Page 1

ISSUE IV

WIN 13

Mountain Sledder Magazine Issue 4 Winter 2014

34

0

7447 0 8 0 632

TERRACE // FILM REVIEWS // KJ // GEARGIRLS 5


2

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

Photos: Stephen W. Clark, Jaylen Reed, Mike Reeve, Tom Delanoy and Shane Lewis


DISTRIBUTED BY:

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

3

www.RIDE509.com | www.facebook.com/RIDE509 | 1-877-743-3509


Vest

YOUR last vital layer. 4

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


PRO

prime

pitch

We have spent years listening to what sledders like, don’t like, wish they had, love that they have, features they use and things they never use. From this invaluable feedback, we have built the Snowpulse Highmark Collection. From prioritizing safety with a comfortable fit, to the location of the shovel pocket and handle, we can truly advocate that these packs are made by sledders for sledders.

The absolute preferred avalanche airbag of choice by snowmobile professionals. ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

SNOWPULSEHIGHMARK.COM

MSM

5


6

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

7


DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES

10

18

Gaining Traction

20

Film Reviews

12

24

28

38

Over The Hills... Die Hard

First Trax

Patrick Orton VARDA Sponsorship

Tech Theory Clutching

Gear Girl In Powder

Ultimate Mod KJ’s Frankensled

53

Gallery

63

...And Far Away

#1 Girl

P Stevin Tuchiwsky R Joel Kistenfeger L Middle Kootenay, AB

8

MSM

32

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

42

Are snow bikes the real deal? Mountain Sledder talks with Pro Freestyle Motocross rider Reagan Sieg about his experience with snow bikes, how they compare to riding a sled, and what to expect in the future.

An inside look at six of this year’s top sledding flicks, along with our thoughts on who and what impressed us the most.

Natural Born Sledder

“Kalle was the first to hit big jumps with a turbo, throttle to the bar. He has singlehandedly taken big mountain sledding to new levels—he is the first real innovator of big mountain riding.”

Inner Passage

Using BC Ferries to get to and from Terrace ranks high as one of the most special excursions a sledder can do.


IN THIS ISSUE

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

9


OVER THE HILLS...

“YOU’RE A DIE-HARD,” SHE SAID AS I PULLED MY BIKE

under the covered courtyard where 15 centimetres of fresh snow gave way to dry pavement. “Ya well, ya gotta do what ya gotta do,” I replied honestly. My daily bike commute was typically a refreshing break from my physically mundane career, but on that particular day I was happy to have arrived in one piece after sliding, swerving and skidding through the slushy streets of our mountain town. Throughout the day I pondered her accusation: “you’re a die-hard.” What exactly did that mean? I guess compared to some who rarely experience nature’s elements, my daily bike to work may seem like an act of survival. I thought of Bruce Willis and his refusal to be killed, which roused dormant memories of my own close encounters, and the lingering questions of why my life was spared, while friends' were taken? I guess their nine lives were up, yet still they went down swinging.  I thought her comment was rather exaggerated, but I guess biking through ten months of coastal elements symbolizes the lives we lead as sledders. We are not fair weather adventurers, but opportunists who enjoy each day of riding regardless of the weather, obstacles and hardships. Of course, carving through fresh dry powder in the sun is the ultimate goal, but those days are often few and far between in our western Canadian climate. With optimism fueling our search through thick and thin for those golden moments, it’s the die-hards who reap the rewards from slogging through the flat light in wet sleet to eventually rise above the clouds and find blue skies and cold smoke waiting. In the words of the wise Stomp’n Tom, “Life can be real with a snowmobile.” Die hard. M W Daryl Treadway P Patrick Orton

10

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

11


FIRST TRAX

>> COVER PHOTO Patrick Orton – Elliot Bernhagen, Haines, AK

>> CONTENT MANAGEMENT, LAYOUT AND DESIGN Publisher: Tim Grey Content Manager: Patrick Garbutt Graphic Design: James Wheldon, Shane Gault, Tim Grey www.SummitCommunications.ca

>> CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Patrick Orton Live Your Dreams Scholarship Fund It was with deep sadness that we learned of the passing of Patrick Orton from a drowning accident on July 20th 2013. He was 24. Patrick was an excellent photographer who had a unique ability to capture the emotions of the mountain sledding lifestyle and we used his work regularly, including on the cover of this issue. All the money from the images that we are using of Patrick’s this year will go towards the Patrick Orton Live Your Dreams Scholarship Fund, which is administered by Patrick’s parents and can be donated to at Wells Fargo bank in the USA. Below are some kind words from his friend Elliot Bernhagen. -Tim Grey

Steve Crowe, Patrick Garbutt, Tim Grey

>> CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Elliot Bernhagen, Chris Brown, Julie-Ann Chapman, Patrick Garbutt, Chuck Gorton, Tim Grey, Joey Imhoff, Kalle Johannson, Jessica Joy, Geoff Kyle, Matthew Mallory, Curtis Pawliuk, Turkey Reinhardt, Reagan Sieg, Daryl Treadway

>> CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Rob Alford, Dave Best, Julie-Ann Chapman, Stephen W. Clark, Russell Dalby, Steve Dutcheshen, Patrick Garbutt, Tim Grey, Mark Gribbon, Jeremy Hanke, Bryn Hughes, Vera Janssen, Blake Jorgenson, Steven Lloyd, Chris Messervey, Patrick Orton, Curtis Pawliuk, Thierry Provencher, Nadia Samer, Mark Schilperoort, Alain Sleigher, Daryl Treadway, Stevin Tuchiwsky, Todd Westlake

>> DISTRIBUTION

Mountain Sports Distribution 1.888.987.SLED

>> CONTACT // EDITORIAL

Tim Grey - tim@sleddermag.com – 1.855.SLED.MAG

>> CONTACT // ADVERTISING

Jessica Joy - jessica@sleddermag.com – 1.855.SLED.MAG

>> FIND US ON THE WEB www.SledderMag.com

VOICE

THE OF MOUNTAIN SLEDDING

www.facebook.com/mountainsledder

atrick came from the most loving family and had the best relationship with his parents that I’ve ever seen. Growing up in the woods of North Idaho he fell in love with nature and adventure at a young age. Hucking cliffs and bridges into lake Pend d’Orielle and riding the 3 miles of downhill mountain bike trail he built on the family property was the norm. Thanks to his mom he also discovered photography at a young age and at 24 had grown to have one of the most impressive portfolios in the world. He had an unrelenting drive to live life. With or without a camera he would always be the one organizing adventures whether it be a day trip to climb rocks, a yoga photoshoot or camping for a week on a remote glacier in Alaska. Patrick had one of those personalities that everyone likes. Full of energy at all times and accepting of everyone he was always pushing people to live everyday to the fullest it was easy to love him. Not to mention the fact that he would make you look damn good while doing it. On top of a million other things Patrick was a great friend. He was honest, followed through with what he said and didn’t exaggerate his stories as he was creating real life experiences that needed no embellishment. He was generous with his time and insight and offered great constructive criticisms; something I miss dearly. He used his success in photography to bring me up alongside him when he could have left me in the dust. Patrick seemed to have figured out the secret of life and then it was snatched away from him in the prime of his. Patrick lived the fullest, most amazing life I’ve seen anybody create and everyone that knew him is better for it.

www.twitter.com/mountainsledder

Love and miss you buddy.

www.youtube.com/user/mountainsleddermag

Elliott Bernhagen

www.issuu.com/mountainsledder

12

P

Copyright ©2014 Summit Communications All Rights Reserved. Printed in Canada. MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


Sahen Skinner

Burandt’s Backcountry Adventure Guide FXR MTN Pro Ride Team Athlete Photo George Marsh

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER Check out FXRRACING.COM to find our DEALER LOCATOR and complete collection.

MSM

13


FIRST TRAX

Ac t i onLi ne sVol . 2

der Or Today

Sled Dealer Sponsors Valemount Snowhost Program E-Tec Turbo Kits Pro Climb Turbo Kits Stingers/Pipes Ez-ryde Suspension Strong Boards Bikeman Performance Tunnel Extensions Sleds for Sale Action Line Movies

T

he loyal customers and staff of Martin Motor Sports often visit the backcountry terrain surrounding Valemount, BC, and the shop wants to help keep them safe and informed. According to Curtis Anderson, Division Manager, it was only natural that the dealership support the Valemount area Snowhost program, a passionate, two-sledder crew that works with snowmobilers on the subjects of “respecting boundaries, minimizing impact, and being safe in the backcountry.” The Valemount Area Recreation Development Association (VARDA) is the key facilitator of the Snowhost program, which employs experienced snowmobilers to liaise with the local enthusiastic snowmobiling population. Since the inception of the program in 2004, the Snowhosts have assumed responsibility for trail maintenance, hazard abatement, and maintenance of both the cabins and the Mountain Caribou closures in Valemount’s most popular riding areas, including Westridge, Clemina, Allen and Chappell Creek. The Snowhosts have also taken an active role in educating snowmobilers on environmental stewardship and avalanche awareness. In 2012-2013, Martin Motor Sports began to tangibly support the program by contributing financial aid toward usage of the 2013 and 2014 VARDA Ski-Doo snowmobiles. With the cost of sleds and fuel an all-too-familiar expense, VARDA’s Curtis Pawliuk calls the partnership with Martin’s “integral to our success.” The donation of the funds toward a sled has been “a huge boost to morale and the program itself.” Having such visible sledders in the area on Martin Motor Sport’s flagship Ski-Doo XMs is a win for the Snowhosts, VARDA, Martin’s and area sledders. According to Anderson, their “ongoing visibility is key as they can be found riding and visiting with numerous different groups on any given day.” As any experienced sledder will realize, “the Snowhosts’ presence is a constant reminder to everyone that we are privileged to enjoy the backcountry freedom we do.” - Jessica Joy

14

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

Come have the Sled of your Dreams built by the Micku boys.

Top Secret Shop .ca 250-833-7501


Make Vernon the base of operations for your next

snow adventure.

Don Weixl

1-800-663-4433

1-800-663-4422

villagegreenhotel.com 4801 27th Street, Vernon, BC

bestwesternvernonlodge.com 3914 32nd Street, Vernon, BC

1-866-677-1111

1-855-758-1800

hiexpress.com/vernonbc 4716 34th Street, Vernon, BC

pacificinnvernon.com 4790 34th Street, Vernon, BC

Sled heads to bed heads – there is nothing like a great meal and comfy bed after a day spent rocketing through soft champagne powder. 1.800.665.0795 tourismvernon.com

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

15


INTERVIEW

with Reagan Sieg

Reagan Sieg has been riding dirt bikes all his life. Starting out at a young age on his first Z50, he grew up racing moto throughout his teenage years, and turned pro at only 17. After a couple of years, he ventured into freestyle, and 14 years later, Sieg is still heavily involved in FMX. Lately, he has been transferring his skills from dirt to snow, riding the Timbersled Mountain Horse snow bike with jaw dropping aplomb, as seen in this year’s Braaap 13 film. MS: When did you first become aware of the existence of snow bikes? RS: About 4 years ago, an old sponsor and friend of mine took some friends and I riding in Sicamous on a couple of moto snow bike kits. It opened my eyes as to how much fun it can be riding a snow bike setup in the backcountry. I wanted to push its limits, but I didn’t feel that that particular setup would allow me to do what I had in my head. Two years later, another good buddy of mine, pro motocross rider Brock Hoyer, purchased one of the new snow bike products from Timbersled. He proceeded to tell me how well it worked, and how he no longer had any interest in riding his snowmobile again. Brock and I had similar skill levels, and so I figured that if it was enough to entertain him then I would give it a go, and bought one without even trying it out. MS: What has changed since you bought your first snow bike kit? RS: Although the Timbersled track design was a big step in the right direction, when I first started riding it the biggest problem was the front ski handling. The only choices at the time were snowmobile skis. It didn’t take Timbersled long to figure that out, and so they partnered up with Simmons to design a snow bike specific ski. I can say that this ski changed everything! Now the snow bike handles better than I ever thought possible. I can lean the bars to the snow and hold it wide open without the ski slipping out at all. MS: Are you an avid sledder as well? What are the main differences between how a sled and a snow bike handle?

16

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


P Steve Dutchesen

MS: How does a snow bike handle in the air? Being that they look rather tail heavy, does it take any special technique to make it fly with proper attitude?

RS: They are longer and heavier in the back end than a stock bike, but that is where I rely on my years of riding experience to take over. I simply lock into my desired line and let my body do the work. This last year, I surpassed what size cliff drops and jumps I thought I would be able to do, so I look forward to riding this year with an even better setup, and plan to take it to the next level. MS: What is your favourite style of riding, and what locations suit that best? Where do you ride most often? RS: I tend to stay pretty local, we are lucky living in Vernon, BC to be surrounded by mountains, and don’t have to drive far to get to many different locations to ride. We can be seen anywhere from Revy to the other side of Lumby. I don’t have a favourite place to ride my snow bike but getting lost in the trees is never a bad time.

The bike is the ultimate tool for exploring the trees and tight terrain. But as soon as there is sunshine, I hit the big slopes to shred downhill cliff lines that would make any skier jealous. MS: Do you foresee a lot of growth in the number of snow bike riders in the next few years? Or will it hold steady as a niche market? RS: I think that this industry will see huge growth in the next few years. The Mountain Horse has sold out every year so far and is continuing to grow. The big selling point is that combined with a dirt bike, not only can a Timbersled kit offer you a winter machine to explore the backcountry, all for a price tag on par with a snowmobile—which ends up sitting for more than half of the year— you can also have a dirt bike to ride in the summer. I am very happy to be a big part of helping them grow. I think there are many more good things to come.

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

17

P Steve Dutchesen

RS: Yes, I was an avid sledder. I have been riding sleds my whole life, and realized I have just been killing time until someone made the ultimate snow bike. The width is the main difference. Since there is only one ski to deal with, there is no real feedback from uneven terrain, which results in a very easy ride. Sleds have the advantage of big power and can climb straight up better, but with the introduction of the Boondocker turbo kit in the snow bike market, it might take some of that advantage away. The snow bike will ride a sidehill all day long with little effort or stress of being pulled into a tree well. And since there are no running boards, there is very little snow drag for the bike, which results in getting stuck less often.


FILM REVIEWS Each year, the sled films start arriving in August at our office and it’s a hard time to be watching awe-inspiring footage because it’s 32 degrees out and you’re sitting in a puddle of your own ball sweat. It doesn’t help that riding powder is at an optimistic best, 3 months away. We’ve watched every movie we could get our hands on in time for this review and hopefully our reviews will help you decide which flicks to pick up for your own collection, so you can enjoy watching them at your early winter leisure in front of a roaring fireplace, while the snowflakes fly outside.

2013 Film Awards

- PG

509 VOLUME 8 - Produced by Mike Reeve, Tom Delanoy As with any great film, the opening shot of Volume 8 sets the tone for the rest of the film. It starts out with a long heli-shot of Brett Turcotte hitting a manicured jump sequence before panning straight into a burly hill-climb by Yammy guru Randy Swenson, all in one shot. Right away, we know that we can expect to see a variety of different aspects of mountain riding, and Volume 8 does a tidy job of delivering on that promise. Tight trees, cliff drops, deep powder, jump lines, and chute claiming are all here, equally well represented. There’s even a little summer dirt thrown in for good measure. And there are some interesting back stories on several of the athletes as well, some more so than others. The film could have benefited from this theme being more fully developed throughout. Having said that, a Chris Brown speed-flying ski segment does feel a little out of place. Otherwise, there are a lot of beautiful shots of very impressive riding, all in time with an upbeat soundtrack. Amongst the most exciting footage is a number of tandem lines throughout the film. Overall, it is a very enjoyable film at the top end of the scale. - PG

BRAAAP 13 - Produced by Jaya Lange Braaap 13 serves up an action packed sled-porn flick, with rider-oriented segments and hard hitting music. The movie also has two of the most unique segments of the year featuring Reagan Seig on a snow bike and Eric Oddy parasledding. Braaap 13 will stand as the coming out party for snow bikes as Reagan’s segment legitimizes the platform by showing how versatile and fun they can be. Reagan slays just about every kind of terrain on his bike and there are some big cliffs and deep powder that will make anyone who hasn’t tried a snow bike yet want to. Braaap 13 has tons of action but almost no storytelling. The movie is a barrage of shots from many different athletes but there is little relief between the clips. The Eric Oddy parasledding segment would serve as an example where a little bit of B-roll might have been interesting. Some of the camera work is shaky and the music is dubstep heavy but for anyone who doesn’t want any non-action shot fluff in their film, Braaap 13 is for you. It’s the kind of movie that would play well in a bar. - TG

18

SLEDNECKS SIXTEEN - Produced by Jason Moriarty If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. That seems to be the Slednecks motto, which applies even to its series namesake title. The latest edition of the lineup doesn’t stray far from the successes of the past, showcasing a host of top-notch athletes once again upping the ante in a string of exciting, fast-paced segments that are chock full of easily some of the best riding of the year. However, the formula isn’t perfect—one hiccup being the soundtrack. It feels like we’ve heard it before, including a moldy old Pendulum track and—instant cliché—an Iron Maiden song. That aside, there are a couple of newer tracks in the mix that freshen it up somewhat. But the old habit that truly needs to die is an unwarranted synthetic film burn technique that is majorly distracting during the Joey Junker AK segment. So while the film sucks the originality hind teat at times, it delivers where it counts. The riding is radical, there are no B-shots to speak of, and the editing is stylish and tight. A little more storyline here and there wouldn’t hurt, but if what you came to see is some of the finest riding there is, then Sixteen, much like its fifteen predecessors, won’t gather much dust in your collection. -PG MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


RIDE VALEMOUNT, BC

For more information on Valemount and it’s spectacular sledding, contact VARDA at 250.566.4817 or email info@ridevalemount.com

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

19


THE SPECIALISTS

Golden, BC

The Biggest Selection and the Best Prices (888)742-8769 20

All safety gear is exempt from provincial sales tax

www.avalanchesafety.ca MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


FILM REVIEWS If you only pick one movie to see this year, Fourcast 3 is your ticket. The movie has the best combo of cinematography, editing, music and storytelling. The athlete list is super impressive and the pros deliver, as they should. Honourable mentions: Slednecks 16, Boondockers 10

2013 Film Awards

Best Film Fourcast 3

2013 Film Awards

Best Segment Brad Gilmore Slednecks 16

Brad Gilmore’s opening segment in Seldnecks 16 hits hard from the first shot and delivers all the way through till his season ending injury shot. Brad drops cliffs with creativity, hits massive booters with ease and also has steezy pow carves that make this segment the best single display of riding this year.

2013 Film Awards

Rider of the Year Kalle Johansson

2014 Film Awards

Best Air Brett Turcotte

KJ stars in 3 movies this year and his run of versatile dominance continues to go unmatched. The massive step-down air to chute climb in 509’s Volume 8 struck us as the single most impressive feat of the season. KJ can jump, drop, carve, climb and fly like no one else and that’s why he remains our top pick.

With closing segments in three of the top movies this year, Brett’s resume of steezy whips, technical drops and tricked-out booters is highlighted by a monster cliff drop Superman air that will make you hit rewind at least once.

THUNDERSTRUCK 12 - Produced by Jim Phelan Chute climbing, which seems to have nearly gone the way of the Dodo in the last couple of years (on film at least), has had a breath of new life thanks to Team Thunderstruck. True to the roots of the series, there are a lot of chutes climbed in this film, which is rather refreshing in the midst of a gamut of other films hawking cheese-wedge booter segments galore. In fact, with a running time of 1hr47m, there is a lot of other stuff packed into this baby as well. It seems that producer Jim Phelan took a poll, and the people have spoken. Leave nothing on the cutting room floor they said. We want to see it all, and Phelan delivers. You asked for it, so settle in, and don’t get up before the credits finish, because one of the highlights of the film rolls after they are through. Phelan narrates an interesting behind-the-scenes segment about an ambitious spring climb attempt gone wrong, and how it came to be resolved, in true Thunderstuck style. Other highlights include a banging segment by young Linden Ladouceur, and, as always, plenty of carnage. - PG

FOURCAST 3 - Produced by Highmark Films and Dragon Factory Films Fourcast 3 is the third installment of the Fourcast trilogy by Whistler based filmmaker Jorli Ricker. The 2014 Film Awards goal of the Fourcast series has always been to capture the essence of the emerging culture of mountain Best Film sledding and Fourcast 3 takes the viewer on an epic journey like none of the other flicks in this review. Fourcast 3 The cinematography, story telling, editing and music are all top shelf as Jorli and crew attempt to paint a picture of our sport in possibly the most ambitious way the genre has ever seen. Whether or not Fourcast 3 achieved its own goal is a matter of personal opinion. For some, the movie falls short because of too much moody introspection and the narration can come off preachy with a lot of Jorli Ricker at the pulpit. But despite its flaws, Fourcast 3 is definitely a must-see and a worthy addition to your collection. There is a ton of pow, big airs, boondocking, and adventure in this flick. The addition of Jon Schramm’s camera work this year also amps up the production value in compared to other movies in the series. Give these guys full credit for pushing the boundaries of the standard ‘sledporn’ flick and applaud them for the quality in which they do it. We’re left wondering, what’s next? - TG

BOONDOCKERS 10 - Produced by Dan Gardiner, Andrew McCarthy, Geoff Dyer Boondockers 10 is a triple hit that comes just shy of a home run. The movie has the same fun vibe similar to the series’ predecessors but there is a significant uptick in production quality that makes it among the best in class this season. The Boondockers are out for a good time in their tenth movie and they get it good. The movie has by far the deepest pow segment of the year and, by heading to Newfoundland for a worthy travel segment, it breaks the golden rule that you must shoot in Revelstoke’s Turtle area to make a good movie. The quality of the shots in this year’s movie are noticeably higher than in years past and the audio is a nice mix of music and real life. As always, the level of the riding is top shelf and Matt Entz puts on a notable performance, proving he’s one of the top riders in the game. We also really liked the acknowledgement of the seasons, conditions, and areas included with the standard rider-oriented segments. The Boondockers make you feel a part of their crew as they constantly search for the next epic moment. - TG ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

21


by Joey Imhoff

CLUTCHING 101: Therapy Session The clutch system provides a means for the driver to go to full throttle, allowing the engine to accelerate to its peak power rpm while efficiently converting that power to the ground. Every time the throttle is chopped off and on, the rpm can quickly recover to maintain peak output. The clutch system is such an important one, yet so often neglected. If the clutches could talk to a therapist, they would probably cry out: “People think I’m awkward. They’re scared to get to know me. I try to ‘reach out’ to my loving driver with low rpm. Even then I’m only humored for a moment or two, a few looks, a few caresses to get my hopes up, yet time and time again let down with only a change of my belt. What about the rest of me? It’s funny how the people in my life expect me to care and work hard when they either ignore me or only come to me only when they’re upset. I show them the way I’ve been abused with belt rub marks, tattered threads and loose fitting parts. Still, they won’t look at me. Show me you care, help, change some things and I’ll perform well again!” To help keep your clutch system from feeling neglected, here are some points for your review. They are listed starting with the least effort required and ending with the most.

Drive Belt Width Every snowmobile has a required belt width, length, and replacement specification in its owner’s manual. You know; the book that you have no idea where it is? Other sources for these measurements are an OEM race handbook, shop manual, or via a phone call to your local OEM parts dealer. For example; new belt width @ 1.50”, Replace belt @ 1.366”. Observing lowered engine speed at full throttle can indicate a belt nearing its replacement width limit.

Drive Belt Discoloration Every new belt sidewall has an original colour, be it green, yellow, gold or bright brown. With riding, belt temperatures increase and while the original color can still be seen, it can become glazed over from miles of use. This glaze can be removed with hot soapy water, your favorite scour pad and some elbow grease. However, when the sidewall color turns to a darker or black tinge, although you can still buff that off, you’ve sentenced it to death by overheating and now it’s only a matter of time to failure.

Belt Cords If you install a belt backwards, overheat it, or if the clutches are misaligned while at full throttle, the cord can pop from its adhesion. If you notice an exposed cord, snip it off as flush as possible with the sidewall. Push the frayed end back into the cord track, and you can probably save it as a spare belt. Install the new belt in the correct direction as indicated on the belt. Increase air flow underneath the hood or give the belt some rest time after a hard pull for cooler temperatures.

Clutch Alignment & Engine Mounts Know what the alignment measurement should be for your sled and try to learn how to do this exercise if needed. At the beginning of every season, or if during the season the sled had an impact that could have bent the front end, then do clutch a clutch alignment check. At least once a season, take a bar and pry the engine mount around its four corners to see if a mount rubber has failed or the engine frame is cracked.

22

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


Ski-Doo snowmobiles cast a pretty big shadow. Even if the sun isn’t out.

Find yours today at Riderz.

It’s all about the ride... 5016 4th Avenue • Edson, AB T7E 1T9 • 780.723.5775 • RIDERZ.CA

®, ™ and the BRP logo are trademarks of Bombardier Recreational Products or its affiliates.

THE SPECIALISTS -

Free shipping on orders over $100 The largest selection in Canada Competitive pricing Outstanding service

www.avalanchesafety.ca ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

23


CLUTCHING 101: Therapy Session cont... Clutch Springs Springs “sack out” from time, use and heat. In fact, even a spring with little use can still sack out just from being installed (deflected) over time. When the spring loses about a ¼ inch from original length, it’s taken a “set”. Up to 10~20 pounds of force can be lost, which may reveal 100~200 rpm of reduced engine speed. Springs are economical and can be replaced each season to maintain maximum performance.

Clutch Shoes The job of these brave little parts is to take one for the team. They’re made of resin, polymer or plastic and are designed to withstand heat, shaky-shakes and substance abuse. Some are held in place by springs, O-rings or metal shims which wear out too. If you can hear a rattling noise from the primary clutch while the engine is idling, then a severe case of wear is indicated. Remove the clutch and change out these shoes to prevent damage from metal-to-metal contact.

Pressure Levers Regardless of type, whether lever or cam-arm, both have bushings mounted on an axle. The bushings can get gummed up; axles can retain corrosion and can have surface material peeling. These factors diminish the free movement of the lever pushing on the sheave, and can contribute to fluctuating engine speed. The lever assembly can be cleaned once or twice per season to prevent wear and keep them moving efficiently.

Rollers Both clutches may have rollers. You probably won’t find a wear dimension in any written material, but rather a suggestion for visual inspection. Check for ease of rolling on the axle, cracks on the steel roller surface and inner bushing, dents, skid marks (haha) and wavy surfaces. If you can wobble a roller between your fingers and thumb and feel it loose to a point where it makes you go “hmmm...”, then don’t be shy and change the roller.

Helix Cam Pieces of belt, road salt, cattails, moisture, pussy willows, bushing coating, rust, dust, things that combust, encrust and disgust can imbed on the angled path. When the roller or button runs over foreign materials on the cam path, it can result in unstable shifting that reveals fluctuating rpm. The secondary roller can actually crack to pieces after cycling back and forth over a large chunk of material. Clean the helix cam at least once per season.

24

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


Sheave Bushings Bushings keep the clutch sheaves in parallel so the belt is squeezed uniformly along its sidewall. As bushings wear, this results in an increase of; bushing edge load, sliding sheave deflection, shaft binding, and the belt being awkwardly pinched and traveling in an uneven arc. All said mentioned will increase belt temperature. If you are having frequent belt failures, high clutch heat and constant engine speed fluctuation, then dig deeper into the system and have the bushing sizes measured and replace near or at their wear limits.

Lubrication For any clutch shaft that has splines or a keyway, a little bit of recommended grease is okay. Otherwise, on any roller bushing, axle, helix casing, angle surface or other wear part mentioned in this article, use... no... lube. None! N. U. N. None! The clutch likes it dry. Clean surfaces self-remove encrust and disgust. Lubed surfaces act like a magnet and attract encrust and disgust.

For your clutches sake, be the therapist. Not only hear what the clutches are saying, but listen and look at them. Be concerned in discovering problems, restoring their health and preserving a long life for them so you can enjoy your engine operating at its maximum output. Joey Imhoff is the man behind the popular Dynamo Joe clutch kit for Ski-Doo Summit sleds. To “Increase Your Clutching IQ�, visit www.ibackshift.com for more technical knowledge.

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

25


GEARGIRL

HITS THE POWDER ROOM Obviously it’s not you. You’re an amazing sledder. You just need better gear. Mountain Sledder is here to help. Here are some of the highlights for the coming winter from some of our favourite brands. We recommend tearing out the pages, circling things you like and taping the pages up around the office and your fridge at home.

Photos: Martina + Reem Words: Jessica Joy

Avalanche Safety Solutions Shovel $49 If you have “Work Carhartts” and “Date Carhartts,” this is your shovel. Effective, nothing fancy and under $50. www.avalanchesafety.ca

26

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

Adrenalin Jacket - FXR $479 Everything about this 3-in-1 jacket promises to keep you warm and dry. We don’t recommend pairing it with thigh-high fishnets. www.fxrracing.com


Knucks Handlebar Riser - Cheetah Factory Racing $115 4”, 5”, 6”, 7” or 8”, CFR lets you pick the extension you’ve always wanted. www.cheetahfactoryracing.com

Stealth Bib – Klim $649.95 If you’re looking to add some stealthy ninja elements into your sledding, these super-lightweight, uber-mobile Gor-tex pants will do the trick. If it wasn’t for your turbo, no one would hear you coming. www.klim.com

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

27


Brain Bucket Hoodie/T-Shirt Combo - 509 $89.95 Sledder high-fashion commands the finest in black hooded sweatshirts and t-shirts. Make it easy on your wardrobe with this pair. www.ride509.com

Powder Pack Waterproof Tunnel Pack – Skinz Protective Gear $99.95 Perfect for anything that you’re carrying that should never,ever get wet (wedding album, cigarettes, etc). www.skinzprotectivegear.com

Honda Snowblower HSS928WC $3,099 This monster can move the equivalent of an 18-wheeler truck filled to the brim with 80,000 lbs of snowblowers of snow every hour. On a four-stroke. Take that. www.powerequipment.honda.ca/bringit

Carbon Fiber Helmet (Burandt Signature Model) - 509 $399.95 At some point in every sledder’s career, they ask themselves–“what would Chris Burandt wear?” The answer, obviously, is a 2.6 lbs bucket with an unbeatable warranty. www.ride509.com

28

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


WATCH BEHIND THE SCENES AT THIS SHOOT ON SLEDDERMAG.COM

X5 Goggles (Orange) - 509 $99.95 If you’re not wearing a goggle with an “Italian-sourced Polycarbonate dual lens,” then what are you wearing? Regardless of the answer, you’ll see much better with 509’s new goggle. www.ride509.com

Vest – Highmark by Snowpulse $1058.95 (includes air cylinder) You don’t wear a backpack. We get it. Now sack up, wear this vest, be safe, and come home to your wife at the end of the day.

Art Direction: Brit S Model: Kyla H @Next Models Stylying: Carla Pedersen MUA: Atefeh Shojaie Assistants: Maylies Lang Assistants: Jason Blais

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

29


Your one stop shop for:

SERVICE & REPAIR PARTS & ACCESSORIES GEAR & CLOTHING AVALANCHE EQUIPMENT & AUTHORIZED AIRBAGS REFILL STATION 604-905-7733 revolutionpowersports.ca 10-1212 Alpha Lake Road, Whistler

Authorized Dealer

Wilson Prewitt / Photograh : Jussi Grznar


PERFORMANCE DEFINED By introducing the industry’s first use of a Stretch GORE-TEX® threelayer material and dynamic D3O® intelligent padding, the all-new Stealth Jacket and Bib from KLIM are like nothing you’ve ever seen.

STEALTH BIB

STEALTH JACKET

The new KLIM Stealth Series is the ultimate in highly-maneuverable, lightweight, durable, comfortable and ultra-serious riding gear for the most active riders.

WITH THE HIGH-TECH FUNCTIONALITY OF

www.KLIM.com ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

© KLIM® 2013

31


N O S S N A H KALLE JO

R E D D E L S N R O B L A R U NAT 32

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

by MATTHEW

MALLORY


asy. e k o o l t i s e k and ma e g u h s e the air o n g i e e l H b . a e t l r y t o f s KJ has mad le on his sled. He's com Moriarty on ab He's comfort across in his riding. - Jas es m o c t a h t d n a

se P Vera Jans

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

n

33


SON KALLE JOHANS

DER D E L S N R O B L NATURA

The Animal Within Big cats are some of the most graceful animals in the wild. Their movements are smooth, sleek and purposeful. Nothing is wasted, but their head and eyes are always looking, always focused. This is a pretty accurate description of KJ on a sled. KJ is an animal, but not in the sense of some who tend to vibrate with aggression. It’s just the opposite really; he looks like he was born on the machine—relaxed, composed and unhesitant. And like an animal in the wild, his movements are smooth, graceful and

instinctual. There are no wasted movements, no stumbles or jerks, just the smooth application of ridiculous horsepower from his turbo charged monsters, through the track to the snow. Which is easier said than done when trying to hold onto the bars of a 250+ horsepower snowmobile. With a tall, lanky build, and forearms and wrists like a gorilla, he always looks relaxed, but ready. Whether he is running into a big jump or drop, climbing a steep gnarly chute or just cruising across the flats, he carries the appearance of a predator posed to pounce. An everalertness seems to set in him whenever he throws a leg over one of his sleds. It’s a position, a stance, an

attitude that doesn’t just come from thousands of hours in the saddle, but rather something that is born into him, like a wild animal. KJ is a natural born sledder, guided by instinct. There must also be something buried deep in his genes, a strange twist of fuel-inspired DNA.

In The Beginning Kalle Johansson, the youngest of three, was born and raised on a small farm in the town of Örnsköldsvik, a port town of 30,000 people on the eastern shores of Sweden. Örnsköldsvik is known for three things: heavy machinery exports, paper products and an abnormally high number of NHL players. It was here that KJ cut his teeth riding at a young age. By the age of eight, he was riding his Dad’s Ockelbo 6000. Ockelbo was a Norwegian snowmobile manufacturer, which produced sleds that were designed to be workhorses. The Ockelbo 6000 was a tool for farmers, trappers and fallers who needed winter transportation. Piloting 285kg of underpowered steel, it was young KJ’s job to break trail through the forest and to haul out the trees that his father fell. Over time, those trails became more interesting and less useful for hauling, as Kalle’s skills grew and he began bobbing and weaving through the forest. From there, his progressive nature moved him to start gapping the road in front of their house. Spending not just days, but weeks and months on a sled during the winter, from an early age, has led to his smooth, naturallooking riding style.


From the Ockelbo, he moved through a series of short track sleds that are all the rage in the Swedish scene. The Swedes don’t get much snow, it tends to get wind-affected quickly, and the terrain consists of rolling mountains, so a short track sled makes sense. The local lads also love their backcountry booters, spending more time in the air than most, which helps explain some of KJ’s comfort hitting huge drops and jumps. Today, many recognize KJ because of his Slednecks fame, but in the beginning it was a segment in a Ruffriders movie, produced by a hard charging, hard partying crew out of Sweden, that precipitated his move to Canada and the big time. In 2007, KJ and his bros Ulf Nilsson and Per Erikson, forgoing the sea-faring ways of their Scandinavian ancestry, descended upon Vancouver via the air. Having seen the mountains and deep snow of British Columbia in the Slednecks films that they had devoured religiously growing up, the trio had chased their sledding dreams to the Coast Mountain Range. Upon arriving, doing what they had always done, the Swedes bought short track sleds. For $5000, Kalle picked up a used Ford F-150 and a 2003 Ski-Doo Summit. They quickly found out why everyone in the videos they had seen was riding a long track sled. The deep snow was a reality, and they spent full days that season digging, just trying to set an up-track up so they could come back down. That first season was all about learning, and KJ was an apt pupil.

Film Star A couple of years later, KJ’s move into the big time came with the release of Slednecks 13. Out of the blue came this guy that most people had never heard of, who tears the shit out of some huge big-mountain lines with a style that is like water flowing downhill— smooth, natural and fall-line oriented. His is a full segment that hits you like a tornado—a hard charging whirlwind of deep pow, sick downhill lines and huge airs. And in his numerous movie segments since, he can be seen transitioning turn-to-turn, launching and stomping drops, hits, hips and whips with just as little effort. Such is the well rounded talent that Kalle has on a sled: flinging himself off of backcountry booters with the short track crowd, huge drops, gnarly climbs, steep trees and downhill lines that make you drool. It is not just that he is strong when it comes to freeriding, he can hang with style with the best in the backcountry at whatever type of riding is going down. He could comfortably be called the best big mountain rider out there right now.

TGFG

dedly taken as singlehan h e H . ar b e tain riding.” ttle to th of big moun a turbo, thro r h it to w va s o p n m in big ju t real e first to hit he is the firs ew levels— “Kalle was th n to g in d in sled big mounta lms Highmark Fi r, ke ic R i rl - Jo se P Vera Jans

, AK n L Valdez ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

35


Tough to Beat Us to the Top

Cylinder Repair and Replating Stock Cylinders Big Bore or Ported Pistons, Gaskets and many other Parts

DON’T SETTLE FOR EASY WHEN YOU CAN HAVE

Available From

SMART AND EASY.

5701 Portage Avenue, Headingley, MB, Canada R4H1E7 Phone 204-895-1727 • Fax 204-888-2705

FE0007A-mountainAd.indd 1

GET THE GEAR:

7/25/13 3:19 PM

Ensure everyone has an avalanche transceiver, shovel, and probe on their person and knows how to use them.

GET THE TRAINING: Take an avalanche course.

GET THE FORECAST:

Make a riding plan based on the current avalanche and weather forecast.

GET THE PICTURE:

RECCO® LOGO USAGE GUIDELINES

If you see recent avalanche activity unstable snow exists. Riding on or underneath steep slopes is dangerous.

Runs on 1 AA alkaline battery LOGOS = 250 hours in transmit

GET OUT OF HARM’S WAY:

“ON” SWITCH

Ortovox’s 3+ features patented SMART ANTENNA TECHNOLOGY™ that detects the buried victim’s orientation and switches to the optimal transmission MINIMUM SIZE antenna to ensure you will be LOCATED FASTER.

One at a time on all avalanche slopes. Don’t go to help your stuck friend. Don’t group up in runout zones.

Logo Mark

Knockout Logo

Boxed Logo

Square (Web) Logo

Embroidery Logo

ADDITIONAL SAFETY TECHNOLOGIES:

GET THE APP

Multiple-burial FLAGGING. 2.375 CM

2.375 CM

2.5 CM

2.875 CM

AUTOMATIC SWITCHOVER in case rescuers are caught in an additional avalanche. CLEAR SPACE

Rob Alford

UPGRADABLE software.

ORTOVOX Canada: info@ortovox.ca / 403.283.8944 For all Logo Marks, a minimum amount of clear space must be maintained around the Mark. This clear space is equal to, or greater than, the size of the capitol R in RECCO . ortovox.com ®

Bleeds: When logo is placed near an edge of a canvas, the side of the red box that bleeds must be extended out, making sure that the RECCO® logo mark remains 6mm in from the edge.

RECCO REFLECTOR INSIDE! 5 CM


ULTIMATE MOD

THE WILDCAT PROJECT STARTED WITH MY old M8 turbo getting a bit tired after one and a half seasons with me. I wanted something different to ride. What I wanted was going to be light, stronger than a M-chassis, it was going to be awesome in deep pow, and it would be able to handle big jumps like a race sled. And it was going to have at least 200hp.

That’s easily done if you have a huge budget and lots of time to spend. But I had a budget of $5000 and it was peak season, so time was short. I wanted to build it on a Snocross chassis but that was hard to find within 4000km. Then suddenly, I came across another project when a friend got the throttle stuck on his 2010 M8, causing it to run wide open like a blind Russian torpedo straight into an ice wall. I had a closer look at the destruction in the Route 99 Motorsports shop and found that the motor was okay, as were the clutches, diamond-drive, track, skid and most parts from the steering except for the A-arms. All of the plastics were in pieces, and the chassis was folded together under the motor. I made an offer of 2000 bucks to the insurance company for the sled when I knew it would cost too much to repair it again, and they accepted. I started to look around the shop for parts for the project. I found a 2008 M8 chassis with cracks on the tunnel near the steering post, but okay otherwise. I also found a gas tank from a 2010 Sno Pro 600 race sled, which I placed onto the empty tunnel to see the difference from the regular M8 gas tank. I found over 20cm more legroom with the new tank, and a better angle from the steering post’s new location. I offered a 6-pack of cold beer for the chassis and seeing as the boys were thirsty and were wondering what crazy thing I was going to build, I could start work right away. Before I started to lift the motor into its new home, I made some reinforcements for the chassis with additional and stronger motor mounts to keep the beast in place. With the motor and pipe in place, I engineered an upper frame to hold the new gas tank and the new horizontal steering post. I ordered new M8 plastics and pistons, a big gas tank, a seat and some frame parts for a 2010 Sno Pro 600. When I got all the parts and started to mount everything, I found that the seat would be really low because the tunnel on the Sno Pro 600 is 2” higher. I would have to block the tank up. I found a wooden 2x4 board that, together with some Styrofoam, would block the tank up to the right height. The frame I had to cut and bend to make fit on the M8 chassis. I ended up using running board lists from a Nytro for the middle frame and a Rev gas tank frame for the back, and the back frame from a Sno Pro 600 as a front frame. The steering post I made out of 2 broken ones that I found in the junk pile. I cut and welded them together for the right length. The sled’s geometry is close to the 2004 Sno Pro 440, only with a stronger and lighter frame.

38

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

After that, I took the modified CPC turbo kit with tunnel dump from my old M8 and mounted it with a Boondockers control box instead of the Attitude box, to be able to run higher fuel pressure and adjust it more easily. New pistons and stiffer reeds were installed too. I bought an external fuel pump designed for a racecar, with higher pressure and more flow so I could mount it outside the gas tank, because it was hard to fit it inside the tank. Now everything was coming together really well and soon it was time for a test ride. But first I had to make the hood and side panels fit with the new body shape. The steering post would come out where the gauge is mounted on the M8, and the back of the hood would have to be cut up to 5” to follow the shape of the new gas tank. Then I was going to shape the back of the hood in about 3” to make a tight fit and give more leg room on the sides. Slowly I heated up one side at a time with a heat gun and formed the new shape that is much rounder and narrower then the stock hood. Finally after two weeks it was time for the first test ride. My first impression was that it was really solid and the riding position reminded me mostly of the Polaris IQR. It felt more like a race sled now but with the geometry to work in really deep snow as well. I loved it right away and there wasn’t much to adjust before it felt really natural to ride. In two days I was leaving for a month-long road trip to Alaska. Was the sled really ready for a trip like that or would I have to wrench the whole trip? It ended up making the entire trip without major work and two years later I returned to Alaska with the same Wildcat, and it killed it once again. At the end of that first trip I entered my first-ever hill climb race, the Mountain Man Hill Climb in Valdez. On the Wildcat, I took home both the King of the Hill title and the Open Mod 800 class. And after surviving 7 film parts, 2.5 seasons, and 12000km with me, I can definitely say that the Wildcat is amazing for a low budget build. W Kalle Johansson P Tim Grey


KJS

FRANKEN

SLED THE WILDCAT TOOLKIT “An axe and a drill is all you need most of the time. And if that’s not enough, I always keep some duct tape and tie wires under the seat with the regular tool kit.”

CHECK OUT THE MOD-BY-MOD BREAKDOWN >>

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

39


CHARGE TUBE

FRONT FRAMES

THE FUN KNOB

“When I first bought the turbo kit, I didn’t want to mess around with it too much. This charge tube was the only one that would fit with this type of steering setup. It is one of few things on the sled that isn’t modified.”

“It is nice and tidy in the machine room on the Wildcat. The front frame is actually a rear frame that is mounted in the front. That’s just how it fits. The middle frame is made out of Nytro running boards for extra strength.”

“The boost knob is for adjusting the smile on your lips. I usually run 6-8lbs boost on 91 octane fuel, but I can run around 11lbs on good fuel, or if someone is getting to close to my landing marks. Here you can see the pull-cord making a detour around the pipe through the wooden wheel.”

SLEDBREAKDOWN|

“A lot of the parts on the Wildcat were made in the parking lot in the morning with an axe, drill and some aluminum from the local hardware store.” -KJ

STEERING ROD

GAS TANK BLOCK

THE GILLS

“This steering rod from a Finnish Lynx makes the steering quick and easy. Also, some aluminum foil from my muffpot lunch protects the injectors and wires from heat.”

“One day, I could smell gas and opened the hood. It turned out that over time, gas had melted the styrofoam under the tank and the hot pipe had been rubbing a hole in the gas tank. Not a good combo. This piece of wood, between the frame made of Nytro running board, and the gas tank, is now preventing the tank from coming too close to the pipe. Safety first!”

“What do you do on a Sunday night when it’s been crazy deep out, and the mesh on the side panel lets in too much snow? Ah, why not take a crazy carpet and make some gills that stop the snow from coming in, but still let the hot air from the clutches out. This mod cost about 5 bucks with all the material, and took about 25 minutes to cut out and rivet on.”

40

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


PIPE WRAP

CUTTING THE BRACKET C

RUNNING BOARD MOD

“The pipe wrap keeps the pipe hot and the rest cold. It also makes the sled look good. Exhaust bags from a Proclimb M8 keep the pipe wrap in place, and give it a nice finish. Homemade quick clamps hold the pipe in place and make life easier.”

“A lot of the parts on the Wildcat are made in the parking lot in the morning with an axe, a drill and some aluminum from the local hardware store. But even an axe has its limits, so sometimes I have to use hi-tech tools, like this hacksaw.”

After just getting back from a month in Alaska, it was time to head out to Log Chalet in Revelstoke for the annual 509 Films shoot. The Wildcat had a rough month in Alaska and was in need of some tender loving care. One running board bracket was broken, and the tunnel was held together by some extra rivets, plates and a mad clown wrap from HTR Designs for extra support.

FRANKEN PULL CORD WHEEL

TURBO KIT

REAR FRAME WOOD

“The wooden wheel for the pull-cord is another late night invention. It is machined out of my shop broom shaft, using a drill and a file. It even has a plastic bushing for many smooth pulls.”

“The Stage 2 turbo kit from CPC Racing is mounted backwards to be able to use a tunnel dump for really deep conditions. Before that it was really hard to ride downhill when snow was clogging the exhaust. Meanwhile, a turbo muffpot takes cooking to new levels.”

“The wooden board under the gas tank is actually from an Arctic Cat sled crate, so you can say it’s an original part. Apparently, styrofoam is not very good to have under the gas tank because gas makes it dissolve. But I keep it in there just to make people shake their heads.”

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

41


IN NER PASS AGE W+P TIM GR EY

THE TRIP ENDED THE WAY IT BEGAN ONLY IN R EVERSE, with the scratching of carbides on Dan Treadway’s driveway in the dark. The noise of our unloading pierced the calm Pemberton night and when the silence returned, I walked over and gave Jon Schramm, my truck partner for the last week, a high-five, semi-embrace. After the good bye, the trip was officially over and only as I drove away, alone for the first time in seven days, did the magnitude of our recent adventure begin to set in. Once again the north had charmed me. This time Terrace, Kitimat, and an incredible sea journey had readjusted my life calibrations.


Chapter 1 / THE CREW AND THE IDEA JORLI RICKER HAD A PLAN. He suspected there might be

a better way to do a trip to Terrace, for a Lower Mainland sledder, than to drive for 20 hours, much of it on single lane roads. His idea was to use the sea as our highway by connecting a couple of BC Ferries to transport us up to Prince Rupert and from there, drive to Terrace to go sledding. Jorli’s theory, as a sledder and a film maker, was that taking the boats wouldn’t just be a better way to travel up to Terrace but that it would also provide a good story for his upcoming Fourcast 3 movie. Deeply inspired by the recent snowboard movie blockbuster The Art of Flight (TAOF), Jorli figured that sledding movies could use a lot more storytelling in them and a trip like this seemed to have the potential he was looking for. Jorli needed top tier talent to give this segment a chance and when Kalle Johansson and Dan Treadway agreed to come on the trip, things were looking up. However, the decision to go north was still a big gamble. Mid-winter filming time is precious when trying to put a movie together and although inspired by TAOF, there was no similarity in the budgets used. The reality was, if this trip was going to be a success, a lot of things were going to have to happen right, and on the cheap.

Chapter 2 / THE JOURNEY NORTH Our three-truck caravan left Horseshoe Bay on an 8am ferry sailing. As the boat plowed across a foggy sea we lined up for food, texted our friends and made fun of Dan for posting to Instagram (@dantreadway). The experience seemed routine for most on the ship, which was packed with daily commuters, the majority of whom were glued to their phones. The scale of our trip and the early morning departure kept our excitement levels subdued. After docking at Nanaimo and getting truck fuel, our convoy motored 387 kms north towards Port Hardy where we were scheduled to catch an evening sailing of the aptly named Northern Adventure ferry bound for Prince Rupert. The Island was a different world from snowy Whistler. Here, the place was green like spring and we sped past countless forests that revealed a rich, life-giving smell of an ocean breeze mixing with misty cedars. The further north we travelled the fewer and fewer people we saw and our decompression from the real world began. Cell reception was patchy and there were long stretches of road where we didn’t see anyone.

PORT HARDY to PRINCE RUPERT The ferry ride from Port Hardy to Prince Rupert made the expedition worth it alone. The cruise is a genuine Canadian tourist attraction that features an exquisite display of raw nature married with maritime experience. The journey is, for the most part, in a narrow channel of water that flows between the British Columbia mainland, and a collection of islands. The topography is littered with snowcapped peaks and treed slopes scarred by creeks starting at glaciers and running straight down to the sea. Traveling via the ocean on a sled trip felt unnatural and really special. Our group sat on the outside deck absorbing the magnificence of a new set of peaks and valleys appearing every few minutes and we weren’t alone. The boat had a high frequency of travellers from all over the world who were there to see the sights. The only difference between them and us was our knowledge that we would soon be sledding. It was an interesting juxtaposition that was not lost on many who saw our trucks. More than once KJ and Dan were stopped for picture opportunities next to our rigs: it would also not be the last time their fame would prove useful. After docking in Prince Rupert, we proceeded to Terrace on an incredible highway that followed the banks of the Skeena river. There were tens of thousands of birds and hundreds of seals that were following the current herring run up the fresh water. It was a wild natural orgasm of life and its awe was hard to ignore. The two days of travel to Terrace had gone by quickly and the relaxation of the ferry ride was an unfamiliar and positive benefit. Upon arriving in Terrace, Dan coordinated meetings with a couple of locals who had responded to his social media callouts about where we should go sledding. Both Darren Hedberg of Kitimat and Regan Kardas of Terrace were gracious enough to come meet us at a run down shack that Dan had also arranged for us to stay at. ‘Bralorne living’ is how Dan described our abode, but we figured beggars shouldn’t be choosers and we just adapted to our grungy surroundings. We were clearly not the first mountain vagrants to take up residence at this place and the only things we dared put in the fridge were beer cans. Darren and Regan both gave us the beta about current conditions and where to go. ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

43


Chapter 3 / ROBINSON After weighing all the options, Robinson was the of first zone that we decided to check out with the Kitimat boys as our guides. Robinson is near the ocean and overlooks Kitimat but the parking lot didn’t feel like a long drive from our Terrace home, which had been nicknamed ‘Chateau Non-Mouse’ for of its one good quality. When we rounded the final corner to the Robinson parking lot we were greeted by a hoard of locals who had come to see what the ‘Slednecks’ crew was up to. True, both Dan and KJ ride for Slednecks clothing company but the fact that we were with a Fourcast movie seemed lost on them. What wasn’t lost on us was that these locals looked ready to rip; the north didn’t appear to raise sissies. The abundance of RMKs was unmistakable and clearly Dan had found his people. They pored over his sled, asking him questions about every little part. Robinson was a fantastic zone. The trail in was a rowdy, trenched track that was by no means a gimme. The approach set the tone for what we would find to be an expert riding area with massive potential. Upon entering the zone we rolled up to a sweet cabin with a stove and beds—always a good sign. Walking down into an entrance way that is built on 20 ft stilts is testament to how much snow falls here. After a short play session nearby, Darren and his guys led us up to the first big area and it wasn’t long before KJ, Dan and Jorli were flying through the sky for the cameras. After a capturing a few air and powder shots, the decision was made to spend some time exploring because the weather wasn’t very good for filming. We got lucky because the locals took us on one of their big tours. For hours we followed them up, over, and around several big valleys, which revealed a wild and promising land. The clouds gave us a few sucker holes, which we tried to make use of for shots but mostly we just explored and mentally logged potential spots for when the sun came out. Our far point was marked when Dan and KJ started playing on a natural hip. Most of us gathered to enjoy a show but after only a couple of hits KJ had lost all his turbo power and didn’t know why. Suddenly the vibe of the day changed because we were a long way back, in intermittent weather, with a worrisome mechanical. Between the warm cabin and us were a couple of large hill climbs that required good pull to get up. Would KJ’s sled even make it back up those climbs? What would we do if we couldn’t get back over? These questions started playing with our minds and forced us to turn for the trucks. What KJ didn’t know at the time was that the bracket that holds his wastegate was broken and his turbo was now useless. Despite his predicament, our worries proved needless as KJ nursed his now underpowered sled back to the cabin with relative ease. We watched the sun go down as we lit a fire and ate some food in the cabin, and after the rodeo back to the trucks it was dark before we pulled away. When we finally found our beds back in Terrace we were bushed. Day 1 was an epic adventure but the shots in the bag for the movie were few.

44

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


Chapter 4 / KJ FIX

Chapter 5 / NORTH DOUGLAS

Day 2 broke with the promise of good weather unfulfilled and after breakfast, the task of fixing KJ’s sled was the top priority. The first thing we needed was a place to work so we could begin to understand what was even wrong. The constant drizzle of rain did little to inspire a big repair outside so our first stop was the Arctic Cat dealership where KJ tried to negotiate some shop space. This would prove to be a tough sale but our luck changed drastically when a teenager who was waiting behind us at the shop recognized Dan and KJ. Within five minutes of talking, Tyler Calcutt had invited us to his place and to work in his family’s garage and offered KJ a sled to ride if he couldn’t fix his own. This is the kind of hospitality that makes the north what it is, but Tyler, as we would later find out, was no ordinary kid. Being the overall BC moto champion for his age class was just one of Tyler’s traits. He was also an amazing sledder and he and his buddies would provide us countless laughs, good times and show us the most fruitful zone for shots of the trip. The wastegate bracket ordeal was an amazing journey. Meeting Tyler at random and then being welcomed into his shop was something that could never have been planned. Having him call his uncle, who just happened to be a metal fabricator, and getting him to make KJ another bracket on the spot (for $50) gave us all hope that the trip wasn’t lost and good things were yet to happen. The north seemed to be taking care of us despite our setbacks.

After leaving the fabrication shop, Jorli was anxious to get shots and so we decided to go sledding. We rolled out of Terrace for the North Douglas area around 2 pm. KJ had been left to put his sled back together on his own but the rest of our crew followed Regan to this Terrace zone. The poor weather wasn’t very reassuring and neither was leaving the trailhead at 3:30pm for what was described as a full day ride. Our only advantage was that by being on the road, none of us had any real-life responsibilities to get back to that day. North Douglas was big terrain. Because it is higher and further from the ocean the snow was much drier than the day before in Robinson but that also made it more unstable. The mountains had a lot more rock showing than the day before which made them feel more like the Selkirks than the coast range. After breaking into the alpine and through some massive avalanche runout paths, we followed a flagged trail up and over a pass and then down to yet another awesome cabin in the trees. Here we found the driest and fluffiest snow of the trip. The boondocking amongst the trees was incredible and Dan put on a show, whipping out airs into deep powder landings. As we ventured out from the thick trees to more sparse areas, however, we found a slab that did little to encourage us. We cut off some small slides that had potential to be much larger in bigger terrain so we kept to the thick trees as much as possible. The fact that it was late in the day, we were in a remote location and had poor visibility was not lost on us. While the sledding was superb, the video capturing was proving elusive and Jorli was lamenting another day of almost no shots. Again we returned to the trucks in the dark and when our phones chimed with regained reception we made plans to meet KJ for dinner. The good news was that KJ had fixed his sled. The bad news was that KJ had gone for a short ride with Tyler and had wrecked his sled again. It goes without saying that this was not the news that Jorli wanted to hear!

ISSUE IV / ISSUE DEEPIVDAYS WINTER / DEEPOF DAYS OF WINTER MSM MSM

05 45


Chapter 6 / BOLTON Day 3 started with another wrenching session in Tyler’s garage on KJ’s sled. The sky was cloudy and to make matters worse, it appeared our called-for high pressure had instead moved south and found Pemberton. Tensions at breakfast were spiked by texts about epic riding back home. Nothing adds stress like missing the ‘best day of the season’ back home. However, we were committed to where we were and the show had to go on. Dan’s advice was to ignore the news from back home; it wasn’t going to help to dwell on it. Whatever KJ’s sled issue was, he fixed it quickly, and his Evolution Powersports turbo’d cat was ready for another day of riding. KJ had assured us that Tyler was an awesome rider and so we gave him the green light to show us a new area called Bolton. As we prepped for the day in Tyler’s yard, his friends kept showing up. It was awesome to see these ‘kids’ with big trucks and sleds stoked to ride. Clearly priorities were more straight in the north. Jorli, however, was nervous. After the horde of people on the first day, he was gun-shy on having a big crew again, but we didn’t have much choice because we were lost without our hosts. Bolton proved to have the best combination of terrain and snowpack that we found. One of the beauty parts about sledding in Terrace is the variety that you can find in snowpack amongst the zones. The areas close to Kitimat are typically warmer and get more volume of snow. This will commonly make them more stable but also temperature affected. The snow north of Terrace in areas like North Douglas is much drier and continental. For us Bolton seemed to have the stability that we wanted and still a powdery feel to the snow.

46

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


Despite Jorli’s reservations, Tyler and his buddies proved to be perfect riding partners. They were patient with the filming process and stayed out of the way until it was their turn to shred the slope. Our crew didn’t fully appreciate who we were with until we unleashed them on a slope after Dan and KJ had done a couple airs. When the ‘kids’ finally got their turn they showed us how it’s done in Terrace by annihilating everything they saw in expert style. To see these guys rip so hard at such a young age stoked us up big-time! Each one of these kids probably deserved a segment in the movie we were filming. A full day in Bolton, where we didn’t even get to see ‘the good part’ according to our young friends, convinced us to head there the next day. Miraculously, KJ’s sled had made it through Day 3 and when we finally saw blue sky the next morning our crew headed back to Bolton early, this time on our own. After all the tension we had incurred with the travel, the weather, the good conditions back home, the mechanicals and the lack of shots, everything came together on the last day. When we made our way to ‘the good part’ at Bolton, we weren’t disappointed. The zone proved to be a paradise of features and low avalanche potentials. It was perfect for what we were trying to do and we were the only crew in there. Dan, KJ and Jorli started lining up jumps, hips and airs as Schramm worked his bag off capturing shot after shot after shot. Midway through the day, KJ sent what had been a hip jump, full throttle,

with the intentions of gapping the whole feature only to have his belt drive break during take off. This sent him flying through the air like superman well above his sled, which took a heavy nose dive without its rider telling it what to do. Luckily KJ was ok but his sled was broken yet again. While he proceeded to field fix it, Dan lined up another hip and did his thing by boosting big and making it look perfect. We rolled around Bolton like we owned the place but didn’t even get to the end of the zone. The weather improved the longer we were out and we stayed in the alpine until the sun set in spectacular fashion. By the time we got back to the trucks in the dark, for the fourth day in a row, we were beat. Terrace and Kitimat had proved themselves worthy. The people there had been amazing and we finally had enough shots to call it a good trip. With the ferry leaving Prince Rupert the next day to go back south we decided to grab it and call it good.

EVERY JOURNEY TO REMOTE LOCATIONS IN THE NORTH IS A MEMORABLE ONE but using BC Ferries to

get to and from Terrace ranks high as one of the most special excursions a sledder can do. It is an adventure that reinforces in one’s self all that remains important in this world: wild adventure, raw nature, trusted friends, kind locals, time away and the joy of returning alive to loved ones. M


RADZONES TERRACE Prince Rupert

HORSESHOE BAY > TERRACE

Terrace

by road

1,308 kms / 15 hrs

Kitimat

Horseshoe Bay > Nanaimo

Approx. $85 one way (2 pp, 2 sleds and 1 truck) Sailing time: 1 hr 40 mins

Nanaimo > Port Hardy

387 kms 4 hrs 30 mins

Port Hardy > Prince Rupert Approx. $900 (2 pp, 2 sleds and 1 truck) About 18 hrs

Prince Rupert > Terrace 144km / 1hr 45 mins

Terrace > Kitimat

Port Hardy

62km / 50 mins

TERRACE

> Regional population of >20,000 pp > All 4 snowmobile brands have dealerships > March & April are the best Steelhead and Trout fishing months

PRINCE RUPERT

> 12,000 pp > All five species of salmon may be caught in Prince Rupert: Chinook, Coho, Sockeye, Pink and Chum

Nanaimo

Horseshoe Bay

KITIMAT

> <8000 people > Excellent crab fishing

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

49


699

$ starting from For a limited time,

Plus freight and PDI

Show Winter Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boss Honda Powersports Canada

50

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

See dealer for details.

@HondaPowerCA

honda.ca/bringit


YES! WE SHIP TO CANADA! FREE SHIPPING on u.s. orders

(see site for details)

SINISTER X5

AVIATOR

Pantone 186

THE ABS TWINBAG SAVED MY LIFE IN A MASSIVE AVALANCHE. IT FEELS LIKE A MIRACLE THAT IT KEPT ME ON TOP OF 6 METERS HARD PRESSED SNOW.

Pantone 420

Pantone Process Black

®

AVALANCHE GEAR BE PREPARED! IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE! AIRBAG SYSTEMS

Xavier De Le Rue – Extreme Snowboarder

MOUNTAIN ADDICTION JUGS & BAGS

BEACONS Kits starting at just $139

Read Xavier’s whole story

ABS ® TWINBAG FOR LIFE

PROBES & SHOVELS

E UR FRE GET YOOG TODAY! CATAL

4

201

W W W. A B S - A I R B A G. C O M

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

51

Serving Snowmobilers Throughout The United States, Canada & Across The Globe! CLOTHING - HELMETS - GOGGLES - PARTS - AVALANCHE GEAR & MORE!


52

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


P Patrick Orton R Brodie Evans L Revelstoke, BC

DEEP DAYS OF WINTER ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER MSM

GALLERY

53


P Stevin Tuchiwsky R Joel Kistenfeger L Middle Kootenay, AB

54

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

GALLERY

P Patrick Orton R Derek Woods L Selkirk Range, BC

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

55


P Patrick Garbutt R Rob Alford L Sicamous, BC

56

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


P Patrick Orton R Craig Kasburg L Haines, AK

DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

GALLERY ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

57


P Patrick Orton R Derek Woods L Revelstoke, BC

58

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

59


P Mark Schilperoort R Tim Watt L Northern Monashees, BC

60

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


CANADIAN DEALER LISTING BRITISH COLUMBIA

ALBERTA Alberta Beach

Ecko Marine www.eckomarine.com

780.924.3255

Calgary

Bow Cycle North 403-288-5421 www.bowcyclecalgary.com ww Bow Cycle South 403.441.1299 www.bowcyclecalgary.com

Drayton Valley

First Choice Recreation 780.621.1923 www.firstchoicerecreation.com

Eckville

Rainy Creek Powersports 403.746.5000 www.rainycreekpowersports.com

Edmonton

Fuel Motorsports www.fuelmotorsports.xxx

604.858.7897

Greater Vancouver Powersports 604.795.7800 www.gvps.ca

Courtenay

Parker Marine www.parkermarine.ca

250.334.4808

Fernie

Ghostrider Motorsports 250.423.9251 www.ghostridermotorsports.ca

Golden

Avalanche Safety Solutions www.avalanchesafety.ca

250.344.8606

Martin Motor Sports (South) 780.438.2484 www.martinmotorsports.ca

Mountain Motorsports 250.344.6100 www.mountainmotorsports.ca ww

Martin Motor Sports (West) 780.481.4000 www.martinmotorsports.ca

Robin’s Marine Service

Edson

Riderz www.riderz.ca

780.723.5775

La Crete

Tuffline Power Sports www.tuffline.com

780.928.3932

White Knuckle Motorsports 780.872.7004 www.whiteknucklemotorsports.ca

Red Deer County Turple Bros. www.turplebros.ca

Kamloops

250.851.0084

Kelowna

M&M Performance www.mmperformance.com

403.346.5238

Sedgewick

250.491.4800

McBride

Spindrift Powersports 250.569.0070 www.spindriftpowersports.com

Merritt

TKat Sled Sense

Lloydminster

250-315-1082

Pemberton

604.894.6840 Route 99 Motorsports Ltd. www.route99motorsports.com

Surrey

Greater Vancouver Powersports 604.888.8700 www.gvps.ca

Vernon

Cross-Country Sales & Service Ltd. 780.384.2215 www.crosscountrysales.com

Riders Edge Suspension Ltd. 250.542.0269 www.ridersedgesuspension.com

Westlock

Williams Lake

C.C. Cycle (2012) Ltd. www.cccycle.ca

800.792.8313

Gordo’s Rent-All

250.392.4222

Spectra Powersports 250.392.3201 www.spectrapowersports.com

SASKATCHEWAN Biggar

Biggar Tire Centre 306.948.2426 www.oktirearcticcat.com

MANITOBA MANI

Regina

Dauphin Speed n’ Sport 204.638.8995 www.dauphinspeednsport.com

Agri-Sports www.agrisports.ca

306.525.8366

Dauphin

Riders Gear Shop 306.545.4327 www.ridersgearshop.com

NEWFOUNDLAND

Rocanville

Corner Brook

Universe Satellite Sales 306.645.2669 ww www.universesatellite.com

QUEBEC Rush Motosport 418-360-0075 www.rushmotosport.com

Quebec City

Extreme Limit www.ExtremeLimite.ca

DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

www.RIDE509.com

Western Motorsports www.western-motorsports.ca

709.634.3526

YUKON

Gaspé

GALLERY

Chilliwack

|

Whitehorse

Checkered Flag Recreation 867.633.2627 www.checkeredflagrecreation.com ww

418.805.0222

DISTRIBUTED BY:

www.facebook.com/RIDE509 1.888.987.SLED ISSUE IV / |DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

61


Avalanches Are Fast. Now Rescuers Are Too. easy clear guidance thanks to straightforward handling fast quick and precise location thanks to 360° display and three antennae effective saves time thanks to clear overview in the event of multiple burials. www.mammut.ch

Come play in our backyard Sicamous, BC

Anywhere you want to go! Scan to go online

 Designed for mountain riding  Based on the layout of a snowmobile  Bolts onto bike w/o mods  Low operating cost  Worldwide dealer network

 Fully coupled or non coupled design with instant fingertip adjustability  Super smooth ride quality  Extremely bottom-out resistant  Saves a respectable amount of weight on all models  Mounts into factory tunnel holes

 FOX or EXIT shock packages available  Several price point options to fit your budget  Complete skids available  Available for all brands of mountain sleds www.timbersled.com

208 208--255 255--5644

SICAMOUS INN

Looking for the finest snow-covered mountains to shred this year? Sicamous has everything from challenging vertical to great family riding.

SLEDDER DISCOUNTS • Indoor pool and hot tubs • Large family and specialty suites • Free continental breakfast • Sports equipment drying room • “In Room” parking lot surveillance system • Up to date trail and snow conditions RESERVE TODAY: 1-800-485-7698 www.sicamousinn.ca


...AND FAR AWAY

#1 G RL I CAN REMEMBER EACH AND EVERY ONE. MY FIRST WAS

a 1974 Arctic Cat Panther 340 with a sexy leopard print accent on the seat, which I could barely climb aboard. She was chased by a bright orange Moto-Ski, a mid-eighties Yamaha Enticer and a slew of Ski-Doos, each with its own charming character and quirks that I can still recall. Some I loved more than others, but I cherished each in its own way. I gave them all the names of the beautiful girls that in my youth I had fallen in love with so easily, as tender boys tend to do. Daphne, Jessica, Betty & Veronica were just a few. But Midge… oh Midge, she was my high-school sweetheart. Little Midge, with her smooth ride and neversay-die attitude—the little engine that could. She had such an easygoing demeanour; she was always up for a good time. And she was a good-looking girl too, the best I’ve had yet. No flashy powder-coated makeup required, she was a natural beauty. I couldn’t walk by her all loaded up without turning my head for at least a sneaky peek. Good ol’ reliable Midge, in all our time together, she only let me down once and it wasn’t her fault. I didn’t treat her right, didn’t take care of her needs. And for that, she hung me out to dry. But you have to respect a girl like that, whose tough love can make you a better person. So I did the right thing, made my apology and we moved on together, stronger than ever. She was my rock, a two-pull cold starter every time, full of life and raring to go.   She’s gone now, but not forgotten. She’s someone else’s Midge, but I still imagine her enjoying a well-earned retirement, putt-putt-ing along the rivers and fields of the Foothills. I miss her and those days together, and get a little sad thinking about her sometimes. But then it makes me feel good to hope that she still gets to take the odd run at a riverbank every now and then. And even if her little paddles are too worn now to make it to the top, I know she’ll have poured every ounce of her heart and soul into the effort.   Every year or two, a new and different sled comes into my life, just as they have before, and just as they will continue to do. Each seems a little more refined, a little better looking, and with a little more get-out-on-the-dance-floor than the last. Maybe it’s my taste that has grown, as I have in age, to be little more discerning, a little pickier. Yet, somehow, regardless of how good they have become or likely will be, in my heart I know that Midge is, and always will be, my number one girl. M W+P Patrick Garbutt

ISSUE IV / ISSUE DEEPIVDAYS OFDAYS WINTER / DEEP OF WINTER MSM MSM

63 63


C A N A D A The world leader in Performance.

Your Custom Snowmobile Specialists

Leading the Industry with Exceptional Customer Service. » » » » »

Custom Suspension Components XP 860 Big Bore Kits Custom Clutching & Tuning Custom Chassis Parts Turbo Kits

Absolute Power & Performance

(780) 460-9101

7 Riel Drive, St. Albert Alberta, Canada

www. abspow.ca

Pump Gas Turbo | Race Gas Turbo EFI Fuel Control Box Electronic Boost Control EZ Ryde Suspensions | 2Moto Snow Bikes | Nitrous Kits

DON’T GET LEFT BEHIND

BoonDocker Canada Toll Free: 877-449-2699 Local: 250-449-2699 Fax: 250-449-2328 Email: sales@boondocker.co Web: www.boondocker.co

Cylinders & Crankshaft

TIMBERSLED RENTAL UNITS AVAILABLE

Piston Kits

Slide Savers GOLDEN, BC AUTHORIZED TIMBERSLED DEALER 1-888-SLED-NOW or 250-344-0969

www.MountainMotorSports.ca

Pipes & Silencers

2414 Millar Avenue · Saskatoon SK

Toll Free: 1-800-667-7669

www.recreationsupply.co


LAST CALL

“Forget twerking, real men tailstand.” -@turkey_reinheardt 509 Canadian premiere, Edmonton AB

P TGFG P TGFG

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

65


66

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER


the pro choice. ROB ALFORD CHRIS BROWN CHRIS BURANDT STEPHEN DARCY KALLE JOHANSSON GEOFF KYLE BRET RASMUSSEN DAN TREADWAY BRETT TURCOTTE TYLER BLAIR CORY DAVIS GEOFF DYER JULIE-ANN CHAPMAN BRAD GILMORE TROY LAKUSTA JOEY JUNKER SCOTT RHODES REAGAN SIEG

The absolute preferred avalanche airbag of choice by snowmobile professionals. SNOWPULSEHIGHMARK.COM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

MSM

67


Altitude SickneSS

Chris Browniwhistler, BC

Visit ridewithChrisBrown.Com for more information on a mountain riding CliniC aVailaBle in your area.

68

MSM

ISSUE IV / DEEP DAYS OF WINTER

Mountain Sledder Issue 4  

Deep Days of Winter featuring an interview with big mountain ripper Kalle Johansson, the low down on the uprising of Snowbikes, Sled films o...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you