollar hopes a wide range of visitors will come to the museum. “It’s an exhibit not just for techies; it is an exhibit for the general public.” Museum officials hope that those who attend the museum, fan boy or not, will see just how much of a role computers play in our everyday lives. Hollar compared the invention of computers to the creation of the printing press and the cotton gin, calling them “the amplifier of the mind.” That sentiment ��� that computers are an outgrowth of humans and meant to work symbiotically with everything humans do — was echoed by other museum officials, as well as seen in the multimedia displays found throughout the museum. Jim McClure, who led a tour for members of the media on Jan. 11, made a point to remind the group that “up until the 1950s, the term ‘computer’ was reserved solely for people who did computing.” McClure, who calls Revolution

the street to the Capitol steps, she said. “I’ve always thought that members of Congress were sitting ducks,” she said. But separating herself from the public is counter to the function of political leaders in American democracy, she said. “It’s a slippery slope. What Gabby Giffords was doing is what every one of us does. ... When I look at the Capitol after 9-11 and at the masked, official gunmen with machine guns at the ready, it’s a very unpleasant feeling. We struggle with this,” she said. “We need to do common sense. I don’t think it’s time to hunker down. ... I’ve commuted every week for 18 years to be with my constituents. I don’t want anything to come between us,” she said.

NOBITUARY

JAMES LAWRENCE PARTLOW James Lawrence “Parsh” Partlow, a retired El Segundo fire captain, died unexpectedly the morning of Dec. 24 at his home in Mountain View. He is survived by his fiancee, Mary Patricia Hill; his children, Bryan Matthew Partlow, Danielle Nicole Partlow and Jacqueline Rose Partlow; his father, Carl James Partlow; his stepfather, Robert Boaz; and an aunt and uncle. Arrangements are by Cusimano Family Colonial Mortuary.

V

ing up after this. I’m definitely having dinner with you.” Wilson said he grew up in a “bohemian family” in 1970s Seattle who believed in the Bahai faith. His father was an abstract painter and sewer truck dispatcher who wrote science fiction in his spare time. “I’m not making this up,” he said. For a while he ditched the spiritual focus instilled in him as a child when he moved to New York after high school to become an actor, foregoing a chance to travel to India in order to attend acting school. “All I saw in religion was hypocrisy,” he said. His new gods were Shakespeare, Chekov and Brecht. He said that he realized that he wasn’t rejecting morality alto-

gether. “Even Hitler had morals,” he said. “There were certain things he would not do.” Wilson said he has come to believe that “we aren’t human beings having a spiritual experience, we are spiritual beings having a human experience,” quoting Teilhard de Chardin, a French philosopher and Jesuit priest. He admits his co-authors wrote much of the book. He also has help with the soulpancake. com website, where people can discuss life’s big questions. He advised readers to take it all with a grain of salt. After all, “I’m just an actor in a TV show,” he said.

“our new toy,” says that to witness the history of computers linearly in such a small space is to see the gradual transference of tasks once done by humans to machines. That is, of course, not all computers are good for. As Hollar pointed out, computers also do things humans could never do — like track satellites in outer space and crunch impossibly complex equations at breakneck speeds. Assembling the collection of roughly 1,100 artifacts on display and raising the $19 million used for the renovations and additions took some doing, according to Dag Spicer, senior curator for the Computer History Museum. The museum has a “very modest” acquisition budget, Spicer said, noting that most of what is on display at Revolution was donated. The money was raised mostly from private contributions, which included a $15 million “gift” from Microsoft founder Bill Gates. Once funds were found, the project took about two years to complete. The museum broke ground on renovations in January 2009. Spicer, who worked as an engineer for 10 years before going back to school, was working on a doctoral degree at Stanford on the history of science when the museum reached

out to him. He said he is proud to work for the Computer History Museum, where he has been for the past 15 years. He said his favorite object in the Revolution exhibit is an original Enigma, which several countries, including Nazi Germany, used to create coded messages during times of war. The museum’s design, created by Mark Horton Architecture, gives the impression that the visitor is inside a computer chip. Its sharp lines and shiny surfaces are austere — visitors shuffle through the exhibit like electricity over copper wire, coming to rest in little alcoves of silicon before darting down the next hallway.

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CITY MANAGER Continued from page 5

relationships between council and staff and there has been an emphasis on being more conservative financially.” This year’s budget process may be difficult, but “I feel like were in a better position to move through this than has been the case elsewhere.” V


-PDBM/FXT

A T E G

P M JU

LS A O G S S E N T I F R U YO N O 2010

Your New Year starts now!

$ MICHELLE LE

Cheryl Burke helps Ashley Vergara with some salsa moves on Monday, Jan. 10.

BURKE

Continued from page 1

Mountain View, a new offering of the Mountain View Police Activities League. Roughly 30 teens excitedly learned to salsa dance from Burke. “It was fun, I would come back and do it again,� says Estrella Tejada of Crittenden Middle School. “I enjoyed it a lot.� “It’s important to influence teens with something positive that their school doesn’t offer or they can’t afford,� says Burke, who grew up in Atherton. Besides teaching dance moves, she performed at the fundraiser with several of her fellow cast members from the popular musical “Forever Tango.� The teens were all smiles as Soul Con Dance Company stepped in and assisted with teaching. “This program allows us to bring our love of dance to share with the kids,� says Corinne Leon of Soul Con Dance Company. The dance company was one of several sponsors of the event, including WILD 94.9 radio station, Creation Technologies, The Cantankerous Fish and the

CRIME BRIEFS

Continued from page 4

No signs of forced entry were discovered, Wylie said, and the second-floor apartment’s only entrance, the door, was locked when the couple returned. Police have no suspects and say they have no idea how the apartment was broken into, Wylie said.

GAS LEAK A gas leak brought fire engines and police to Comstock Queen Court on Wednesday, Jan. 5, at

Artisan Wine Depot. Funds raised at the event will help support the program, which aims to expand PAL’s reach to an audience that may not be interested in boxing or tennis. Participating youths will learn dances ranging from hip-hop to Latin and swing. Classes begin Thursday and will take place at the Mountain View Sports Pavilion on Castro Street. Mountain View’s PAL program was resurrected in 2006 by police Chief Scott Vermeer and is in full swing. The program offers a wide variety of activities and leadership opportunities for kids ages 5 to 18, including paintball, bike rides, and trips to San Jose Sharks games are some examples of the wide variety of opportunities offered by the organization. PAL membership costs $5 and for children 11 or older, includes access to The Dance Club. When asked why MVPAL is now offering dance among their other programs, Officer James Guevarra says, “It’s something different. It builds social skills, boosts confidence and self esteem while having fun.�

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—Bay Cities News contributed to this report

around noon, according to the Mountain View Fire Department. The emergency units were on the scene “just in case� anything went wrong as PG&E fixed the gas line, said Jaime Garrett, spokeswoman for the fire department. Garret encouraged Mountain View citizens to check the department’s Facebook and Twitter accounts for breaking fire-related news. The links to those pages can be found at the department’s website, www. mountainview.gov/fire.

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JANUARY 14, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

11


7JFXQPJOU

â–  EDITORIAL â–  YOUR LETTERS â–  GUEST OPINIONS

NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F

City stands by cell tower regulations

Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Andrea Gemmet Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Nick Veronin Intern James Tensuan Photographer Michelle Le Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Monica Schreiber

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Gary Vennarucci

Advertising Advertising Representatives Anna Mirsky, Brent Triantos Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Samantha Mejia Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 E-mail news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com E-mail letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   FAX   E-mail Classified ads@MV-Voice.com E-mail Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Media Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions FORPERYEAR PERYEARSAREWELCOME #OPYRIGHTÂĽBY%MBARCADERO-EDIA Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

W

hy is it that parents and neighbors who almost certainly use cell phones in every part of their everyday life go ballistic when a cell phone tower is proposed near their homes or schools? This mindset comes despite many findings that cell phone users are susceptible to receiving much more radiation from a handheld phone placed against the ear and carried close to the body in a pocket or purse than they ever would receive from a cell tower, or in this case its closely related cousin: a new WiMax tower that transmits data to cell phones and computers. Nevertheless, many neighbors and preschool parents have been vehemently opposed to plans by the First Presbyterian Church at Miramonte and Cuesta to install a WiMax tower hidden in a steeple. They fear children attending the Little Acorn Preschool, about 50 to 75 feet from the tower, will be harmed by cancer-causing radiation. About 70 students attend the school, which is located on church property. Many of the protestors are upset that the church did not notify them before a deal was struck to accept the tower, which came about after the company was unable to get approval to put it on the shopping center or office building across the street. Church spokesmen say the tower deal with Clear Wire LLC has been discussed internally since last July and that after examining research from the phone company, the church decided to go ahead. Pastor Tim Boyer said the antennas were approved to provide a service, especially since the location is within a line of sight to nearby El Camino Hospital. Pastor Boyer declined to say how much the church would be paid to host the antennas. After losing a November ruling from city Zoning AdminNTOWN SQUARE

H E R E ’ S W H AT T H E Y ’ R E S AY I N G O N T O W N S Q U A R E

Rep. Eshoo to keep in contact with constitutents NWHAT’S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM POST your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com E-MAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 964-6300

12

Posted by Tanya, a resident of the Blossom Valley neighborhood, on Jan 11. If this tones down the rhetoric, whether it was the cause of this nut going on a shooting rampage or not, it will be of benefit to everyone. People screaming at each other without listening is a surefire way to get absolutely nothing of value done — and in the real world, not an ideological paradise for either side — it is cooperation, listening and making compromises that will get us all ahead in the end. Both sides are guilty of polemic

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 14, 2011

(Sarah Palin isn’t the only who’s used bull’s eye or target maps (there are some Democratic Party maps of the same sort), and it’s time to tone it down for everyone. Get rid of the stupidity of anger, use rational and logical thinking, and solutions will actually be found. Posted by Resident, a resident of the Monta Loma neighborhood, on Jan. 11. While the shooting of the Congresswomen in Arizona is sad and was tragic, it is ironic that the emergency room doctors who saved her life are the same ones that will suffer under the federal healthcare measure that Rep. Eshoo also supports.

istrator Peter Gilli, who said he could not withhold approval of the tower unless radio frequency waves exceed FCC guidelines, the protestors attempted to use the city’s own zoning ordinance, which does not specifically permit cell phone towers, to overturn the approval. But that argument failed Tuesday, when the council voted 4-1 to back the current ordinance and start the process to craft more definitive language that would permit towers in residential neighborhoods. If the ordinance had been interpreted as some protestors wanted, most of the city would be off limits to the towers, city staff said. Even new Google WiFi towers could be in jeopardy of violating the ordinance. Absent any real data from protestors that showed the towers could be harmful, the City Council did the right thing in permitting them. They have been shown to emit only tiny radiation levels, well under the thresholds set by federal regulators. The council’s decision should allow installation of First Presbyterian’s tower, although we doubt that preschool parents and neighbors will be satisfied. Zoning Administrator Gilli said approval of the tower is on the condition that parents would be able to pull their children from the preschool without being penalized with any fees or extra charges. That may not be enough for those who say the Little Acorn preschool is the most convenient and affordable for them. We recommend parents study results from a “before and after� radiation level test planned by Clear Wire official Gordon Bell. He promised to post results at the church, which he said would show almost “undetectable� levels of radiation. If that is the case, as we suspect it will be, there will be no reason for preschool parents or neighbors to worry about cell phone tower radiation.


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n chilly and not so chilly mornings, I love waking to thoughts of a bounteous breakfast. My lifestyle doesn’t allow for indulgence in a big breakfast very often, but when it does, it’s a place like Country Gourmet in Mountain View that whets my appetite. Country Gourmet has been a fixture on the southeast corner of El Camino Real and Rengstorff Avenue for decades. Architecturally, the restaurant resembles a small farm structure. Built in the late 1960s, the building originally housed a unit of the long-defunct Red Barn restaurant chain, according to owner Herman Shaw.

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Bring this ad in for 10% Off Minimum $20 pre-tax purchase.

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A Gift for the Mountain View Voice Patrons

See COUNTRY GOURMET , page 14

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“The property had been in the family for many years. After Red Barn closed, the building sat empty for some time,� Shaw said. In 1981, his son conceived the family-restaurant idea and the place has been a local favorite ever since. Shaw is the only family member active in the restaurant but has other business interests that limit his on-site time. “We have a manager and most of the staff has been with us for 10 years,� he said. From my perspective, it seems to be a well-run operation. While Country Gourmet is open six days a week for breakfast, lunch and dinner, I’m focusing on the early menu for this breakfast review.

1405 W. El Camino Real Mtn. View 650/964-3321 Casual and cozy French restaurant. 15 tables.

KAPP'S PIZZA BAR & GRILL 191 Castro Street Mtn. View 650/961-1491

Happy Hours Mon-Fri 4pm-6pm.

ICE CREAM GELATO CLASSICO

241 B Castro Street Mtn. View 650/969-2900

     Valid for dinner Monday—Wednesday 5pm—10pm. Expires January 26, 2011. Offer valid with purchase of dinner. Minimum 2 person dinner party. Dine-in only. No wine substitutions. One bottle per table.

If you would like to be listed in DINING ON THE TOWN please call Anna or Brent at the Voice at 964-6300.

JANUARY 14, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

13


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Tradition - Established in 1957

Pezzella’s Villa Napoli

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The Belgian waffle at Country Gourmet is topped with fruit.

January Pie Special Lemon Meringue

COUNTRY GOURMET Continued from page 13

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14

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 14, 2011

“Healthy Food and Lots of It” is the logo beneath the Country Gourmet sign that beckons along El Camino. It’s one advertising line that few could dispute, at least the “lots of it” part. Portions range between generous and gigantic, frequently overflowing the large plates that the orders are served on. Just inside the door, the “Place Order Here” sign was a little offputting on my first visit, where

the service was semi-self-serve. Orders were delivered to the table but there was no attendant table service. There was an area for water and soft drinks, while another section was designated as the serve-yourself coffee station. The behind-the-counter staff was friendly but I missed a perky waitress sashaying around the breakfast room, refilling coffee mugs willy-nilly and calling everyone “hon.” Printed menus were ready for diners at the door, listing the usual retinue of omelets, scrambles, Benedicts, quiches, pancakes and eggs any which way, with sides of

Country Gourmet 2098 W. El Camino Real Mountain View 650-962-1700 cgmountainview.com Breakfast hours: Tue.-Fri. 7-11 a.m.; Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Closed Mondays.

Reservations Credit Cards Alcohol Takeout Highchairs Wheelchair Access Banquet Catering Outdoor Seating Noise Level Bathroom Cleanliness Parking

low excellent lot

fruit, biscuits, potatoes, meats, toast options, grilled polenta, guacamole and hollandaise sauce. There was also a chalkboard behind the order/pay position that catalogued 17 additional breakfast specials. “Come earlier” was my lesson; several of the specials were already sold out. According to Shaw, the most popular item is Belgian waffles ($7.95). The waffles are topped with a thicket of blackberries and sliced strawberries, along with Chantilly cream and scoops of sweet butter, with syrup on the side. It’s an artistic plate, worthy of a Dutch Master’s signature, but this edible art would have pleased even Vermeer — had he loved waffles. Pumpkin pancakes ($7.95) were also topped with a bucketful of sweet butter, with cranberry and maple syrups on the side. There were no additional frills, and my initial reaction was that eight bucks was a lot for two pancakes. Still, it was plenty to eat: I could barely manage a salad for dinner that evening. The pancakes were dense and flavorful, fresh-tasting and slightly nutty. My only real complaint was that the cranberry syrup was teeth-chattering sweet. The San Jose omelet ($8.75), served open-face, was layered with bacon, cheddar and jack cheeses, diced tomatoes, roasted tomatillo salsa, avocado and sour cream, and came with a choice of two sides. Although I couldn’t finish it all, my mind still carries an image of that tempting omelet. Corned beef hash ($8.95) was a mini-mountain of grilled potatoes, house-made corned beef, bell peppers, tomato and onions, topped with two poached eggs under a blanket of hollandaise sauce. The hash and eggs were delicious and the hollandaise well prepared. I didn’t like them together, though. The lemony sauce seemed at odds with the other savory ingredients rather than complementing them. Next time, I’ll ask them to hold the hollandaise and give the hash its just due: a liberal splash of Tabasco. I cringed when I saw the size of the Italian sausage omelet ($8.95). The eggs ballooned with spicy sausage, mushrooms, feta cheese, fresh arugula and sweet peppers. Unwisely, I chose potatoes as one of the sides. Not that they weren’t delicious, but it was just too much when coupled with the huge biscuit that was more sconelike and bigger than any other flaky little breakfast biscuit in the neighborhood. I passed on dinner altogether that evening. Country Gourmet has an excellent children’s menu ($5.25). Every order is served with a ramekin of fruit and choice of milk or juice


8FFLFOE

Spices for Health

and either pancakes, chocolatechip pancake, cheese omelet or breakfast quesadilla (eggs, bacon and cheese) all designed specifically for children. The interior of Country Gourmet is zigzagged off with wood planters filled with living plants, making the dining room more intimate than if it were one large open space. There is a small patio for use in warmer weather. Tables are tile-topped, chairs of sturdy wood. Daylight floods the room even on inclement days thanks to highup windows. Restrooms must be accessed from the parking lot, but are part of the building, a holdover from Red Barn days. Next time you’re hankering for an all-American, amped up, heavy-duty, super-delicious, home-styled, 100 percent authentic and “lots of it� breakfast, Country Gourmet is the place for you. Who knows? You might be hungry again in a day or two.

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Exp. 1/31/11 JANUARY 14, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

15


8FFLFOE

ILLUMINATIONS A lighting retail showroom

2243 Old MiddleďŹ eld Way, Mountain View 650-940-1559 Now re-opened under new Ownership & Management. Take advantage of our re-opening sale. December 31, 2010 through January 31, 2011

NMOVIETIMES Black Swan (R) ((( Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 5, 7:40 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 12:05, 2:45, 5:25, 8 & 10:35 p.m. Blue Valentine (R) (((( Aquarius Theatre: 2, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7, 8 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2, 4:45, 7:35 & 10:20 p.m. Casino Jack (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 2:25 & 8:10 p.m.

All Lighting Fixtures in the showroom

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Fri 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Sat 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Sun 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Mon 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Tue 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Wed 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Thu 4:45 & 9:35 p.m. Century 20: Fri 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. Sat 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. Sun 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. Mon 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. Tue 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. Wed 4:30 & 9:40 p.m. Thu 4:30 & 9:40 p.m.

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Country Strong (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:30, 4:10, 7:05 & 9:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:40 a.m.; 2:20, 5:10, 7:55 & 10:40 p.m.

Hours: Monday to Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm Saturday 10:00am to 4:00pm

The Dilemma (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:35 a.m.; 2:15, 4:55, 7:50 & 10:35 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:10, 1:50, 2:50, 4:25, 5:25, 7:05, 8:05, 9:45 & 10:45 p.m. The Fighter (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:30, 5:35 & 8:25 p.m. Gantz (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 8:30 p.m. Century 20: 8:30 p.m.

3ATURDAY *ANUARYTHsAM Preview: &RIDAY *ANUARYTHAM PM AND3ATURDAY/PENSAM

The Green Hornet (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Noon, 3, 6:30 & 9:40 p.m. In 3D at 1, 4:15, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 12:20, 3:10, 6 & 8:50 p.m. In 3D at 11:30 a.m.; 1:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5:05, 7, 7:55, 9:50 & 10:45 p.m. Gulliver’s Travels (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 2 & 7:25 p.m. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (PG-13) (((1/2 Century 16: Fri.-Wed. at 9:25 p.m. Century 20: 6:45 & 10:05 p.m. The King’s Speech (R) (((1/2 Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 2:10, 4:55, 7:45 & 10:25 p.m. CinÊArts at Palo Alto Square: 1:30, 3, 4:20, 5:55 & 7:15 p.m. Fri.-Sat. also at 8:45 & 10 p.m.

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Little Fockers (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:45 a.m.; 2:10, 4:40, 7:20 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:35, 7:10 & 9:35 p.m. Made in Dagenham (R) ((1/2 Guild Theatre: 1 & 3:30 p.m. Rabbit Hole (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2, 4:25, 7:10 & 9:30 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: Sat. at midnight. Season of the Witch (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 1:25, 4, 5, 6:40 & 9:15 p.m. Fri.-Wed. also at 10:10 p.m. The Social Network (PG-13) (((1/2 Guild Theatre: 6 & 8:30 p.m. Somewhere (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:55 a.m.; 2:45, 5:10, 8 & 10:25 p.m. Tangled (PG) ((( Century 16: 12:40, 3:40, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 1:45 & 4:15 p.m. In 3D at 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:10 & 10:30 p.m. The Tourist (PG-13) (1/2 Century 20: 2:35 p.m. Fri.-Wed. also at 7:40 p.m. Tron: Legacy (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 5:20 p.m. In 3D at 1:30, 4:30, 7:35, 10:25 p.m. Century 20: 6:55 & 9:55 p.m. In 3D at 11:45 a.m.; 2:40, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. True Grit (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 12:50, 2:30, 3:50, 5:05, 7:55 & 10:35 p.m. Fri.-Wed. also at 6:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 12:25, 1:55, 3:05, 4:40, 5:55, 7:20, 8:40 & 10 p.m. Yogi Bear (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 2:35 & 7:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:10 a.m.; 1:20 & 3:25 p.m.

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16

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 14, 2011

Note: Screenings are for Friday through Tuesday only.

AQUARIUS: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) CENTURY CINEMA 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) CENTURY 20 DOWNTOWN: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CINEARTS AT PALO ALTO SQUARE: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) GUILD: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) For show times, plot synopses and more information about any films playing at the Aquarius and Guild visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com

-Skip it --Some redeeming qualities ---A good bet ----Outstanding

For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more movie info, visit www.mv-voice.com and click on movies.

NMOVIEREVIEWS

BLACK SWAN ---

(Century 16, Century 20) Longtime ensemble dancer Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman) covets the leading dual role in a high-scale New York ballet production of Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake.� Though she has the attention of artistic director Thomas Leroy (Vincent Cassel) — or is that the “attentions�? — he questions her ability to play both the innocent White Swan and the sinful Black Swan. Still, Leroy takes the leap of casting Nina. “Perfection is not just about control,� he purrs. “It’s also about letting go.� Letting go is, of course, dangerously close to coming unhinged, as Nina steadily does over the course of the film. Rated R for strong sexual content, disturbing violent images, language and some drug use. One hour, 48 minutes. — P.C.

BLUE VALENTINE----

(Aquarius) At the film’s present-day outset, we find youngish couple Dean (Ryan Gosling) and Cindy (Michelle Williams), along with kindergarten-age daughter Frankie (Faith Wladyka), living in that house in rural Pennsylvania. The early scenes show a functional family with everyday tensions, little fissures that eventually erupt. Dad’s attentive but a little too buoyant; Mom’s wearily responsible but nearly humorless. The point is pressed when the family dog goes missing, with an emotional fallout that sends Frankie to the grandparents for a spell and forces Dean and Cindy to deal with each other. In a clumsy bid for romance, Brooklyn-bred Dean insists: “We have to get out of this house. Let’s go get drunk and make love.� So the couple repairs to a honeymoon hotel and encamps in the cheesily decorated (and pointedly chosen) “Future Room.� The story unfolds in two timelines: the present-day and six years earlier, when the couple meet, court and marry. Rated R on appeal for strong graphic sexual content, language and a beating. One hour, 52 minutes. — P.C.

THE FIGHTER --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) Christian Bale plays a crackhead in mid-’90s Lowell, Mass. Ex-boxer Dicky Eklund milks his status as “The Pride of Lowell� as he struts the streets, crowing, “Making my comeback!� Walking a half-step behind Dicky, younger half-brother Micky Ward (Mark Wahlberg) wears a weary smile. Co-dependency zig-zags through Micky’s extended family as he pursues his own light welterweight boxing career Micky trusts Dicky’s boxing instincts, but Micky’s no fool. When a promoter dangles a deal with the condition of “no crazy-time nonsense,� Micky recognizes the opportunity, though it takes the moral support of new girlfriend Charlene (Amy Adams) to take a leap. Rated R for language throughout, drug content, some violence and sexuality. One hour, 54 minutes. — P.C.

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 ---1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) The boy wizard who has captivated audiences since his literary introduction in 1997 is ready for his final curtain call. Harry Potter is officially a young man in this film (“Part 2� is due


8FFLFOE

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MADE IN DAGENHAM --1/2

(Guild) “We are the working classes, the men and the women.� So goes the rallying cry in the quivering-lip climax of “Made in Dagenham,� a dramatization of the pivotal 1968 Ford autoworkers’ strike that led to the 1970 Equal Pay Act in the United Kingdom. Sally Hawkins plays Rita O’Grady, a chipper machinist for Ford’s Dagenham plant. Having languished under unfair treatment for years, the women begin to feel that the times may be on their side, and Rita finds herself the popular choice to be their spokeswoman. Rated R for language and brief sexuality. One hour, 53 minutes. — P.C.

THE TOURIST -1/2

(Century 20) Depp and Jolie essentially play themselves in this hapless attempt at a romantic romp: the former a goof itching to take on new roles, and the latter an unearthly creature who makes every sidewalk her runway. Jolie puts her inaccessibility to work for the part of Elise CliftonWard, a person of interest to police tracking her boyfriend, Alexander Pearce. As part of his plan to keep breathing, Pearce sends missives to Elise, directing her how to throw Scotland Yard and Shaw’s Russian thugs off his trail. His latest scheme forces Elise to pick out a suitably built stranger and convince her observers that the stranger is Pearce. Elise lights on Frank Tupelo (Depp). Rated PG-13 for violence and brief strong language. One hour, 44 minutes. — P.C.

TRON: LEGACY --1/2

(Century 16, Century 20) Released in 1982, the original “Tron� film boasted groundbreaking graphics and established a techsavvy fan base. But “Tron: Legacy� arrives about 15 years too late. Leading the foray this go-round is Sam Flynn (Garrett Hedlund), the 20-something son of video-game guru Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges). When family friend Alan Bradley (Bruce Boxleitner) tells Sam that he’s received a cryptic message from Kevin — who vanished some 20 years earlier — Sam goes to visit his dad’s old arcade to find clues. After reckless computer use, he’s transported to “the grid,� a digital world where gladiatorial games and luminous attire are the norm. Rated PG for sci-fi action violence and brief mild language. 2 hours, 7 minutes. Rated PG for sequences of sci-fi action violence and brief mild language. 2 hours, 7 minutes. — T.H.

TRUE GRIT ---

(Century 16, Century 20) The Coen brothers place their indelible stamp on this impressive remake of the classic John Wayne western. Assertive young lass Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld) is determined to track down her father’s killer, Tom Chaney (Josh Brolin), who is hiding out deep in rugged Indian territory. Mattie is headstrong and defiant, and seeks to hire only the very toughest bounty hunter to bring in Chaney. Enter Rooster Cogburn (Jeff Bridges), a no-nonsense U.S. Marshal who speaks with a gruff voice and sports an eye patch. Also on Chaney’s trail (for a separate crime) is cocky Texas Ranger LaBoeuf (Matt Damon). After considerable dissention, the three odd companions elect to travel together in hopes of hunting down Chaney. Rated PG-13 for some intense sequences of western violence including disturbing images. 2 hours, 8 minutes. — T.H.

NMOVIECRITICS S.T.- Susan Tavernetti, P.C. Peter Canavese, T.H.-Tyler Hanley

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Ecole internationale de la PĂŠninsule

Mountain View Whisman School District (K-8) ENROLLMENT K-8 ENROLLMENT 2009-2010 2010-2011 BEGINS BEGINS FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 21 DISTRICT DISTRICT OFFICE OFFICE 8:30 8:30 AM AM -- 4:00 4:00 PM PM

District Kinder Info Nights District Kinder Info Night (registration requirements and enrollment info) (registration requirements January 11 - Theuerkauf Elementary and enrollment info) January 13 - Landels Elementary January 7 6:30 - 8:00Elementary PM Landels 6:30 -Info 8:00 Kinder Sitepm Visits and Open Houses throughout the month of January

Kinder Info Site Visits and Open Houses

throughout MVWSD offers:the month of January Castro DI (English-Spanish) MVWSD offers Monta Loma CEL Choice (parent Programs participation) CEL and PACT (parentparticipation) participation) Stevenson PACT (parent DI (Spanish-English)

Ě˝ ࣑ ੢ á„‘ á‹• ओ PRE-SCHOOL Outstanding fullday program.

LANGUAGE Longest running bilingual immersion school in the area. Experienced native-speaking faculty.

ACADEMICS

More iinformation: 650.526.3 650.526.3500, ext. 1001 www.mvwsd.org (Enrollment Info) www www.mvwsd.org

Ranchtownrecycling.com

Established English curriculum. Rigorous program in a nurturing environment. Low student-to-teacher ratio.

WHEN IT’S YOUR CHILD, EXPERIENCE MATTERS. TEACHING MANDARIN CHINESE IMMERSION FOR 15 YEARS. A LEADER IN FRENCH IMMERSION IN PALO ALTO. ACCEPTING PRE-SCHOOL APPLICATIONS. REGISTER FOR A TOUR TODAY. OPEN HOUSE/INFO SESSIONS January 8, 2011 RSVP FOR ADMISSIONS TOURS AND INFO NIGHTS IN ON OUR WEBSITE

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF THE PENINSULA 7%"777)342/2's0(/.%  

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE McKelvey Park and Shoreline Sports Complex You are invited to a Study Session where the City Council will discuss conceptual design alternatives for McKelvey Park, and how some alternatives would affect the design and programming of the proposed Shoreline Sports Complex. The McKelvey Park improvements are part of the Santa Clara Valley Water District’s Permanente Creek Flood Protection Project. The meeting will be held at the following time and location:

The Bowman program builds confidence, creativity and academic excellence. +"#'$) $$"#'$) 

Tuesday, January 18, 2011 7:00 p.m. Mountain View City Hall Council Chambers 500 Castro Street Mountain View At the meeting City staff will provide an update on the projects, review conceptual plans, receive public input, and hear discussion by the City Council. If you have questions, please contact Robert Kagiyama in the Public Works Department at (650) 903-6311 or by email at Robert.kagiyama@mountainview.gov.

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www.bowmanschool.org        JANUARY 14, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

17


(PJOHT0O M O U N TA I N V I E W V O I C E

ART GALLERIES

FAMILY AND KIDS

Let The Sun Shine Viewpoints Gallery and Gallery 9 have joined to present sun-themed group shows. The artists are all local. Receptions to meet the artists: Jan. 15, 1-4 p.m. at both galleries. Gallery 9 is located at 143 Main Street in Los Altos. See websites for Sun. hours. free. Viewpoints Gallery, 315 State St., Los Altos. www. viewpointsgallery.com

Pets In Need Animal Adoption Fair Central Park at Whisman Station is kicking off the 2011 volunteer season by hosting a pet adoption fair with the help of Pets In Need as they help find homes for many pets. Jan. 15, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Central Park at Whisman Station Apartments, 100 N. Whisman Road, Mountain View. Call 650-964-8400. www.petsinneed.org or http:// prometheusreg.volunteermatch.org/campaign/ project_detail.jsp?id=787187 Preschool Open house MVPNS is an NAEYCaccredited parent cooperative nursery school, where parents’ involvement is key. Programs are offered for 3s, 4s, and 4/5s who are not quite ready for kindergarten. Tour the school and meet staff at the open house. Jan. 15, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. MVPNS School, 1325 Bryant Ave., Mountain View. www.mvpns.org/events.html

CLASSES/WORKSHOPS Communication Workshop (Toastmasters Orbiters) “Interested in improving communication and leadership skills, through prepared or impromptu speeches? Join our club and friendly learning atmosphere, as a guest. We meet every first and third Thursdays,� Toastmasters says. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Community Center, 210 South Rengstorff Ave., Mountain View. Call 408-623-3543. orbiters. freetoasthost.us Nutrition and Cancer Treatment Learn ways to eat during cancer treatment that can help in the recovery process, how to establish nutritional goals, stay hydrated and cope with changes in taste and tolerance. Facilitated by Grace Avila; nutrition educator, cancer guide and professional chef. Jan. 15, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free. Cancer Support Community, The Vineyard, 455 N. Whisman Blvd., Suite 300, Mountain View. Call 650-9685000 ext. 2. www.Cancersupportcommunity.net

COMMUNITY EVENTS Graham Middle School Zumbathon Graham Middle School presents a “Cardio Fitness Zumbathon.� Salsa, merengue, hip hop, cumbia and much more. This is a fundraising event to support Graham Middle School. Jan. 21, 3-6 p.m. $5 at the door. Graham Middle School in the MUR, 1175 Castro Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-471-3357.

EXHIBITS Pancakes, Coffee and Heroic Actions Exhibition of drawings and paintings by artist Norm Rosenberger. Free. Mohr Gallery, Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA) at Finn Center, 230 San Antonio Circle, Mountain View. Call 650-917-6800 ext. 306. www.arts4all.org/ attend

LIVE MUSIC Amy Obenski Amy Obenski performs Jan. 14, 8-10 p.m. Redrock Coffee, 201 Castro St., Mountain View. Jenne Sluder Jenne Sluder performs live Jan. 21, 8 p.m. Free. Redrock Coffee, 201Castro St., Mountain View.

ON STAGE “Angels in America: Millennium Approaches� Bus Barn Stage Company presents Tony Kushner’s “Angels in America: Millennium Approaches� from Jan. 13-15 as part of its new mentorship program for young adults called first stages. Kushner’s epic is directed by Revati Dhomse, a senior at Monte Vista High School. 8-10:30 p.m. $15. Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Call 650-941-0551. www.busbarn.org

OUTDOORS Hands-on Nature: Critters of the Bay Area “Touch an owl! Sniff a skunk! Respect a rattlesnake! Join Hidden Villa’s lead naturalist at the hearthside for a fascinating evening featuring local wildlife both big and small. No live animals present, but plenty of cool things to investigate, then treat yourself to warm cocoa and cookies. 5 years old and up,� Hidden Villa said. Jan. 21,

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY “Darwin’s Dilemma� DVD Reasons To Believe San Jose Chapter regular meeting. “See why the Cambrian explosion and the sudden appearance of many animal phyla presents a serious problem for Darwinian evolution,� even organizers say. Q&A and discussion period following. Light refreshments. Jan. 14, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. First Presbyterian Church of Mountain View, Room 103, 1667 Miramonte Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-917-9107. www.reasons.org/get-involved/ chapters-and-networks/san-jose

RESEARCH SUBJECTS Advanced Research on Spoken Dialog Systems Telephone-based commercial Spoken dialog systems (SDS) have become reliable tools: delivering information from stock quotes to bus schedules, performing transactions such as paying bills, and providing technical assistance. An overview and challenges are discussed. Jan. 18, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Carnegie Mellon Silicon Valley, NASA Research Park, Bldg 23, Moffett Field. Call 650-335-2852. www.cmu.edu/silicon-valley/ news-events/seminars/index.html

SENIORS City Council Meet and Greet The Mountain View Senior Advisory Committee (SAC) will be hosting a “Meet and Greet� with Mountain View City Council members at the Senior Nutrition Program. City Council and SAC members will eat at different tables to maximize the opportunity to meet and hear comments from seniors. Jan. 19, 11:30 a.m. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330. Life Strategy - It’s Never Too Late Join Ron Schilling, PhD, discusses the path to self discovery. Jan. 20, 1 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330. Newcomers’ Group An orientation and tour of the Senior Center includes a review of classes, upcoming events, social services, and general information. Tour begins in the front lobby. Jan.

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'RANT2OAD ,OS!LTOSsWWWSTSIMONORG &ORINFORMATION#ALLXOR%MAILADMISSIONS STSIMONORG 4OURSAVAILABLE NOAPPOINTMENTNECESSARY â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 14, 2011

‘NO GOOD DEED’ BY PAUL PRAVERMAN Set in the midst of the Irish gang war, this new play is told with a classic film noir feel. Thurs - Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2p.m. Jan. 13-30, $15 - $30. Pear Avenue Theatre, 1220 Pear Ave. Unit K, Mountain View. www.thepear.org

7-8:30 p.m. $7 per student/limited income or $10 per person. Hidden Villa Farm, 26870 Moody Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-9704. www. hiddenvilla.org

-ĂŒÂ°ĂŠ-ÂˆÂ“ÂœÂ˜ĂŠParish School

18

NHIGHLIGHT

Wild Cat Adventure Wild Cat Adventure features five live wild cats from around the world. Each cat is shown on stage as information about the species is shared with the audience. You may see a cheetah, rare king cheetah, cougar, serval, caracal, Siberian lynx, Canada lynx or Geoffroy’s cat. Jan, 23, 2-3 p.m. $10-$5. Foothill College - Appreciation Hall, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 707-8740-3176. www.wildcatfund.org 24, 2 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-9036330. Planning for your Future: Financial Solutions BridgePoint hosts a presentation by Met Life and Lars Larsen, President of Heritage Financial North. Learn about long-term financial options. Jan. 15, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. BridgePoint at Los Altos Senior Living Community, 1174 Los Altos Ave., Los Altos. Call 650- 948-7337. www. kiscoseniorliving.com Setting Up an E-mail Account Learn to create free and easy e-mail or learn more about an existing Gmail account by signing up for this workshop with Monica Lipscomb. Space is limited, and basic computer skills are required. Jan. 20, 2:30 p.m. Free. Mountain View Senior Center, 266 Escuela Ave., Mountain View. Call 650-903-6330.

TALKS/AUTHORS Dr. Abbas Milani Dr. Abbas Milani presents “The Shah.� Though his monarchy was toppled in 1979 and he died in 1980, the life of MohammadReza Shah Pahlevi, the last Shah of Iran, continues to resonate today. Jan. 18, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www.booksinc.net Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish presents his memoir “I Shall Not Hate: A Gaza Doctor’s Sacrifice on the Road to Peace and Human Dignity.� Jan. 14, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 301 Castro St., Mountain View. www.booksinc.net eWomenNetwork ‘Accelerated Networking’ Luncheon Kristy Rogers, eWomenNetwork. With guest speaker Suzanne Doty. Discussion topic: workplace flexibility and the economic security of women. Jan. 14, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. $52. Michaels at Shoreline, 2960 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View. Call 408-2888484. http://kristyrogersconnects.com Free talk: Introduction to Reiki Reiki (“universal life energy� in Japanese) is hands-on healing energy. Reiki Master Michal Rinkevich’s talk will include both explanation and demo. Jan. 29, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Camelot Center, 1000 Fremont Ave., Ste 155, Los Altos. Call 650-949-3332. www.CamelotCenter.net NASA Research Park Public Lecture KR Sridhar, CEO of Bloom Energy, will discuss his early roots at NASA, developing technologies to sustain life on Mars, and how this experience led to his vision for an innovative new fuel cell technology. This technology powers Bloom’s unique on-site power generation systems. Jan. 18, 7-9 p.m. Free. NASA Conference Center Building 3, 500 Severyns Road, Moffett Field. http://researchpark. arc.nasa.gov/

Public Talk on What Happened to Pluto Dr. Mike Brown of Caltech will give an illustrated, non-technical talk on “How I Killed Pluto and Why It Had It Coming.� Brown has led the effort to find worlds beyond Neptune, and his work directly led to the demotion of Pluto. Jan. 19, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Smithwick Theater, Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Call 650-949-7888. www.foothill.edu/ast Reading and signing with Li Miao Lovett “The Lap of the Gods� is a novel set in China by Li Miao Lovett. Lovett is a frequent contributor to the San Francisco Chronicle. Jan. 27, 6-7 p.m. Stanford Bookstore, 519 Lasuen Mall, Stanford. Call 650-329 - 1217. stanfordbookstore.com

TEEN ACTIVITIES Lee McKenkie Launch Party Celebrate the launch of local author Lee McKenzie’s new YA novel “The Princess of Las Pulgas,� in which a girl’s grief, perceived to be aloofness, earns her the nickname Princess. Jan. 20, 7 p.m. Free. Books Inc., 74 Town & Country Village, Palo Alto. www.booksinc.net Teen Open Gym Teen Open Gyms are open every Saturday night for various sports. Middle School and High School students only; bring student ID. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Whisman Sports Center, 1500 Middlefield Road, Mountain View. Call 650-903-6410.

VOLUNTEERS Mitzvah Day Community Day of Service Community-wide day of service. There are around 25 service projects to choose from for every age and interest. Jan. 17, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto. Call 650-223-8656. www.paloaltojcc.org/mitzvah Pancreatic Cancer Information Meeting The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Bay Area Affiliate is hosting an information meeting with special guest Julie Fleshman President & CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. The Stanford Hospital & Clinics Health Library is located in the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center. Jan. 19, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Stanford Hospital & Clinics Health Library, 3921 Fabian Way, Room G106, Palo Alto. Call 415-543-3549. www. pancan.org/bayarea

NMORELISTINGS For a complete listing of local events, see our website at www.MountainViewOnline.com


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Bulletin Board 115 Announcements PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN) Adopt a Cat - $50 Breakthroughs for the New Year! C-oDependents Anonymous (CoDA) Canary Foundation Luncheon Computer Basics-Adults & Seniors Create your ISC: Individual Sust - free Do you need a personal CFO? Free Kids Reiki Free Shiatsu to the community! Free talk: Introduction to Reiki Free talk: Theta Healing Fun Dance Classes (Kids-Adults) House Cleaning

240 Furnishings/ Household items

Friday Afternoon driver needed

Hope Street Studios In downtown Mtn. View Most instruments, voice All ages & levels (650) 961-2192

Blanket, Twin, Red Fleece NEW - $22

345 Tutoring/ Lessons

Jazz & Pop Piano Lessons Learn how to build chords and improvise. Bill Susman, M.A., Stanford. (650)906-7529

Entertainment Center - $75/OBO

Guitar Lessons 650-224-3550 beg/int all styles your home $60

Prepare for Year End Sign up for dance class! Softball Tryouts 16U 14U Teacher Open House Are you new to teaching? A career changer interested in teaching? Curious about working in an independent school? Menlo School is always interested in meeting exceptional teachers. Get to know our school community and find out what it’s like to teach at an independent school at our Open House for Teachers on Thursday, Jan. 13, 3:30-5:30 pm. Menlo School, 50 Valparaiso Avenue, Atherton, CA 94027. RSVP to: teacheropenhouse@menloschool.org

Airlines Are Hiring Go to aviation maintenance college for FREE! Tuition paid for the BEST. H.S. Grad w/good grades and proven work history. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866) 859-6378. (Cal-SCAN) Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-210-5162 www.Centura. us.com (Cal-SCAN) High School Diploma! Graduate in 4 weeks! FREE Brochure. Call Now! 1-866-562-3650 ext. 60 www. SouthEasternHS.com (Cal-SCAN) HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy. com (AAN CAN) GERMAN Language Class Instruction for Hebrew Bar and Bat Mitzvah For Affiliated and Unaffiliated George Rubin, M.A. in Hebrew/Jewish Education 650/424-1940

133 Music Lessons A Piano Teacher Children & Adults Ema Currier (650)493-4797 Barton-Holding Music Studio Next 6 week “singing for the non-singer” class starts Jan. 13. Call Laura Barton 650/965-0139 FUN Piano Voice Violin Guitar

Lenox Solitaire Platinum-Banded - $ varies Porthole Clock - $100.00

OMG Meetup Softball Tryouts

Saturn 1994 SC2 Coupe - 1499.00 ob

FREE FIREWOOOD & MULCH

Winter Singles Dance

202 Vehicles Wanted

garden shed - $60

Piano Lessons Taught in your home. Member MTAC & NGPT. Specializing in beginners. All levels welcome. Karen, (650)367-0307 or

135 Group Activities BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP CHILDREN’S ENTERTAINER http://www.meetup.com/onceamonth Learn to Square Dance NATURE/OUTDOORS Events Calendar

www.art4growth.com

Lost leather Glove ladies brown glove. 650.964.0251 Runaway Cat!

145 Non-Profits Needs Donations Needed! Knitters Wanted

150 Volunteers Library Volunteers Needed Museum Volunteers NASA cats need fosterers

Donate Car Receive $1000 Grocery Coupons, Your Choice. Noah's Arc, No Kill Animal Shelters. Advanced Veterinary Treatments. Free Towing, IRS Tax Deduction. Non-Runners. 1-866-912-GIVE. (Cal-SCAN) Donate Your Car Children's Cancer Fund! Help Save A Child's Life Through Research and Support! Free Vacation Package. Fast, Easy and Tax Deductible. Call 1-800252-0615. (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales PA: 843 Ross Court, 1/14, 1/15, 9-4 Furn, housewares, glassware, toys new and used, some collectibles. Palo Alto, 765 San Antonio Road, Unit 67, Jan 14, 12-6, Jan 15 9-5, Jan 16 9-2

Your Personal CFO

130 Classes & Instruction

Dining Table B&B Italia - $900

245 Miscellaneous

McCool Piano Studio 566-9391MP Near Burgess Gym Menlo Park

140 Lost & Found

Katha Pollitt Talk

DINETTE SET - $125

Polaris 2009 Ranger XP 700 EFI AWD This is a 2009 Polaris Ranger XP 700 4x4 Limited Edition.It is a liquid cooled, 4-stroke, fuel injected twin cylinder beast of a utility vehicle with a fully automatic transmission.The transmission has high and low range as well as reverse.It has four wheel independent suspension and on-demand 4 wheel drive meaning that when you need 4x4 you only have to flip a switch. When you don’t need it you can turn it off and save gas. You can also unlock the rear differential to save your turf.This machine is in like new condition. It has only 884 original miles and 141 engine hours on it.FREE SHIPPING!!! For more questions regarding the Ranger please email me at:thomas.summer007@msn.com

Wanted. Audio cassette player,

INDEX

fogster.com

For Sale

215 Collectibles & Antiques 1930’s Style Mickey Mouse Framed - $5.00

201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

Disney’s Donald Duck Framed 50’s $25.00

Mercedes Benz 2002 E320SE 2002 Mercedes E320SE $15,850 Very Good Cond. Always garaged. Only 31,920 miles (this is not a misprint!). Clean, just smogged, registered and serviced. Clean title.Orig owner. call: 650-948-7580

Mickey Mouse Holiday Animation - $30.00

Disney’s Org. 50’s Donald Duck - $20.00 Org. 1955 Mickey Mouse Club, - $20.00 Rare! Org. 30’s D. Duck Glass - $25.00 SHOT GLASS CHECKERS: 25 Pcs. SPORTS MEMORABILIA: 80s-’10 Vintage Bakelite Purse - $30 Vintage lighting New Years Sale VINTAGE ROCK T-SHIRTS: 80s

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD IN The Almanac, The Palo Alto Weekly or The Mountain View Voice call 326-8216 or visit us at fogster.com

220 Computers/ Electronics 16MM FILM PROJECTOR: B&H 5 Assorted Wii Games(Bundled) - $70 OBO ANTI-SLEEP ALARM: Keychain** Apple 22” Cinema Display - $150 AM/FM CD DUAL TAPE BOOMBOX:* Brother HL-2140 - $62.50

FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-904-3558 (AAN CAN) 60s-70s Toys: Star Wars+++++ ABORIGINAL BOOMERANG: Signed Back Pack - Jansport - $30.00

Nanny wanted

Chess Lessons for kids and adult One-to-One Tutoring Service Stanford-Educated Expert Tutors Tutoring/Homework Help Writing/SAT Tutor Grades 6-12

350 Preschools/ Schools/Camps Holiday Horseback Riding Camps Webb Ranch (650)854-7755 MVPNS-preschool Open house 1/15

BASS ALE BEER TAP HANDLE: **

355 Items for Sale

CANON CHARGER & 4L BATTERY $15.00

4Y Boy winterclothes30+items$40

Canon 35 MM Camera - $40.00 CRUTCHES: Adj. Aluminum Lg.

BOY 1-2years clothes 30+items Snowboots size 10 toddler$8

CRYSTAL DECANTER: Signed****

HAWAIIAN PETROGLYPH TRIVET: LAPLAND SHAMAN WITCHES DRUM: PARACORD: Blackhawk Black POSTERS: French, DM, Batman+ Pre-Teen Girls Clothing - $2.00 or L QUARTZ JAGUAR CARVING: Mayan SMOKE/FOG MACHINE: DJ Smoke* Stetson Western Hats - $35.00 Telephoto Camera Case - $25.00 ULTIMATE BBQ GRILL: Fire+Ice Vintage Rabbit Fur Coat - $125 VINTAGE VINYL: Elec./Rock/DJ Western Boots - $55-$100

250 Musical Instruments Baby Grand Piano - $1550.00

425 Health Services Diabetic Test Strips WANTED. Cash Paid. Unopened, Unexpired Boxes Only. All Brands Considered. Help others, don't throw boxes away. For more information, Call 888-491-1168. (Cal-SCAN) Type 2 Diabetes? If you used Tye 2 diabetes drug AVANDIA between 1999- present and suffered a stroke, heart attack or congestive heart failure you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727. (Cal-SCAN) Toren Psychological Services - $800 to $1200 for a

Piano-Baldwin Excel Tone - 2,250.00

260 Sports & Exercise Equipment German Hiking Boots (Men) - $45.00 OBO GRAPHITE TENNIS RACQUET GUN CASE,TALL STEEL - $100.00 SOFTBALL BAT: Ten Pro Alumin THREE RACQUETBALL RACQUETS: TWO FISHING ROD & REEL COMBO

Kid’s Stuff 330 Child Care Offered After School Care/Driver Avail AM Nanny - MV to Santa Clara Are you looking for mature Nanny Arts,Music,Bilingual,play based. Child Care opening in San Carlos

HANDSFREE HEADSET: 2.5mm

Debbie’s Family Day Care - RWC

HDMI CABLE FOR BLUE RAY NEW - $15.00

EXCELLENT BABYSITTER AVAILABLE!

IBM Selectric II Typewriter - $350

EXCELLENT NANNY AVAILABLE!

LASER PRINTER/COPIER: Xerox

Little Ages Has January Opening

230 Freebies

Sweet and Outgoing Babysitter

Learn to Live Pain Free - FREE

Violin Teacher

Window Screen - FREE

235 Wanted to Buy

340 Child Care Wanted

Record Players

French babysitter/tutor wanted

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Engineer Technical Marketing Eng Responsible for providing application & system level guidance to dev teams & customers in the design & build of systems to integrate our lenses into mobile phone cameras. MS in EE. Mail resumes to:Human Resources-106, LensVector, Inc. 2307 Leghorn St, Mt View, CA 94043. Management - VP, Business & Product Mgmt for Oysterfields LLC Menlo Park, CA Bach Deg in MIS or the equiv; 10 yrs relevant wrk exp; foreign lang abil. Resumes:1370 Willow Rd, Menlo Park, CA 94025

550 Business Opportunities All Cash Vending Route Be Your Own Boss! 25 Machines + Candy All for $9995. Vend3, 880 Grand Blvd., Deer Park, NY. 1- 877-915-8222. Major CC accepted! (Cal-SCAN)

560 Employment Information $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

GO TO FOGSTER.COM TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS JANUARY 14, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

19


MARKETPLACE the printed version of

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$18.70 Per Hour DOE Immediate Opening Processing refunds on your computer. No experience needed. FT/part-time. Start Mon. 1-800-5644483 (AAN CAN) Company Drivers Solos and Hazmat Teams * GREAT PAY * GREAT MILES * CDL-A Required. We also have dedicated and regional positions available. Call 866-789-8947. Swift. (Cal-SCAN) Computer Work Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.KTPGlobal.com or call 1-888-304-2847. (Cal-SCAN) Driver - ASAP! New Pay Increase! 34-46 cpm. Excellent Benefits. Need CDL-A & 3 months recent OTR. 1-877-258-8782. www. MeltonTruck.com (Cal-SCAN) EMT Free Training Plus pay, benefits, vacation, regular raises. HS grads ages 17-34. Help others. Gain financial security. Call Mon-Fri 1-800-345-6289. Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! HYPERLINK “http://www. homemailerprogram.net/�www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

Business Services 624 Financial CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. (866) 447-0925. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (AAN CAN) Cash Now! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866-SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. (Cal-SCAN) crosetti funding CASH NOW we offer fast cash for your mortgage note, annuity, and business note call 1 800 391 4032 Note Investment 6 percent ret., paid monthly, 50%LTV, secured on Woodside income property. Owner/agent Jim 650-851-7300

645 Office/Home Business Services Advertising: Best Kept Secret A business card sized display ad.140 California community newspapers. Reach 3 million+ Californians. Cost $1,550.$1.33 cost per thousand. Free brochure (916)288-6019; www.CalSDAN.com (Cal-SCAN) CA Press Release Service The California Press Release Service distributes news releases electronically to 500 California newspaper editors. www.CaliforniaPressReleaseService. com Questions call (916) 288-6010.

710 Carpentry Cabinetry-Individual Designs Precise, 3-D Computer Modeling: Mantels * Bookcases * Workplaces * Wall Units * Window Seats. Ned Hollis, 650/856-9475

715 Cleaning Services AC Housecleaning Residential/Commercial. Move in/ out, offices, more. Good rates. 11 years exp. Please call 650/678-4792. www. achousecleaning.com

Asuncion Yanet House Cleaning ! !!       

650-906-7712 or 650-630-3279

Francisca’s Deep Housecleaning Experienced, Refs. 650-669-0628 or 650-701-0703 Marlem HouseCleaning House, Condos, Apartments, Office, Move-in, Move-Out, Free Estimates. Good References. “Serving All The Bay Area� 650-380-4114 or 650-389-3327 Patty’s House Cleaning Service Apartments, Houses, offices. 10 years exp. Excellent Ref. Free est. Call Anytime. Lic#32563 (650)722-1043 Socorro’s Housecleaning Comm’l, residential, general, move in/out. Detailed, honest, good refs, 25 yrs exp. 650/245-4052

719 Remodeling/ Additions Domicile Construction, Inc.

General Contractor T 415 999-3143 650 366-8335 www.domicileconstructioninc.com since 1990 lic #627843

All Animals Happy House Pet Sitting Services by Susan Licensed, insured, refs. 650-323-4000

Home Services 703 Architecture/ Design Design/Permits One stop for your remodel/design needs. Comp. plans incl structural engineering and energy compliance (T-24). ADW 650-969-4980

20

Free

est.

R.G. Landscape Yard clean-ups, maintenance, installations. Call Reno for free est. 650/468-8859 Uriel’s Gardening Maint., haul, poison oak, clean up, free est. 650/862-1378 Uriel Vidal Gardening & Landscaping Bi-Weekly, twice a month clean up. Tree removal. Fences, retaining walls, new lawn irrigation systems. Gutter cleaning. Free est., excel. refs. 650-771-0213 WEEKLY MAINTENANCE Comm/Res. Tree Ser. Aeration, Irrigation, Rototilling, Stump Grinding, Trimming/Pruning. Roger 650.776.8666

751 General Contracting NOTICE TO READERS It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb. ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board

AB WEST CONSTRUCTION $ $ $$ !#$  $ !$" $! www.ABWESTConstruction.com Call E. Marchetti    "

(650) 799-5521

730 Electrical

748 Gardening/ Landscaping Beckys Landscape Weekly/periodic maint. Annual rose/fruit tree prune, clean ups, irrigation, sod, planting, raised beds. Demolition, excavation. Driveway, patio, deck installs. Power washing. 650/493-7060

Since1990!

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS          

650-322-7930 PL/PD STATE LIC# 608358

www.cjtigheconstruction.com

GARDENING MAINTENANCE

             Jose Martinez

(650) 271-4448

General Construction Services RooďŹ ng, Water ProoďŹ ng, Decks and other Services.

(408) 532-8020 Lic#770948-B&C39

754 Gutter Cleaning Carlson Gutter Cleaning Pressure Washing Available Servicing Menlo Park and surrounding areas CALL MARK (650)322-5030

Jody Horst

Artist

856-9648 $ Consult $DrSprayIrrigation $ Maintenance $La!RocGardens $EdibGardensV Boxes Lic. #725080 JR’s Garden Maintenance Residential clean up, trimming, new lawn and sprinkler installations. 16 yrs exp. Great refs. Jose, 650-743-0397 Leo Garcia Landscape/ Maintenance Lawn and irrig. install, clean-ups. Res. and comml. maint. Free Est. Lic. 823699. 650/369-1477.

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 14, 2011

HANDY

“Ed� MAN

   $! $      #$ $    

757 Handyman/ Repairs AAA HANDYMAN AND MORE

Repair        

Lic.# 468963

Since 1976 Licensed & Insured

650-222-2517

ABLE HANDYMAN FRED CompleteHomeRepair Maintenanc  emodelin ProfessionalPainting Carpentr Plumbing Electrical CustomCabineDesign Deckence  AnMuchMore 30 Years Experience

650.529.1662 3.27

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790 Roofing

FREE ESTIMA     

ED RODRIGUEZ (650)465-9163$(650)570-5274 Miller’s Maintenance Plumbing, Painting,Tile & wall repair Free Est. No job too small! Senior Disc. 25 years Experience (650)669-3199 Small Jobs Welcome Local, refs., 25 years exp., trusted, reliable. 650/218-8181

759 Hauling a J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, appliances, garage, storage, etc, clean-ups. Old furniture, green waste and yard junk. Licensed & insured. FREE ESTIMATES 650/368-8810

A

J O H N STO N

70% Recycled

LARGE TRUCKS ,&(,'*-Trees LARGE/small JOBS Free Estimate Insured

650-327-HAUL cell: 415-999-0594

HAULING 

A Junk Hauling Service Residential & Commercial. Yard clean-up service. Large & Small jobs. 650-771-0213 Frank’s Hauling Commercial, Residential, Garage, Basement & Yard. Clean-up. Fair prices. 650/361-8773

767 Movers Armandos Moving Homes, Apartments, Storage. Full Service moves. Serving the Bay Area for 20 yrs. Licensed & Insured. Armando, 650-630-0424. CAL-T190632

MOOVERS LICENSE CAL. T-118304

Serving the Peninsula since 1975/Owner-Operated!

327-5493 771 Painting/ Wallpaper Don Pohlman’s Painting *Detailed Craftsmanship *Excel. Restorative Prep *Great Local References 650/799-7403 * Lic. 635027 Gary Rossi PAINTING Free 2 gal. paint. Water damage repair, wallpaper removal. Bonded. Lic #559953. 650/207-5292 Glen Hodges Painting Senior discount. Quality work. 35+ yrs exp. Payment plan avail. Lic #351738. 650/322-8325 STYLE PAINTING Comm’l/Residential, interior and ext., full service painting. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650/388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete

820 Home Exchanges

Al Peterson Roofing since 1946

Specializing in

#   "  #!  

SHMOOVER

Alex Electric Lic #784136. Free Est. All electrical. Alex, (650)366-6924

Classified Advertising 240 California community newspapers reaching over 6 million Californians. 25-words $550 works out to 18 cents cost per thousand! FREE email brochure. Call (916) 288-6019. www.Cal-SCAN. com (Cal-SCAN)

650 Pet Care/ Grooming/Training

Mario’s Gardening Maintenance, clean-ups. 650/365-6955; 995-3822

 ng        

650-493-9177

FULLY FURNISHED NEW 2 BEDROOM/2 NEW 2 BEDROOM/2 New luxury executive duplex home Palo Alto 2 BR/2.5 BA

825 Homes/Condos for Sale

795 Tree Care THE TREE EXPERTS Tree trimming/removal. Quality tree care. 10% off. lic./Ins. (650)222-4733

Real Estate

Palo Alto Condo, 3 BR/3 BA Open Sat. & Sun. 1/8&9 2-4 P.M. For Sale by Owner. Remodeled 4th fl. corner unit w view, pool, security in desirable downtown Hi-rise, approx. 1800 S.F. Palo Alto schools. $895K. 650-321-2827.

801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Menlo Park, 2 BR/1 BA - $1780/mo Palo Alto 2 Br/2.5 Ba - $4500/month , 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 1 BR/1 BA - $1,395/mo Palo Alto, 2 BR/2 BA Condo - $4500/month Palo Alto, 3 BR/3 BA - $4250 WDSD: Studio Secluded studio, central Woodside. $1250 mo., utils incl. Gar. 650/851-1113

803 Duplex Fully Furnished New Duplex Home Available, 2 BR/2.5 BA - 4500 New Luxury Executive Duplex Home For Lease In The Midtown Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3500

805 Homes for Rent Great Price In The Neighborhood! Midtown Palo Alto Duplex Home For Lease / Rent :, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3500 Los Altos Hills, 2 BR/2 BA - $2500

Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA One level condo with balcony views in the heart of downtown Palo Alto— low maintenance—$475—covers HDTV. Priced at $1.1 million. Walk to University Ave stores, restaurants and Caltrain. Seventeen unit, well managed elevator building with two underground parking spots and storage unit. We are represented by Gary Kurtz at Alain Pinel real estate Phone: 650.543.1202 Cell: 650.796.5507

830 Commercial/ Income Property

Los Altos, 3 BR/2 BA - $2600/mont Menlo Park, 2 BR/2 BA - $2600.00/m Midtown Palo Alto 2 Br/2.5 Ba , 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Midtown, Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $3400/mo New Luxury Executive Duplex Home For Lease In The Midtown Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 2 BR/1.5 BA - $2,950/month Palo Alto, 2 BR/2.5 BA - $4500 Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $3600/mo Palo Alto, 4 BR/2 BA - $3600. Palo Alto, 5+ BR/3 BA - $6500/mo. Redwood City, 3 BR/2 BA - $3,000/mon RWC: 3BR/1BA 2 car gar., big yard. Woodside Plaza. $2000 mo. 510/728-7661 Woodside, 1 BR/1 BA - $1,300.00

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) LA: Room Share home w/elderly woman. Full privs. Convenient loc. $700 mo. N/S/P. 650/254-1810 Menlo Park, 1 BR/1 BA - $1200/mth, or $300/w

Deli/Restaurant/Commercial Restaurant - Deli - Wine Shop/BarGrocery - Retail - Menlo Park - For Lease. 650-218-3669

840 Vacation Rentals/Time Shares Timeshares: Sell/Rent For CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Services will Sell/Rent Your Unused Timeshare for CASH! Over $78 Million Dollars offered in 2010! www.SellaTimeshare.com (877) 554-2098 (Cal-SCAN)

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage ARIZONA BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS $99/mo., $0-down, $0-interest. Golf Course, Nat'l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int'l Airport. Guaranteed Financing. NO CREDIT CHECK! (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www.sunsiteslandrush.com (AAN CAN) OWN 20 ACRES Only $129/mo. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas (safest city in America!) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free map/pictures. 866-257-4555 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN)

Roe General Engineering Concrete, asphalt, sealing, pavers, new construct, repairs. 34 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703 * 650/814-5572

Palo Alto, 2 BR/1 BA - $985.00

779 Organizing Services

New 2 Bedroom/2 1â „2 Bath Duplex Home/ Furnished, 2 BR/2.5 BA - 4500

890 Real Estate Wanted

Redwood City, Studio - 940.00

Retired couple want 2bed/2bath

End the Clutter & Get Organized Residential Organizing by Debra Robinson (650)941-5073

787 Pressure Washing Discount Pressure Washing Decks * Patios * Driveways Becky, 650/493-7060

810 Cottages for Rent New 2 Bedroom/2 1â „2 Bath Duplex Home/ Fully Furnished, 2 BR/2.5 BA - 4500

815 Rentals Wanted Great Caretaker-Tenant - $1000 Home Wanted Long-Term Rental Needed Roomate available Seeking Quiet Cottage/Guest Quar

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MARKETPLACE the printed version of

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

1VCMJD/PUJDFT 995 Fictitious Name Statement ESSENTIAL SPIRITS ALAMBIC DISTILLERIES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 546046 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Essential Spirits Alambic Distilleries at 865 Sonia Way, Mountain View, CA 94040, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Limited Liability Company. The name and residence address of the owner(s)/registrant(s) is(are): CLASSICK IMPORT & EXPORT LLC 865 Sonia Way Mountain View, CA 94040 Registrant/Owner began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein on 03/15/2001. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 28, 2010. (Voice Jan. 14, 21, 28, Feb. 4, 2011)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: EUTIMIO VALENZUELA GARCIA Case No.: 110-PR-168100 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of EUTIMIO

VALENZUELA GARCIA. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: TIMO E. GARCIA and EDWARD GARCIA in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: TIMO E. GARCIA and EDWARD GARCIA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on January 31, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept.: 3 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: /s/ Victoria Li, Esq. 2845 Moorpark Ave., Suite 110 San Jose, CA 95128 (408)386-3998 (Voice Dec. 31, 2010; Jan. 7, 14, 2011) NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 10-0126130 Title Order No. 10-8458401 APN No. 14838005 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/24/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice

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is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by GREGORY R GRAY, AN UNMARRIED MAN, dated 07/24/2007 and recorded 08/08/07, as Instrument No. 19542206, in Book , Page ), of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Santa Clara County, State of California, will sell on 02/04/2011 at 10:00AM, At the Market Street entrance to the Superior Courthouse, 190 North Market Street , San Jose, Santa Clara County, CA at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2178 LELAND AVENUE, MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA, 94040. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $811,985.55. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an "AS IS" condition, but

Do You Know? ★ The Mountain View Voice is adjudicated to publish in the County of Santa Clara. ★ Our adjudication includes the Mid-Peninsula communities of Palo Alto, Stanford, Los Altos and Mountain View.

without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. If required by the provisions of section 2923.5 of the California Civil Code, the declaration from the mortgagee, beneficiary or authorized agent is attached to the Notice of Trustee's Sale duly recorded with the appropriate County Recorder's Office. DATED: 01/02/2011 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone/Sale Information: (800) 281 8219 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. FEI # 1006.122172 1/07, 1/14, 1/21/2011 Voice

NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: December 13, 2010 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of Applicant(s) is/are: TARGET CORPORATION The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 555 Showers Dr. Mountain View, CA 94040-4795 Type of license(s) applied for: 21 - OFF-SALE GENERAL (Voice Jan. 7, 14, 21, 2011)

Call Alicia Santillan (650) 326-8210 x6578 to assist you with your legal advertising needs.

Or e-mail her at: asantillan@paweekly.com

Yes! It is possible! AY ND

U NS

PE

O

3 bed., – 21/2 bath home, 2-car gar. With Los Altos Schools YOU BET!

$645,000 www.49ShowersD464.com 1.888.328.8097 Tour #273 Francis C. ROLLAND

- serving you Since 1985 Direct: 650-947-2259 Francis@Frolland.com

CASSIDY REAL ESTATE

When buying a home through Cassidy Realty our agents will make efficient use of your time, provide you with unsurpassed service, and ensure a smooth and successful transaction.

Call us today.

MARY K. & JAMIE CASSIDY

1530 Miramonte Ave., Los Altos, CA 94024 Phone: (650) 948-0650 Fax: (650) 948-0663

★ The Mountain View Voice publishes every Friday.

JOSEPH HITTINGER

Deadline: 5 p.m. the previous Friday

Call Alicia Santillan (650) 326-8210 x6578

to assist you with your legal advertising needs. E-mail: asantillan@paweekly.com

R E A LTO R / A G E N T

496 First St. suite 200, Los Altos, CA 94022 ) 650-947-4700 !# 650-947-4731  650-468-9090  "   ####%$"###%#%!(#&#  #&#!$%#"#"!%&(""#!%# ( #"% "#%' !&$(!"#!

JANUARY 14, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

21


OPEN SUNDAY, JANUARY 16



BEA SINES

1:30 – 4:30 PM

650.743.5198

LD nd SO Fi

Yo ur D re am H om e!

The only number you need to call. www.beasineshomes.com

Experienced, QualiďŹ ed and Successful. A consummate real estate veteran with more than 30+ years of experience in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties

We have new listings every week!



        

Happy 2011! As your real estate agent, I’ll bring my years of

786 Rustic Lane, MOUNTAIN VIEW

experience successfully buying and selling homes in the local market.

                                

OFFERED AT $1,225,000 www.786RusticLn.com

â– 

CertiďŹ ed Residential Specialist

â– 

Seniors Real Estate Specialist

â– 

EcoBroker CertiďŹ ed

650.947.4798

INTERO CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE, TOP 1%

I know the neighborhoods, schools, market conditions, zoning regulations and what it takes to make the deal go through. It takes a full-time commitment - anything less and you’d be short changed. As a full-time agent, I’m able to “work the market� for you, keeping up-to-date with new listings and conditions as they impact the market. It would be my honor to serve as your real estate agent.

Let’s get together to talk about your home buying and/or selling plans. Call me at the ofďŹ ce 650 823-1515 or on my cell phone (650) 747 9332 or send me an e-mail lrthinkgreen@gmail.com

Lynn Ross Kinetic Properties Ăˆxä°Ç{Ç°™ÎÎÓÊUĂŠĂˆxä°nÓΰ£xÂŁx

Pam@PamBlackman.com www.PamBlackman.com DRE# 00584333 Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.

O P E N SAT /SU N , 1 : 3 0 - 4 : 3 0

LOS ALTOS

179 GIFFIN RD.,

$998,000

Great location just minutes from downtown Los Altos! Charming 2BR/2BA home has many amenities & upgrades including gorgeous hardwood floors & new double paned windows. Remodeled Master bathroom, new interior & exterior paint. Top L.A. Schools.

B Y AP P O IN T M E N T O N LY

LOS ALTOS HILLS

360 DEGREE VIEWS

$3,750,000

Private Gated knoll top estate w/ breathtaking views. 5 BR, including 2 master suites. 3 car garage, pool, terraced gardens, lawns & access to Preserve.

O P EN S UNDAY, 1 : 3 0 -4 : 3 0

LOS ALTOS HILLS

13914 MIR MIROU DR.

BY A P P OI NTMENT ONLY

LOS ALTOS

â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  JANUARY 14, 2011

LOS ALTOS HILLS

$6,450,000

ATTENTION TO DETAIL THROUGHOUT $2,899,000

4 SECLUDED LOTS

Exceptional Estate includes a 1.12 Acre parcel w/ main home 6BR/5.5BA, pool, gazebo + a 1.25 Acre parcel w/ gst house, tennis court, total of 2.37 Acres adj. to the Preserve. P.A. Schools.

Beautifully remodeled spacious one level home on a cul-de-sac w/ 6BR/4BA. Library w/ custom cherry bookcase. Kitchen w/ top of the line appliances & granite countertops. Close to downtown Los Altos.

Private drive leads to 4 secluded knoll-top Estate Lots. Situated on 15+ acres with majestic oaks and serene views of the valley & western hills. Lots range from 2.2 5.3 acres & are approved and ready to build. Create your own private compound. MFA range from 5,299 - 11,145 sq.ft.. Lots priced from $2,495,000 to $2,795,000.

B Y A P P OI NTME NT ONLY

LOS ALTOS HILLS

DESIRABLE NEIGHBORHOOD

$4,100,000

Newly rebuilt custom 4BR/3.5BA home on 1 acre private park-like setting. Separate 700 sq.ft. gst hs., Tennis Court, sparkling pool w/ hot tub. 3 car garage.

BY A P P OI NTMENT ONLY

LOS ALTOS HILLS

GORGEOUS ESTATE

$5,600,000

Gated European Estate. Private drive leads to incredible knoll-top setting. Gorgeous new 4BR/5.5BA, gourmet kitchen, spacious family rm, wet bar, library, theatre and separate game/entertainment room. Manicured gardens, fruit orchards, pool & spa.

Worldwide Referral and Global Internet Exposure. Go to www.campi.com for a complete search. 22

BY APPOINTM ENT ONLY

PRICE UPON REQUEST

BY APPOINTM ENT ONLY

SAN JOSE

GREAT FAMILY HOME

$549,000

Lovely 3 BR / 2 BA home in a wonderful family neighborhood. Close to Pruneyard, Santana Row & Los Gatos Creek Trail.

33AN!NTONIO2D ,OS!LTOSs650.941.4300


LIFELONG MOUNTAIN VIEW RESIDENT & AREA SPECIALIST

DIA N E SC HM I T Z Realtor (650) 947-2955 www.DianeSchmitz.com dianeschmitz@serenogroup.com

Open Sunday 1:30-4:30

     



%  ,      0 *   *  0 , 

OLIVE TREE LANE, LOS ALTOS HILLS

DRE # 01235034

!  ++,*2 ,"'*.&"1-   Open Sunday 1-4



   

Open Sat/Sun 1:30-4:30

'"  ( )&%"*+$)&%"*

LINDA HOLLISTER Realtor, Relocation Specialist

 !" # $  

PARMA WAY, LA

PHONE: 650.479.1105 CELL: 650.868.0883 EMAIL: lhollister@apr.com WEBSITE: www.lindahollister.com

 *"    * -   .

!    

LINDA HOLLISTER PERSONAL PROFILE AND COMMITMENT Linda has enjoyed 34 years in the real estate industry beginning in 1970 in Palo Alto. Working and raising children here on the Peninsula, she participated in the market as property values stretched from the $24,000 to $75,000 mid-range to the current $750,000 to $1.5 million mid-range. apr.com | Half Moon Bay 42 N. Cabrillo Hwy, CA 94019 650.712.1199





  

'"  ( )&%"*+$)&%"* ORCHARD GLEN CT LYELL ST, LOS ALTOS  !   

The Ratelle Team David Chung and Caroline Ratelle Alain Pinel Realtors

     

 !    

Open Sunday 1-4

,"" 

# * 



 

Let our teamwork elevate “your real estate experience to the next level.� Caroline Ratelle

David Chung

650.380.3389 650.302.6027 cratelle@apr.com dchung@apr.com

'"  ( )&%"*+$)&%"*

!  ./))&)$(",'!&''-+,*+",.3 

www.davidandcarolineapr.com

Is Quality Important to You?

 *    .1# *

PRICE REDUCED Open Sunday 1-4

apr.com | LOS ALTOS 167 S. San Antonio Rd 650.941.1111

WE MEASURE QUALITY BY RESULTS

%!

      

HAMILTON WAY, REDWOOD CITY

   

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JANUARY 14, 2011 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

23


461 Palo Alto Avenue, Mountain View

22395 Diericx Court, Mountain View

Open

OPEN SAT/SUN 1:30-4:30

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irca 1900 Bungalow located on a premier tree lined street in the heart of the Old Mountain View neighborhood, offering charm with the option to move right in. Nestled on a large lot presenting three bedrooms and one bath with room to expand or rebuild. Conveniently located within moments to downtown shops and restaurants. Easy access to Caltrain transportation and major commute routes. Other amenities include newer roof, new exterior siding, a cellar and modernized with forced air heating. s!PPROXIMATELY SQUAREFEETOFLIVINGSPACE s!PPROXIMATELY SQUAREFOOTLOT s%XCELLENTSCHOOLS"UBB%LEMENTARY 'RAHAM-IDDLE AND-OUNTAIN6IEW(IGH

Offered at $799,000

Offered at $1,299,000

Barbara Williams

Sheri Hughes & Judy Bogard-Tanigami

DRE#01033672

650.209.1519 877.274.9790

650.209.1608 shughes@apr.com

bwilliams@apr.com www.barbsite.com

WWW.22395DIERICXCOURT.COM

When it comes to buying or selling a home, you want Barb in your corner.

apr.com | LOS ALTOS | 167 S. San Antonio Road | 650.941.1111

167 S. San Antonio Rd. Los Altos

R E A L E S T A T E.

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R E A L S E R V I C E.

R E A L R E S U L T S. Over 1500 Homes SOLD in 25 Years! The only Diamond Certified® Realtor in Mountain View and Los Altos

1741 Crane Avenue, Mountain View 4 Large, deep lot offers expansion 4 Upgraded electric service, central opportunities forced air furnace, AC, and other upgrades 4 Refinished hardwood floors, fireplace in living room 4 Located near Cuesta Park, shops, YMCA, hospital, commute routes 4 Updated kitchen with gas stove & and not far from Downtown! French door to backyard

3 Bdrm/1 Bath Offered at $850,000

diamondcertified.org diamondcertified.org

650 947 4780 HBloom@InteroRealEstate.com www.HowardBloom.com DRE# 00893793 24

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 14, 2011

Mountain View Neighborhood Specialist

650.575.8300

web: www.nancystuhr.com

Calif. DRE 00963170


SOLD by Pam Blackman (partial list)

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Let My Experience Work for You! Map data ©2010 Google

Certified Residential Specialist

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650.947.4798

Pam@PamBlackman.com www.PamBlackman.com INTERO CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE, TOP 1%

EcoBroker Certified

496 First Street, Suite 200 Los Altos, CA 94022

DRE #00584333 JANUARY 14, 2011 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

25


     

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26

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  JANUARY 14, 2011

Pam@PamBlackman.com www.PamBlackman.com DRE# 00584333

496 First Street, Suite 200 Los Altos, CA 94022 Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.


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JANUARY 14, 2011 â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013; 

27


:30 0-4 3 : 1 un t/S a S

SARATOGA

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PALO ALTO

4 BR | 2.5 BA

12450 CURRY CT $1,225,000 Flexible floorplan, refinished hrdwd floors, vaulted ceilings, den & spacious backyard R. Brendan Leary

6 BR | 5.5 BA

4060 MANZANA LANE $3,600,000 Green to the core! Sophisticated,eclectic & colorful Mediterranean hm. Vivi Chan

650.941.7040

PALO ALTO

2 BR | 2 BA

320 PALO ALTO AV #D1 $795,000 One-level condo w/fireplace. Newer carpet, kitchen appliances. Secure building w/elevator. Emily Chiang

650.325.6161

:30 0-4 3 : 1 un t/S a S

PALO ALTO

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MOUNTAIN VIEW

4 BR | 3 BA

650.325.6161

3 BR | 1 BA

LOS ALTOS HILLS

5 BR | 4.5 BA

1060 LINCOLN AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,295,000 A must see! This sunny, exquisite 4 bdrms 3bths home in sought after Crescent Park

1741 CRANE AVE $850,000 Lg deep lot, hrdwd flrs, updt kit-bath-heat, frplc in liv rm. Near shops, park, commutes

14176 STANFORD COURT $2,988,000 Beautiful Hm w/Western Hills vw.Virtual tour www.EllenBarton.com Close to Stanford

Denise Monfette

Nancy Adele Stuhr

Ellen Barton

650.325.6161

LOS ALTOS

MENLO PARK

716 N SAN ANTONIO ROAD SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,695,000 4 BR 3.5 BA Master suite & sitting area. Full guest cottage completed.2car garage. Built 2005. Terri Couture 650.941.7040 ELEGANT FAMILY HOME $2,300,000 3 BR 3.5 BA 16 years old 2 story home. Desirable setting on 1/2 an acre lot.Inviting park-like garden. Dora Thordarson 650.941.7040 3YO-1LEVEL-CLOSE TO TOWN $2,158,238 5 BR 5 BA Unique open flrpln w/approx.900 SF cntrl great rm(kit-fam rm)-Cherry flrs Jerry Haslam 650.948.0456 311 CUESTA DR SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,848,000 3 BR 2.5 BA Beautiful spacious home almost completely rebuilt in 2005.Large family room and yard. Hannelore Blanchard 650.941.7040 841 TERRACE DR SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,659,000 3 BR 2 BA Beautiful lvl yrd w/great bk yd,wonderful trees,xellent opportunity to expand or build new Terri Couture 650.941.7040

OLD WORLD CHARM $1,095,000 2 BR 2 BA Stylish remodeled home w/ character & instant appeal. Designer finishes thoughout. Judy Decker 650.325.6161 224 WILLOW RD SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $948,000 3 BR 2 BA Tastefully remodeled home in the Upper Willows w/gourmet island kitchen & air conditioning Joanne Shapiro 650.328.5211 BEAUTIFUL SPACIOUS HOME $898,000 3 BR 2.5 BA Beautiful, spacious 3-level home. Walls of glass. Large, bright kitchen w/breakfast rm. Ken Morgan/Arlene Gault 650.328.5211

LOS ALTOS HILLS REMODELED / REBUILT 2002 $4,795,000 4 BR 4 full BA + 2 half Stunning gated home w/bay views on approx. 1.65 ac.Tour @ www.sevenpondsmoradrive.com M. Shaevitz & E. Barton 650.941.7040 24632 Olive Tree Ln SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,700,000 5 BR 3 BA Fabulously updated home with a beautiful gourmet kitchen. Terri Couture 650.941.7040 0 EASTBROOK AV SUN 1 - 4 $1,795,000 MDA 30,790 sq. ft., MFA 12,725 sq. ft. Large view lot, close in, with Tennis court site. Jamie & Phyllis Carmichael 650.941.7040 MENLO PARK 1020 SHERMAN AV SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,219,000 4 BR 2 BA This charming home near Downtown Menlo Park features stepping stones & towering trees. Yasemin Richardson 650.325.6161

650.948.0456

MOUNTAIN VIEW

49 SHOWERS DR #N367 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $485,000 2 BR 2 BA www.49ShowersN367.com Bright & updated-beautiful views.A/C,new granite countertops. Francis Rolland 650.948.0456 CREEKSIDE RETREAT $249,000 1 BR 1 BA Open patio facing redwood trees, creek & pool. Near vibrant downtown Mountain View. R. Brendan Leary 650.325.6161 SPACIOUS, GREAT LOCATION $92,500 2 BR 2 BA Beautiful mobile home located in 55+ Park. Many custom features. Spacious floor plan. Deborah Greenberg 650.328.5211 FIND SPECIAL EXTRAS $55,000 2 BR 2 BA 2BR/2BA mobile hm. Gas heat. MOUNTAIN VIEW Garage. Clubhouse and community swimDUPLEX IN MOUNTAIN VIEW! $849,000 Spacious duplex in Mtn. View! Each unit ming pool/spa. 650.948.0456 has 2 bedrooms,1 bath, & garage! BY APPT. Jerry Haslam ONLY! PALO ALTO DiPali Shah 650.325.6161 OLD PALO ALTO $3,849,000 809 ALICE AV SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $820,000 4 BR 3 BA Classic center hall colonial hm 3 BR 2 BA Updated w/granite & stainless on a lrg 12,825 sq. ft. lot. Separate dining steel in kitchen w/breakfast bar.LivRm has rm, hd flrs. frplc & bay wndw Debbie Nichols 650.325.6161 J. Galli & M. Nevin 650.941.7040 1329 WAVERLEY ST BLOCKS TO DWNTWN MTN VW SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $2,795,000 $749,500 5 BR 4.5 BA 2-sty chic custom contem3 BR 2.5 BA Blocks to Microsoft,Google,Stevens porary within minutes of downtown PA, Creek Trail,shopping,parks and much more. Elizabeth Thompson 650.941.7040 Stanford,train, top schls. Margaret Williams 650.941.7040 49 SHOWERS DR #D464 1631 CASTILLEJA AVE SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $645,000 $2,175,000 3 BR 2.5 BA www.49ShowersD464.com SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 Best location, largest unit. Desired com- 5 BR 3.5 BA Built by owners this home has plex. LA sch district!! large family rm w/woodburning fireplace. Francis Rolland 650.948.0456 Downstairs suite. 271 SIERRA VISTA AVE. #2 Alan & Nicki Loveless 650.325.6161 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $545,000 649 HOMER AV 2 BR 2.5 BA Townhome w/dual mas- SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $1,499,000 ter suites.Attached garage.Skylight.Open 3 BR 2.5 BA Brand new! In an enclave of kitchen.Living rm w/fireplace. 3 two-story craftsman inspired homes. Royce Cablayan 650.948.0456 Exquisite details. 65 EVANDALE AVENUE #C Nancy Goldcamp 650.325.6161 SAT/SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $519,950 3 BR 2.5 BA Spacious townhouse in small 4 653 Homer Av $1,499,000 unit complex.New Carpet.Low HOA dues SUN 1:30 - 4:30 3 BR 2.5 BA of $100.1 car garage. 650.325.6161 Ric Parker 650.948.0456 Nancy Goldcamp

650.941.7040

PALO ALTO

SAN CARLOS

1549 ALMA ST SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $850,000 2 BR 1 BA Secluded Private Home in the Walter Hays Elem District. Fenced Yard, Hwd Flrs, Fireplace Leannah Hunt 650.325.6161 3712 HERON WY SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $838,000 3 BR 3 BA Elegant 2-year new townhome, many green built w/energy efficient features. Judy Shen 650.328.5211 555 BYRON ST #207 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $725,000 2 BR 2 BA Lux Condos in Dwntwn PA. Exceptionl amenities. Pool, fitness rm, guest apts, 55+ community Jo Jackson/Barbara Sawyer 650.325.6161 4250 EL CAMINO REAL #D237 SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $459,000 2 BR 1 BA Beautiful 1 BR + Den currently used as BR. Enjoy the quiet & comfort of this home. Tom Huff 650.325.6161 115 GREENMEADOW WAY SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $425,000 1 BR 1 BA Contemporary 1 level w/ hi ceiling, lr/dr combo, open granite kit, cheery br, garden patio Barbara Sawyer 650.325.6161

1340 ALAMEDA SUN 1 - 4 $730,000 1340 Alameda 3 BR 1.5 BA Charming home in excellent condition. Wd flrs, FP, skylights, fresh paint, lrg 2-car gar. Wendi Selig-Aimonetti 650.328.5211

REDWOOD CITY 507 BUENA VISTA AV SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $849,000 507 Buena Vista Av 3 BR 2 BA Open floor plan, updated, large lot, detached bonus room, pool, gated front yard. R. Brendan Leary 650.325.6161 YOUR OWN HOME & RENTAL $839,000 3/2 like a private home & 2/1 rental in the front. No common walls. New roof in 2006. Geraldine Asmus 650.325.6161

SAN JOSE 3352 CARDIN AV SAT/SUN 1 - 4 $575,000 3 BR 2 BA Laundry.Separate family roomSome updating-Central Air Condition-2 car garage. Letty Guerra 650.941.7040 SANTA CLARA 1972 STANLEY AV SAT 1:30 - 4:30 $628,000 4 BR 2 BA Discover the delights of this distinctive 4BR/2BA residence. Lots of space. Shake roof. Susan Selkirk 650.325.6161 GREAT COMPS! $476,000 3 BR 2 BA www.2550Castello.com Great starter home, close to everything. This house needs some TLC. Francis Rolland 650.948.0456 SUNNYVALE 625 W REMINGTON DR SUN 1 - 4 $868,000 4 BR 2 BA Atrium model w/skylight,updated kitch w/tile counters & wood-trimmed cabinets,Fam Rm. Melanie Johnson 650.948.0456 A REAL DELIGHT $494,000 3 BR 2 BA Explore the versatility of this distinctive 3BR/2BA hm! It is enticing and stylish! Royce Cablayan 650.948.0456 125 N MARY AV #110 SAT 1 - 4 $145,000 2 BR 2 BA Updated manufactured home in terrific neighborhood. A great condo alternative! Over 1400sf Janie & John Barman 650.325.6161

REDWOOD SHORES

WOODSIDE

23 SPINNAKER PL SUN 1 - 4 $819,000 23 Spinnaker Pl 2 BR 2.5 BA Gorgeous remodeled waterfront home. 2 BR, 2½ BA+ Den. Pool, spa & tennis. 2 car garage. Maha Najjar 650.325.6161

308 BLAKEWOOD WY SUN 1:30 - 4:30 $948,000 3 BR 2.5 BA Idyllic treasure offers a calm oasis in a secluded street close to neighborhood amenities Susan Selkirk 650.325.6161

©2009 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.  An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office Is Owned And Operated by NRT LLC.  DRE License # 00313415

28

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ JANUARY 14, 2011


Mountain View Voice 01.14.2011 - Section 1