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NOVEMBER 20, 2009 VOLUME 17, NO. 46

INSIDE: HEALTH & FITNESS | PAGE 21

650.964.6300

MountainViewOnline.com

New hospital ‘comes alive’ NO HITCHES SUNDAY AS PATIENTS MOVE INTO $470 MILLION FACILITY By Kelsey Mesher

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MICHELLE LE

Brian plays the marimba with fellow Abilities United students as CSMA teacher Paul Prochaska, left, leads with piano. The group meets once a week in the Reay room.

Art unlocks doors for disabled CLASSES AT CSMA, A VOICE HOLIDAY FUND RECIPIENT, ADD BRIGHT SPOT IN TREATMENT ROUTINE

By Dana Sherne

W

hen Mike was a child, poor treatment at an institution left him with a fear of being outside and a hesitation around doors. Now, nearly half a century later, weekly art classes at the Community School of Music and Arts help him overcome these obstacles, said the school’s visual arts director, Linda Covello. “When he first came here, he hesitated and worried over coming in,” she said. “But it didn’t take him long before he was familiar with us. You can see that it broadens his world.” Mike attends classes with other disabled adults through CSMA’s five-year-old partnership with Abilities United, a Palo Alto nonprofit for children and adults with

INSIDE

developmental disabilities. CSMA’s partnership with Abilities United is one way that the school fulfills its mission of “arts for all,” said Evy Schiffman,

2009

liday o H und F

director of marketing and communication at the Mountain View nonprofit. Schiffman added that a major component of reaching that goal is CSMA’s “Arts in the Schools” program, which provides music and arts education to 7,500 students in 27 schools throughout Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

Every student in the Mountain View Whisman School District, for example, gets his or her arts education through this program. This year, CSMA is one of seven local charitable organizations receiving donations from the Voice’s annual Holiday Fund drive. Contributions from readers and local foundations will directly support CSMA’s “Arts in the Schools” program. CSMA also encourages the arts education of autistic youth through a program called “Artistic Intelligence.” Now in its second year, the program serves 48 students who converge on CSMA from Morgan Autism Center, Pacific Autism Center for Education, and AchieveKids. Covello notes that most of the See CSMA, page 8

onday morning was the start of just another day at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. Patients rested quietly in their rooms, nurses administered drugs and bustled through the hallways. The emergency room took on patients — 27 surgeries were scheduled for the day. Though business carried on as usual, there was one major difference about the hospital’s operations: They were all taking place in El Camino’s brand new, $470 million facility, after a meticulously planned patient and ER move from the old facility on Sunday morning. After years of planning, the new El Camino Hospital is now open. “This is literally the first full day of operations,” said Ken Graham, chief executive officer, on Monday morning to a room full of hospital staff, administrators and city officials including Mayor Margaret Abe-Koga, council members Mike Kasperzak, Laura Macias and Jac Siegal, city manager Kevin Duggan and county Supervisor Liz Kniss. “What a marked difference,” Abe-Koga said of the new hospital before presenting a certificate from the city. “For the patients and their families, the experience will be a lot more enjoyable and comfortable one.” “It’s just wonderful for the county as a whole,” Kniss said. “The entire county benefits from this kind of superb health care.” Among those recognized for their work on the seven-year project were co-chairs of the activation committee: Ken King, vice president of facilities services and Diana Russell,

GOINGS ON 28 | MARKETPLACE 29 | REAL ESTATE 32 | VIEWPOINT 18 | MOVIES 27

RN, chief of clinical operations and nursing operations. “Everything went exactly how it was planned,” Russell said, noting that planning for the actual move into the new facility has been in the works for over a year. In recent months Russell and her team led drills, planned scenarios and imagined real-life problems that could occur during the move, in order to prepare for the transition. “I’m feeling great,” Russell told the Voice. She described her last moment in the new, still-empty hospital building at 4 a.m. SunSee HOSPITAL, page 9

Poll: You are happy, probably By Daniel DeBolt

A

ccording to a national poll, Mountain View and the surrounding region is the happiest place in the whole country. The Gallup Healthways Well Being Index, which tracks national happiness levels on a daily basis, recently began breaking down the results by congressional district. Ranking at the top is California’s 14th Congressional District, which includes See HAPPY, page 8

a p r. c o m R ED EF I N I NG QUA L I T Y S I N C E 19 9 0 Reading bet ween the emotional line makes the dif ference bet ween finding a house and a home.

Ginny Zachow

Lynn North

Ryan Gowdy

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LOS ALTOS N Wonderful 3bd/2ba home located

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on a quiet, cul-de-sac. Great floor plan with spacious kitchen, separate FR + 2 fireplaces. Mature trees + updated patio. $1,199,000

N Tastefully remodeled 4bd/2ba home, offers 2,239+/- sf of living space. Enjoy the large, open family room. Excellent Los Altos schools. Open Sunday. $1,198,000

Sue Dumas

David Chung & Caroline Ratelle

Mary Marley

SANTA CLARA N Great Forrest Park location! Fabulous 4bd/2ba home in lovely, pride of ownership neighborhood. Close to schools, library, local cabana club and shops. $888,000

MOUNTAIN VIEW N Completely renovated 3bd/2ba home with dramatic vaulted ceilings in LR and kitchen. Nice, open floor plan with HW floors, + gourmet kitchen. Open Sat. & Sun. $849,000

LOS ALTOS N Exquisitely appointed 2bd/2ba town-

Soli Saatchi

Helen & Ki Nyborg

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LOS ALTOS N Beautiful 3bd/2ba single-level, end-

SANTA CLARA N Lovely, updated 3bd/2ba home

SUNNYVALE N Charming 3bd/2ba ranch-style home in La Linda Terrace neighborhood. Nicely updated with decorator paint + newly refinished HW floors. Generously-sized rear yard. $599,999

unit condo in a secure, luxury building. High ceilings hardwood floors, designer amenities and upgrades throughout. 2 patios. $798,000

located on a quiet cul-de-sac. Updates include kitchen with granite counters, + nicely updated baths. Large backyard. Open Sat. & Sun. $655,000

home in the heart of the Village. Grand entrance, country French kitchen, spacious LR and DR, + library. Private balcony. $849,000

apr.com | LOS ALTOS OFFICE 167 SOUTH SAN ANTONIO ROAD 650.941.1111 A P R C O U N T I E S | S a n t a Clar a | S a n Ma t e o | S a n Fr an c i s c o | A l am e d a | C o n t r a C o s t a | M o n t e r ey | S a n t a Cr uz 2

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ NOVEMBER 20, 2009

7PJDFT A R O U N D

T O W N

Asked in Downtown Mountain View. Pictures and interviews by Dana Sherne.

What is your favorite thing to eat on Thanksgiving? “Not turkey. Something more special. I like casserole — a big, hearty, healthy casserole.” Ellix Wu, Mountain View

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w w w. S m i l e s D e n t a l . c o m The City of Mountain View Recreation Division presents…

“Yams with marshmallows. I love mashed potatoes too. They’re about a tie.” Melinda Gaul, Sunnyvale

Wednesday, December 2, 2009 5:30 p.m. — 7:30 p.m. Join us in downtown Mountain View for a great community event that will focus on Public Safety featuring...

“My grandma makes this jalapeno stuffing so it’s spicy. I always get at least a couple of servings of that.”

x

A mini SNOW AREA!!! (weather permitting)

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Bring your camera to take a photo with SANTA!

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Crafts for the kids!

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Face art!

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Refreshments!

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Entertainment!

Stuart Keith, Mountain View

“I’m a vegetarian.” Charles Samuels, Mountain View

In the Spirit of the season, bring a can of food to help build the Giving Tree which benefits the Community Services Agency of Mountain View/Los Altos Holiday Sharing Program.

Have a question for Voices Around Town? E-mail it to editor@mv-voice.com

For more information call (650) 903-6331 — Event will take place rain or shine! NOVEMBER 20, 2009 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

3

NOTICE OF RECORD OF DECISION INSTALLATION RESTORATION SITE 25 FORMER NAVAL AIR STATION MOFFET FIELD, CA

Read, use a computer, or drive a car without any glasses November 2009

The Department of the Navy (Navy) announces the availability of the Record of Decision (ROD) for Installation Restoration Site 25 at former Naval Air Station (NAS) Moffett Field. The ROD was signed by the Navy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board in November 2009. Former NAS Moffett Field is located 35 miles south of San Francisco and 10 miles north of San Jose. It was an active military base until it was closed in 1994. Former NAS Moffett Field is currently owned and occupied by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Site 25 is located in the northeastern corner of former NAS Moffett Field and includes the Eastern Diked Marsh and the stormwater retention pond. Stormwater from former NAS Moffett Field flows into Site 25. Contaminants transported in stormwater have deposited in sediment and pose a risk to animals at the site. The remedy selected to address contaminated sediment is presented in the ROD and includes excavation, treatment, off-site disposal, and focused restoration of wetland excavations. The remedy was one of several alternatives evaluated and presented to the public for review and was selected as the remedy for Site 25 after comments were received from the public. When this remedy is complete, Site 25 will be available for unlimited use and unrestricted exposure.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION The Site 25 ROD and other site documents are available for public review on the Navy website, www.bracpmo.navy.mil, and at the following locations. For more information about the Site 25 ROD, please contact Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Environmental Coordinator ATTN: Ms. Kathryn Stewart, 1 Avenue of the Palms, Suite 161, San Francisco, CA 94130-1807 (415) 743-4715. Information Repository Mountain View Public Library 585 Franklin Street Mountain View, CA 94041 (650) 903-6337 http://www.mountainview.gov/ city_hall/library/default.asp

-PDBM/FXT

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Administrative Record NAVFAC, Southwest Administrative Records Coordinator ATTN: Diane Silva 937 N. Harbor Drive, Building 1, 3rd Floor San Diego, CA 92132 (619) 532-3676

NPOLICELOG BATTERY 600 Block West Evelyn Ave., 11/11 Central Expy & North Rengstorff Ave., 11/13 1100 Block Castro St., 11/14

BATTERY ON SCHOOL GROUNDS 1000 Block Linda Vista Ave., 11/10

BATTERY ON A POLICE OFFICER 600 Block Moorpark Way, 11/10

DRUNK IN PUBLIC 500 Block Manila Dr., 11/15

TERRORIST THREATS 900 Block Clark Ave., 11/14

OBSCENE/ANNOYING PHONE CALLS 2100 Block Leghorn St., 11/11 400 Block Dell Ave., 11/11 500 Block South Dr., 11/12 400 Block Victory Ave., 11/14

VANDALISM 500 South Rengstorff Ave., 11/15

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Eastbound West El Camino Real, 11/13 Showers Dr., 11/13

DISORDERLY CONDUCT ALCOHOL 600 Block Showers Dr., 11/9 Central Expy & North Rengstorff Ave., 11/11

POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA 1900 Block Hackett Ave., 11/10 2200 Block California St., 11/11 West Middlefield Rd. & Moffett Blvd., 11/13

POSSESSION OF MARIJUANA - LESS THAN ONE OUNCE Latham St. & Showers Dr., 11/10

DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE

A Guide to the Spiritual Community MOUNTAIN VIEW CENTRAL SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

Los Altos Union Presbyterian Church

Saturday Services, Worship 10:50 a.m. Sabbath School, 9:30 a.m. Wednesday Study Groups, 10:00 a.m. 1425 Springer Rd., Mtn. View Office Hours 9-1 Tues - Fri

858 University Ave 650-948-4361

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Los Altos Lutheran Church

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ NOVEMBER 20, 2009

UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE Castro St. & West El Camino Real, 11/9 Evandale Ave., & Leong Dr., 11/10

FALSE REPORT TO POLICE 100 Block San Antonio Cir., 11/9

COMMERCIAL BURGLARLY 2200 Mora Dr., 11/15

RESIST OR INTERFERE WITH OFFICER 900 Block North Shoreline Blvd., 11/10 West Middlefield Rd. & Moffett Blvd., 11/14

INDECENT EXPOSURE 100 Block Farley St., 11/12

PETTY THEFT 300 Block Showers Dr., 11/9 100 Block Sierra Vista Ave., 11/9 500 Block Showers Dr., 11/10 300 Block Showers Dr., 11/10 2500 Block California St., 11/10 600 Block San Antonio Rd., 11/11 1400 Block California St., 11/12 900 Block Marilyn Dr., 11/12 Kohls, 11/14 400 Block San Antonio Rd., 11/15 900 Sierra Vista Ave., 11/15 400 Block San Antonio Rd., 11/15

GRAND THEFT 1000 Block Space Park Way, 11/10 2700 Block West El Camino Real, 11/11 1900 Block Rock St., 11/11 1 Block East Middlefield Rd., 11/11 600 Block National Ave., 11/11 2600 Block Fayette Dr., 11/12 800 Block East El Camino Real, 11/13 1600 Amphitheater Pkwy., 11/15

MISSING PERSON: JUVENILE 1400 Ernestine Ln., 11/15

IDENTITY THEFT 500 Block Palo Alto Ave., 11/10

POSSESSION OF STOLEN PROPERTY

NARCOTICS POSSESSION

1900 Block West El Camino Real, 11/11 California St. & View St., 11/14

400 Block Foxborough Dr., 11/10 West El Camino Real & El Monte Ave., 11/10

THEFT BY FRAUD 600 Block Showers Dr., 11/12

NARCOTICS POSSESSION

DEFRAUDING AN INNKEEPER

400 Block Foxborough Dr., 11/10 500 Block West Middlefield Rd., 11/15

KIDNAPPING 1500 Block West Middlefield Rd., 11/14

SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCE/PERSON/ VEHICLE

100 Block Castro St., 11/13

POSSESSION OF SWITCHBLADE West Middlefield Rd. & Moffett Blvd., 11/11

400 Block Moffett Blvd., 11/9 400 Block North Shoreline Blvd., 11/9 500 Block Escuela Ave., 11/12

ELCA

Pastor David K. Bonde Outreach Pastor Gary Berkland 9:00 am Worship 10:30 am Education Nursery Care Provided Alpha Courses

NCORRECTION

Last week’s story about Mountain View writers participating in NaNoWriMo incorrectly stated that East West Bookstore’s next “writein” is Wednesday, Nov. 23. The correct date is Monday, Nov. 23.

650-948-3012 460 S. El Monte Ave., Los Altos

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To include your Church in Inspirations Please call Blanca Yoc at 650-326-8210 ext. 6596 or e-mail byoc@paweekly.com 4

300 Block West El Camino Real, 11/15 Jane Ln. & North Rengstorff Ave., 11/15 West Evelyn Ave. & Hope St., 11/15

100 Block Castro St., 11/13 600 Block Castro St., 11/13 200 Block Showers Dr., 11/13 1900 Block Crisanto Ave., 11/13 California St. & South Rengstorff Ave., 11/13 Nob Hill Foods, 11/14 Safeway- North Shoreline Blvd., 11/14 1800 Block California St., 11/15

The Mountain View Voice is published every Friday by Embarcadero Publishing Co. 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto CA 94306 (650) 964-6300. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Rates is Pending at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. The Mountain View Voice is mailed free to homes and apartments in Mountain View. Subscription rate of $60 per year. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Mountain View Voice, 450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306.

-PDBM/FXT MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE

■ CITY COUNCIL UPDATES ■ COMMUNITY ■ FEATURES

Is BMX park idea DOA?

Kniss: County officials ‘angry’ over vaccine distribution

COUNCIL DEADLOCKS ON BIKE COURSE, APPROVES DOWNTOWN OFFICE BUILDING

By Kelsey Mesher

S

upervisor Liz Kniss bemoaned the small number of doses of the H1N1 vaccine in Santa Clara County and called their slow distribution “political” during a community forum on the disease last week at the Mountain View Senior Center. “This has been a very trying time for us, with H1N1,” Kniss said, adding that she and other county officials have been “angry, upset and outraged” at the plodding distribution of the vaccine. Kniss, who is president of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors and represents Mountain View, hosted the forum on Thursday evening to inform the public on the pandemic and ways county health officials are working to stop it. Because the county has been so vocal about the shortage, she said, officials finally got a response from the state. Two weeks ago the county had received only 8,800 doses of H1N1 vaccine, far less than the 200,000-dose shipment they were expecting. But as of Thursday night, Kniss said, there had been 147,000 doses delivered to Santa Clara County. “There really hasn’t been a whole lot of consistency or coordination to this,” she said, adding that the county is “well aware” of the uneven distribution of vaccine among states. Kniss said the first shipments of vaccine from the state went to Kaiser, because it was determined on the state level that the provider could reach a large population quickly. Other health providers, as well as the county health department itself, were forced to wait for new shipments, noted county health officer Dr. Marty Fenstersheib. However, he said, the county has now received nearly 150,000 doses and “There will be more vaccine coming.” V

By Daniel DeBolt

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Doc Pezel has been the faculty advisor for 30 years at KJFC, Foothill College’s radio station.

‘Waving high the banner of Punk’ KFJC, FOOTHILL COLLEGE’S STUDENT-RUN RADIO STATION, CELEBRATES ITS 50TH YEAR By Kelsey Mesher

T

aking a tour of KFJC’s facilities, it’s not hard to believe that the local college radio station has been around for awhile. The station seems almost molded to the insides of a brick building on the Foothill College campus. Layers of posters, stickers and a wide assortment of random paraphernalia are plastered to its walls — souvenirs from decades past that mark the station’s evolution. Over the years, KFJC, which broadcasts at 89.7 FM, has garnered awards and earned national press. The most recent milestone: celebrating its 50th anniversary on Oct. 20.

Bob Ballou, KFJC designer and the first voice ever to go on-air under its name, helped celebrate by giving an on-air interview about the first days of the station, back when it broadcast from the old Foothill campus in Mountain View. “(We) focus on the underground music scene, or perhaps stuff you’re not going to hear other places,” said Eric Johnson, the station’s general manager, whose on-air alias is Grawer. Johnson has worked for KFJC since the early 1990s. The station plays anything, from ambient to punk, so long as it’s obscure and, according to Johnson, “not designed to be a billboard hit.” The staff of around

80 students and volunteers adds dozens of songs each week to the station’s already robust collection of music; faculty adviser Doc Pezel estimates they have over 65,000 albums or collections of some sort. As he put, “If you started listening now, you would be very old by the time you were done listening.” Though the station has been around since the 1950s, Johnson said it took on its current underground flavor about 30 years ago. He recalled a 1978 uprising at the station, an event described in true KFJC style on the station’s Web site: “On October 4,” it reads, “five student managers at KFJC voted to overthrow the general manager in reaction to his aggressive emphasis on tight formatting, following mainstream radio industry practice. The mutineers take control of KFJC, waving high the banner of Punk.” “That kind of shaped what the station is today,” Johnson said. Since the overthrow, KFJC has provided Bay Area listeners with off-the-beaten-path broadcasts, featuring little or unknown bands — some of which made it big later, like REM, Sonic Youth and Nirvana.

uesday’s council meeting began straightforwardly — with the approval of a new four-story office building on Evelyn Avenue — and ended surprisingly, with a deadlocked vote on building a new BMX park in Mountain View. The subject of a BMX park was not on the agenda, but was brought up at the end of Tuesday night’s meeting by Mayor Margaret Abe-Koga. Facing possible legal and safety problems, the city in August demolished an informal BMX track along Stevens Creek at Central Avenue that locals had been building and maintaining for at least 20 years. Abe-Koga wanted the Parks and Recreation Commission to study whether the city should build its own BMX park to replace it, probably on a 1.25acre site that stretches along North Road just east of the city’s dog park at Shoreline. She didn’t expect what happened next: The council deadlocked 3-3, with member Tom Means absent, halting the idea in its tracks. “I was kind of surprised they didn’t even want the PRC to look at it,” which would cost nothing, Abe-Koga said. She added that the idea could always come back to the council if there was enough interest from the community. Since 2001, the city has had on-again, off-again interest in building its own BMX park. Such a project would cost about $400,000 an acre and $70,000 a year to maintain, according to a Sept. 17 report from parks section manager Jack Smith. The need for the city to retain an engineer and a landscape architect are among the requirements that “dramatically change the scope” of the project, which

MICHELLE LE

DJ Leticia Domingo spins records during her show “Groove Therapy.”

See KJFC, page 7

See COUNCIL, page 13

NOVEMBER 20, 2009 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

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-PDBM/FXT

Rapist gets 25 to life for Terra Bella attack

Police hunt for armed man in kidnap-robbery WOMAN AWOKEN IN HER MIDDLEFIELD ROAD APARTMENT, TAKEN TO BANK TO WITHDRAW CASH, RELEASED By Kelsey Mesher

A

27-year-old Mountain View woman was wakened at gunpoint early Saturday morning after a man entered her apartment through a bedroom window, then forced her to drive to a bank and remove cash, police say. Police are classifying the crime as a robbery and kidnapping. It occurred at about 1:40 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 14 in the Meadowood apartment complex at 1555 Middlefield Road. “She had the window closed and then instead of locking it with the main lock she had it secured� with a screw lock, said police spokesperson Liz Wylie, adding, “That’s how he got in.� Wylie said the suspect did not let the victim look at his face, and she

was not able to describe his appearance or even say whether he was wearing a mask. “He was just very adamant about her not looking at him and staying behind her in the car, staying behind her while they walked,� Wylie said. The victim could only describe the suspect as a man of medium height and build. He used a small handgun. According to police, after the robber made the woman drive to the bank and withdraw an undisclosed amount of cash, he told her to drive them back to her home. But the woman balked, telling the robber he already had what he wanted. “He had his money and he fully agreed,� Wylie said. The woman pulled over her car and the robber exited and fled on foot.

The woman drove directly to the Mountain View Police Department to report the crime. “She was very, very cooperative,� Wylie said. “She drove straight here, which was smart.� Police are looking into whether this case is related to another Mountain View home invasion robbery which occurred in late September, as well as a similar incident in Palo Alto. Wylie said that at this point, the only similarities seem to be that the victims were young women living alone. “We don’t know for sure, but there are many differences between these� cases, she said. For example, in the previous cases there were sexual threats involved, and in Saturday’s case there was no threat of sexual assault. Wylie said the incident is a scary reminder to all to lock doors and windows properly and to be vigilant, even in a generally safe community like Mountain View. Anyone with information is encouraged to call Detective Kevin Solomon at (650) 903-6356 or the main MVPD number at (650) 9036344. Callers may be anonymous. V

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MELCHOR PAREDES ASSAULTED MOUNTAIN VIEW WOMAN IN 2007 By Kelsey Mesher

A

San Jose man was sentenced last week to 25 years to life in prison for the 2007 rape of a young woman on Terra Bella Avenue. Melchor Paredes, 38, pleaded no contest last month to the rape, in addition to burglary and possession of a deadly weapon. His sentence was handed down on Thursday, Nov. 12. On Aug. 2, 2007, Paredes hid outside the victim’s home in the 900 block of Terra Bella Avenue, wearing dark clothing and a ski mask. According to police reports, Paredes confronted the then-22year-old woman as she was leaving for work shortly after 7 a.m. He threatened her with a knife and forced her back inside her apartment, where he bound her with duct tape and raped her. Paredes, who had been working for a local construction company and using the alias “Ramon Jayardes,� reportedly moved to Georgia after committing the

crime. He moved back to the area in December 2008, and began working for the same construction company. In January, police received a tip from the victim’s husband, who was a coworker of Paredes’ and knew him as “Ramon.� Police began investigating Paredes, and three weeks after receiving the tip-off managed to collect physical evidence from him. Reportedly he was pulled over in a routine traffic stop, and police collected a thumb print and DNA sample to confirm his identity, because he was driving without a license. The County Crime Lab confirmed in mid-February that the physical evidence matched evidence collected at the time of the rape. On Tuesday, Feb. 17, police sought out Paredes at his work. After attempting to hide in the attic, he was taken into custody. Paredes reportedly told police he knew the victim, and had dated her for two months. V

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â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â–  NOVEMBER 20, 2009

          





  

        





  

       





  

     

   

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-PDBM/FXT

Foothill chief: College faces ‘unprecedented cuts’ By Kelsey Mesher

C

ommunity colleges have not been immune to the state’s slashes to educational funding, said Foothill College president Judy Miner in a talk to Mountain View community leaders last week — these days, in fact, even tenured faculty face the ax. In her presentation, given during a Thursday, Nov. 12 Challenge Team meeting, Miner said that July 1, 2010 will mark a two-year period of shrinking staff size and “unprecedented cuts� to the college’s budget. Its administrative staff will be down 14 percent since July 2008, she said. Classified staff will be down 9 percent, and faculty down 6 percent. This March, she said, district officials will have to notify tenured faculty of looming layoffs. “We can no longer support the number of programs and services which we have been able to offer,� Miner said to the group, which includes local school officials, city representatives, members of the Mountain View Police Department

KFJC

Continued from page 5

“Those were bands that were unknown, and KFJC was one of the first places that played their music,� Johnson said. Hits and hijinks Over the years, KFJC has held events as eclectic and bizarre as its play lists. In August 1983, the station played 823 versions of the Richard Berrie hit “Louie Louie.� The songwriter himself performed live on the air to promote what they called the “Maximum Louie Louie� marathon, which ran for more than 63 hours and garnered attention from the Wall Street Journal and other media outlets. One student hosted a show where instead of reviewing films, he rated laundromats, giving them between one and four “suds.� He was eventually invited to speak to a large laundry organization. “It was amazing what he was able to do with a very stupid idea,� Pezel said. Today, KFJC has DJs working 24 hours a day. Some are students, others are just interested in music. “What drew me in from being just a listener,� said 32-year-old DJ Leticia Domingo, “was I knew that KFJC had an amazing library and that all the DJs didn’t just play music and not talk about it. ... They were knowledgeable and that enticed me.�

and others. Italian and German language classes are already absent from the college, she said. French is being phased out. “We have had some carry-over dollars,� Miner said, explaining that this money has allowed staffers to stay through the end of this year. Moving forward, however, administrators are making “strategic� decisions about how they will balance their budget and plan programming for students. “In spite of all these challenges, we continue to do good work for the community,� she said. Educators are “expanding where they can,� especially in programs that are of greatest need: basic skills, workforce development and transferring students to four-year schools. Recent projects at the college include working with local middle school students in intensive math programming over the summer, overseeing the construction of a new science and technology building to open in 2012, and searching for the district’s next chancellor.

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“I can learn about any music genre, any record label, and there are other people who are amazing resources for that information,� she said. Domingo, whose on-air name is MSTIZA, hosts her own show, Groove Therapy, on Mondays from 2 to 6 p.m., and also volunteers as the station’s publicity director. True commitment Beyond student and volunteer power, KFJC operations are also made possible by Pezel’s longtime commitment. “I am the radio department,� joked Pezel, who has served as adviser for the station for about three decades. “The station is definitely much more involved and interested in what it does,� Pezel said, adding that volunteers and students only benefit from the work they do rather than receiving compensation. Another unique feature is that “all of its music is hand-picked by human beings,� he said, setting KFJC apart from mainstream stations which often use computer programs to create play lists. KFJC has signed a contract for another 50 years. Pezel says that at some point during the next half century the station will surely switch to HD radio — though he noted that HD has been “just around the corner since the ‘80s.� The station is run almost entirely on listener contributions. To donate to KFJC, hear netcasts or for other information, visit www.kfjc.org. V

NOVEMBER 20, 2009 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

7

-PDBM/FXT

How to Give

Your gift helps children and others in need Contributions to the Holiday Fund will be matched dollar for dollar, to the extent possible, and will go directly to the nonprofit agencies that serve Mountain View residents. Last year, Voice readers contributed more than $40,000, which with matching grants, provided more than $10,000 to each agency No administrative costs are deducted from the gifts, which are tax-deductible

as permitted by law. All donations will be shared equally with the seven recipient agencies listed here.

2009

ay d i l o H und F

This year, the following agencies will be supported by the Holiday Fund: ■ PARTNERS FOR NEW GENERATIONS

■ THE SUPPORT NETWORK FOR BATTERED WOMEN

Trains volunteer mentors who work with local youth in education and community programs.

Operates a 24-hour bilingual hotline, a safe shelter for women and their children, and offers counseling and other services for families facing this problem.

■ THE COMMUNITY HEALTH AWARENESS COUNCIL Serves Mountain View, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and seven school districts. Offers schoolbased programs to protect students from highrisk behaviors, such as drug and alcohol abuse.

■ COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND ARTS Provides hands-on arts and music projects in the elementary classrooms of the Mountain View-Whisman School District. Nearly 40 percent of the students are low-income and 28 percent have limited English proficiency.

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW ROTACARE CLINIC Provides uninsured community residents with medical care and medications, and is frequently the last resort for this under-served clientele.

■ DAY WORKER CENTER OF MOUNTAIN VIEW

■ COMMUNITY SERVICES AGENCY OF MOUNTAIN VIEW AND LOS ALTOS

Provides a secure place for workers and employers to negotiate wages. Serves 50 or more workers per day with job-matching, English lessons and guidance.

Assists working poor families, homeless and seniors with short-term housing and medical care and other services.

Name of donor ______________________________________________ Amount $ ____________ Street address ___________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________ State _____ Zip _______________ ❏ I wish to contribute anonymously.

❏ Don’t publish the amount of my contribution.

❏ I wish to designate my contribution as follows: ❏ In honor of: ❏ In memory of: ________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________

TO DONATE ONLINE GO TO: http://www.siliconvalleycf.org/giving-mvv.html PLEASE MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: THE HOLIDAY FUND Enclose this coupon and send to: The Voice Holiday Fund The Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405, Mountain View, CA 94042 By Credit Card: ❏ Visa or ❏ MasterCard

No. ______________________________________

Exp. Date ________________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________

8

■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ NOVEMBER 20, 2009

MICHELLE LE

Autistic student Cesar plays the marimba to “Jingle Bells” during Bill Liberatore’s class held at CSMA. Students in his class are from Pacific Autism Center for Education.

CSMA

Continued from page 1

students spend their education in intimate, one-on-one settings isolated from the rest of the community. They love coming to CSMA because it gets them into a group setting, she said. Covello recalls one student’s reaction to his weekly classes: “We go from being in a really small space to being in these really big spaces where we can paint and work with clay and interact,” said Jordan, a 19-year-old enrolled in the Morgan Autism Center. Like Mike, the special needs students come away from arts and music classes with more than artistic skills. The students, separated into higher and lower functioning groups, work with aides to learn art and music skills. For Covello, teaching these students is a unique experience because of the pride they feel in even the simplest expressions of creativity. “They have a kind of innocence

HAPPY

Continued from page 1

Mountain View, much of Silicon Valley and the Santa Cruz Mountains. “Of 435 districts in the country, people in Congresswoman Anna Eshoo’s district apparently feel happier than in any other district in the country,” said city manager Kevin Duggan. “I think it’s great.” He added, “It’s good that people feel good about their circumstances in such trying times.” The city of Sunnyvale has pounced on the Gallup poll results, and now claims to be “the happiest place in America” in a press release on its Web site. The accolade comes from TV personality “Dr. Oz,” who for his Nov. 9 show contrasted Sunnyvale to the city of Hazard in Kentucky, which is in the least happy congressional district in the

and excitement about making art,” she said. Mary Holmes, music director at CSMA, at first was concerned about the effectiveness of the program because the teachers are not trained as music therapists. But the classes have exceeded her expectations, she said: Students who were previously disengaged now are participating and talking. “It’s about learning social skills and encountering a peer from another agency that you don’t see every day,” said executive director Jeffry Walker. Walker’s office features artwork by a student from Abilities United — a painting resembling an abstract interpretation of sheet music. Like Walker, Holmes also has a keepsake of her work with the students: a note from Wanda, an autistic adult. It begins, “I send you a very happy late Halloween and early Thanksgiving hug! I’m really enjoying giving you this card because I like you a lot as my staff and friends! You are great ones and I care about you a lot!” V

country, according the poll. The 14th congressional district stretches from Sunnyvale through Mountain View and Palo Alto to parts of Redwood City, Belmont and San Carlos to the north. It also stretches to the coast to cover Half Moon Bay, Ben Lomond, Scotts Valley and other less densely populated areas in Santa Cruz County. Gallup says the survey sample represents 98 percent of the adult population, including households that have begun using cell phones instead of landlines. On a daily basis, about 1,000 people are asked dozens of questions about everything from job satisfaction to how often a person laughs. The poll’s results by district are available at www.ahiphiwire.org/ wellbeing. A map of the 14th district is available on Eshoo’s Web site, www.eshoo.house.gov. V

-PDBM/FXT received “princess� treatment from the hospital staff. Emma said her favorite part of the new room was the shower, though her parents said she’s already been through several of the movies available on the private room’s flat screen television. The Hams said they were impressed with the details that went into the design, especially for families visiting or staying over with loved ones. Amenities include comfortable bedside seating and private rooms; 85 percent of the rooms in the new hospital are private. “It makes a huge difference as far

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as your privacy factor, and comfort,� Brian Ham said. People in the hospital are already dealing with a difficult situation, he said, and having a roommate is “an added situation� he was happy to avoid. The new facility was constructed in order to comply with updated safety standards passed in 1994. El Camino Hospital is one of the first in the Bay Area to meet the new seismic safety standards. El Camino was referenced in Popular Science magazine’s December 2009 issue as “the most technologically advanced hospital in the world.�

AN

day morning before the move began, when the halls were deserted and all was quiet. “It was fun to see it come alive,� she said. The old El Camino emergency room was closed down at 6 a.m., with the new ER opening at 6:01. The first patient arrived minutes later, administrators said, and the first ambulance followed shortly after. The ER saw 138 patients Sunday. Meanwhile, 119 patients were transferred from the old hospital building to the new one in a choreographed routine involving numerous volunteers and staff members wearing color-coded T-shirts. Starting at 7 a.m., the patients were wheeled in their beds at two minute intervals through a hallway connecting the two buildings. By 11:15 that morning, 30 minutes ahead of schedule, all were situated in their new rooms. As of Monday morning, Russell said, the hospital was a little more than half full, but she added that by Monday evening the number of people would “increase dramatically.� “The communication was so great yesterday,� said Tammy Ham,

Exp. 00/00/09

Continued from page 1

speaking from her daughter’s bedside in the new hospital facility. Emma Ham, 5, had her appendix removed in the old hospital building on Saturday. “They seemed very organized.� Ham said they were informed after their daughter’s surgery about the transition to the new building, and that she was the first pediatric patient to move. (For a photo of Emma being transported to the new facility, see page 21.) “She’s been very down and in pain,� added her father, Brian, “and after the move she was a whole new person.� The Hams said Emma

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NOVEMBER 20, 2009 â–  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â– 

9

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■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■ NOVEMBER 20, 2009

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NOVEMBER 20, 2009 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

11

-PDBM/FXT

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n what many hope will be the final chapter of a long drama, Bay West Realty Capital has purchased the 64-unit Summerhill apartment complex at 291 Evandale Ave., with the intention of renovating its vacant, dilapidated buildings and turning them into marketrate rental housing. Project manager Todd Hill said his company closed on the property Nov. 9 after several months of escrow. The deal comes after the city and the neighborhood spent over a year opposing what appeared to be a plan by the previous owner, Sal Teresi, to move tenants into buildings there, even though the structures still required significant work to be safe and comply with city building codes. City officials said Teresi had also run afoul of City Hall by failing to pay $88,000 in planning fees for a failed plan to build 144 condos on the site.

Hill said he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why Teresi had his lawyer fight with the city for a permit to re-roof the buildings, an issue which took center stage at a City Council meeting last month. The council rejected the permit request, saying there was no proof Teresi would improve the buildings and make them safe. Hill said Teresiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tiff with the city had nothing to do with his project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s put the problems in the past and do something good with the project,â&#x20AC;? Hill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do something good for the neighborhood, for the city, for the environment and build something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to own. It will be an example of the right thing to do.â&#x20AC;? Hill said his company plans a â&#x20AC;&#x153;high-end, high-quality renovationâ&#x20AC;? which will be well regarded for its environmentally friendly features. For example, he said, LED and fluorescent lighting will be used throughout, along with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Energy Starâ&#x20AC;?-rated appliances, low-flow plumbing,

drought-tolerant landscaping and low VOC paints. Lisa Matichak, the president of the Wagon Wheel Neighborhood Association, said she was pleased with the change in ownership after talking with Hill. Neighbors made their concerns clear in June as the City Council rejected a proposal by KDC Communities to renovate the buildings and turn them into affordable housing. Many neighbors say crime has gone down in the neighborhood since the apartment complex became vacant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We very much care about the neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; concerns,â&#x20AC;? Hill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are diligently getting educated to address them.â&#x20AC;? Hill would not say what his company paid for the project, but those familiar with the deal say it was sold for less than half of what Teresi was offered before the recession. V

E-mail Daniel DeBolt at ddebolt@mv-voice.com

Developer selected for NASA Research Park By Daniel DeBolt

        

        

   

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â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  NOVEMBER 20, 2009

T

MG Partners and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Related Companiesâ&#x20AC;? have been selected to be master developers of a unique $1 billion research park at Moffett Field in a partnership with NASA Ames and local universities. The 3 million-square-foot project includes nearly 2,000 homes, a million square feet of commercial space and 600,000 square feet of academic space, according to conceptual plans, which put an emphasis on environmentally sustainable design. The developers say that working with universities and NASA Ames attracted them to project, which could be seen as risky in the current market. The developers are betting that the economy will rebound in three to five years, said William Berry, president of University Associates-Silicon Valley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A new community integrating the commercial, science and residential components with technology companies of Silicon Valley can be found nowhere else,â&#x20AC;? said Michael Covarrubias, chairman and CEO of TMG, in a press release. City manager Kevin Duggan noted that the city has always been

supportive of the project, which Berry said. sits outside of city limits on federal TMG and The Related Compaland. He likened the project to the nies were both vetted financially, Stanford Research Park, which along with four other interested helped shape Silicon Valley. developers, by UA-SV. Berry said â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the long run it will have a he is confident that the developsimilar effect,â&#x20AC;? Duggan said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We ment firms could provide the best canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take our unique position available financial backing for the in the world for granted. The project, adding that the reputation whole concept is trying to create of the master developers â&#x20AC;&#x153;demonsynergy and collaboration with strates the considerable attractiveprivate corporations, researchers ness of this project, even in a tough and world-famous and world-re- economy.â&#x20AC;? nowned educational institutions, An environmental impact statewhich we think is great.â&#x20AC;? ment approved in 2002 for the A year ago, University Associ- NASA Research Park calls for a ates-Silicon Valley, LLC (UA-SV) maximum of 2.9 million square signed a 95-year ground lease feet, including 1,930 housing units, with owner NASA Ames for the 600,000 square feet of academic 77-acre site, located on the south- space, 300,000 square feet of western corner of Moffett Field. industrial space and 100,000 The Foothill-De Anza College square feet of training and conferDistrict and UC Santa Cruz joined ence space. to create UA-SV with the intention of creating a major Silicon Valley college campus at Ames. Santa Clara University and Carnegie Melon University have also written letters indicating that they intend to partner in the development. UA-SV has until 2013 to begin construction of COURTESY IMAGE the project under the lease, Nasa Research Park rendering. V

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An artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rendering of the office building that would replace the Pacific Euro Hotel on Evelyn Avenue just west of Castro Street.

downtown is another blank wall.â&#x20AC;? A motion by Bryant to require Continued from page 5 some form of planting on the site as determined by the planning department failed in a the council hoped to build with 3-3 vote, with council member $60,000 in funding budgeted in Means absent. That gave way to a 2007. compromise from city manager The report cites the Calabazas Kevin Duggan: Have the develBMX park in San Jose as the oper voluntarily do whatever source of the cost estimate. It also is deemed possible for plants lists safety and legal requirements around the building, which from the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s risk manager, leaves little room for greenery on Claudia Koob, including a maxithe site. mum jump height of five feet. Because the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downtown As for the locaprecise plan tion, city staffencourages ers prefer the Developer Daniel Minkoff said the Evelyn ground f loor North Road site retail space, the over the nearAvenue building would be for the high- project required by â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crittenden a provisional use end office market, and would meet high permit to allow overflow basin,â&#x20AC;? which was a recoffice space on LEED standards for green design. ommended site the ground floor. years ago. CounCouncil memcil member Mike bers were unsure Kasperzak and others have also Street area. But generally, the there would be demand for suggested that the city use a council was happy to have the retail on that portion of Evelyn, meadow that is newly accessible development, which they said though the building could be thanks to the Stevens Creek Trail would allow growing companies modified to allow it in the extension south of El Camino located downtown to expand future. Real. The building will have one while staying in the area. Council members made no Developer Daniel Minkoff said level of underground parking, comments explaining the vote, the building would be for the which allows for 34 spaces. which came at the end of a five- high-end office market, and Another 43 spaces of parking hour meeting. Opposing further would meet high LEED stan- required for the project are in study were members Ronit Bry- dards for green design. He noted a nearby parking garage, which ant, Laura Macias and Kasper- the use of high quality building the city pays for through fees zak. Members Abe-Koga, Jac materials, such as limestone, from downtown projects which Siegel and John Inks were in favor. which would extend onto the commonly do not supply their Meansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; position on the subject sidewalk. own parking. was unknown as of press time. Downtown residents did not Council member Ronit Bryant was not so impressed, saying show up to oppose the project. In Evelyn office OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d she had concerns with how the the past, residents of condos at The days are numbered for the building would affect the â&#x20AC;&#x153;pedes- 108 Bryant St. have expressed Pacific Euro Hotel, which sits on trian experienceâ&#x20AC;? downtown. concerns about Pacific Euro one of two parcels now slated for â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will not be able to support the Hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effect on their neighbora new four-story, 63,000-square- project without adding some living hood. foot office building downtown. greenâ&#x20AC;? element, such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;a trellis E-mail Daniel DeBolt at The City Council unanimous- or potted plants,â&#x20AC;? Bryant said. ddebolt@mv-voice.com ly approved the office building â&#x20AC;&#x153;Otherwise what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re putting

COUNCIL

for 871-891 Evelyn Ave., just west of Castro Street at Bryant Street and a stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s throw from the train station. It is about three times taller than the nearby buildings on the historic 100 block of Castro Street. Council member Jac Siegel said he was not a fan of the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modern design, which he said did not fit the downtown area. Other council members complained that the developer did not illustrate what the building would look like from the Castro

V

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13

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â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  NOVEMBER 20, 2009

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â&#x20AC;˘ It helps the environment. Buying locally saves transportation fuel. Plus you get products that you know are â&#x20AC;˘ It keeps dollars in our economy. safe and well made, because our For every $100 a consumer neighbors stand behind them. spends, local businesses give back $68 to the local economy, â&#x20AC;˘ It nurtures our community. chain stores only give back $43. Studies show that local businesses donate to â&#x20AC;˘ It makes us unique. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community causes at more than no place like the Peninsula! twice the rate of chains. Homegrown businesses are part of what makes us special. â&#x20AC;˘ It conserves tax dollars. Spending locally ensures that â&#x20AC;˘ It creates local jobs. Local your sales taxes are reinvested businesses are the best at where they belong, right here in creating higher-paying jobs for your community. our neighbors.

This message is brought to you by Hometown Peninsula, an alliance of locally-owned independent businesses. We strive to maintain our unique community character, to educate local residents that purchasing locally creates a strong local economy and bring back the vibrant hometown to our communities that is being displaced by national chains and online stores.

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15

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This Holiday Seasonâ&#x20AC;Ś.. Think. Shop. Buyâ&#x20AC;Ś.Local HOLIDAY GIFT SHOPPING IN MOUNTAIN VIEW HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER

The holiday shopping season has arrived. With so many fabulous restaurant choices around town, the easiest gift for any Mountain View resident to purchase would certainly be a gift card from their favorite restaurant. We also have some interesting retail shops tucked away that are just waiting to be explored. Does the person on your list drink coffee? Assuming the answer is â&#x20AC;&#x153;yes,â&#x20AC;? we have coffee shops in our downtown district that are wildly popular. Everyone loves a pound of coffee and a new mug. Mountain View is also lucky enough to have some excellent bookstores that are well-known to the entire Bay Area.

As you make your holiday purchases during the next month, please keep in mind how important it is to shop locally and support our fabulous community. This holiday shopping season would be a great time to show our support for the local businesses by keeping your shopping, dining and lodging dollars local If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for things to do during the holidays, be sure to check out the www.ILoveMV.org website.

16

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  NOVEMBER 20, 2009

N H O L I D AY B R I E F S

‘COPS AND GOBBLERS’ SEEKS ASSISTANCE

INNVISION PRESENTS TWO PROGRAMS InnVision, an organization that provides shelter and resources for thousands of homeless and at-risk people in the area, has announced two holiday programs to benefit Silicon Valley families in need. The “Holiday Toy & Teen Shoppe” program allows homeless parents to choose gifts and other essentials for their families and children free of charge. To support this, InnVision is asking community members to donate new toys and gifts, winter clothing for adults and children, everyday clothing for children and teens, new undergarments and socks, new toiletry items and gift cards to local drugstores and grocers. For its “Adopt-a-Family” program, InnVision hopes to fulfill the wishes of 200 families this holiday season. The organization is seeking groups or individuals willing to “adopt” a family with a commitment of purchasing and wrapping gifts on a wish-list ranging from $200 to $500. Cash donations may be sent to InnVision at 974 Willow St., San Jose, 95125. New, unwrapped gift donations for the Holiday Toy and Teen Shoppe may be delivered to Custom Fitness, 650 Castro St., Suite 108, Mountain View, from Monday to Friday between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. To adopt a family or volunteer, contact Jaynie Neveras at (408) 213-5186 or (408) 292-4286, ext. 1018. For more information, visit www.InnVision.org. — Kelsey Mesher

HOLIDAY FAIR

Ukranian Egg by Laurel Rezeau

The Mountain View Police Officers’ Association hopes to deliver baskets full of food to hundreds of less fortunate families around the city this Thanksgiving as a part of its 13-year-old Cops and Gobblers program. The Association, along with community partners like Mountain View Kiwanis, Rotary and the Challenge Team, hopes to collect monetary donations and small stuffed animals for the upcoming holiday. They will use monies collected to buy food in bulk, in partnership with a local grocer. Organizer Bruce Barsi said they already have the names of over 250 families in need, and are still seeking donations to help meet that commitment. The food, along with a store certificate for a turkey and small toys for children, will be sorted and packaged Sunday, Nov. 22 at 9 a.m. and delivered to families in the area. To volunteer or donate, contact Barsi at (650) 280-0251 or bbarsi@msn.com.

Fine Crafts U Local Artists December 11, 12, 13, 2009 Friday, Saturday & Sunday 10-5 Hoover House (aka “The Girl Scout House”) 1120 Hopkins, Palo Alto for information: 650-625-1736 or TheArtifactory@aol.com

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SCHOOL DONATION GOAL: $10,000! Shop Local is a joint initiative between local businesses, the Chamber of Commerce Mountain View and the Mountain View Education Foundation to raise money for local shools. Businesses Proudly Participating:

P.O. Box 391557, Mtn. View 650-526-3500 x1030 www.mvef.org

1249 W. El Camino Rl. Mtn. View 650-940-9831 www.baskinrobbins.com

Participating Community Service Member www.kmvt15.org

830 E. El Camino Rl., Mtn. View www.littleprodigypreschool.com 650-938-3800

SPECTRUM FINE HOMES, INC. Mtn. View 650-960-2449 www.SpectrumFineHomes.com

2037 Old Middlefield Way Mtn. View 650-961-0302 www.deansautomotive.com

2526 Leghorn St., Mtn. View 650-492-5443 www.autoworks.com

the smar ter way www.pegpay.com

954 Villa St., Mtn. View 650-965-2739 www.tiedhouse.com

2520 Wyandotte St #G Mtn. View 650-988-0460 www.helmings.com

650 Castro St., Mtn. View www.leboulanger.com

133 E. El Camino Real, Mtn. View 650-988-6800 www.playitagainsports-sanjose.com

1000 Fremont Ave., Suite 270 Los Altos 650-948-2528 drized@gmail.com www.LizZed.com

Visit the ilovemv.org Web site, click on the Shop Local NOVEMBER 20, 2009 ■ MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE ■

17

7JFXQPJOU

â&#x2013;  EDITORIAL â&#x2013;  YOUR LETTERS â&#x2013;  GUEST OPINIONS

NEDITORIAL

THE OPINION OF THE VOICE Founding Editor, Kate Wakerly

N S TA F F Publisher Tom Gibboney

Editorial Managing Editor Don Frances Staff Writers Daniel DeBolt, Kelsey Mesher Intern Dana Sherne Photographer Michelle Le Photo Intern James Tensuan Contributors Dale Bentson, Angela Hey, Sheila Himmel, Jennifer Pence, Monica Schreiber

Design & Production Design Director Raul Perez Designers Linda Atilano, Laura Don, Gary Vennarucci

Advertising Advertising Representatives Anna Mirsky, Dianna Prather Real Estate Account Executive Rosemary Lewkowitz Real Estate Advertising Coordinator Diane Martin Published every Friday at 450 Cambridge Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 E-mail news and photos to: editor@MV-Voice.com E-mail letters to: letters@MV-Voice.com News/Editorial Department (650) 964-6300 fax (650) 964-0294 Display Advertising Sales (650) 964-6300 Classified Advertising Sales   s   FAX  

Holiday Fund helps strapped local agencies

L

ast year more Voice readers than ever before shrugged off the sagging economy and dug deep into their pockets, donating more than $40,000 to support seven local nonprofits in the Voiceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Holiday Fund drive. Along with grants from the Hewlett and Packard foundations, as well as the Wakerly Family Foundation, a total of more than $70,000 was raised, giving each nonprofit more than $10,000. This year, we hope to exceed the record of 178 donors to the fund, and also surpass last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s total donation for each of the nonprofit agencies. With the economy still floundering, there continues to be hundreds, even thousands, of local residents who are having trouble providing the basic needs of food and shelter for their families, or who are suffering from a lack of other important social services. If you are able, please consider making a donation to the Voice Holiday Fund this year. Your contribution will help provide a safety net to those who are down on their luck. These are our neighbors who may have been laid off unexpectedly, or had a catastrophic illness, or suffer from addiction or mental health problems. They deserve our help. The Voice Holiday Fund, now in its seventh year, provides grants to organizations that can offer a temporary home, arrange health care or provide counseling to bring an end to the substance abuse that destroys families and victimizes young children. Last year through the Holiday Fund, the Voice and its foundation partners were able to raise a total of $75,125 for seven local agencies. More than half that contribution, $42,000, was donated by Voice readers. With matching grants of over $33,000, the Holiday Fund was able to provide $10,732 for each of the seven nonprofit agencies. Monies contributed to the Holiday Fund are held by the Silicon Valley Community Foundation and will be distributed to the nonprofits in February or early March. No administrative costs or fees are deducted from Holiday Fund gifts, so 100 percent of all donations will be received by the nonprofit agencies.

2009

liday o H und F

Here are the organizations that will benefit from this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Holiday Fund: Community Services Agency of Mountain View and Los Altos CSA assists homeless families and seniors with short-term housing, medical care and more. The nonprofit is a cooperative effort of 17 faith communities in Mountain View and Los Altos.

Community Health Awareness Council CHAC serves Mountain View, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and seven school districts. It offers school-based programs to protect students from high-risk behaviors, such as drug and alcohol abuse.

Mountain View RotaCare Clinic The RotaCare Clinic provides uninsured community residents with medical care and medications and is frequently the last resort for this underserved demographic.

Day Worker Center of Mountain View The Day Worker Center provides a secure place for workers and employers to negotiate wages. It serves 50 or more workers per day with jobs, English lessons and guidance.

Support Network for Battered Women This group operates a 24-hour bilingual hotline and a safe shelter for women and their children. It also offers counseling and other services for families dealing with domestic violence.

Community School of Music and Arts CSMA provides hands-on arts and music projects in the elementary classrooms of the Mountain View Whisman School District. Nearly 40 percent of the students are low-income, and 28 percent have limited English proficiency.

Partners for New Generations Partners for New Generations matches adult volunteers with organizations serving youth in the Mountain View, Los Altos and Los Altos Hills area.

We hope that this year, as in the past, Voice readers will show their generosity by giving to these worthy causes. To give to the Holiday Fund, simply cut out the coupon provided in the paper each week (this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coupon is on page 8) and send it in with your donation. Or donations can be made online by going to www.siliconvalleycf.org/giving-mvv.html.

E-mail Classified ads@MV-Voice.com E-mail Circulation circulation@MV-Voice.com

NGUESTOPINION

The Voice is published weekly by Embarcadero Publishing Co. and distributed free to residences and businesses in Mountain View. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 964-6300. Subscriptions for $60 PERYEAR PERYEARSAREWELCOME

Save Shorelineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burrowing owls

Copyright Š2009 by Embarcadero Publishing Company. All rights reserved. Member, Mountain View Chamber of Commerce

CITY MUST CHOOSE BETWEEN ATHLETIC FIELDS OR DISAPPEARING SPECIES By Shani Kleinhaus & Bob Power

NWHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S YOUR VIEW? All views must include a home address and contact phone number. Published letters will also appear on the web site, www.MountainViewOnline.com, and occasionally on the Town Square forum.

TOWN SQUARE FORUM POST your views on the Town Square forum at www.MountainViewOnline.com E-MAIL your views to letters@MV-Voice.com. Indicate if it is a letter to be published. MAIL to: Editor Mountain View Voice, P.O. Box 405 Mountain View, CA 94042-0405 CALL the Viewpoint desk at 964-6300

18

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  NOVEMBER 20, 2009

O

nce numbering in the hundreds around the Bay, the western burrowing owl in Santa Clara County is now down to fewer than 40 nesting pairs. In the past 10 years, as many as 13 of those pairs nested at Mountain Viewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shoreline Park. In 2009, the last three remaining families raised owlets there. Relying on ground squirrel burrows, along with thoughtfully placed man-made nesting chambers, the burrowing owls at Shoreline have delighted park users for the past several decades. But plans now being drawn up

by the city of Mountain View put this animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future in doubt. In 2008, city staff presented plans for an athletic field that would use Shoreline Park lands along Garcia Avenue. In July 2009, city staff released a request for proposals for the design of the athletic field, and on Sept. 22 the council approved a $667,300 contract for BAS and Associates to design the facility. The September staff report to the council does not discuss an environmental impact report or analysis of alternatives for this development. The report mentions conversations with â&#x20AC;&#x153;local experts Continued on next page

7JFXQPJOU Continued from previous page

and the California Department of Fish and Game to develop an owl mitigation plan,â&#x20AC;? and describes the option of purchasing off-site mitigation credits in eastern Alameda County, enhancing foraging habitat within Shoreline, or some combination of the two. The report concludes that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Council does not have to make a decision about owl mitigation strategy for the athletic field project at this time.â&#x20AC;? City Council decisions for years have benefited burrowing owls; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Shoreline still has a population while Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Sunnyvaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owls have disappeared. The current situation, however, is a classic case of good intentions, but less-than-complete information, guiding a series of decisions. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to step back and do the right thing. Of the myriad questions this project and its process bring up, here are a few: â&#x2013;  Why are the owls an afterthought? â&#x2013;  Why are we considering the export of our local biological treasures to Alameda County? â&#x2013;  What happened to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to sustainability and the preservation of biodiversity (see Mountain View General Plan, Mountain View 2009 Sustainability Report, Shoreline at Mountain View Web site)? â&#x2013;  In the long run, which would be remembered and appreciated more by residents: another athletic field, or the creation of a burrowing owl preserve? We believe that the City Council is truly interested in informing the public in an open public process

The Bowman program builds confidence, creativity and academic excellence. +"#'$) $$"#'$) 

$$*-$)%$#$(& !#'$#**)*$) regarding these decisions, and is willing to save the burrowing owls of Shoreline. But somehow the City Council hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been briefed on 1) the nearly extinct level of the local population; 2) The horrendously poor track record of off-site mitigation for burrowing owls (it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work); and 3) the need for a series of burrowing owl preserves along the Bay to ensure the existence of this species as part of our precious ecosystem. So, if the athletic field is a done deal, what do we do about those beautiful owls? Should they be an afterthought? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Council does not have to make a decision ... at this time.) Or should they be the very first consideration? Burrowing owls are on the brink of extinction in Mountain View and in our county. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an opportunity for the city to have a positive impact. Get beyond â&#x20AC;&#x153;what the law requiresâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;what the consultants recommendâ&#x20AC;? and do something memorable, for this generation and the next, that you can all be proud of. Create a bur-

rowing owl preserve at Shoreline. For more information, see www.scvas.org or contact owls@ scvas.org. V

Shani Kleinhaus and Bob Power are representatives of the Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society.

 ))((#' "%'%#, +)*$#'

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19

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NO CONTRACTS s.OCONTRACTSONANY Consumer Cellular plans!

SIMPLE PLANS s2ATESSTARTATJUST

GUARANTEED

PLAN NAME Anywhere Casual Anywhere 250 Anywhere 500 Anywhere 1000 Anywhere 1500 Anywhere 2000

Doro PhoneEasy 345GSM

RATE PLANS

MONTHLY FEE PLAN MINUTES ADDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;L TIME/MIN $10 N/A 25¢ $20 250 25¢ $30 500 25¢ $40 1,000 25¢ $50 1,500 25¢ $60 2,000 10¢

ADD A LINE FOR $10/mo AND SHARE YOUR PLAN MINUTES!

$40

Motorola W259

Phone*and

FREE

FREE Shipping

Phone*and

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EXCLUSIVE PROVIDER! Doro PhoneEasy s"IG RAISEDBUTTONS s,ARGE BRIGHTSCREENSANDTEXT s%MERGENCYCALLFEATURE

sDAYSORMINUTES money-back guaranteeâ&#x20AC; .

ALSO AVAILABLE AT A

LOCATION NEAR YOU!

AARPÂŽ members, ask for your special discount when starting new service!

Call 1.888.206.6554 Online www.ConsumerCellular.com/Sears *Requires new service activation on approved credit and $35 activation fee. Retail buyers pay $35 activation fee upon purchase of phone. Phone price after instant rebate applied at time of purchase. Certain models are free beyond activation fee. Cellular service is not available in all areas and is subject to system limitations. Phones are limited to stock on hand. Terms and Conditions subject to change. â&#x20AC; If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not satisďŹ ed within 30 days or 30 minutes of usage, whichever comes ďŹ rst, cancel and pay nothing, no questions asked.

Howâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s This For Going Green?

2.10% APY

*

12-month CertiďŹ cate of Deposit

t.JOJNVNEFQPTJU  t1FOBMUZNBZCFJNQPTFEGPSFBSMZXJUIESBXBM

The Bay Areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Newest Community Bank

650.810.9400 700 E. El Camino Real, Suite 110 Mountain View, CA 94040 Contact: Jim Wall, 650.810.9401, jim.wall@myglobaltrustbank.com *Annual Percentage Yield 3BUFT4VCKFDU5P$IBOHF

www.myglobaltrustbank.com Because â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trustâ&#x20AC;? Is Our Middle Name

20

â&#x2013;  MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE â&#x2013;  NOVEMBER 20, 2009

DIRECTORS

James C. Wall President & CEO Vinod Thukral Chairman Bhupen B. Amin Vice Chairman Pramod R. Patel Vice Chairman

Arthur C. Carmichael )BSQSFFU4$IBVEIBSZ Kamleshwar Gunsagar Mahendra P. Patel


Mountain View Voice 11.20.2009 - Section 1