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NEWS & VIEWS

Way to Go, Lisa!

STORY BY LISA BALLARD 6 PHOTOS BY JACK AND LISA BALLARD

GOING FOR A

GLOBE

HOW A LOCAL 55-YEAR-OLD SKI RACER WON A WORLD TITLE

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Lisa Ballard PHOTOS BY Jack and Lisa Ballard STORY

The author stands near the top of the World Cup Super G trail at Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy. The FIS Masters Cup Super G starts just below the World Cup start. Opposite: First time’s the charm! The author on the podium after the Super G in Cortina!

Ski Faster! TIPS TO HELP YOU KEEP UP

52 i m a g e •

eveloping world-class ski racers is part of the fabric of the Upper Valley. Countless US Ski Team Members, including defending Olympic slalom champion Mikaela Shiffrin, age 22, have honed their skills on our local mountains. Mikaela could potentially rule the women’s World Cup for another decade. At age 39, New Hampshire native Bode Miller, the most successful American man in alpine ski racing, is on the cusp of retirement. But what if a skier wants to compete at an international level into his or her 40s, 50s, 60s—and beyond? The Fédération Internationale de Ski (FIS), the international governing body for snow sports, sanctions over 40 masters’ world cups around the globe each winter. Athletes ages 30 and over compete in five-year age groups, vying for the overall title among their peers. In addition, the FIS awards season-long discipline titles in Super G, giant slalom (GS), and slalom. There are no downhills in international masters racing. There are also no coaches, gear technicians, dietitians, masseurs, agents, or lucrative sponsorships. Athletes on the international masters circuit are on their own to train, coordinate their travel, tune their skis, and handle a myriad of other details while pursuing their ski-racing goals. Find image at www.uppervalleyimage.com •

Winter 2017/2018

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A deserted beach on Hudson Bay extends as far as the eye can see. The strand would be the envy of any resort except for the frigid water.

TIPS TO HELP YOU KEEP UP

Ski Faster!

TIP: As my skis carve around this fast turn, the outside ski has the most pressure. My uphill ski is pulled under me and tipped on edge the same amount as the downhill ski. My body forms a comma shape with the downhill ski out from under me.

MORE INFO To order a personalized copy of Ski Faster! Guide to Racing and High Performance Skiing, 2nd Edition (Rocky Fork Media, 2016) or to ski with Lisa Ballard this winter, go to lisaballardoutdoors.com.

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IF YOU LOOK AT THE TITLE OF MY BOOK, SKI FASTER!, AND THINK, “BUT I DON’T WANT TO SKI FASTER,” YOU’RE NOT ALONE. Everyone has a speed threshold on skis, even the top racers on the World Cup. Go faster than your comfort level, and you feel out of control. On the other hand, you might be annoyed by your slower pace compared to others on the slopes. Good news! With a few adjustments to your technique and a couple of gear considerations, you’ll keep up without getting nervous.

Skiing in the

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Czech Republic A new adventure sparks memories of home Story and Photos by Lisa Ballard

TIP: At the end of the turn, my skis are now across the hill. Check out those ski bases! My skis are nicely on edge. Notice how my torso still has some orientation over my downhill ski. I never fully turn my chest across the hill.

F I N D H E R E I N H A N O V E R AT W W W. H E R E I N H A N O V E R .CO M

W IN TER 2017/2018 • HERE IN HANOVER

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ast March, when the opportunity arose to ski in the Czech Republic, my first reaction was, “Of course! It’s Europe.” A couple of fast-skiing friends I race with on the masters circuit came from the Czech Republic. Sarka Zahrobska, the 2007 World Slalom Champion, did too, so the country must have some decent skiing, I reasoned. It might not boast famous international destinations like St. Anton and Cortina, but chalk that up to marketing. No ski area in a former Eastern Bloc country was at the top of most Americans’ minds, but they sure sounded like interesting places to make some turns.

A skier arcs some fast turns on the slopes of Pec pod Snezkou. Inset: Skiers start down a Czechstyle terrain park.

4 8 F I N D WO O D S TO C K M AGA Z I N E AT W W W. WO O D S TO C K M AGA Z I N E . C O M

W I N T E R 2017–2018

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WO O D S TO C K M AGA Z I N E

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The North American Snowsports Journalists Association (NASJA) recently announced that Mountain View Publishing longtime regular contributor Lisa Ballard is the recipient of their prestigious Harold Hirsch Award. This year, the Hirsch Awards had only three categories: Words, Images, and Books. Writers are asked to submit a portfolio of three stories, so Lisa sent one article from each of Mountain View’s three magazines—Here in Hanover, image, and Woodstock Magazine— and won the Words category. Congratulations, Lisa!

Be Like Bessie

Bessie’s Story: Watching the Lights Go Out is available locally at Violet’s Book Exchange (Claremont, NH), Morgan Hill Bookstore (New London, NH), Gibson’s Bookstore (Concord, NH), The Yankee Bookshop (Woodstock, VT), and The Norwich Bookstore (Norwich, VT) as well as at Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Contact the author (bessiesstory@gmail.com) to have personalized/autographed copies delivered locally or mailed. To learn more, visit www.bessiesstory.com. 32 i m a g e •

Spring 2019

Bessie’s Story: Watching the Lights Go Out by Thomas Farmen of Unity, New Hampshire, chronicles the tale of a chocolate Labrador retriever who loses her sight. Bessie, who has progressive retinal atrophy, is now completely blind at nine years of age. The story of her slow fade to sightlessness provides life lessons for all ages as she continues to live her life to the fullest, joining her family on daily hikes in the woods off-leash and skillfully navigating the world around her. She also continues to retrieve on land and in the water using her heightened senses of hearing and smell. The book has been endorsed by NEADS, Inc., an organization that raises, trains, and places World Class Service Dogs with individuals with hearing loss or a physical disability, veterans, and children

with autism or other developmental disabilities. A portion of book sales will be donated to NEADS. Author Tom Farmen gives presentations at schools with Bessie in attendance, stressing three main concepts for the students: • We all have insecurities and flaws that can hold us back if we let them. Accept your weaknesses, deal with them, and move on. • Asking for help and giving help are essential to being successful and happy. • Being around people with physical or intellectual handicaps or disabilities should bring out the same characteristics Bessie elicits. Share your genuine interest, offer assistance, and show affection. He concludes by saying, “Be like Bessie!”

Profile for Mountain View Publishing

Image - Spring 2019  

Read about a riderless Morgan horse, Good Neighbor Health Clinic and Red Logan Dental Clinic, Caving in Barbados, and more in the Spring 201...

Image - Spring 2019  

Read about a riderless Morgan horse, Good Neighbor Health Clinic and Red Logan Dental Clinic, Caving in Barbados, and more in the Spring 201...

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