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MOUNTAINPARENT |

W I N T E R 2 016

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ISSUE ONE

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R OA R I N G FO R K VA L L E Y, CO L O R A D O

STARGAZING Guide for Families

WELLNESS

HUNTING Traditions with Kids

EDUC ATION

WINTER READS by Basalt Library

RECRE ATION

LOCAL SKIING

HOME LIFE

Programs & Deals

ST YLE


M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Dear Readers, It’s been almost 8 years since MOUNTAIN PARENT was in publication and I am excited to announce that this beloved free magazine will hit the racks again. Can you believe it - in print no less! MOUNTAIN PARENT is about sharing resources, about getting to know more about our own community, about highlighting uplifting and challenging issues. MP is not about embodying perfection or judging parenting tactics. It is about laughing at our own mistakes and honoring the totally crazy, exhausting, maddening and hilarious joy that our children bring to our lives. It’s impossible to deny that families of great diversity and great promise shape business and life as usual in our valley. So let’s make the most of it and grow in the process. MOUNTAIN PARENT will prove to be a creative read for your entertainment and contemplation. I hope you join in however you can. Take advantage of our free calendar event listings, submit an article idea or editorial or promote your business to a large group of engaged readers. Enjoy the ride as a parent and enjoy the read with MOUNTAIN PARENT! Sincerely,

Lauren M. Suhrbier,

Publisher, MOUNTAIN PARENT Magazine 2016/17

Dear Readers, Moving to the Roaring Fork Valley in 1999, after graduating with a Masters degree in Physical Therapy, I never imagined that someday I’d be a stay-at-home mom running a parenting magazine. But when I held my first baby, Sawyer, in 2001, I had a complete change of heart. As soon as we locked eyes, the career ambitions didn’t disappear, rather faded a bit and became secondary to staying home and spending more time with him. MOUNTAIN PARENT magazine was born to connect and form bonds with other parents and to contribute to the community in a meaningful way. I had so many local parenting experts at my fingertips, and I always knew what was happening for kids/families when I owned the magazine. Many people have lamented that there has not been a parenting magazine in the valley since we closed the magazine in 2008. I am confident that legions of parents from Aspen to Glenwood will appreciate the ideas, inspiration and encouragement that Lauren and the new MP team will provide in MOUNTAIN PARENT magazine. With your help and the good start they have, MP is taking pulse on real life in the Roaring Fork Valley for families. This magazine will fill a well needed void of information. I am absolutely thrilled to pick up this first issue of MOUNTAIN PARENT magazine and fill my calendar with events and activities for my three kids! Sincerely,

Sa ra h Shook

Lauren M. Suhrbier (Publisher) and Griff on a recent plane flight just keeping busy. We love the Aspen airport!

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Griff - the inspiration and motivation for Mountain Parent. Not shown is Mike Suhrbier, the biggest supporter of MP.

Sarah Shook and her son Oliver. Sarah and Mike Shook published Mountain Parent for 5 years starting in 2004.


In this Issue FA L L / WIN T ER 2016 05 E D U C AT I O N & L E A R N I N G

Music is for Life + A Round-up of Music Classes Winter Reads for All Grades + A Stargazing Guide for Local Families

LOCAL + AMAZING EDUCATION SPONSORS These ads actually have useful information. How incredible!

14 W E L L N E S S & PA R E N T I N G

Non-profit profile: CASA of the 9th + Epilepsy from a Mom’s Perspective Tales of Parenting in The Dark Essential Oils for Winter Health + Emotion Coaching

LOCAL + AMAZING WELLNESS SPONSORS A pictoral resource guide to practitioners.

20 R EC R E AT I O N

Of Home and Sport: Success on the Podium and as a Mother Nordic Skiing with your Kids + Hunting Traditions for Colorado Kids Skiing Round-Up: Deals and Programs for Kids 2016/17

LOCAL + AMAZING RECREATION SPONSORS Check out organizations who just want to have fun.

31 H O M E L I FE & H O L I DAYS

Wooden Toys + Winter Crafts + A New Recipe Holiday Bazaar + A Round-up of Santa’s Visits Photographer for Your Holiday Pics

LOCAL + AMAZING HOMELIFE SPONSORS Sponsors? Advertisers? We call them HELPERS.

40 N OV/ D E C 2016 CO M M U N I T Y C A L E N DA R 3


M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

All About Mountain Parent ESSEN T I A L S

Mountain Parent is available free of charge at over 150 locations in the Roaring Fork Valley. We publish 6 issues each year (every other month) and provide new online content monthly. Visit mountain-parent.com to sign up for the monthly E-Newsletter and don’t miss out on anything!

DISCL A IMER

The opinions and views expressed by the contributors to Mountain Parent are not necessarily those of the Publisher. Mountain Parent Magazine has been registered with the State of Colorado. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial or graphic content is prohibited.

E V EN T C A L ENDA R

We welcome your input, ideas and news. Letters may submitted via mail or e-mail. E-mail to editor@ mountain-parent.com. Listings for the Calendar of Events must include a basic description of the event, time, date, location, contact information and cost.

CON T RIB U TORS

Mountain Parent is always looking for interesting ideas, beautiful photographs and news coverage. Please contact us at editor@mountain-parent.com to learn more.

A DV ERT ISING

This publication offers both businesses and non-profits an extremely cost-competitive way to reach a targeted audience of readers. We offer both online and print advertising options and non-profits can take advantage for special discounts. Please visit our website www.mountainparent.com for more information.

CON TAC T

Mountain Parent Magazine editor@mountain-parent.com mountain-parent.com 970.319.3939 Find us on Facebook too!

W EBSI T E

At present we are not at the top of Google search results. Scroll down! You can also enter our website directly. Please make note that it has a hyphen. Our website is:

mountain-parent.com

SPECIAL THANKS

Many thanks to our amazing desigers who made late night time in their schedules. We couldn’t have done it without you truly talented folks! RANDALL LEVENSALER CREATIVE A layout and big picture maestro! levensaler.com JEN MOSS She’s well-known brilliance, but consider yourself lucky if you can track her down.

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Artist for Our Year HOW M A N Y PU B L IC AT IONS SPONSOR T HEIR OW N “A RT IS T IN RESIDENCE” ? A B O U T O U R PR O G R A M Well folks, we are so excited to announce that Mountain Parent is “relaunching” in style and in keeping with the artistic ethos in our valley by sponsoring an Annual Artist of The Year Program. Each year the selected local artist’s work will grace each cover and interior artwork for each of our six issues. Mountain Parent seeks to aide an amazingly talented artist from western Colorado each year in experiencing increased financial security and professional support through our program. We hope this program enhances the promotion of their work, catalyses new collaboration with the community and helps them shine even brighter. The Mountain Parent community jury will evaluate applicants for 2018 from August 1 - November 1, 2017. Please check our website this spring for more information! M EE T T H E A R T IS T: SA R A H U H L After a 10 year career as a professional bike racer, 4 years of teaching sensory expertise within the beer industry and a brief chapter of marketing and branding for outdoor brands, Sarah is finding her niche as an illustrator. Sarah has designed custom illustrations for Outdoor Research, The American Alpine Club, Alpinist Magazine, 5Point Film Festival, Coalition Skis, Vail Mountain Coffee, Professional Ski Instructors of America, Carbondale Chamber of Commerce and numerous small business owners and personal clients. With a focus on landscapes, Sarah’s art tends to relay her imaginative take on natural beauty. At Mountain Parent we love her work because it resonates with both children an adults. It invites us to feel playful and to get out there and explore. Who knows? Maybe someone around here will really see an elk riding a unicycle this year! Check out Sarah’s work for purchase and commission at sarahuhl.com

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M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Music is for Living TAMI SUBI

D I R E C T O R G L E N W O O O D

O F

S P R I N G S

B A N D S H I G H

S C H O O L

Almost every time I tell someone that I am a band director/music teacher I get a similar response: “I used to play _____(insert trumpet, clarinet, saxophone, etc.) and I quit. I wish my parents had made me continue.” As parents, we know how brutal it can be to keep our kids going on anything that they have decided they are uninterested in. My oldest son is 9 and although he whines about practicing the piano, as soon as guests come over he can’t wait to show off his skills. I am so lucky to see first-hand the transformative experience of music both at home and at school. If you Google “benefits of music education” you will get somewhere around 15 million results discussing IQ, brain function, spatial-temporal skills and oh-so-much-more. What isn’t so obvious is the safe space music creates for students of all ages. In a time when technology and social media seem to engross young people for hours a day it is so refreshing to be with students as they create music. They are unplugged and connected by the intangible. During a free period, lunch time or in between classes many students recharge in the safe haven of the band room. When the rest of the world doesn’t seem safe, the place where they create music becomes not only safe but creative. Music unifies. It crosses boundaries of race, gender and politics. Where else do a team of students unite for a common goal every single class period? They have to put their own individual desires or comfort aside for the good of the whole. In the GSHS high school band we have students who may not hang out outside the band room but inside the band room is different story. Recently they worked together for weeks to put together a marching band performance for the Homecoming football game. Some of the students totally hated it; some of them wished that we marched all Fall, and some of them were just willing to do whatever it took. All of them were proud of what they achieved as a group and the gift they gave to the community with their performance. I moved internationally seven times from 1st to 12th grade. Aside from my family, the one constant in my life was music, everything from the accordion in 3rd grade to flute and piano in 5th, then oboe and jazz piano in high school. The lunch room at each dreaded first day in a new school was the worst, but I always knew that I would find the band room and a room full of musicians. We are so fortunate to have amazing music opportunities in our valley. There really is something for every age. If you don’t have 6

TO P L E F T Jazz Aspen Snowmass creates events like District 8 Honor Jazz for students to perform [Photo: JAS Aspen] B OT TO M L E F T: Aspen Music Festival and School brings valley students together with the Bel Canto Children’s Choir. [Photo: Aspen Music Festival]


RESOU RCES NOTE: Many of these programs offer scholarships or are already discounted by the organization. Please don’t let money concerns stop you. Ask the program for help if needed. ($ = Denotes if there is a cost to participate). If we have missed your musical program please e-mail us for posting on our website. M US I C A L S TO RY T I M E

Birth to 6+, Free Garfield County Libraries gcpld.org/news-and-events PE A S A N D C A R ROT S , $

Birth to 3, Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork Fridays at 9 a.m. waldorfschoolrf.com A L L VA L L E Y M US I C TO G E T H E R , $

Birth to 6+, Wednesdays & Fridays allvalleymusic.com

TO P R I G H T Tami Suby, Director of Bands, pictured with the Symphonic Band, one of the three GSHS instrumental ensembles. [Photo: Matt Suby Photography]

Mu si c u ni fi e s. It bre a k s t he ba rri e rs of ra c e, re ligi on, poli ti c s a nd e ve n hig hs c hool popu la ri ty.

G L E N WO O D C E N T E R FO R T H E A R T S $

Ages 6+, Piano, Guitar, Ukulele, Voice, Songwriting glenwoodarts.org A S PE N M US I C FE S T I VA L

Beginning Strings $ Grades 1+, Days depend on community Lead Guitar $ Grades 4+, Classical Guitar Maroon Bel Canto Children’s Chorus $ Grades 4 – 8, Days depend on community aspenmusicfestival.com B OT TO M R I G H T AMFS teaches classical guitar through their Lead Guitar program. [Photo: AMFS]

musical experience, don’t be afraid! Small children love to hear you sing and will sing with you, even if you don’t sound good. Hand drums, tambourines, melodicas, and harmonicas are all portable, fun and will bring music into your life. The Music Together course comes with a CD and it a savior on road trips! Jazz Aspen Snowmass (JAS) and the Aspen Music Festival and School are oneof-a-kind resources for music in our valley. JAS supports musicians with their Pays to Play program, Beat Lab, Faculty In School support, financial contributions for instruments and repairs and so much more. The Aspen Music Festival and School offers Beginning Strings and Bel Canto Choir after school for elementary students. In Sweden researchers studied the effects of singing on the human heart. “Using pulse monitors attached to the singers’ ears, the researchers measured the changes in the choir members’ heart rates as they navigated the intricate harmonies of a Swedish hymn. When the choir began to sing, their heart rates slowed down.” In a very short time they found that the singers’ hearts all began to beat at the same time (When Choirs Sing, Many Hearts Beat as One by Anna Haensch). What a powerful metaphor for what music can do!

E A R T H B E AT C H I L D R E N ’ S C H O I R $

GSES during Winter months earthbeatchoir.com

ROA R I N G FO R K YO U T H O RC H E S T R A $

Ages 6 - 18, String Orchestra for Advanced Beginners + roaringforkmusicsociety.org JA Z Z A S PE N S N OW M A SS

JAS Café Concerts, Private Lessons, Honor Jazz events, Music Education program support jazzaspensnowmass.org M O N DAY N I G H T JA Z Z JA M

Free, Open to all musicians of ability Hotel Colorado, Glenwood Springs Glenwood Springs, 7 pm

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M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Winter Reads ERIN HOLLINGSWORTH

T E E N

L I B R A R I A N ,

B A S A L T

W I N T ER B R E A K A N D T H E H O L I DAY S are right around the corner, and routines can fly out the window with travel, out-oftown guests, and celebrations. Keep your kids engaged this winter with these reading tips from the Basalt Regional Library: 1. Read for fun! Whether your child is in the mood for holiday stories or the latest installment of their favorite series, winter break is the perfect opportunity to set aside school books and read for fun. 2. Read together! Reading with your child is one of the most important things you can do to prepare them to read, or to improve their reading skills. Create a new holiday tradition by reading bedtime stories together, or snuggling up with hot cocoa and a good book.

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P U B L I C

L I B R A R Y

3. Make the most of travel time! Practice reading while traveling in the car, or listen to an audiobook. Studies show that listening to audiobooks improves comprehension, increases reading accuracy, and bolsters general motivation. 4. Stock up on books and audiobooks at the library! Help your child pick out books they’re interested in reading or listening to—and remember, borrowing books from the library is FREE! Libraries also have free, fun activities for children and families. For more reading tips, to browse the library’s catalog, or to check out our calendar of events visit: BASALTLIBRARY.ORG.


Recommended picks for school age kids LOWER (GRADES 2-3 ) Inspector Flytrap by Tom Angleberger:Inspector Flytrap may be a Venus flytrap, but the carnivorous plant is also trying to become the greatest private detective ever grown. Inspector Flytrap lives in a pot and can leave the office only with the help of assistant Nina the Goat. Their cases are full of silly characters and silly solutions.

Skunked! Calpurnia Tate, Girl Vet by Jacqueline Kelly: This book is just right for second or third grade animal lovers. Calpurnia’s younger brother brings home an abandoned baby skunk he names Stinky, and then finds his litter mate Winky. The skunks cause just enough fun chaos to keep young readers reading from chapter to chapter.

Rise of the Earth Dragon (Dragon Masters #1) by Tracey West: This series has it all. Dragons, a Dragon Stone, a king, a wizard, and magic! In this series, 8-year old Drake is snatched up and taken to the castle to be trained as a Dragon Master. Does Drake have what it takes to become a real Dragon Master?

MIDDLE (GRADES 4-7 ) The Inquisitor’s Tale by Adam Gidwitz: In 1242, travelers gather at an inn to tell the story of the three most famous children in France: a Jewish refugee, a young monk, and a psychic girl... and their back-from-the-dead dog. On the run to escape prejudice and persecution, their adventures take them on a chase through France, where they are taken captive by knights, sit with kings, and save the land from a farting dragon. A heartfelt and hilarious romp through medieval Europe-- not to be missed.

Nine, Ten by Nora Raleigh Baskin: September 11, 2001 was a beautiful, sunny day-- until a plane struck the World Trade Center in New York City. On that fateful day, four kids from diverse backgrounds are going about their business-- with no idea that their worlds are about to change forever. A thoughtprovoking introduction to a tough subject, this book is perfect for students who want to learn more about this defining moment in history.

Ghosts by Raina Telgemeier: Catrina and her family have just moved to a new town on the coast of California, where everyone is completely obsessed with ghosts. Carlos, a new friend, introduces Catrina to the idea that ghosts aren’t scary-- they’re the spirits of loved ones. After a ghostly encounter puts her sister in the hospital, though, Catrina isn’t so sure. But as Day of the Dead approaches, she begins to reconsider. Another great graphic novel from master storyteller Telgemeier.

TEEN (GRADES 8-12 ) Holding Up The Universe by Jennifer Niven: Libby Strout, once famous for being “America’s Fattest Teen,” who had to be cut out of her house, is ready for a change. After years of counseling, Libby’s entering high school, where big-man-oncampus, Jack Masselin, is dealing with his own issues (he suffers from face blindness). After a bullying incident sends both students to detention, Libby and Jack learn to accept each other, and themselves.

Scythe by Neal Shusterman: Fresh off his 2015 National Book Award win for Challenger Deep, Shusterman presents a fast-paced new series. Set in a world where humans have conquered death, only the Scythes are allowed to take a human life. Rowan and Citra are selected to become Scythe apprentices, but when their teacher is mysteriously “gleaned,” they are forced to put their newly acquired skills to test against each other. A thrilling, unputdownable read.

Heartless by Marissa Meyer: Before she became Queen of Hearts, Catherine just wanted to be a baker. But her ambitious mother has another idea. At a royal ball, where Cath is expected to accept the king’s proposal, she meets Jest, the new court joker. At the risk of offending the king and infuriating her parents, Cath sets out to define her own destiny-but in a world of monsters and madness, fate may have other plans.

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MOUNTAIN PARENT MOUNTAIN PARENT

Stargazing Guide for Locals

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E D U C A T O R ,

A S P E N

E D U C A T O R ,

A S P E N

ANDRE A KL APHAKE C E N T E R F O E N VAPHAKE I R O N M E N T A L ANDRE AR KL C E N T E R

F O R

E N V I R O N M E N T A L

S T U D I E S

( A C E S )

S T U D I E S

( A C E S )


TAKE A WALK THROUGH THE MILKY WAY WITH YOUR FAMILY THIS WINTER SEASON!

TO P Photo courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies / Jordan Curet B OT TO M P hoto courtesy of Aspen Center for Environmental Studies / Olivia Siegel

V ISI B L E CO NS T EL L AT I O NS , YE AR ROUND Circumpolar constellations are constellations that are only visible in the Northern hemisphere, but never move in the sky from the viewer’s perspective. Because of this, you can use circumpolar constellations to orient yourself to other seasonal constellations…that is if you can find them! Things to keep in mind: • Stars rise in the east and set in the west every day (just like the sun) • There are 6 circumpolar constellations including: Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, Draco, Cepheus, Cassiopeia, and Camelopardalis • Polaris, or the “North Star,” is at the center of our circumpolar stars.

CO NS T EL L AT I O N SP OT L I G H T: ORION THE HUNTER • One of the beloved winter constellations, Orion appears in the southern sky and will be easier to spot in the early evening hours as Christmas

Astronomy is a great family hobby. It is intellectual, analytic and best of all outdoororiented. It provides a real world application for many of the skills and tools children are learning in the classroom. Kids can start stargazing with some patient guidance at a fairly young age and it is also something interesting to do when the days get shorter and shorter or even just before bed time once everyone is PJ’d up. At ACES, we have an in-house astronomer and offer several stargazing programs throughout the year. Mountain Parent asked us to share a few fun facts and tips for stargazing in the mountains. Whether you are a local or tourist we hope you can explore the night sky this winter in the Roaring Fork Valley. We have a special vantagepoint free of much of the world’s light-pollution and know how thankful we should all be!

approaches. • Orion rises on his side, with his three belt stars – Mintaka, Alnitak, and Alnilam – pointing straight up. • In Greek mythology, Orion was a hunter whom Zeus placed among the constellations in the night sky, where Orion appears to be hunting a bull (the constellation Taurus) with an upright club in his hand.

T I P S F O R S TA R G A Z I N G I N T H E M O U N TA I NS: • Get out of town, away from light pollution from towns and neighborhoods. Pick a spot where the horizon is most visible (think mountaintop 360-degree vistas!) • Check the weather. Clouds are common in the mountains and a clear sky is best for stargazing. • Prepare to be cold! Pack a blanket, hat, gloves, handwarmers, snowpants,a parka, and even some hot chocolate! • Bring a head lamp with a red light feature to preserve night vision. A laser pointer can also be helpful to point out

different things in the sky. • Don’t have a telescope? Binoculars are the next best thing! 8x42 magnification is suitable for stargazing. • Know what is in the sky! Join ACES for monthly Astronomy Nights at Hallam Lake to learn about the winter night sky. R E SO U R C E S stardate.org astroviewer.com earthsky.org oneminuteastronomer.com texasastro.org midnightkite.com skymaps.com VISIT ASPENNATURE.ORG FOR ACES ASTRONOMY NIGHT INFO

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EDUCATION Special Thanks to these Sponsors

Basalt Library

Here for your kids in so many ways Basalt Regional Library offers materials and programs for all ages, from infants to teens. Come cozy up with a book this winter, or stop in for one of our storytimes or tween game nights. More information at www.basaltlibrary.org. 14 Midland Ave • Basalt, CO 81621 • 970.927.4311 www.basaltlibrary.org


Our Library Moves, Makes and Shakes Libraries are dynamic institutions. The book-centric model of past decades has evolved to include both communal and DIY aspects to library service and learning. We love The Library Lab, our new makerspace located in the bright and colorful northeast corner of the main floor.  It’s purpose and design encourage participatory learning, experimentation, collaboration, and innovation in a hands-on do-it-yourself environment. 120 N Mill St., Aspen, CO 81611 • 970.429.1900 pitcolib.com

Photo: Drew Carlson

Magical Winterfaire Saturday, December 3rd from 10am to 3pm

Meet King Winter, the Wishing Stone Wizard, and the Winterfaire Faries at Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork. Come see our school transformed into a magical Winter Wonderland: children will be able to visit the winter tea haus, dip beeswax candles, choose handmade gifts for family members in our angel room, and visit the sleeping giant! 970.963.1960 x 209 • 16543 Highway 82, Carbondale, CO waldorfschoolrf.org

Questions about early childhood education?

Kids First provides many resources: quality improvement materials, curriculum, scholarships for college classes, incentives for retention and completing educational goals, infant and toddler operational support, and financial aid to families. Our staff works locally but we also partner regionally with the Aspen Community Foundation Cradle to Career Initiative and the Rocky Mountain Early Childhood Council. 970-920-5363 • kidsfirst@cityofaspen.com cityofaspen.com/kidsfirst


M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Non-Profit Spotlight H A RDS H I P M E E T S H O PE TH RO U G H O U R LOC A L C A SA

PAT TI CUMMING

D I R E C T O R ,

C A S A

S TORIES OF HOPE SHERILEE sat with her head down, hair falling over her face, refusing to look at anyone as her foster mom voiced her concerns to the team of caseworkers, therapists and the CASA who had responded to a request for an emergency meeting. “I’m scared for her. I’m scared for the other children if she comes home high on drugs again. I’m scared of the cutting she is doing. I want her to be able to stay, I really want this to work.” The CASA hugged Sherilee after the meeting concluded. “I’m here for you, Sherilee. Always remember that.” JENNIFER sat alone on one of the benches in the courtroom. Across the aisle sat the mother of the children Jennifer had been advocating for over the past 18 months. The caseworker was testifying before the court in favor of a motion to terminate the parental rights of both parents. As their CASA, Jennifer had also recommended termination to the court, believing it was in the best interests of the three children in the case. But Jennifer was crying

almost as hard as the mom. She was a mom too. She knew the pain the mother was feeling. CRYSTAL hugged Rianna goodbye. It had been a long three years, but the case was finally closed, the family successfully reunified at last. Crystal remembered the day she finally broke down, wondering if there were any hope for this family to move past the seemingly endless string of drug abuse, sexual abuse and physical violence that had been a part of their lives for at least two generations. As a CASA she felt powerless, wondering if her role as advocate for the two girls on her case had made any difference at all. But then the caseworker turned to her for help. “You have the relationship with the girls. You are in the best position to help them through this.” Now, as she turned to get into her car, she heard Rianna call after her, “I love you, Crystal.” “I love you too, Rianna.” And for the first time, Crystal’s tears became tears of joy.

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These vignettes are all based on real cases in which a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) was involved. The names of the people involved, as well as some other details, have been altered to protect their anonymity and right to confidentiality. They are presented here to illustrate the important work that CASAs do every day. WHAT IS A CASA? Court Appointed Special Advocates, or CASAs, are appointed by the court to serve as advocates for children removed from their home due to abuse and neglect. In contrast to caseworkers and Guardians at Litem (GAL)--attorneys for the children--CASAs are typically assigned to only one case. They spend time with the children in the case, monitor their wellbeing, talk with the people involved in the children’s lives, and then use this information to make recommendations to the court that they believe are in the best interests of the children. CASA volunteers always seem to have a special calling. Perhaps that is because being a CASA is hard! It is a roller coaster ride of hope and disappointment, joy and pain, gratitude and frustration. The outcome is always uncertain and rarely without some amount of heartbreak. Being a CASA can bring out the best in you…and it can bring you to your knees. So why do it? The best answer is the one that came from a foster parent who was asked the same question: “Because,” he said, “it needs to be done.”

We want to share your projects and help you reach your goals. Please submit news and editorials about your non-profit to:

MOUNTAIN PARENT editor@mountain-parent.com 14


Pa yi ng At t e n ti on E PI L E P S Y AWA R E N E SS M O N T H

MEGAN NOONAN

T E A C H E R ,

When our son Sam was 18 months old, he first began to have seizures. We met immediately with a neurologist who was unable to identify the source of Sam’s seizures or to provide us with the right kind and dosage of medication to control them. We then took Sam to an epileptologist at Children’s Hospital in Denver to whom we had been referred and where Sam is currently being treated. He has undergone numerous tests and studies, and we have experimented with many different medications. He had almost 2.5 years of seizure-free days and nights, but last year Sam’s seizures came back. Most of his seizures happen in his sleep, sometimes up to 6-8 per night. There have been some seizures during the day as well, usually when he isn’t feeling well. A second medication has been added to his routine and we have seen a decrease in his night time seizures. Since Sam’s diagnosis we have had many days of fear and anxiety. With amazing care from the doctors at Children’s and by constantly educating ourselves about epilepsy, we feel hope that our son will lead a full and happy life and overcome the challenges that come with epilepsy. The schools help us also. Sam has an IEP (Individual Education Plan) in school to help with his learning challenges resulting from epilepsy. He has trouble with his attention, short term memory, speech, and handwriting. November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month. I want to provide education about epilepsy. I also hope for continued research for treatment options for epilepsy, and for hope that our son will be seizure free and will have a minimum of side effects from his treatments. Epilepsy is the third most common neurological disorder in the U.S., affecting nearly 3 million people. One in twentysix people will develop epilepsy in their lifetime. The causes of epilepsy are tied to head injuries, tumors, genetic conditions, problems with brain development before

A S P E N

H I G H S C H O O L

birth, or illness. Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition that, for many people, can be successfully treated as long as medications are taken regularly. Different treatments such as: surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, or a special diet can be used to control different types of seizures. Epilepsy is a neurological condition involving recurrent seizures. A seizure is a change in sensation, awareness, or behavior brought about by a brief electrical disturbance in the brain. While about ten percent of people will have a seizure at some point

not try to restrain them. As someone who loves someone very much who is affected by epilepsy, I strongly encourage everyone to know what to do if you witness a seizure. Our son’s life, or that of someone you know, may depend on it.

in their lives, a person is diagnosed with epilepsy after they have had two or more seizures. There are many types of seizures and not all involve convulsions. For seizures that do not involve convulsions no immediate first aid is required other than reassurance and emotional support. If you do witness a seizure that involves convulsions, it is important to remain calm, and stay with the person until the seizures stop. If possible, place the person on their side and turn their head downward so that secretions can drain out of the mouth to prevent choking. Move hard objects out of the way so the person cannot hurt themselves. It is also important to use a clock or watch to time the seizure. If a seizure lasts more than 5 minutes or the seizures happen in a series, it is important to call 911. When someone is having a seizure, do not try to open the mouth or place anything between the teeth, and do

be. There are some really great times and there are some really heart-breaking moments. It is very tough to watch your child suffer, or to watch them deal with challenges when all you want is for them to enjoy being a kid. Fighting insurance and drug companies, balancing doctor’s appointment and therapies while working full time can spread you thin. But, we want Sam to have every opportunity, to experience all that life has to offer, to not hold him back, and to encourage him to always do his best. We will advocate for him and keep him safe. We will educate and empower him to overcome this challenge.

If you would like to learn more about epilepsy or donate to the on-going research for treating epilepsy please go to: epilepsy.com After battling epilepsy for 4 years now, we know what a roller-coaster this can

Sam is my hero. Through him I have discovered more patience and strength than I ever knew existed. There are so many things we can’t control in life, but we have control in how we handle tough situations. We choose hope.

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M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Toolbox

N O M E T HOD, B E L I E F, OR PA R E N T I N G S T Y L E I S R IG H T F OR E V E R YON E OR P E R F E C T. M P ’ S T O O L B OX M I N I - S E C T ION PR E S E N T S YOU W I T H TAC T IC S A N D OPI N ION S T O E VA LUAT E I N YOU R OW N PA R E N T I N G . P E R H A P S YOU ’ L L PIC K U P A T O OL F OR YOU R PA R E N T I N G T O OL B OX - OR N O T ! PA R E N T I N G I N T H E DA R K I S A N ON G ION G OPI N ION A N D H U MOR C OLU M N . PL E A S E S E N D US YOU R OW N S T OR Y O F F U N N Y M I S TA K E S OR L E S S ON S !

MEGAN SHAPIRO C A R B O N D A L E

tales of

L A C T A T I O N ,

C A R B O N D A L E

PA R E N T I N G I N T H E D A R K

Do you feel like you are parenting in the dark? Literally? Figuratively? Please send us your story for the next column. E-mail: editor@mountain-parent.com.

save billions of dollars annually on health care costs associated with formula-feeding. What many of us are not aware of, however, is how impactful the actual act of breastfeeding is to long-term oral health*. Breastfeeding protects teeth from dental cavities; prevents malocclusion aka tooth misalignment, decreases risk of overbite, and improves adequate development of the orofacial structures, which leads to better muscle tone and breathing, both of which can impact speech development, TMJ, and other issues. And so we did. We brushed her sweet, little, chocolate-coated teeth. On the floor of a Hyatt. In the dark. Because I swam upstream and fought a long battle to succeed at breastfeeding that girl, and my husband knew it and was grateful for it. She slept peacefully through the whole thing. And we laughed at our audacity and success, because whisper-laughing with your partner is (like breastmilk) pretty magical and medicinal, especially when you’re parenting in the dark.

On a recent vacation, my husband and I let go of the limits we typically set on dessert. It was quite fun for exactly 37 minutes. Then, of course, a good old fashioned meltdown commenced; and the evening ended with our toddler weeping herself to sleep in her chocolate-smeared clothes. After successfully changing her into pajamas without waking her (a procedure I feel can be likened to minor surgery in its precision), I announced to my husband, “now I want to brush her teeth.” He looked at me like I was nuts. “But she’s had so much sugar!” I protested. “And I’ve worked so hard on her perfect teeth!” Huh? Her teeth? My husband could be considered a prisoner in our home, having to listen to me rant and rave about every breastfeeding journal article I read (I’m a Certified Lactation Educator so we are talking hundreds of them). This time he knew that I was referring to the fact that our toddler was exclusively and extensively breastfed. Most of us are well aware of how incredibly beneficial breast milk is for babies and mothers. It is literally a perfect food. It is species and developmentally specific; locally sourced; and contributes to sustainability for our planet by costing nothing, creating no waste, and having the potential to

The health implications of breastfeeding versus are extensive. This article is but a short summary of the impact on oral health. Citations: Peres, Acta Paediatrica 2015, Pediatrics 2015

A NNE VA N DRU T EN C O L O R A D O

C O M M U N I T Y

A C U P U N C T U R E ,

Essentia l oils for Part of my graduate degree in acupuncture from Swedish University in New York City involved training in essential oil therapy. Mountain Parent asked me to share a little about my personal and professional experience using essential oils. Two years after I graduated my daughter Uma was born. Thanks to my education, and support from other moms, I felt armed and ready to deal with seasonal threats, tummy upsets, sleeplessness and moodiness with this beautiful therapy derived from plants. I was amazed by my experiences. As parents we are all very in tune with our children and I knew the oils were working within minutes of using them. Through proper use of essential oils we have successfully 16

C A R B O N D A L E

W I N T E R H E A LT H cleared ear infections (Uma’s pediatrician diagnosed her and also told me it was gone after 2 days), seasonal illnesses like respiratory congestion, high temperatures and fatigue. They have also worked very well for digestive issues, calming her when it’s time for bed and helping her with clarity and focus when it’s time to go to school. Essential oils are just part of our health toolkit. Why not try it out before you decide its definitely time for that visit to the doctor? The same goes with other tactics like eating soup, using a humidifier, extra Vitamin C, and lots of sleep. They are much lower cost than a doctor’s visit and of course smell wonderful. Back to your innate parenting instincts - you’ll know when it is


A PPL I C AT I O N & S A FE T Y

time to go to the pediatrician! With the busy school year upon us and the threat of our kids (or us) getting sick all around us, I lean on essential oils on a daily basis for preventative use, for the lovely aroma they offer our home, car or wherever we are, and in our cooking. I personally use doTerra brand oils, but there are of course other good brands. Regardless of the brand, make sure it is high quality. The effectiveness of essential oils is very much based on their potency.

Essentail oils are safe for children when diluted through either a carrier oil for topical use or in a diffuser for inhaling. Oils may also be ingested in certain cuircumstances. When in doubt please contact a professional. A few examples of ailments and the essential oils used for them include: • Respiratory congestion Breathe*, Frankincense, Eucalyptus, Peppermint, Rosemary • High Temperature Peppermint, Oregano, OnGuard*, Lemon, Melaleuca • Ear Infection Lavender, Melaleuca, Purify* • Tummy ache DigestZen*, Ginger, Peppermint • Restful sleep Serenity*, Lavender • Focus & Clarity InTune*, Wild Orange, Peppermint * Denotes a doTerra blend

MEG A N MON AGH A N

Q U A L I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T C O A C H K I D S F I R S T , C I T Y O F A S P E N

pa re n t u si ng

E MOTION COACHING

Kids First offers free parenting workshops that blend the teachings of Dr. John Gottman and Dr. Tina Payne Bryson. One of the key workshop components is Emotion Coaching. This parenting style sees emotional moments as a chance to teach important skills and strengthen the attachment between parent and child. The securely attached child is more likely to come to parents for support and is more resilient during stressful times. How can we become emotion coaches? 1. Be aware of your child’s and your own emotions, watch for cues and triggers. 2. Connect with your child. Hug your child. This is when your child really needs your support. 3. Listen to your child, validate his or her feelings. 4. Name the emotions, avoid telling them how to feel, figure out what he is actually feeling. 5. Find solutions with your child. Teach your child that all feelings are ok but not all behaviors are ok. Help them figure out an appropriate way to respond to the feeling.

Keep in mind that inappropriate behavior in young children typically indicates he/she is trying to meet a need but doesn’t know how to do so yet. Instead of punishing your child, teach him or her appropriate ways to express their feelings and build a lifelong skill of self-regulation and healthy emotional expression. Life-long benefits of Emotion Coaching include: appropriate expression & regulation of feelings, academic success, and healthy relationships. Emotion coaching teaches children how to solve problems and self-soothe, and helps us develop an awareness of and concern for other people’s feelings (empathy). We hope these steps help you form a stronger bond with your child. For more parenting strategies and information on Emotion Coaching, look for Kids First workshops next spring and summer. Contact us at kidsfirst@cityofaspen.com and visit EMOTIONCOACHING.GOTTMAN.COM.

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Care from Prenatal to Postpartum

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Anesthesia-Free Fillings Carbondale Family Dental cares for the unique dental needs of its patients in a friendly, caring, and comfortable environment. Dr. Andrew Nardecchia and the team at Carbondale Family Dental are committed to providing you with the personalized, high quality dental care that you and your family deserve. We believe in personalizing our approach to meet the unique needs of each patient. THE LASER TREATMENT EXPERIENCE For children especially, using the Solea Laser for cavity fillings helps reduce anxiety and fosters a life-long appreciation of healthy teeth. No needles • No drills • No jarring noises • No soreness

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Do You Want to Enjoy Breastfeeding?

Katie Mac, IBCLC and Meagan Shapiro, MA CLE offer classes, support groups and private consultations based on the newest clinical research on infant feeding and health. We are certified lactation experts offering support in the comfort of your home. Call or go online to schedule now. THE LAUNCHPAD 76 S. Main Street • Carbondale, CO 81623 • 970.456.1850 CarbondaleLactation.com

New Network Brings Local Moms Together The Roaring Fork Holistic Moms Network connects families who are passionate about holistic health and green living. Meetings take place the first Monday of every month, 6:30pm, at the Orchard Gathering Center, 110 Snowmass Drive, Carbondale. rfholisticmoms@gmail.com • 970.216.5365 chapters.holisticmoms.org/chapters/co-roaringfork/


M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Of Home & Sport A B A L A NCING AC T: Moms who are competitive athletes juggle home front, training, travel, and health all while exceeding at their sport. Well let’s be clear, every parent (whatever your life’s passion beyond your amazing kids) is juggling. There are three local women we’d like to introduce to you who are nurturing happy families and yet somehow following their passions as athletes on a national and international stage. From the outside it appears they have a magic formula, but of course we know there is more to the story. Mountain Parent caught up with the three mothers to find out how they land on the top of the podium in both home and sport.

“Reframe the idea that I need to go for a run so that I can show up for my family, so that I can be fully present for them, so that I can be energized and in a good mood, so I can be my best self for my family,” –Elinor says. 20


L E F T Lindsay racing in Verbier, Switzerland for the 2015 Ski Mountaineering World Championships R I G H T Elinor out on a beautiful early morning run, getting ready to lead her next training seminar.

LINDSAY PLANT Lindsay Plant (of Carbondale) gets exhausted even thinking about her second year of ski mountaineering (“skimo”) racing, when daughter Myel was just three months old. “It’s still kind of crazy to me that I did all those races after she was born that following season. I felt pretty good but, man, that was a juggling act of feeding her before races, finding someone to watch her during the races, racing, and training,” she said. Plant and Myel’s dad, Brian Edmiston, both raced and they would sometimes trade off child care or get babysitting help from family members or the wives of fellow racers. “I had a great season, but in the last couple races my body shut down on me. I remember going to this race in Crested Butte, and I literally could not move my legs to hike uphill,” Plant recalled. “I think I just pushed it too hard. I’ve learned from that.” In 2015 — with a better sense of how to balance racing, training and raising a child, and Plant’s added experience in the sport — she placed sixth with teammate Jessie Young at the skimo world championships. It was a huge accomplishment in a demanding sport. (The Power of Four in Aspen, for instance, requires 12,000 feet of elevation gain in 25 miles. Plant won that race back-to-back in 2014 and 2015, by the way.) Now 34, Plant is aiming to represent the U.S. at worlds and additionally earned a spot at the Pierra Menta stage race in France. Plant also made some changes to better accommodate her life as a mom and complement her training that year. She started a bookkeeping business in July 2015 so she could work from home. Still, her schedule isn’t easy. Plant works in the mornings and nights while Myel is sleeping, and when she is in school, Plant sneaks in an hour or two of training, saving the big ski outings for the weekend. She got the routine down last winter, but still lamented: “For a while it was just like eating, sleeping, working, Myel and training. My social life was skimo people. There wasn’t much outside of that, which was fine. It’s not sustainable by any means.” She says it’s having a positive influence on Myel, too, who hit the slopes for the first time last year. When Myel spied the first snow on Sopris this year, she declared: “It’s time to ski just like Mom!”

ELINOR FISH

Elinor Fish (Carbondale) doesn’t maintain the intense competitive cross country and track calendar she did as a collegiate athlete or when she was an endurance trail runner in her early 20s. But as the owner of Run Wild Retreats and mother of 7-year-old Reed, training is more important than ever. Not only does she run to maintain her fitness in order to lead her national and international retreats, Fish runs for its meditative value, to cope with chronic autoimmune diseases, and to be the best mother she can be. “Your sport, whatever it is … it’s not just something that you like to do but it is vitally important to your well-being. Declare it to whoever you need to, whether it’s your family, your employer, your friends: ‘This is non-negotiable. I need this time.’… And don’t be apologetic about it,” Fish said. Fish, a coach for her retreats, she urges — even fights for — her clients to claim that for themselves. The retreats aim to provide participants with renewed motivation and passion for running and the tools and methods for making well-being and self-care a top priority. Helping her accomplish that on all fronts is husband Rob Russell, who is very involved with Reed and his interests. “That allows me to find time to get out,” Fish said. “I know that’s not the case for everybody.” Fish has lived with one chronic autoimmune disease for 20 years and was recently diagnosed with arthritis (in her feet of all places), so her mindfulness practice is more important than ever. She practices what she preaches: “You need to understand how stress affects you and make investments in your own recovery and self-care to improve your quality of life.”

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S TAY PRODU C T I V E

Sari’s other advice? Pack the night before. She always has her bottles filled, food in her pack, and clothes laid out for the next day’s training session. She credits much of her success to her husband, Ian, who supports her and also manages the kids while she’s away. For regional races, he’s on the sidelines cheering her on, along with Juniper and Axel.

SARI ANDERSON REMEMB ER TO EN JOY

Sari says having the kids at her races motivates her to push hard. “Plus, there is nothing better than coming to an aid station and having your children get you food and water, give you a kiss and cheer you on as you go back out.”

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Sari Anderson (Carbondale) is so passionate about her athletic pursuits — trail running, adventure racing, mountain biking, ski mountaineering and paddling. She took a breather competing during her pregnancies in 2007 and 2010. “I knew I wasn’t capable of taking it easy, but I did train most days to keep my mind in a good place,” Anderson, now 37, said. And then ... five months after having daughter Juniper in 2007, she went to Abu Dhabi for a six-day adventure race and pumped breast milk morning and night in a Bedouin tent. In 2010, at the 24-hour mountain biking national championships in Moab, only six months after her son Axel was born, she took the win in the coed duo category with friend Max Taam. In between each 15-mile lap, Anderson nursed or pumped. Although she is no longer a nursing mother (her kids are now 9 and 6), her commitment to both fitness and family remains strong. She took first place among the pro women at the Breckenridge 100 mountain bike race and the Gunnison Meowler off-road duathlon this summer. In April, her team placed fourth at the Tierra Viva expedition race in Chile. She is the 2012 Ski Mountaineering National Champion, 2008 Mountain Bike Marathon National Champ, and 2006 Adventure Race World Champ. Racing has never been her full-time job, which works well for her personality. Anderson loves competition and the travel that goes with it, but she would never want it to be a “ job.” “I want it to be fun. I think I would have burned out very quickly if I didn’t work while competing. Plus, I’m in the wrong sports to make a living racing.” With her family life and a job as the business manager at Key Elements Construction, Anderson has less time to devote to training, which means it must be quality training. Thanks to a “wonderful boss” who allows her flexibility in the work day, Anderson can train for an hour at lunch break and still leave in time to pick up the kids from school. Longer training sessions take place on the weekends. When it comes to pursuing a sport, Anderson reminds other parents that it’s OK to take time for training. Not only does it show your children how to work toward a goal, she says, it also teaches them about staying active and healthy.


Nordic Skiing with Your Kids B E TS Y A F T ER CARBONDALE

RIO GR A NDE A ND CRYS TA L VA L L E Y PAT HS

Locals are already familiar with the Rio Grande trail for running, walking, or biking. But taking your child out on skis will give you a new appreciation for the path. In a good winter, the Rio Grande is snow-covered and beautifully groomed for classic or skate skiing as far down valley as Carbondale. If you’re looking for a variation on the classic bike path, try the hillier Crystal Valley Trail, which starts at Roaring Fork High School and goes for 5 miles up Highway 133 to the KOA Campground.

SPRING GU LCH

A B O V E Betsy’s husband Brion After, owner of Independence Run and Hike in Carbondale, tows their son Julius uphill on a bluebird day in Aspen.

THIS TIME LAST YEAR, I WAS DREADING WINTER. Since moving to the Valley 8 years ago, I’d grown accustomed to spending weekends skiing at the resort, going on hut trips with friends, or skinning up Tiehack. As last winter approached, I didn’t know how to continue my outdoor activities with my one-year old son, Julius. I was surprised and delighted when last year turned out to be one of the most joyful ski seasons I’ve had. After learning a few hard lessons, I had a fabulous winter of Nordic skiing with my baby. The first lesson I learned is to invest the time and money to find a decent ski sled. I had thought it would be easy and fun to Nordic ski with Julius in an Ergo on my chest. Wrong—It wasn’t easy or fun. I slipped, fell, and nearly crushed him before I left the parking lot in my ski boots. After that, I found a Chariot ski sled on Roaring Fork Swap. It was dusty, rusty, and missing a few screws, but it worked and I was able to spend the rest of the winter comfortably pulling Julius behind me. Another important lesson I learned is that if the kids’ water, formula, or preciously pumped breast milk freeze, it will ruin your day. You can prevent this disaster by using an insulated bottle or packing it among warm layers. After some trial and error, I settled on these as my favorite trails to Nordic ski with a child in tow.

Five miles west of Carbondale, this elaborate network of Nordic trails has terrain for beginners or experts. The hills creep up quickly by the way.

L I T T L E A NNIE ROA D

Seven miles past the Aspen roundabout toward Castle Creek. Turn left onto Little Annie Road and take your winter-ready vehicle to the snow mobile lot. Once you make it up the first steep mile, you’ll be rewarded with views that will remind you why you live here. Be aware that avalanche conditions exist on this trail.

Mini Gear Review: The Chariot is a great choice for active parents in the Valley because it can be outfitted for running, biking, or skiing (each of the attachments are sold separately). I’m the third owner for our Chariot and although the original red color has faded to light pink after being left outside by families through the years, Julius is comfortable riding in it and I’m comfortable pulling it. It has plenty of storage and so what I carry along with us is limited only to what I have the strength to pull. One feature of the Chariot that annoys both parent and child is that the sunshade is too small for the frame; it regularly falls down onto the child’s face. This causes an unfortunate amount of stopping, readjusting, and starting up again--not ideal when you’re dealing with a fussy baby. While all ski carriers tend to be pricey (the most expensive is $1200 for a new Chariot Chinook, not including the $300 ski or bike conversion kits!), there is a thriving second-hand market for them in the Valley on the local Facebook marketplaces (Roaring Fork Kids Swap, etc.).

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HuntingTraditions MIKE PORR A S PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER COLOR ADO PARKS & WILDLIFE, NORTHWEST REGION, GR AND JUNC TION

Colorado is known around the world as a vibrant place for outdoor recreation. Ski resorts and rafting come to mind for most, but often overlooked is our rich hunting heritage. Traditionally, hunting skills have been passed from grandfathers to fathers to sons, each succeeding generation enjoying the bonding experience and the challenge of hunting in Colorado, home to a wide variety of game species and one of the most rugged and scenic places on earth. But as times change, so do social and gender norms, now shifting across a wide spectrum of society. Hunting was once a predominantly male dominated sport but is now welcoming more and more women of all ages to the game. Some women learned to enjoy hunting at an early age and now that many of them are moms, it has led to a growing number of families participating together in what is considered one of the safest and satisfying of all outdoor activities. If you are a hunting dad or mom thinking about involving the kids, or you are a non-hunter thinking about introducing your kids to the sport, here are few things to keep in mind: Hunting is not for everyone Although many participants can’t wait to head out to the backcountry to hunt, others may never feel the same thrill. Before you take your kids on their first big game hunt, be sure to manage their expectations. Most big game hunts can be a challenge. You’ll spend days in the woods, experience cold early 24

mornings and travel long distances on foot, carrying a rifle or bow and a heavy backpack - and all before harvesting an animal. Once the animal is down, the real work begins. First, you will need to field dress it, then lug several quarters back to camp, possibly through snow at high altitude in rugged terrain. Keep in mind that elk quarters weigh approximately 60-pounds each. As much fun as all that may be for an expert hunter, for a novice, the experience could be a deal breaker. So, rather than beginning with a big game hunt, some kids may have more fun if they begin with small game, including rabbits, upland birds or even a challenging turkey hunt. Once they have some experience, it likely won’t be long before most kids are begging to go after big game.

H U N T ING IS NOT FOR E V ERYONE

Although many participants can’t wait to head out to the backcountry to hunt, others may never feel the same thrill. Before you take your kids on their first big game hunt, be sure to manage their expectations. Most big game hunts can be a challenge. You’ll spend days in the woods, experience cold early mornings and travel long distances on foot, carrying a rifle or bow and a heavy backpack - and all before harvesting an animal. Once the animal is down, the real work begins. First, you will need to field dress it, then lug several quarters back to camp,


reacquainted in a hunt camp! The chance to spend time outdoors among beautiful scenery is what draws many people to hunting. It is even better when you spend the time with your kids, participating in wholesome, outdoor fun.

possibly through snow at high altitude in rugged terrain. Keep in mind that elk quarters weigh approximately 60-pounds each. As much fun as all that may be for an expert hunter, for a novice, the experience could be a deal breaker. So, rather than beginning with a big game hunt, some kids may have more fun if they begin with small game, including rabbits, upland birds or even a challenging turkey hunt. Once they have some experience, it likely won’t be long before most kids are begging to go after big game.

H U N T ING IS RESPONSIB L E W IL DL IFE M A N AGEMEN T

What most hunters know and many non-hunters often fail to understand is that we have healthy and varied wildlife populations precisely because people choose to hunt. ‘Hug A Hunter’ is the tagline of Colorado’s well-known public service announcement, because the dollars hunters spend on licenses make up the majority of the funds critical for managing wildlife - no tax dollars involved! If you hunt, you make it possible for everyone, hunters and non-hunters alike, to enjoy healthy wildlife populations, including fish, birds, mammals, reptiles, and small and big game. Once your kids become hunters, they too will directly fund wildlife management in the state, to the benefit of all.

FOOD ON T H E TA B L E

At least one recent survey reveals most people hunt to put good, organic meat on the table. In fact, a growing number of people make it clear they prefer to eat meat from an animal they harvested themselves. One elk can feed an average family for almost one year with meat free of hormones and antibiotics. Incorporating the taste of “game” into a kid’s diet early is a great idea. In general, exposing a child to a wide variety of flavors and smells as early as possible helps them become “good eaters” throughout life. If you have any specific questions contact your pediatrician. Do you want your family to eat healthy food? Do you want your kids to be able to sustain themselves in all circumstances? Remember, hunting provides much more than outdoor recreation.

H U N T ING IS S A FE A ND T E ACH ES RESPONSIB IL I T Y

Remember, before purchasing a license, a hunter must either take a Hunter Education course or take advantage of a new mentor option - a novice hunter can hunt along someone 18 or older that has taken Hunter Education. Yes, firearms are involved and yes there is the potential for an accident, but when you compare hunting related injuries to other outdoor activities (skiing anyone?), the number of hunting accidents pales in comparison. In addition to information about wildlife identification, survival in the backcountry and hunting ethics, Hunter Education teaches the very important lessons of firearm safety. Although your kids have the option to opt-out for one year and hunt with a mentor, taking the course anyway is strongly recommended.

M EN TO RSH I P IS ESSEN T I A L

Many kids have hunting dads, moms or grandparents to teach them; however, many kids want to hunt but have no one at home to show them how. Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the agency responsible for managing hunting and wildlife in the state, has many programs for nontraditional hunters, including women and youths. CPW’s Hunter Outreach Program teaches novice and inexperienced hunters of all ages the knowledge, skills, ethics, and traditions of hunting through workshops and educational hunts. The program is designed to take kids through the first steps toward becoming a skilled hunter. + TO L E A R N M O R E A B O U T H U N T E R E D U C AT I O N , I N C LU D I N G AG E R E Q U I R E M E N T S , C A L L YO U R LO C A L C P W O F F I C E O R V ISI T CO LO R A D O PA R K S A N D W I L D L I F E’ S W E B SI T E C P W. S TAT E .CO.U S

GET TING OUTDOORS AND SPENDING TIME WITH FAMILY

Most families lead very busy lives. Between school, homework and after school activities, there is often little time left to spend together as a family. So, get

L E F T PA G E Colorado kids enjoying hunting and fishing and being outsoors. [Photos: CO Parks & Wildlife] C E N T E R : The majestic Rockies, an amazing place to learn about wildlife.. [Photos: CO Parks & Wildlife]

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Know the Ropes on the Slopes JOSLY N DOERGE , SNOWMASS

I’ve been an instructor in Aspen, Telluride and New Zealand for ten years and have to say that the opportunities in the Aspen area stand out from the rest. Here is short a summary of these many amazing offerings for kids of all ability levels in our valleyfrom Sunlight to Aspen Mountain.

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A SPEN -SNOW M A SS A RE A

There are two primary organizations that teach skiing “up-valley” - Aspen Ski Company and the Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club (AVSC). AVSC is a non-profit club that teaches on Ski Co’s mountain resort operations as well as several nordic centers. Aspen Ski Co. offers amazing group and private lessons geared towards children. They also have unparalleled amentities such as The Hid eout and The Treehouse.

SK I CO.

Cool programs and deals for 2017 : This year rent your kids equipment (ages 7 to 12) from Four Mountain Sports, and they’ll get a free lift ticket! Also, the VIK Snowmass Program daily programming for children, such as Free Activities from 3:30-4:30 PM, additional afternoon/ evening activities, supervised Après Parties and Kids Night Out offered weekly; Contact: VIKSnowmass.com. CHILD 6 & UNDER PASS – $25 While children 6 and under ski/ride for FREE, this pass offers the convenience of unlimited skiing without visiting a ticket office, Children must be 6 or younger through February 15, 2017 to qualify for this pass. LOWER LIFT PASS – $77 Unlimited access for the winter season on the following two lifts: Snowmass – Assay Hill; Buttermilk – Panda Peak. Parent Pass is a shared pass available for parents of children ages 12 and under. Only one parent may use the pass at a time. Discounted lift tickets are available for the other parent at $109 per day. Contact: Snowmass, Buttermilk, Aspen & Highlands aspensnowmass.com or call (800) 525-6200

A SPEN VA L L E Y SK I CLU B .

AVSC DEADLINES approach! • November 11, 2016 - Enrollement deadlines for resort skiing. • November 28, 2015 - Enrollment Nordic Base Camp. Contact: 970-205-5160, tshepard@ teamavsc.org, teamavsc.org SIDENOTE: Visit mountain-parent.com and read our January and March issues for more in-depth information and interesting stories from AVSC this season.

SU NL IGH T MOU N TA IN RESORT, GL EN WOOD SPRINGS

Sunlight Mountain is known for its focus on family skiing and boarding. It is a great place to ski with younger kids. The terrain is fun, the cost is very reasonable and the atmosphere is relaxed. Here are some deals and programs that illustrate just how committed to our community Sunlight really is! 4th Graders Ski free. Yes that’s right Sunlight offers free season passes to fourth-graders. LOCAL’S DISCOUNT BUY-BACK PROGRAM Purchase a Junior Package (skis, bindings, boots, and poles) for just $265 plus tax. Bring the skis back next year, and receive 50% off the purchase of new equipment for 2017/18. Receive 25% off new equipment purchases after two years.

Contact:Sunlight Bike and Ski Sunlight Children Ski School 970-945749)309 9th St., Glenwood Springs. (970) 945-9425.sunlightmtn.com

OT H ER DE A L S

Colorado Ski Country offers 5th and 6th graders some nice discounts. The 5th grade passport provides THREE free days of skiing or snowboarding at each of their 20 member resorts. The 5th grade pass is FREE. The 6th grade pass provides FOUR free days of skiing or snowboarding at each of their 20 member resorts for just $105 if purchased before November 30. The program was established in 1996 and more than 200,000 kids have participated in the program since then. passport@coloradoski.com 303.866.9707.

SEASON LEASE PROGRAM This rental program is a really affordable way to keep fast-growing kids in top-line equipment! Sunlight updated it’s entire fleet with the latest skis, snowboards this year. 27


RECREATION & SPORT RECREATION & SPORT Special Thanks to these Sponsors Special Thanks to these Sponsors

Its cold outside but warm in Its coldour outside indoorbut poolwarm in

our indoor pool

Swimming Lessons • Ice Skating Lessons Youth Basketball • School-break Camps • Aquatics Center • Fitness Center Drop-In •Daycare Climbing Wall •Lessons Swimming Ice Skating Lessons • Ice Rink • Room Rentals Gymnasium • •

Youth Basketball School-break Camps Aquatics Center Climbing Wall • Drop-In Daycare • Fitness Center We Take Fun Seriously! Gymnasium • Ice Rink • Room Rentals 100 Wulfsohn Road • Glenwood Springs, CO 81623 • 970.384.6300 glenwoodrec.com

100 Wulfsohn Road

We Take Fun Seriously! Glenwood Springs, CO 81623 glenwoodrec.com

970.384.6300


Kids Love to Ski & We Love Kids Top-line rental gear for kids STARTING AT $100 PER SEASON 309 9th Street • Glenwood Springs, CO 81623 • 970.945.9525 sunlightmtn.com

Carbondale Rec Center: Variety in Action So many winter programs for youth it’s hard to decide! Enrichment Wednesdays. Youth Climbing Club. Dinky Dunkers Basketball. Ice Hockey. Taekwondo. Motion Mondays + Wacky Wednesdays for Preschoolers. Santa visits Carbondale 567 Colorado Avenue • Carbondale, CO • 970.510.1290 carbondalerec.com

Growing Skills. Having Fun.

Discover new ways for your child to broaden their sports and artistic capabilities with Basalt Recreation. We offer indoor sports camp, babysitter trainings, league basketball, beading classes, after-school cross country skiing and so much more! 101 Midland Avenue • Basalt, CO • 970.927.8214 basaltexpressrec.org


Really Explore Winter ASPEN CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES programs and events for all ages

ACES has something for everyone this season, from camps during school breaks to daily snowshoe tours to monthly Astronomy Nights! Visit Hallam Lake, a 25-acre nature preserve in the heart of Aspen and Rock Bottom Ranch in Basalt. Farm Tours on Wednesdays and Fridays at 11AM.

aspennature.org

PA SSING THE TORCH ... HEY CARBONDALE, we at Carbondale Moms for Moms have enjoyed this ride with you over the last six years, loving every bit of this community, connection, support and inspiration. I owe a debt of gratitude to Janine Cuthbertson for founding this network and to you as a community for making it great. Carbondale Moms for Moms is drawing to a close, the website forwarding to Mountain Parent with the publishing of this magazine, but our community and our community connections will remain strong. While we will still see each other all over town, another great way to keep abreast of community events and happenings is in your hands right now. Welcome Mountain Parent, and thank you so much for continuing to carry the torch of information, community and connection.

R I G H T Tracy and son Dax having some fun on a sunny fall morning recently. [Photo: Matt Suby Photography]

L E F T Lauren (MP Publisher) and Tracy celebrate passing the Moms for Moms torch. [Photo: Matt Suby Photography]

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Carbondale community, thank you for being so amazing. I’ll be seeing you around. All the best,

Tr a c y Hol c om be


story title

In Search of Wooden Treasures K AT HRY N C A MP CARBONDALE

With toys, the old “Less is More” adage comes home in wooden playthings. Wooden toys invite creative play because their simplicity leaves more room for child’s imagination. For example, a plain wooden block can be a house, a cell phone, or a horse jump, depending on the mood of the moment. Made of maple, cherry or other hardwoods, wooden toys are durable. Unlike their plastic counterparts, my family’s wooden trucks have been fitted for a new axel, sanded down to remove “graffiti,” and lovingly cleaned with beeswax polish when little hands have needed some good, real work to do. They have outlasted heaps of cheaper toys, and their beautiful nicks and scratches show how loved they are. Here are some classic, yet contemporary, wooden toys that can grow with your family: B LO C K S Look for sets with a variety of shapes, in sizes that are geometrically proportioned. These incremental measurements gained new meaning recently for my eighth grader when he learned about the Golden Mean, and realized with an incredible ah-hah that his blocks taught him this concept without words when he was two. PL AY S TA N DS These are furniture pieces that seem more like investments than toys, until you see how they satisfy your child’s need to create their own spaces, akin to our grown up need for nesting. Moved

easily, or draped with fabric, they become forts, storefronts, and dollhouses – an endless variety of child-sized shelters. T R A I N T R AC K S O R R OA D SE T S Not “ just for boys,” these give children a chance to construct and navigate a miniature community of their own design. H A N D C A R V ED A N I M A L S Heavy, solid, and works of beauty, these critters can live in your barnyard, nativity set, castle, and nature table. When the kids “outgrow” them, you can repurpose some as bookshelf art as I did. Never hesitate to grab a wooden toy at a garage sale or thrift store, because with a little TLC, they can be better than new. LO C A L / O N L I N E R E SO U R C E S Basalt Printing: three aisles of toys and children’s art supplies Dancing Colors: wooden craft kits to make your own wooden figures. WSRF Winterfaire store: handmade, seasonal, and thoughtfully selected toys – first Saturday in December. Nova Naturals: www.novanatural.com Creative Playthings: www.communityplaythings.com PlanToys: www.usa.plantoys.com Little Colorado furniture: www.littlecolorado.com

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M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Wonderland SON YA TAY LOR MOORE

OWNER, YELLOW CANARY ART STUDIO, BASALT

This holiday season why not bring the outdoors in? Whimsical white decor is a magical way to turn your home into a winter wonderland. The best part? All these decorations are best done as a family and are low-cost or free... So grab some glitter and a bag of marshmallows and get started.

T H I S PA G E We had a fun photo shoot at the Yellow Canary in Basalt after setting up our wonderland scene. Local cuties Conrad Mackin (age 1.5) and Burkely Mullin (age 4) were all dressed up in their winter best and enjoying the big snowflakes. A special thanks from MP to moms Jaspen, Sonya and Megan. [Photos: Jaspen Mackin]

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Super Duper Snowflakes SU PPLI E S One sheet of white poster board, oil pastels, markers or crayons, scissors, blue and white felt, glitter, school glue, white pipe cleaners, mini marshmallows, scraps of yarn, hole punch and a hot glue gun S TEP BY S TEP • Cut 2 strips of poster board approximately 3 inches wide and as long as desired (ours are about 16 inches long) • Cut two more strips 1 1/2 inches wide and the same length as your 3 inch strips

Snowball Centerpiece SU PPLI E S Twigs from outdoors, white paint, glitter, styrofoam balls (found at Walmart or other craft stores), marshmallows (big and small) and evergreen tree sprigs

Winter Wonderland Trees SU PPLI E S Mini foe Christmas trees found at Walmart, Target or other craft stores,mini marshmallows and glue gun S TEP BY S TEP • Shop for mini Christmas trees at a local craft store • Hot glue marshmallows around bases of trees to look like snow

S TEP BY S TEP • Gather twigs that have fallen off trees • Paint twigs with white paint • Immediately dust with glitter • Let dry • Paint styrofoam balls with white paint • Roll in glitter • Once dry, push styrofoam ball(s) onto the painted, glittered twig • Disperse snowball twigs along middle of table • Add evergreen tree sprigs • Scatter marshmallows throughout so they look like fallen snow.

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M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Recipe: Kraut for Kids TR AC Y HOLCOMBE

M O T H E R O F T W O & F O R M E R M A N A G E R O F C A R B O N D A L E M O M S F O R M O M S

F ER M EN T I N G IS A D EL I C I O US E X PER I M EN T A couple of friends and I made sauerkraut two weeks ago and the kids have been begging for it at every meal since. Our boys love fresh sauerkraut on Chicago-style hotdogs, or on its own as a side, and I am a happy mama to be feeding them all the good probiotics found in an easy-to-make, homemade kraut. After fermenting in bulk-sized jars for years, I’ve started to make small batches which are easier to manage and only take a week or two to ferment. Not only is it easy, but the kids love to help. Here’s how make a delicious, nutritious kraut in a 1-quart jar. When the cabbage is submerged, the Lactobacillus and other bacteria found of the surface of the cabbage begin to break down the sugars in the cabbage preserving it and protecting it from the growth of harmful bacteria. Because of this Lactobacillus fermentation, sauerkraut has many of the same healthy probiotic benefits as yogurt.

1. Cut 2 lbs of cabbage into fine ribbons. 2. Put the cabbage strips in a bowl with 1 Tbsp plus 1 tsp noniodized salt, and crush it with your fist until there is liquid at the bottom of your bowl. This is where the kids really excel. 3. Pack the cabbage firmly into your mason jar, being careful to avoid any air pockets. Continue until 1 1/2 inches from the top of the jar. Make sure there is liquid covering the cabbage. If there is not enough from the cabbage itself, add brine mixed at 1 1/2 Tbsp salt per quart of water. 4. Cover the jar, allowing it to breathe. An airlock lid is best, but you can also place a small jelly jar inside the mouth of the quart jar to keep the cabbage weighted under the brine. 5. Wait a week to taste it, skimming off any mold you find on the top. Refrigerate when you like the flavor to slow down the fermentation. The kraut will keep in the fridge for up to six months.

LEARN MORE ABOUT FERMENTATION AND FIND MORE RECIPES AT The Art of Fermentation by Sandor Katz Cultures for Health (culturesforhealth.com)

A L L MP had a really fun time hanging out with Tracy and Dax (age 3) on a beuatiful fall morning. We taste tested the kraut and honest to goodness it was amazing! the other bonus is that is requires very minimal effort and space. [Photos: Matt Suby Photography]

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HOMELIFE HOMELIFE

Special Thanks to these Sponsors

Special Thanks to these Sponsors

Family Comes First

Family Comes First

We take a sincere approach to real estate and our clients become part of our extended family. We advocate for every client and We taketransaction a sincere approach to real estate andand ourhonesty. clients become every with rigor, attention to detail

part of our extended family. We advocate for every client and GOOSE HENDERSON LAUREN SUHRBIER every transaction with rigor, attention DONNY to detailBIRNKRANT and honesty. MICHAEL SHOOK

TOMMY KEARSEY

GOOSE HENDERSON LAUREN SUHRBIER DONNY BIRNKRANT MICHAEL TOMMYCO KEARSEY 345 Colorado Avenue,SHOOK Unit 105 • Carbondale, 81623 970.618.6795 homewatersrealestate.com

345 Colorado Avenue, Unit 105 • Carbondale, CO 81623 970.618.6795 homewatersrealestate.com


Art Unique Toys for All Ages We are the Valley’s headquarters for Melissa & Doug Toys and Creativity for Kids. We specialize in toys with educational value, that develop coordination and promote creativity. Basalt Printing also has an outstanding arts and crafts supply selection. 23252 Two Rivers Road • Basalt, CO • 970.927.4705 basaltprinting.com bprint@comcast.net

C LOS E O N E LOA N . B U I LD. M OV E - I N . E N J OY.

Building A New Home? Talk to Vectra!

The 1xClose Loan from Vectra Bank is a sharp new tool that combines your construction and permanent mortgage into one application, one credit approval and one closing. We understand the local market like no one else. Carolyn Meadowcroft • 970.384.2322 Charlene Revoir • 970.384.2989 vectrabank.com

ROARING FORK FURNITURE

A Healthy Sleep for the Entire Family

Roaring Fork Furniture not only carries a surprising stock of contemporary furnishings, but we also carry OMI organic natural latex mattresses, pillows and bedding accesories. OMI makes organic, no-VOC crib mattresses and children’s beds. Kids deserve the best. Call us!

2424 S. Glen Avenue, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 • 970. 945.8321 roaringforkfurniture.com

I LOV E TH I S TOW N 36

Thanks Roaring Fork Valley I love being here to help life go right in a community where people are making a difference every day. Thank you for all you do. 590 Hwy 133 Carbondale, CO 81623 • 970.963.5610 todd.fugate.g0ku@statefarm.com


MAGICAL WINTERFAIRE & ARTISAN MARKET Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork. 16543 Highway 82, Carbondale, CO Saturday, December 3 10am to 3pm The school is transformed into a magical Winter Wonderland: children will be able to visit the winter tea haus, dip beeswax candles, choose handmade gifts for family members in our angel room, and visit the sleeping giant! Grownups can buy holiday gifts from any one of the many local artisans in our marketplace and all can have lunch at Rudolf’s Diner or enjoy coffee, cider and baked goods from the Honey Bee Cafe.

Holiday Treasure Hunt MARLENE SALEEBY O F

B A S A L T

LOCAL CRAFT BAZAARS ROUND-UP Once the temperatures drop and the snow starts falling, my daughters and I eagerly plan our holiday shopping at several local Bazaars to discover the most unique and precious gifts. Local holiday Bazaars also provide another intangible gift - spending time with your teenager. Teenage girls especially love to shop and parents want to expose their teens to amazing artists and the creativity that stirs inside them. Take advantage of these opportunities discover a treasure this holiday season. Buy, browse and brighten the time you have with your teenager by supporting local artists. Memories made this season will be the most cherished gift you’ll discover. Finding unique gifts for people you love truly is an art. Those handmade tokens will be kept year to year and have a story to tell behind each trinket or treasure.

DECK THE WALLS The Launchpad, 76 South 4th Street, Carbondale, CO Friday, November 18: Opening reception 6:00 - 8:00PM Show runs through December 30 Presented each holiday season by Carbondale Arts, Deck The Walls is carefully juried and open to artists and craftspeople. They have cultivated a vibrant collective of local and regional artists, designers, and hand-makers for this year’s Deck The Walls. More at: CARBONDALEARTS.COM

* Please note that we tried hard not to miss any events, but there is so much going on in the Valley it can be difficult to capture. Send us an e-mail at editor@mountain-parent.com to have your event placed online if desired.

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M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

40TH. ANNUAL CARBONDALE HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE NOV 12: 8:00 AM - 3:00PM

Carbondale Firehouse, Carbondale, CO The longest running Holiday Boutique in Carbondale is celebrating it’s 40th year. Hand made gifts to keep the nostalgia of Christmas Alive! Free admission with treats to enjoy while you mingle, shop and visit with valley locals and other special guests.

EMMA SCHOOLHOUSE CHRISTMAS BAZAAR FRIDAY, NOV 11 4:00 - 7:00 PM FRIDAY, NOV 12 8:00 - 3:00 PM

The little white Emma Schoolhouse is located 2 miles west of Basalt on the south side of Hwy 82 between the blinking pedestrian lights. The bazaar features all handmade food and gifts made by local artists. It’s magical how this beautiful little Schoolhouse transforms into a quaint holiday boutique for the holidays!

CHRISTMAS IN THE ROCKIES CRAFT SHOW NOV 25 1:00 - 9:00 PM NOV 26 10:00 - 4:00 PM In its 26th year, the Hotel Colorado ballrooms are full of vendors from all over Colorado and the West! 526 Pine Street, Hotel Colorado, Glenwood Springs, CO

* Please note that we tried hard not to miss any events, but there is so much going on in the Valley it can be difficult to capture. Send us an e-mail at editor@mountain-parent.com to have your event placed online if desired.

A B O V E Mr. and Mrs. Klaus visit the ArtBase in Basalt last year. [Photos: The Art Base

LIGHT UP CARBONDALE DEC 12 | 5:15 PM – 8:00 PM COST: FREE 4th Street Plaza and the Launch Pad Santa visits Carbondale every year for the annual lighitn gof trees around town. CRAFTS WITH SANTA DEC 11 | 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM COST: $5 PER CHILD

Get crafty with Santa Claus! Before you leave make sure to take your picture with Santa. Location: Carbondale Rec Center Gymnasium REGISTRATION DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7

Sa n ta Com e s To Town JUST ADD GLITTER FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 4:00-6:00P COST: FREE Children create their own holiday craft while they wait for Santa and the Basalt Tree Lighting. The ART BASE, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt, CO TREE LIGHTING & SANTA VISIT AT HOTEL COLORADO DEC 11 | 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM The Anuual Tree LIghitn gis always a speical time at the histoirc hotel and a very family friendly event. Hotel Colorado, 526 Pine St., Glenwood Springs, CO

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SANTA IS COMING TO CROWN MOUNTAIN PARK DEC 3 | 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM COST: FREE Join us at the Eagle County Building IN BASALT, for Crafts with Santa. Here is a chance to tell Santa what you want for Christmas. 12 DAYS OF ASPEN DEC 20 - 31 | VARIOUS TIMES COST: FREE Santa’s Reindeer, Aspen 12-4pm FREE! Visit Santa’s Live Reindeer | Cooper Avenue Mall aspenchamber.org , facebook.com/livereindeer SANTA’S VILLAGE IN SNOWMASS DEC 21 - 24 | 2:00PM-4:00PM Complimentary photos with Santa: December 21 & 23 Snowmass Mall December 22 & 24 Base Village The North Pole comes to the Snowmass Village Mall and Base Village.


NOVEMBER 2016 story title story title

Recreation Recreation Center Center Events Events & & Programming Programming

ASPEN 0861 Maroon Creek Rd, Aspen, Colorado, 81611 aspenrecreation.com ASPEN RECREATION RECREATION CENTER CENTER (THE (THE ARC) ARC) 970-544-4100 970-544-4100 0861 Maroon Creek Rd, Aspen, Colorado, 81611 aspenrecreation.com

ONGOING: ONGOING: Advanced Advanced Youth Youth Karate Karate

Tuesday › 3:45 - 4:30 PM Tuesday › 3:45 - 4:30 PM Thursday › 3:45 - 4:30PM through May 30 Thursday › 3:45 - 4:30PM through May 30 Cost; For the month › $60 Drop-In › $15 Cost; For the month › $60 Drop-In › $15 Kids will learn the basics of karate, including self-disKids will learn the basics of karate, including self-discipline and gross motor skills, as well as mentor them cipline and gross motor skills, as well as mentor them as they advance in the sport. This class is for Orange as they advance in the sport. This class is for Orange belts and up. belts and up.

ONGOING: ONGOING: Aspen Aspen Swim Swim Club Club

Weekdays 4:00 - 6:00 PM Weekdays 4:00 - 6:00 PM Various ages Various ages The Aspen Recreation Center is proud to host the The Aspen Recreation Center is proud to host the Aspen Swim Club and Aspen High School Swim Team. Aspen Swim Club and Aspen High School Swim Team. Additional information regarding the Aspen Swim Additional information regarding the Aspen Swim Club can be found at aspenswimclub.org Club can be found at aspenswimclub.org

ONGOING: ONGOING: Preschool Preschool Swim Swim Level Level 2 2

Mondays, Nov 07 - 28, 4:30 - 5:00 PM Mondays, Nov 07 - 28, 4:30 - 5:00 PM Ages: 4-5 Ages: 4-5 Cost: $40 Cost: $40 Preschool Level 2 class is for children 4-5 years old. Preschool Level 2 class is for children 4-5 years old. This class helps children improve upon their beginner This class helps children improve upon their beginner swim skills and prepare to advance to our Level 1-4 swim skills and prepare to advance to our Level 1-4 swim program. swim program.

BASALT x400 basaltexpressrec.com BASALT RECREATION RECREATION 970-927-8214 970-927-8214 x400 basaltexpressrec.com

Babysitter Babysitter Training Training

November 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 November 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 Mon-Thurs 3:30 - 5:30 PM; Fri, 1 :00 - 4:00 PM Mon-Thurs 3:30 - 5:30 PM; Fri, 1 :00 - 4:00 PM At Basalt Middle School At Basalt Middle School Cost: $50 Cost: $50 Class participants can be successful babysitters by Class participants can be successful babysitters by learning about leadership, basic care, safety, choking, learning about leadership, basic care, safety, choking, rescue breathing, and first aid. Friday class we will rescue breathing, and first aid. Friday class we will be teaching CPR and first aid from 1-4 during parent be teaching CPR and first aid from 1-4 during parent teacher conferences. teacher conferences.

Special Special Beading Beading Classes Classes

Mondays, | 3:30 – 5:00 PM Mondays, | 3:30 – 5:00 PM Ages: 5 + years Ages: 5 + years Cost: $23/ class (pick and choose but please register) Cost: $23/ class (pick and choose but please register) Beaded Snowflakes: Nov. 7th Beaded Snowflakes: Nov. 7th Dazzling Beaded Snowflake Angels: Nov. 14th Dazzling Beaded Snowflake Angels: Nov. 14th Beautiful Beaded Christmas Spiders: Nov 28th. You will make two Christmas spiders in this class and go home Beautiful Beaded Christmas Spiders: Nov 28th. You will make two Christmas spiders in this class and go home with a Legend of the Christmas Spider storybook. with a Legend of the Christmas Spider storybook.

CARBONDALE 567 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado 81623 carbondalerec.com CARBONDALE RECREATION RECREATION CENTER CENTER 970.510.1290 970.510.1290 567 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale, Colorado 81623 carbondalerec.com

Motion Motion Mondays Mondays

Monday, Jan 25 – May 31 | 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM Monday, Jan 25 – May 31 | 10:30 AM – 11:45 AM Ages: 0-6 years (children under 1 are free) Ages: 0-6 years (children under 1 are free) Cost: $5 member/$6 non-member Cost: $5 member/$6 non-member Bring your own scooter, Strider, Razor, tryke, bike, Bring your own scooter, Strider, Razor, tryke, bike, or any other wheeled contraption to the gym. The or any other wheeled contraption to the gym. The bounce house will also be set up. Parents or caregivbounce house will also be set up. Parents or caregivers must be present. ers must be present.

Enrichment Enrichment Wednesdays Wednesdays

Fridays, Aug 24 – Jun 7 | 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Fridays, Aug 24 – Jun 7 | 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM Ages: 7 + years Ages: 7 + years Cost: $3 drop in Cost: $3 drop in The gymnasium will be available for Open Gym activiThe gymnasium will be available for Open Gym activities on Early Release Wednesdays from 2-4pm. Sport ties on Early Release Wednesdays from 2-4pm. Sport options will include basketball, volleyball, and indoor options will include basketball, volleyball, and indoor soccer. soccer.

Dodgeball Dodgeball Derivatives Derivatives

Fridays, Dec 2nd, 9th, 16th | 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM Fridays, Dec 2nd, 9th, 16th | 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM Registration Deadline: Friday, November 25 Registration Deadline: Friday, November 25 Ages: 8-11 years Ages: 8-11 years Cost: $30 Cost: $30 Do your kids need to run off some energy after school? Do your kids need to run off some energy after school? Do they like throwing things . . . at people? We use Do they like throwing things . . . at people? We use foam dodgeballs and will explore the many variations foam dodgeballs and will explore the many variations of the game. of the game.

GLENWOOD 100 Wulfsohn Road, Glenwood Springs, Colorado, 81601 glenwoodrec.com GLENWOOD SPRINGS SPRINGS COMMUNITY COMMUNITY CENTER CENTER 970.384.6301 970.384.6301 100 Wulfsohn Road, Glenwood Springs, Colorado, 81601 glenwoodrec.com

Gobble. Gobble. Gobble. Gobble. Autumn Autumn Fun Fun Day Day

Friday, Nov 18 | 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM Friday, Nov 18 | 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM Registration Deadline: November 11 Registration Deadline: November 11 Join us for a splendid afternoon of nature and crafts. Join us for a splendid afternoon of nature and crafts. Don’t forget your lunch and your walking shoes and Don’t forget your lunch and your walking shoes and be ready to have a gobble, gobble good time! Parbe ready to have a gobble, gobble good time! Parents do not need to stay on site for this program ents do not need to stay on site for this program

Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Break Break Camp Camp

November 21 - 23 | 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM November 21 - 23 | 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM Registration Deadline: November 14 Registration Deadline: November 14 Ages: K - 5 grade Ages: K - 5 grade A good time will be had by all with a variety of crafts, A good time will be had by all with a variety of crafts, games and activities. Space is limited for more inforgames and activities. Space is limited for more information or to register go to glenwoodrec.com mation or to register go to glenwoodrec.com

School School Days Days Off Off CLub CLub

Nov 11, Jan 3, Jan 16 & Jan 20 Nov 11, Jan 3, Jan 16 & Jan 20 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM *Extended Care Available 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM *Extended Care Available Registration Deadline: November 7 Registration Deadline: November 7 Ages: K - 5 grade Ages: K - 5 grade Out of school and need something to do? This is the Out of school and need something to do? This is the club for you! Crafts, organized games and physical acclub for you! Crafts, organized games and physical activity along with local field trips guarantee an exciting tivity along with local field trips guarantee an exciting day. Bring a sack lunch, two snacks and water bottle. day. Bring a sack lunch, two snacks and water bottle.

SNOWMASS 12835 Brush Creek Road, Snowmass, Colorado, 81615 snowmassrecreation.com SNOWMASS RECREATION RECREATION CENTER CENTER 970.922.2240 970.922.2240 12835 Brush Creek Road, Snowmass, Colorado, 81615 snowmassrecreation.com

Kids Kids Day Day Camps Camps During During Winter! Winter!

November 21st – 23rd, December 19th – 23rd & 27th – 30th November 21st – 23rd, December 19th – 23rd & 27th – 30th Cost: $45/ day Cost: $45/ day Register now, for a fun filled days at the Snowmass Village Recreation Center! Join your friends for a fun filled day/week of Register now, for a fun filled days at the Snowmass Village Recreation Center! Join your friends for a fun filled day/week of recreation and adventure, utilizing our great facilities so close to home! Activities will include but not limited to indoor rock recreation and adventure, utilizing our great facilities so close to home! Activities will include but not limited to indoor rock climbing, swimming, hiking, arts & crafts, outdoor activities, gym and field activities, playground, field trips, tennis, volleyclimbing, swimming, hiking, arts & crafts, outdoor activities, gym and field activities, playground, field trips, tennis, volleyball, and much more. ball, and much more.


DECEMBER DECEMBER 2016 2016 MM OO UU NN TA TA I NI N - P- A PA RE RN EN T .TC. C OO MM

Recreation RecreationCenter CenterEvents Events&&Programming Programming ASPEN ASPENRECREATION RECREATIONCENTER CENTER(THE (THEARC) ARC)970-544-4100 970-544-4100 0861 0861 Maroon Maroon Creek Creek Rd, Rd, Aspen, Aspen, Colorado, Colorado, 81611 81611aspenrecreation.com aspenrecreation.com

Youth YouthBasketball BasketballLeague League

Dec Dec 1 -1Feb - Feb 25, 25, MondayMondayThursdays Thursdays 6:00 6:00 - 8:00 - 8:00 PM PM Ages: Ages: 3rd 3rd and and 4th 4th Grade Grade Cost: Cost: $145 $145 Our Our children children will will apply apply their their skills skills of of dribbling, dribbling, passing, passing, shooting, shooting, defense defense and and great great sportsmanship. sportsmanship. Enroll Enroll now now forfor this this fantastic fantastic program. program.

Playhouse@ Playhouse@The TheRed RedBrick Brick

Tuesday Tuesday › 2:00pm › 2:00pm - 3:45pm - 3:45pm Wednesday Wednesday › 2:00pm › 2:00pm - 2:45pm - 2:45pm Thursday Thursday › 2:00pm › 2:00pm - 3:45pm - 3:45pm Friday Friday › 8:30am › 8:30am - 11:45am - 11:45am / 2:00pm / 2:00pm - 2:45pm - 2:45pm Ages: Ages: 0-5 0-5 years years Cost: Cost: $5$5 Come Come roll, roll, jump jump and and play play onon our our spring-loaded, spring-loaded, su-super-soft per-soft gymnasium gymnasium floor! floor! FitFit balls, balls, geometric geometric learning learning shapes, shapes, bolster bolster donuts, donuts, tumbler tumbler downhill downhill mats. mats.

Rock RockRats Rats@@The TheRed RedBrick Brick

Mondays Mondays › 3:30pm › 3:30pm - 4:15pm - 4:15pm Thursdays Thursdays › 3:30pm › 3:30pm - 4:15pm - 4:15pm Ages: Ages: 4-6 4-6 years years Cost: Cost: $57/ $57/ month month Drop-in: Drop-in: $16 $16 Kids Kids will will come come away away from from this this class class with with more more self-confidence, self-confidence, a lot a lot of of new new friends, friends, basic basic climbing climbing techniques, techniques, safety safety awareness, awareness, and and the the ability ability to to have have funfun in in anan alternative alternative sports sports setting. setting. Drop-ins Drop-ins areare only only available available if the if the class class is not is not fully fully booked. booked.

BASALT BASALTRECREATION RECREATION970-927-8214 970-927-8214 x400 x400basaltexpressrec.com basaltexpressrec.com

Beaded BeadedSafety SafetyPins Pins

Dec Dec 5, 5,3:30 3:30 PM PM - 5:00 - 5:00 PM PM Ages: Ages: 5+ 5 years + years Cost: Cost: $15 $15 This This class class was was offered offered last last summer summer and and was was very very popular popular with with those those who who took took it. it. So…I So…I amam offering offering it it again. again. Make Make yourself yourself a very a very cool cool and and easy easy pin pin to to wear wear proudly! proudly! Give Give these these cool cool little little pins pins asas a gift a gift oror just just hang hang them them from from your your backpack! backpack!

Indoor IndoorSoccer SoccerCamp Camp

Dec Dec 5, 5, 6, 6, 8, 8, 12, 12, 13, 13, 1515 - 3:20 - 3:20 PM PM - 4:20 - 4:20 PM PM Ages: Ages: 2nd 2nd - 4th - 4th Grades Grades Cost: Cost: $36 $36 BES BES Gym Gym location. location. Work Work onon dribbling, dribbling, passing, passing, and and shooting shooting and and wrap wrap upup every every practices practices with with team team buildbuildinging games. games. Overall, Overall, the the camps camps areare designed designed to to help help kids kids have have funfun playing playing and and learning learning the the game game of of soccer. soccer. Shin Shin guards guards areare required. required.

After AfterSchool SchoolXCXCClass ClassStarts StartsininJanuary! January!

Starts Starts January January6, 6,3:00 3:00 PM PM - 5:00 - 5:00 PM PM Various Various Dates Dates forfor Each Each Age Age Group Group Ages: Ages: 1st1st - 6th - 6th Grades Grades Cost: Cost: $25/ $25/ month month Here Here is the is the chance chance to to learn learn the the funfun sport sport of of cross-councross-countrytry skiing. skiing. Techniques Techniques onon stance stance and and balance balance areare taught taught with with lots lots of of funfun and and games. games. Class Class is taught is taught onon the the RioRio Grande Grande Trail. Trail. Class Class meets meets at at the the Rec Rec House House at at the the High High School. School.

CARBONDALE CARBONDALERECREATION RECREATIONCENTER CENTER970.510.1290 970.510.1290 567 567 Colorado Colorado Avenue, Avenue, Carbondale, Carbondale, Colorado Colorado81623 81623 carbondalerec.com carbondalerec.com

Youth YouthBasketball BasketballLeague League

Dec Dec 1212 – Mar – Mar 3 |34:00 | 4:00 PM PM – 7:00 – 7:00 PM PM Ages: Ages: 3rd 3rd - 6th - 6th Grade Grade Registration Registration Deadline: Deadline: Friday, Friday, November November 2525 Cost: Cost: $80/ $80/ child child Our Our leagues leagues areare designed designed to to develop develop young young boys boys and and girls girls into into fundamentally fundamentally sound sound basketball basketball players players byby teaching teaching them them basketball basketball specific specific skills, skills, teamwork, teamwork, camaraderie, camaraderie, a strong a strong work work ethic, ethic, and and more. more.

Introduction IntroductiontotoIceIceHockey Hockey

Registration Registration deadline: deadline: Friday, Friday, December December 3030 Jan Jan 3 –3Feb – Feb 2 |24:00 | 4:00 PM PM – 6:30 – 6:30 PM PM Ages: Ages: 6 -614 - 14 Cost: Cost: $50 $50 These These lessons lessons areare forfor those those who who have have some some skating skating skills skills with with little little oror nono hockey hockey skills. skills.Participants Participants will will develop develop their their skills skills and and learn learn the the basics basics of of the the game game in in a recreational a recreational environment. environment.

Climbing ClimbingClub Club

Oct Oct 5 –5Dec – Dec 2828 | 4:00 | 4:00 PM PM – 5:15 – 5:15 PM PM Registration Registration Deadlines: Deadlines:Session Session 3-November 3-November 3030 Ages: Ages: 7 -717 - 17 Cost: Cost: $60 $60 Our Our instructor instructor will will equip equip your your climber climber with with new new techniques techniques while while they they learn learn the the importance importance of of fitness, fitness, working working asas a team, a team, and and most most importantly, importantly, having having some some active active and and productive productive funfun byby climbing climbing our our wall. wall.

GLENWOOD GLENWOODCOMMUNITY COMMUNITYCENTER CENTER970.384.6301 970.384.6301 100 100 Wulfsohn Wulfsohn Road, Road, Glenwood Glenwood Springs, Springs, Colorado, Colorado, 81601 81601glenwoodrec.com glenwoodrec.com

Learn LearntotoSwim Swim

Dec Dec 6 -15 6 -15 Register Register By:By: Thursday, Thursday, Dec Dec 1 1 Classes Classes areare held held onon Tuesday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Wednesday, and and Thursday. Thursday. For For level level descriptions, descriptions, please please visit visit www. www. glenwoodrec.com glenwoodrec.com and and click click the the Swim Swim Lesson Lesson link link onon the the Aquatics Aquatics page. page.

Holiday HolidayCelebration Celebration

Dec Dec 16, 16, 12:00 12:00 - 2:00 - 2:00 PM PM Ages: Ages: 3-5 3-5 years years Cost: Cost: $12 $12 member/$15 member/$15 non-member non-member Let’s Let’s allall get get together together forfor a festive a festive celebration! celebration!We We will will make make a holiday a holiday craft craft sing sing songs songs and and play play games. games. Remember Remember to to bring bring your your lunch lunch and and bebe ready ready to to have have a a holly holly jolly jolly good good time! time!Parents Parents dodo not not need need to to stay. stay.

Winter WinterBreak BreakCamp Camp

Mondays: Mondays: Jan Jan 2525 – May – May 31Dec 31Dec 19, 19, 20, 20, 21, 21, 22, 22, 23, 23, 26,27,28,29, 26,27,28,29, 3030 && Jan Jan 33 9:00 9:00 AM AM - 4:00 - 4:00 PM PM Ages: Ages: K -K5th - 5th Grade Grade This This camp camp is action is action packed packed with with iceice skating, skating, swimming, swimming, climbing, climbing, gym gym games, games, crafts, crafts, cooking cooking and and more. more.

SNOWMASS SNOWMASSRECREATION RECREATIONCENTER CENTER970.922.2240 970.922.2240 12835 12835 Brush Brush Creek Creek Road, Road, Snowmass, Snowmass, Colorado, Colorado, 81615 81615snowmassrecreation.com snowmassrecreation.com

Snowmass SnowmassAfter AfterSchool SchoolProgram Program DAYS: DAYS: Monday—Thursday Monday—Thursday

DATES: DATES: August August 2929 - June - June 22 TIME: TIME: M,Tu,Th M,Tu,Th 3:45 3:45 - 5:30 - 5:30 pm pm && WW 2:30 2:30 - 5:30 - 5:30 pm pm Ages: Ages: 5 -511 - 11 Cost: Cost: $15 $15 - $20/ - $20/ day day Kids Kids areare met met byby anan instructor instructor at at the the school school bus bus stop, stop, and and escorted escorted to to Snowmass Snowmass Village Village Recreation Recreation Center Center forfor anan afternoon afternoon of of funfun right right here here in in Snowmass! Snowmass! Activities Activities will will include; include; Homework, Homework, Arts Arts and and crafts, crafts, games, games, swimming, swimming, climbing climbing and and much much more! more! SchedSchedules ules can can bebe found found online. online.


COMMUNIT Y EVENTS M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Glenwood Springs You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown DATE: NOV. 11, 2016 TIME: 7PM

LOCATION: MOUNTAIN VIEW CHURCH 2195 CO. RD.154 970.945.6589

Musical Theater Adults, $20 Seniors and students under 18 yrs. $15 Tickets Outlets: (exact cash or checks accepted only at ticket outlets): Glenwood Springs Chamber, or Sopris Lighting.

Glen-a-Palooza

DATE: NOV. 11, 2016 TIME: 4:10PM LOCATION: GRAND AVENUE DOWNTOWN GLENWOOD SPRINGS

Events throughout downtown Glenwood every second Friday at the Glen-a-Palooza Downtown Glenwood, Grand Avenue and side streets have events and bargains and activities and Food and FUN for all.

Veterans Appreciation Night DATE: NOV. 11, 2016 TIME: 6PM - 9PM

LOCATION: GLENWOOD SPRINGS ELKS LODGE 970.945.2286

Veterans Appreciation Ceremony immediately followed by Free Food, Music and Dancing. The Elk’s invite you to take this opportunity to show your appreciation to

the Veterans, active military and remember those who have passed on. veterans@gwselks.com.

Winter Symphony Concert and Choral Collaboration DATE: 12/3/2016 TIME: 2PM GLENWOOD SPRINGS HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM 970.984.8833

Hundreds of Roaring Fork residents are on a mission to make a lasting impact for children in need. They are packing shoeboxes for boys and girls around the world, Roaring Fork Valley residents will transform 1000 empty shoeboxes into gifts of hope filled with school supplies, hygiene items, notes of encouragement and fun toys, such as a doll or soccer ball.

Mountain Madrigal Singers Christmas Concert

Operation Christmas Child drop off show boxes

2. DATE: DEC 17, 2016 TIME: 7:30PM - 9PM

LOCATION: THE ORCHARD 110 SNOWMASS DR.CARBONDALE 970.945.8940

1. DATE: 12/4/2016 TIME: 2:30PM - 4PM

LOCATION: FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 824 COOPER AVENUE 970.366.0452

Grand Avenue downtown

Celebrate Downtown Glenwood Springs! Our town is open for business and for lots of Fun! Events throughout downtown Glenwood every second Friday at the Glen.a.Palooza

Carbondale Operation Christmas Child 7th Annual Packing and Wrapping Party & Fundraiser Lunch at The Gathering Center at The Orchard DATE: NOV 13, 2016 TIME: 10:30AM

LOCATION: THE ORCHARD, 110 SNOWMASS DR. CARBONDALE 970.945.8940

DATE: NOV 14, 2016 TIME: 11AM - 1PM

Youth DanceLAB: Fundamentals

DATE: NOV 24-26, 2016 TIME: 1PM - 9PM TUESDAYS IN NOVEMBER & DECEMBER BEGINNING NOVEMBER 22, 4:30PM – 5:30PM LOCATION: CARBONDALE LAUNCHPAD STUDIO C 76 S.4TH ST., CARBONDALE, CO 970.963.1680 CONTACT@ LAUNCHPADCARBONDALE.COM

Youth DanceLAB: creative technique & dancemaking (ages 7+) Tuesdays, 4:30.5:30pm Youth DanceLAB uses the creative expression as a point of discovery of movement and positive body awareness. Children must commit to one month minimum and will work toward a performance during the Cirque D’ Sopris Show. (530) 919.1385 rochellenorwood@hotmail.com


COMMUNIT Y EVENTS M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.C O M

Youth DanceLAB: Creative Dance

DATE: NOV 22, 2016 TIME: 3:30PM – 4:15PM LOCATION: STUDIO C

Youth DanceLAB uses the creative expression as a point of discovery of movement and positive body awareness. Children must commit to one month minimum and will work toward a performance during the Cirque D’ Sopris Show.

Basalt Cornerstone Classical School Presents: Silver Bells Annual Fundraiser

Come Enjoy Live Music, Dancing, Door Prizes, Silent Auction, Live Auction, Dinner and MORE! Cost: $125 Includes Dinner and Admission. 100% of proceeds go to Cornerstone! www.cornerstonebasalt.net

Aspen Art Opening: A Red Brick Holiday

FIRST THURSDAY OPENINGS 12/01/2016 5 PM . 7 PM ET ADMISSION: FREE

After School Youth Art Camp 11/09/2016, YOUTH 11/16/2016 2 PM . 4 PM 42

LOCATION: RED BRICK ART, SUITE 110, 110 E. HALLAM ST. ASPEN, CO ADMISSION: $20.00

DECEMBER 26, 7PM – Understanding Zodiacs & Modern Calendar

Our After School Art Camp is a creative way to spend Wednesday afternoons this school year! Students are welcome to come as drop-ins, week to week or register for a three week session.

Summit For Life Uphill Race

Aspen Mountain Opening Day 11/24/16

Astronomy Night With ACES

11/14/2016, 12/12/2016 AND 12/26/2016 PLEASE RSVP: EACH EVENING IS LIMITED TO 50 PEOPLE. LOCATION: HALLAM LAKE, 100 PUPPY SMITH STREET ADMISSION PRICE: $5 NON MEMBERS / FREE FOR MEMBERS WWW.ASPENNATURE. ORGCONTACT PHONE: 970.925.5756 ACES@ASPENNATURE.ORG

ACES Astronomy Nights are monthly gatherings throughout the year to appreciate the spectacle of the night sky. Each evening starts with a 15.minute lesson covering basic astronomy concepts such as life.cycle of a star, reasons for meteor showers, what planets might be visible, or how phases of the moon work. After the mini lecture we will gather outside for the stargazing portion of the evening. NOVEMBER 14, 7PM – Phases of the Moon DECEMBER 12, 7PM – Zodiac Constellations

12/3/2016

The 11th Annual Summit for Life Uphill Race invites local enthusiasts and regional sports junkies to strap on a headlamp and race up 3,000 vertical feet to the top of Aspen Mountain. Participants may use their preferred choice of non. motorized equipment – snowshoes, skins and other creative means in the dead of night. There will be a recreational race category as well as a competitive race.

32nd Annual Sardy House Christmas Tree Lighting 12/4/2016 6.7PM

LOCATION: 128 E. MAIN ST. ADMISSION PRICE: FREE

Free hot chocolate and cookies will be served. Enjoy holiday music on the front porch and of course, a visit from Santa!

V I S IT

M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T.CO M

FO R A G U I D E TO LOC A L PH OTOG R A PH E R S FO R YO U R FA M I LY H O LI DAY PH OTOS!


Your Winter Chauffeur RFTA provides commuter bus service from Aspen to Rifle and winter ski shuttle service to the four Aspen Ski Co. Mountains. RFTA saves gas, money, time and helps children of any age develop a sense of responsibility. This winter consider letting RFTA chauffeur you and your kids.

970.925.8484

WWW.RFTA.COM

10 TIPS FOR KIDS TAKING

1.

Start by riding along on the route kids will be taking. After a few rides, just sit quietly and let them initiate everything with you following along. Then when you are both comfortable, let them go at it alone.

ON THEIR OWN

2.

Buddy up. On those companion rides, see if other kids may be on the same route and let them pair or group up to ride together. Or schedule trips with friends for activities to do together.

PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Kids navigating the valley on their own can make a family’s weekend routine run more smoothly and enjoyable for everyone. It’s a great stepping-stone for kids, too, in becoming more confident and empowered in making decisions themselves. Here are some tips on getting kids ready to ride RFTA and navigate the valley on their own.

3.

Keep it simple and safe. If a stop doesn’t feel safe to you or the connections are too complicated, have kids get off somewhere else.

4.

Remind kids to stay aware. Tell them not to put in both ear buds or look down at the phone constantly. They should look around and be alert.

5.

Let kids practice with orientation and decisionmaking. This will enable them to feel more confident and knowledgeable about the RFTA transit system.

INFO@RFTA.COM

6.

Use a RFTA Stored Value Cards to pay bus fares. With stored value cards, kids won’t have to use exact cash, they can load the bus faster and you receive a discount on the ride. Also remember kids up to 16 years of age receive a $1 discount on all rides.

7.

Have a plan B at all times. If something goes wrong or a bus is missed, having a backup plan can help with disorientation or confusion. Having your child walk to nearest library or coffee shop to wait for pick up can make them feel safer.

8.

Talk to your kids openly and listen to their concerns.

9.

Teach them to trust their gut. If something doesn’t feel right or safe, move away or get help. Let you kids know that they should go to the bus driver if there are any problems or if they are lost.

10. Trust your kids. Empower them to make decisions so they are comfortable thinking and acting independently.


November & December 2016

COMMUNIT Y CALENDAR SHARE + LEARN

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Mountain Parent Magazine, Aspen/Carbondale/Glenwood Springs, Colorado  

Mountain Parent Magazine is a fun print and online resource for families living in the Roaring Fork Valley of western Colorado. We showcase...

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