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MOUNTAINPARENT FEB + MARCH 2020

R O A R I N G

SEASONAL SNIPPETS

F O R K

WHAT'S HAPPENING

A N N U A L

VA L L E Y,

C O L O R A D O

EVERY AGE & STAGE

WELLNESS

RECREATION & OUTDOORS

E D I T I O N

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Do you have an irregular heartbeat? Contact us for a consultation

970.384.7290

PeopleCare. That’s Valley View.

Our outstanding physicians are committed to caring for parents like you. Dr. Laws and the Heart & Vascular Center at Valley View, deliver state-of-the art care for irregular heartbeats, close to home.

V VHEA RTCA RE.ORG

2FR AN K

L AWS, MD, FAC C

BATTLEMENT MESA | EAGLE | FRUITA | GRAND JUNCTION GLENWOOD SPRINGS | MEEKER | RANGELY | RIFLE


MOUNTAIN PARENT

FEBRUARY + MARCH 2020 I SSU E 17

Contents FEATURES:

18

Is Handwriting a Dying Art? Kimberly Bakker of Aspen Country Day School shows us the stages of handwriting development and why this “soft skill” is an important life skill.

20

Trail Map: Aspen-Snowmass Nordic Trail System Stephen Szoradi shares his intel about cross country ski trails that are “right out the backdoor” for your lunch break cardio or afterschool fun with the kids.

25

All We Need is Love. And Ethically Sourced Chocolate. HOCKEY & REC PROGRAMS

49

Here’s a step-by-step journey from cacao grove to Carbondale, from bean to bar with Mark Burrows of Pollinator Chocolate.

DEPARTMENTS:

Seasonal Snippets No-stress winter birthday party venues for all ages 7 DIY Handmakery’s Ami Maes presents an upcycled Snowy Owl 11 Helping Hands Entrepreneurship with Roaring Fork Valley Kids Who Care 15 Good Sports Challenge Aspen NASTAR racer Tanner Jadwin + rec programming 47 What’s Happening Today + Feb & March events 52 Where to Go Spring Break programming + School Open House details 58 Out & About "Society" snapshots from here and there 60 Up Next our annual Summer Camp Sign-Up edition 62 PUBLISHER

Director of Business Development + Advertising Lauren Suhrbier

SPECIAL SEC TION:

29

WELLNESS Learning to Soar with My Superhero Jen Moss shares how she and her husband Brent have redefined Healthy after their daughter Addy’s diagnosis.

EDITOR

Creative Director + Designer Kathryn Camp TA L E N T

Writers, Artists, Photographers & Friendly Support: Kimberly Bakker, Meghan Harvey Bourke, Mark Burrows, Rich Camp, Claudette Collier, Susan Cruz, Jordan Curet, Carolyn Hines, Susan Jackson, Tanner Jadwin, Ami Maes, Jim Mallouk, Kirsten Morey, Brent Moss, Jen Moss, Sarah Murray, Llyn Olson, Stephanie Rae, Elana Royer, Lily Royer, Taylor Rose Smith, Smug Mug, Anna Stonehouse, Deb Sullivan,and Stephen Szoradi.

Directory of Specialists Let us introduce you to our Wellness Superheroes.

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MOUNTAIN PARENT

Dear Readers, COVER ARTISTS

ELANA & LILY ROYER

founders of Lilybart, an Aspen greeting card and paper-art product line created to raise awareness of Cystic Fibrosis

“LOVE IS IN THE AIR” For me, Colorado in the wintertime is one of the most romantic places on Earth. I think back to when my husband and I first met in college and he talked about his beloved ski hill. I think of our February 8 wedding 28 years ago at the family ranch. Of bringing the kids here to ski before we made this our home. Riding the gondola behind a wedding party on its way to a Sundeck reception, and imagining getting to plan numtuals here for our sons or daughters. When Lily and I sat down to make the gondola artwork for one of our first cards, it begged for hearts. Love is everywhere, and when I’m in a place this beautiful and peaceful, I can feel it all around me.

… Elana Royer MEET OUR COVER ARTISTS Lily and Elana Royer at

HANDMAKERY

Children’s Art Studio 449 Main Street, Carbondale First Friday, February 7 5:00-7:00 PM

SAY HELLO:

MOUNTAIN-PARENT.COM

become a contributing writer, advertise & share event listings on our free online calendar

editor@mountain-parent.com kathryn@mountain-parent.com and on Facebook

DISCLAIMER

The opinions and views expressed by contributors to Mountain Parent are not necessarily those of the Publisher. Mountain Parent Magazine is registered with the State of Colorado. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content without permission is prohibited.

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Recently we found this long-lost photo of my husband’s mother Robin. I never met her. She died of breast cancer many, many years ago. Immediately, the resemblance was crystal clear. Baby Caroline is a spitting image of Robin. The frizzy curls growing only on the top of her head, and those cheeks. I wonder how many other traits she might inherit from her grandmother? Will she be a natural with words? Will she be captivatingly gangly? Superbly kind? Does she have those destined-to-be long legs? Will she inherit the breast-cancer gene? What else will she carry in her bones? While Robin’s life was cut short, I think she lived full of wellness, even though she died of cancer. Shannon Adler wrote, “Carve your name on hearts, not tombstones. A legacy is etched into the minds of others.” I am reminded that each of us are an accumulation of our ancestors struggles to achieve wellness, to reach their own full potential, gangly arms and all. Lauren Suhrbier Publisher

WHEN THE RIO GRANDE TRAIL IS COVERED WITH SNOW, I try to leave my desk in time to take our husky mix Zelda on a cross-country ski before dark. She bounds ahead on the leash, pulling me to the trailhead, and when she’s set free, she flies. Her joy is infectious, and I feel lifted by her freedom of movement. She knows nothing of the world, only that it is good because there is snow. On deadline, after a breakthrough day in which we crossed from “oh #@!” to “okay, we’ve got this,” six inches of snow fell outside my desk window and my faithful girl waited at my feet. There was a moment when daylight shifted and she sighed. “You should go,” my husband said, dripping melted snow as he pulled off his boots. “It’s a full moon.” Since we don’t have stellar health insurance, we call this our “Wellness Plan.” The out-and-back is two blocks from our house. I love it when the kids go with me, though when they don’t it’s grown-up solo time, a form of therapy. Shaking off the day means starting with one earbud and a playlist mostly from the 90s. I can go as far as the needs at home allow, and then I turn around and unplug. Each time the music goes silent, the quiet is the first thing I notice. On this night especially so. Car wheels on snow pack can sound far away, leaving only the whoosh of my skis, my dog’s happy panting, and the sound of my thoughts. In this kind of quiet, the occasional design quandary can bubble up as its solution reveals itself. I can shut off the white noise – the ever-present concerns of work and world, of motherhood, of all the rest. I find the glide that can make a flat trail in the dark wild fun. This is why we live here, though it’s easy to fall out of the habit. If you need inspiration, Steve Szoradi’s Trail Map article about the Aspen-Snowmass Nordic Trail System can help you discover your nearby options. Here’s one thing I love about Mountain Parent. My job not only gives me the flexibility many days to peddle or hike or ski before dinner – it also puts me in frequent conversation with others whose routines include skiing the dog. Jen Moss is one such parent. She is the author of our Wellness feature, “Learning to Soar with my Superhero,” a story of how she and her husband Brent are coping with their daughter Addy’s Leukodystrophy. Their family, friends, school, care providers and community are all part of their redefined version healthy. By cultivating thier support network over the past four years, they’re getting back out there, finding their joy in the mountains and sharing it with their children – even if it means hauling 60 pounds of gear so their five year old girl can love this place as much as they do. Jen inspires me beyond words. When my husband came in covered in snow and urging me to go howl, Jen seconded his advice. We ended our phone meeting with her reminding me of the truth she shares in her piece – “Me Time” makes us better parents, better spouses and better at facing even the impossible. It grew dark as I returned to Carbondale on that full moon night, and as I approached the rodeo ice rink, the lights made snowflakes into tiny white, gravity-defying sparkles. My path lit up, and I saw that my out tracks had nearly filled in. I realized how long I’d gone without really seeing beyond a few yards. I thought of Jen’s story, and I realized that life is a little like night skiing. Sometimes you can see what’s out ahead, and other times, you have to feel your way. Kathryn Camp Editor


YOU ARE COLORADO ! e w e r So a

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Contributors The MOST AWESOME benefit in town,

FAMILY FEUD ASPEN! for Aspen Youth Center!

February 7, 2020 Hotel Jerome Aspen Cocktails, dinner, silent & live auction, & game show! Tables, Tickets, & Teams on sale NOW!

KIMBERLY BAKKER

CLAUDETTE COLLIER

AMI MAES

KIRSTEN MOREY

BRENT MOSS

JEN MOSS

DEB SULLIVAN

STEPHEN SZORADI

Kimberly is a music and handwriting teacher at Aspen Country Day School and has lived in the Valley since 2001. In addition to teaching music, she teaches handwriting, cursive, etiquette, and beginning piano. She enjoys skiing, camping, dirt biking, and sailing with her family. When we started looking for an author of our handwriting piece, we learned about Kimberly’s longtime love of calligraphy and her habit of corresponding with students, colleagues, friends and family near and far in her best cursive. Check out Kimberly’s new Kindle Edition children’s book, The Colors.

Claudette is the loving mother and grandmother behind the scenes of our Wellness feature, “Learning to Soar with my Superhero.” Formerly a Senior Manager of Global Learning Strategy and Operations, and Human Resources Manager, she’s recently retired and enjoying spending time with her beautiful family. Along with a busy family life, she is a proud member of the Board of Director’s for the United Leukodystrophy Foundation; an organization dedicated to finding cures for all Leukodystrophies.

Ami is the owner, creative director, and lead educator at HANDMAKERY on Main Street in Carbondale. Ami’s love of art began as a little girl. She grew up sewing and crafting handmade goods with her mother and sisters, and when she had the opportunity to work with young children in a studio experience in high school, she knew she’d found her passion. The upcycled stuffie she created for our DIY column grew out of her love of owls and her wish to find purposeful uses for beautiful discarded woolens.

Reserve today for a chance to beat 2019 Champions, Coldwell Banker Mason Morse!

Kirsten lives in Carbondale with her husband Rob, their children Micah and Jade, and dog Cody. Kirsten has lived in the Valley since 1995 and is a realtor with Coldwell Banker Mason Morse. She teaches skiing to a few of her longtime clients and she holds a seat on the Ross Montessori School Board. She also enjoys playing tennis, mountain biking, yoga and skiing with her family. When we heard about the Kids Who Care project, we learned that Kirsten is one of the mothers who took it from idea to reality. She is known around the Valley as a “get it done gal” who does everything with heart and a smile.

www.aspenyouthcenter.org 970.544.4130

AYC is dedicated to providing a safe & supportive place where all youth connect, learn, and grow...for FREE!

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Born and raised in Minnesota, and drawn to the mountains like a skier to the powder, Brent has called Carbondale his home - and home base for outdoor adventure - for 23 years and counting. Adventure of a different kind is what he got when he started a family and, with his daughter Adele, discovered that life can hit you with anything, and was reminded how nature loves her little surprises... His family photos in our Wellness section prove the saying that the best shots happen when the subject is unaware of the camera. His natural ease with his craft comes through in these images – as does his love for his wife and children.

Jen is a freelance graphic designer based in Carbondale. She has always loved the outdoors and now she gets to share that love of art and nature with her two children. In her free time, she loves to ski with her husband Brent and take winter walks along snowy paths with her dog Oly. She is the author of our Wellness feature, “Learning to Soar with My Superhero,” about how she has redefined healthy after learning of her daughter Addy’s Leukodystrophy diagnosis. This article began with our wish to learn about Jen’s push to create more handicapped accessibility in our community’s parks. We soon realized that her journey toward answers was where we needed to begin. We hope to follow her work on park-access in future editions.

Deb is originally from Boulder, but spent a significant amount of time in the Northwest and oversees, in Bermuda, where she sailed competitively. She moved to the Roaring Fork Valley almost 10 years ago and is happy to be back out on the slopes with local participants of Challenge Aspen. Tanner Jadwin, whom she interviews in our Good Sports column, is one of the many athletes who are thriving because of the work of Deb and her colleagues. Her passion is sharing the outdoors with others, making sure that, with adaptations, all are able to enjoy nature and activity. She has two great rescue dogs, Izzy and Sofia, and spends as much time as possible outdoors with them too.

Stephen began guiding with Aspen Alpine Guides in 2008 after moving from Switzerland where he spent the previous seven years training and working. In the summer, Stephen guides the regional 14,000 ft peaks, as well as day hikes, rock climbs and high-altitude training coupled with trail running. In the winter, he is a backcountry ski and snowshoe guide, avalanche educator, and has worked for five years as a ski instructor. In this edition, he shows us the ins and outs of the Aspen-Snowmass Nordic Trails System.


SE A SO N A L

S N I PPE T S

So you say it’s your

BIRTHDAY? Well, it’s my birth(ing) day too! Whether they’re turning 2 or 20, they’re still your baby (forever and always) And you’re planning to make it special. K AT H RY N C A M P

PHOTO:

(above) Hiking the Bowl is a rite of passage. Save it for the milestone birthday when your kid is truly ready, then gift her or him your favorite line. Best of all – this EPIC adventure costs nothing for season pass holders and the snowcat to Whip’s Veneration is cooler than go-carts any day of the week. Credit: Jeremy Swanson

WHERE TO CELEBRATE ONE BIT OF WINTERTIME ADVICE: If you’re planning a snow season birthday party, we’re here to test your vision of your toasty outdoor firepit house party revival. Here’s why. You can’t simply attach helium balloons to your mailbox and call it good. Helium deflates remarkably fast in freezing temps. But really – your neighborhood scavenger hunt is subject to 15” of snow on the morning of your soiree. In this scenario, wouldn’t you (and for this matter, the tweens, teens and grown-ups on your guest list) rather celebrate on the slopes? And if you’re planning a party for littles, let’s consider your snowsuit exit strategy x 6. Let go of your hankering to make marzipan penguins, ice lanterns and signature hot ginger cider toddies. Not that we take issue with any of the above. In fact, for any other occasion, we’d say go for it. But when it comes to planning your child’s snow season birthday party, we at MP are here to advocate for no-stress venues. We hope you will: 1) Avoid all manner of preparty perfectionism, a.k.a. getting out the wood polish to spiff up your mudroom. 2) Allow yourself to arrive minutes beforehand with previously mentioned balloons and call it good. 3) Most importantly, make your celebration truly memorable for the guest of honor by actually enjoying it with them. Believe us – they won’t tell you that you rocked your DIY snowglobe craft. But they might talk about how chill you were when you ripped the sled hill. We’ve put together our Valleywide picks for easy birthday party venues. Some parties you can throw on the cheap, and others you may need to save for a big year...

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Map Illustration K ATH RY N C A M P

Sled Hills

Here’s our version of Where’s Waldo. Find this little dude at various sledding hotspots from Aspen to Glenwood Springs, then visit Mountain-Parent.com for previously published intel on how to get there.

Sledding Food & Bev

For a birthday picnic, call ahead and place a takeout order with BLT Basalt, a quick-stop sandwich shop on Midland Avenue. The name stands for “Breakfast, Lunch & Takeout,” though of course the classic BLT is on the menu, in seven fun variations – such as the “Daisy Duke,” with BBQ sauce. They will be happy to slice a few of their ciabatta sammys into kid-sized portions to-go for your crew. Pack helmets (of course), blankets, warm beverages, water, and maybe even your Bluetooth speakers. (970) 927-6774

Bouncy Houses

Find these in our map and call the closest community rec department to reserve your pick of inflatables. Here’s a truly big way to get the yayas out while inside – with options suitable for age 1-6ish. Each venue has different days of the week available, a range of prices and party add-ons. Aspen Recreation (970) 544-4100 Snowmass Recreation (970) 922-2240 Carbondale Recreation (970) 510-1278 Glenwood Springs Recreation (970) 384-6301

WEATHER INSURANCE: If it rains or snows bring the vehicle back within 48 hours after an Ultimate Wash and we will rewash it.

Sumo Wrestling

Here’s something your tween hasn’t outgrown and maybe hasn’t tried yet: Inflatable Sumo Wrestling. The Aspen Rec Department offers this at their Red Brick location. Simply step inside a mammoth blow-up Sumo suit, then body-slam your bros to your heart’s delight.

Aspen Youth Center

The hotspot where your tween or teen can hang after school is now offering birthday parties in conjuction with Aspen Rec. Lots of party ideas and options, something for every interest. (970) 544-4130

THE VALLEY’S SOURCE FOR: Car Washing Detailing Quick Lube

New Tires & Changes Express Detailing Headlight Restoration

745 BUGGY CIRCLE, CARBONDALE • (970) 963-8800 8


Slider’s Cabin

Plan a birthday party at this nofrills but way cool mod cabin below Elk Camp at the Snowmass Ski Area – and be the hostess with the most-est at your basecamp on the hill. The barbecue grill and west-facing deck = perfect afternoon beach vibe on bluebird days. On the other hand, the warming hut rustique is perfect for reconvening after powder day laps with the kids. Either way, Aspen Skiing Company will help you transport birthday cakes, food, beverages and other party supplies.Your cooler of grown-up treats may bring back memories your twenty-something birthdays spent tailgating in the ski area parking lot – while the grown-up venue makes for an incredible parent-child ski day, perfect for guests of every age. Reservations: Lynn Olson, ASC Group Services Coordinator (970) 923-0469.

RFTA Excursion

Remember when the simplest outing felt like an adventure? With an adult, children ages 5 and under in groups of 9 or fewer can ride RFTA for free to and from any stop in the Valley. Go between 11:00 AM and 2:00 PM to avoid peak commuting hours, and leave balloons at home. Instead of lugging a cake around on public transit, plan to visit Paradise Bakery in Aspen (one block from the Rubey Park bus terminal) for hot cocoa, ice cream, and a cookie, now with an amazing GF chocolate chip option. Walk from Paradise to the kids’ play zone in Wagner Park, then eventually circle back to Rubey Park to board the next bus. Just avoid the impulse to sing “The Wheels on the …” because once you get it started, you (and every fellow passenger) will regret it.

Snowmobile Tour

Your high school kid isn’t “that” into a party this year. This means you can plan something special for the family, or a one-on-one celebration doing something spectacular – like a 30-mile ride with Sunlight Mountain Snowmobile Tours (970) 9457491. You’ll head up into the backcountry to Baylor Park for freeriding in a huge, powder-prone meadow. You’ll get 360-degree views of Mount Sopris, the Elk Range, and the Flattops – but even cooler, you’ll get miles of smiles all the way there and back.

Handmakery Children’s Art Studio

Turn the page to check out Ami Maes’ DIY Upcycled Snowy Owl. Don’t stress about crafting your way through a birthday party – Ami will make it easy for you and magical for your child. (970) 309-7686

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The Dillard Real Estate Team Diligent. Honest. Professional.

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SELLING YOUR HOME

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choose the commission from our three competitive marketing packages. 4 In house stager & furniture 4 In house handy man 4 Largest Zillow and Facebook presence, which is where all the buyers are today. 4 Better Video, see for yourself at bit.ly/DillardVid 4 Call Scott at 970.355.4080

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specialized professionals for the price of one. 4 Unique team systems which provide a better experience for our customers. 4 Availability: someone will always answer the phone. 4 Do you want your waitress cooking your meal? Then why would you have your negotiator doing your marketing?

We Give Back to Our Heros Homes for Heroes® is Dedicated to Serving and Giving Back to Firefighters, Law Enforcement, Military (Active, Reserves and Veterans), Healthcare Workers, EMS and Teachers, When You Buy or Sell with the Dillard Team. It’s our way to say Thank You. Thank You For Your Service!

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H O M EL I FE

DIY

Handmade Upcycled

SNOWY SNUGGLY OWL Spread your artistic wings with a heartfelt hoot.

AMI MAES HANDMAKERY, Carbondale

WINTERTIME BRINGS WHIMSY AND WONDER. It creates coziness and craftiness in our children and in ourselves. Nights are long but ideas and imagination are spacious with splendor and spark. Snowflakes add sparkle as they soar and softly surround. It’s the perfect time of year to venture on a feathery flight stitching a simple, soft stuffie. Here is a sewing project you can do for a child or with a child, with no need of a sewing machine, without worrying about perfection. In fact, imperfection only makes this creature more darling. SUPPLIES: • Photos or drawings of owls • Download a printable pattern at Mountain-Parent.com • Paper + pencil + eraser + tape + scissors • Wool sweaters (multiple colors and patterns work best) • Embroidery floss (all of your favorite colors) • Needles (large darning needles have big eyes and are easy for little hands) • Straight pins • Stuffing • Buttons

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FABRIC AND COLOR SELECTION: Sift through local thrift shops or your home, to find sweaters made with 100% animal fibers. Avoid any percentage of cotton, acrylic or nylon in the fabric. For the softest fabric, look for lambswool, merino, cashmere, mohair, angora or alpaca. Mix & match colors, textures, and patterns to create unique combinations for your owl’s wings, chest feathers and face. You can go with natural tones for a serious bird or whimsical colors for an other-worldly creation. What is your creature calling to become? Machine-wash wool sweaters on hot, and then dry on high heat. This sets, shrinks, and felts the fibers. Felting wool makes the fabric thicker and provides a finished edge when cutting that won’t fringe or fray.

DESIGN YOUR OWL Download a pattern at Mountain-Parent.com. Use this as a base, and make alterations to suit your vision. Snuggle up and look at a wide array of owls in books, magazines, photos or online. Talk about your child’s favorite owl features… maybe the flair of the feathers, the exquisiteness of the eyes, the magic of the mask, or the symmetry of the simple shapes? Chat and collaborate, sketch and decide how your owl will express its personality. Cut out your pattern pieces and choose which sweater colors, prints and textures you like best for each body part. Limit the overall finished size to 8-9 inches, so your owl’s body pattern pieces will fit the dimensions of a felted sweater. You can multi-layer eyes using various colored wools or buttons. Choose separate wool pieces for an angular beak, wings and your owl’s belly, which can be feathery, layered, ruffled, or simple. It’s ideal if pieces are no smaller than 1” or they can become too challenging to stitch.

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amily

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HANDMAKERY + MOUNTAIN PARENT “SOMETHING TO HOOT ABOUT” PARTY HELPFUL HINTS: PINNING: Pin the individual paper pattern pieces on top of the wool fabric pieces using straight pins. Cut out fabric shapes. Assemble all individual wool pieces onto the owl’s body and pin into place, so you can see how your creation will appear.

• Tie a knot to the needle and at the end of the floss to keep the needle connected and to prevent the thread from pulling through.

STITCHING Visible stitches add character. Embroidery floss is thicker than traditional thread and easier for small hands to use. Select floss colors that compliment or accent your wools. Darning needles are dull (though sharp enough for easily working with thick wool felt). They have a much larger eye, making threading the needle easier. A simple whip stitch works wonders because felted wool doesn’t need to be turned under, as it naturally has a finished edge. To make a whip stitch, you’re basically circling around or looping the edge as you stitch two pieces of felted wool together.

• Pre-plan which parts of your owl’s body will be stitched first. It works best to move from front to back. For example, stitch button eyes to mask, and beak to mask, before stitching mask to body. Add embellishments, such as ruffles or a pocket to the owl’s tummy before assembling the body.

• Before you begin sewing pieces together, use two scrap pieces of felted wool to practice making whip stitches.

• When enclosing the owl’s body, leave a 1-2 inch opening on the bottom of the body for adding stuffing. Use the handle of a wooden spoon to push stuffing into the body of the owl. Once your creature is full and fluffy, stitch the small opening closed.

First Friday, February 7 5:00 –7:00 PM All are invited to join us for a FREE art exhibit and chance to make a DIY Collaged Owl Handmade from the Heart presented by MP cover artists, Lily and Elana Royer of Lilybart.

HANDMAKERY

ARTFUL + ABSTRACT ASSEMBLAGE ON CANVAS

TUES, WED or THURS (once a week) Six weeks starting Feb 18 4:00 - 5:30 PM Ages 5+ Artists will work on an oversized, heavyweight, primed canvas as they dive into the abstract color exploration using staining, layering, texturing, printing, mark-making & embellishing. Save the Date – all are invited to a MINI-EXHIBIT April 9, 10 & 11 at 5:30 to celebrate each artist’s finished piece.

Thursday, March 5 8:30 – 10:30am

To Spark and Nurture the Highest Potential in Humanity There is no better way to experience the excitement of our students and teachers than to see them in action during the school day. We invite you to come take a look! Come visit our classrooms, hear our students play music, and ask questions of our most experienced teachers

Bring Your Questions!

Adults only, space is limited. Please RSVP to catherine@waldorfschoolrf.org 970.963.1960

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RAMS B a s ke t b a l l

COME OUT AND SUPPORT THE ROARING FORK HIGHSCHOOL TE AMS AT THESE HOME GAMES IN F E B RUARY Feb. 1 RFHS @ Aspen 1:00 JV 2:30 Girls Varsity 4:00 Boys Varsity Feb. 7 RFHS @ Basalt 4:00 JV 5:30 Girls Varsity 7:00 Boys Varsity Feb. 10 RFHS @ Coal Ridge 6:30 JV

Feb. 14 RFHS @ Cedaredge 3:00 JV 4:30 JV 6:00 Girls Varsity 7:30 Boys Varsity Feb. 15 Moffat @ RFHS 1:00 JV 2:30 Girls Varsity 4:00 Boys Varsity Feb. 18 Coal Ridge @ RFHS 4:00 JV 5:30 Girls Varsity 7:00 Boys Varsity Feb. 20 RFHS @ Grand Valley 4:00 JV 5:30 Girls Varsity 7:00 Boys Varsity

TH A NK YOU TO OU R SCHOOL BOOS TE R

RICHARD FULLER Mortgage Loan Originator | NMLS 458827 Office: 970.704.6440 | Cell: 970.618.4294 rfuller@houseloan.com www.RichardFullerCornerstone.com BRISA GARCIA Hablamos Español Loan Officer Assistant | NMLS 1700997 Office: 970.704.6440 | Fax: 866.311.6890 brisagarcia@houseloan.com 502 Main Street, Unit 11 | Carbondale, Colorado 81623 Not a commitment to lend. Borrower must meet qualification criteria. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Let us help you achieve your home ownership dreams.


H EL PI N G

H A N DS

ROARING FORK KIDS WHO CARE

THINK globally &ACT LOCALLY A student-led effort gives kids a hands-on way to take action to save Sea Turtles and Rainforests while learning the skills of Eco-Entrepreneurship

KIRSTEN MOREY

IF YOU ASK a nine, ten or eleven-year-old about what in the world really matters to them, you’re likely to hear about honeybees, whales, sea turtles, rainforests, global warming, and the endangered white tiger. Coral reefs, melting ice caps … the list goes on. Global issues can feel overwhelming to adults. We grown-ups tend to get bogged down in the reality of numbers. But our kids are different. Their way of thinking and being in the world is magical and hopeful. They simply need a meaningful way to take action – the more hands-on the better. Roaring Fork Valley Kids Who Care grew out of this impulse. Several local mothers saw their children’s sincere wish to serve, and, inspired by a Carbondale women’s group called the “Sopris 100 Who Care,” they networked with Junior Achievement to make a plan. The Sopris women’s group is a chapter of the national “100 Who Care” philanthropic organization. The premise is simple. One hundred women are invited to bring $100 to a group gathering. They pool their funds and decide among causes that are “pitched” at the event. Collectively they can make a significant difference. (See page 54 for event details.) “We thought – why don’t we make this possible for the younger generation as well,“ Kris Freeman and Kirsten Morey recall. Together with Kris’s Junior Achievement (JA) experience and Kirsten’s philanthropic spin off of the 100 Alliance idea, they combined their skills with their kids’ passion to make a difference. Kris added, “We are looking to empower our children with financial skills to be knowledgeable entrepreneurs, and motivated to be activists, ultimately – to feel connected to something larger than themselves. Since the kids don’t necessarily have $100 just laying around, we thought that they should earn the money first and then make the choice on where to donate.”

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The seed was planted through Access After School at Ross Montessori and later through Junior Achievement, which added 2-3 weeks to the lesson plan in the Spring of 2019. The JA curriculum emphasizes career awareness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy. The kids learned how to create a business plan and understand money management, so it worked well as a vehicle for helping the children to get organized. In the JA class, they formulated a business plan to sell greeting cards and engraved key chains and necklaces as well as succulent planters, soaps and candles at Carbondale’s First Friday celebrations. The funds raised would go to support the causes that the students agreed to support. “I was inspired to join Roaring Fork Valley Kids Who Care because when I found out that they donated all the money they raised to charity, I wanted to be a part of that,” explained Madilyn Matthias, age 9. The children participated in their inaugural First Friday during the Carbondale Block Party, where they raised $272. They then donated $175 to the five local nonprofits that benefited from the Block Party. These included: Colorado Animal Rescue, Valley recreation, and Carbondale youth organizations/programming. The remainder of the money was used to pay back their suppliers for the upfront supply costs. “Wow! I was so impressed. What a bunch of spirited entrepreneurs these children are. They are taking so much of what they learned inside the classroom with Junior Achievement and putting it to work in the ‘real world.’ I am also amazed at their creativity and ability to teamwork,” said Abby Matthias.

PHOTO

Air plants in glass tarrariams or growing in gathered drift wood are among the many things handmade and sold by Roaring Fork Valley Kids Who Care. Shop their booth at Carbondale’s First Friday March 6.

One Junior Achievement lesson involves learning how to work with expenses, such as the cost of supplies. The children figured that since their initial investment in supplies had been covered by their first sales event, future opportunities to sell would make their funds go farther. A lot of the products would be re-used for future sales. Each month, the project grew and the kids learned from the process. For the June First Friday, the kids secured First Bank as a sponsor. They set up their booth next to the bank’s tent, and at the end of the event, First Bank matched funds. The kids raised $223 or $446 including the match.

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The students are in charge. Parents help order products and make suggestions, but the kids price their products and handle all of the marketing and selling. They set up their vendor station at First Friday events and assign tasks for each child. They use Sign-Up Genius ahead of time to know who will be available at the event, including parents. Some specific tasks include: displaying the products on the table, setting up a tent, making sure there is enough change for the cash register, counting their register at the beginning and end of the event, and using a product sheet to tally sales. The kids help with the take-down at the end of the event and of course, they count their money. After the event, they discuss which products are selling better than others. This has helped the children plan for future events. “I helped make the products and personalized the key chains. I also helped man the booth, was a cashier and I helped to set up and organize the booth,” shared Elsa Skagen, age 9. “One thing I did to contribute to this project was being the voice to talk to people. I was explaining where the money would go from the products we were selling,” said Beck Hamilton, age 11. Being a greeter is no easy task. Kids are asked to meet, greet and encourage people to stop by the table. Greeters must be knowledgeable about the products and pricing, and they must be able to speak about the group’s mission. “I helped contribute driving people to the booth. I stood in the middle of the street and started talking to people about our products,” explained Oliver Skagen, age 12. One big part of the group’s vision is to include students from every school in the Valley. They created an information sheet that is displayed on the table at each event, encouraging others to join. In June, the Carbondale Community School started collaborating through their Junior Achievement program. Mackayla Bryan from the Community School helped make necklaces, bracelets and luggage tags. By the end of the summer, Kids Who Care made $800 after paying back suppliers and planning a pizza party for all participants. The children voted to give $400 to two organizations: the Pachamama Alliance (a San Francisco,

CA-based nonprofit dedicated to saving the Amazon rainforest) and the Sea Turtles Foundation (based in Fort Lauderdale, FL). The kids adopted ten Hawksbill Sea Turtle nests and received adoption papers. Next fall, the organization will send information on how many sea turtles hatched from each of the nests.

The Alliance grew in the fall semester. They were also joined by Ms. Tamra Kenyon’s first-through-third grade students from Ross Montessori School. Through the school’s JA pilot program, the students We are looking to participated in the December First Friday Event. Through soap sales, holiday greeting cards, lip empower our children balm and bracelets, the children raised $129.50. The RMS program hopes to grow in 2020 to with financial skills involve students in grades four-through-six. Ms. Tamra shares, “My students were engaged with the curriculum and loved having the JA volunteers come each week. They tailored the content to fit the needs of a multi-age class and it worked out beautifully. The children experienced relevant, engaging, hands-on learning that ended with group collaboration to come up with a business model and make products to sell at a larger, community event. All profits will be graciously donated to a local organization in need. We are already looking forward to next year!”

to be knowledgeable entrepreneurs, and motivated to be activists, ultimately – to feel connected to something larger than themselves.” KRIS FREEMAN

The group is looking to expand its numbers to include home-school families, other JA after school programs, and any group wishing to make items to sell for the cause. Ultimately, the children are learning what excites them and what skills and gifts they have that can contribute to the whole. They are building confidence, an understanding of what it means to work collectively, and truly feeling that they are caretakers of the earth and of each other.

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MOUNTAINPARENT FEB+MAR F E AT U R E S

I REMEMBER WATCHING MY MOTHER USE A DIP PEN AND GLASS INK JAR when she made beautiful signage for her first career as a window designer for a local department store in Holland, Michigan, where I grew up. She was masterful, and rarely made mistakes. It was the 1970s, and most signs for advertisements were made in such a fashion. I used to watch my mother writing notes, cards to family, invitations and even grocery lists in cursive with legible and artistic handwriting. When I am asked if handwriting is a dying art, I note that children are drawn, literally to “draw” and express themselves or just have fun doing what they see siblings or adults doing. What they see us doing is changing, due to our increased use of technology. Children see texting these days more often than they see their parents using paper and pencil. WRITING vs. PENMANSHIP Of course, children still learn to write. We all use handwriting, some more than others. We leave a note for someone, sign a check, make a grocery list, fill out paperwork and label items. It is true that much of our communication has migrated from paper to digital through email and texts, but we still need to learn to write, and most of us do. So I believe handwriting is not dying, but the art and beauty of it is often neglected. I remember beautiful invitations for weddings and events in handwritten cursive script or calligraphy. As soon as I saw one of these, I knew I would get to dress up and use my best manners if I was going to attend. Beautiful handwriting is an aesthetic joy to read. With fewer and fewer hand-written works of art showing up in the mailbox, are our children missing out? This experience can be similar to the feeling one gets when looking at a magnificent sunset or painting. When handwriting is neat, legible and pleasing, it is not only easy to read, but it often reveals the care and thoughtfulness the writer took to convey the message. Should this art be included in the current rebranding of “soft skills” needed for success?

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THE SO-CALLED SOFT SKILLS These days, we hear a lot about the “soft skills,” traits valued in the education and business worlds as “must haves” for success. These include courtesy, communication and responsibility. In my once-small hometown on Lake Michigan, children were expected to have these “soft skills,” as a part of growing up – not taught in isolation or formally in a classroom, but rather through the community as a whole. Discipline was carried out by any adult who happened to notice less-than exceptional behavior. Good penmanship was the norm, something we valued without necessarily naming it, and I draw a correlation here between this skill and the “soft skills” that employers today say are missing in the new young professionals entering the workforce. In many cases we have become more isolated and often not part of a generational community, due to increased mobility, technology, and many other things. It is rare for children these days to be born and raised in the same home or community in which they have grandparents, great-grandparents, aunts, uncles, clergy and neighbors who are a part of their lives from birth to death. So how can we address these societal changes in the ways we raise and educate children today?

A S P E N C O U N T R Y D AY S C H O O L


AGES & STAGES AGE 12-18 MONTHS: SCRIBBLES Children naturally begin to gravitate toward scribbling at a young age and will pick up a crayon, marker, or any other tool available to create a mark. (Even shoe polish and a newly painted hallway will do in a pinch!) The basic grip used by children in this stage is called the Palmar Supinate grip, with the palm surrounding the utensil and the thumb on top.

AGE 2-3 YEARS: SCRIBBLES WITH SYMBOLS The next stage in development occurs when a child’s pencil grip evolves. The Digital Pronated grip is characterized by a whole hand grip with the pointer finger toward the tip of the writing utensil. This grip is associated with more control of the pen or crayon, and during this stage, you see the beginning of intentionally directed lines, symbolic of letter forms.

AGE 3.5 – 4 YEARS: MOCK LETTERS The Static Tripod grip is when 3 fingers are used with the thumb and pointer pinching the utensil. The 3rd finger knuckle is also used for control and balance. When children want to attempt coloring in a certain space or desire more detail, this grip will be used. You will also start to see letters of various sizes and placement on the page.

AGES 5+ PHASE ONE – FINE MOTOR READINESS When a child displays the Dynamic Tripod Grip, you begin to see big leaps in development. The fingers are positioned for precise use, with part of the hand resting on the paper, while fingers work together using fine motor skills to manipulate the writing utensil. This reflects increasing maturity in fine-motor control, and seems to arrive in correlation with a child’s ability to think symbolically. Many educators view this developmental milestone as a key indicator in readiness to read. PHASE TWO –SYMBOLIC THOUGHT Letter Strings – moving from left to right, progressing downward. Groups of Letters – spaces between groups of letters representing words. Picture Labelling – often using the first letter sound to name an object. Environmental Print – copying logos and signs, “reading” their meaning.

PHASE THREE –PHONETICS Early Phonetics (left) – the child goes from hearing the first letter sound to hearing the ending letter sound, and will write two letters to represent the object. Next, they begin hearing consonants in the middle of words, and finally the vowel sounds. When they can link these sounds using letters, they begin forming words, which leads to phrases and eventually to sentences. Is this the ultimate chicken or egg question? What comes first, the ability to write, or the ability to read?

CURVISE & THE “THREE Rs” I often think back to the basics of education; Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic – what my grandparents learned in their one-room school in the 1920s. Education at that time was different, but the basics were the same – they had to be able to read, write, and use basic math to be able to function in their society (my grandparents had between 5th and 8th-grade educations, but functioned and communicated successfully). Education has changed over the years with the needs of technology and our changing world, but many things stay the same. Cursive handwriting gives us opportunities to practice soft skills, which may be the new “Three Rs”– courtesy (respect), communication (relating) and responsibility. Courtesy and respect are demonstrated with a beautiful script when writing thank you notes and greeting cards. Thoughtful communication builds relationships and is practiced when a student writes legibly to a teacher or classmate, for an essay or public presentation. A responsible citizen shows gratitude in any situation, be it the classroom or the boardroom – and we practice this by sending legible and beautiful hand-written thank you notes, as well as cards to grandparents, to a loved one in a hospital, or to a friend who might need encouragement. Using your own writing signifies the amount of thought and care put into the words. Emails are nice, but handwritten notes of gratitude and concern are more heartfelt and meaningful.

HANDWRITING WITHOUT TEARS I teach cursive in Grade Five at Aspen Country Day School, where I work with the students during the first half-hour of instruction every morning. I received special training seven years ago in “Handwriting Without Tears,” which was developed in the 1970s by a physical therapist who focused on fine motor skills and the development of handwriting techniques that not only support children physically, but educationally. It is multisensory, adaptable for many types of learners, and progresses from kindergarten to grade six. Imagine a quiet and focussed start to the school day. We take five boisterous minutes of sharing exciting news and visiting with friends, then everyone settles down. I play classical music (my other educational love, as I am also the ACDS music teacher). Desks are cleared, chairs positioned properly and the cursive books are gently passed out. Students progress at their individual pace in the books as I glide from desk to desk, checking letter formation, giving suggestions, or just noticing how sublime the letters look on the page. One of the most beautiful sounds is the combination of Mozart, graphite on paper and thoughtful conversations about precise letter formation. I plan occasional forays into calligraphy for special projects or holidays and sign-making for school events. We have had cursive competitions in which students submit their best handwriting. When I first introduced this, I thought I might get 5-10 entries, but I was happily surprised when I received over 200! I did not put a limit on how many times students could enter, so the cursive “practice” was amazing and best of all, the students I least thought would enter, were some of my prizewinning selections.

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IDEAS FOR PRACTICING HANDWRITING AT HOME KIMBERLY BAKKER

Any time writing is needed, a child can help with the process in a way that is fun for them. This can also help a child with organizing thoughts and developing a practice of planning ahead.

• Buy a simple chalkboard, a sturdy eraser and a set of art quality pastel chalks at an art supply store. Children can doodle, make signs and practice letters the oldfashioned way – gaining confidence in a medium that can be erased and rewritten over and over. • Write a letter to a grandparent on a nice piece of stationery. Pick out a special stamp. Take time to go to the post office together to mail it. • Write out the family menu. Have fun with fancy lettering like you see at your favorite coffee shop. (Perhaps the child who writes the menu gets to choose a meal or two.) • Children can make a “Knock First Please” sign for their room so their siblings will respect their privacy.

• Calligraphy dinner place cards for a special event. • Pick out craft supplies, stickers, markers and fun paper so children can design their own Valentine’s Day cards to pass out at school or mail to cousins living elsewhere. • Kids can use 3 x 5 Index cards and packing tape to label toy and clothing drawers so they can quickly find what they need. • Make luggage tags for an upcoming family trip. • Collaborate on a chore chart with siblings. • Work together on your weekly grocery store list.

Is it time you had a HEART-TO-HEART about your financing? Call me to start the conversation! LINDA MCKINLEY Branch Manager | NMLS # 162799

Office: 970-945-4001 Direct: 970-928-7900 Mobile: 970-618-3355 lmckinley@fairwaymc.com www.lindamckinley.com 811 Colorado Avenue Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 Copyright©2020 Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. NMLS#2289. 4750 S. Biltmore Lane, Madison, WI 53718, 1-866-912-4800. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. All rights reserved. 227639

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MOUNTA IN PA R ENT T R A IL MA P

ASPEN-SNOWMASS NORDIC TRAIL SYSTEMS A family-friendly guide to “out our backdoor” cross-country ski trails. STEPHEN SZOR ADI Aspen Alpine Guides

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Aspen Snowmass Nordic Trail System

STEPHEN SZORADI Aspen Alpine Guides

Get your cardio fix on the fly

Finding a moment to get out for your cardio fix or some social buddy time for a less than epic adventure is tough. As a parent, and especially as a working parent, sometimes it’s difficult to find that essential moment for a quick workout, or a necessary reset, or simply some balance and perspective. The Aspen Snowmass Nordic Ski Trails are “right out our backdoor” from neighborhoods and even most offices in the upper Valley. If you have not gotten to know these trails yet, here is some help finding your moment. PHOTOS: Aspen Skiing Company

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Snowmass Club Golf Course Nordic Ski Trails: From Brush Creek Road, turn South onto Clubhouse Drive to get to the public parking area next to the Snowmass Cross Country Center. The short green loop adjacent to the Center is good for introducing small children to this sport.

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Aspen Nordic Center: A perfect place for beginners located at the Aspen Golf Course. Turn North at the Truscott light off of Highway 82 to find a large free public parking area with easy access to an extensive Green course. You’ll find a dog loop, as well as many new connector sections added to the basic loop, so you can make your workout as long or short as you wish. HINT: The retail center operated by Ute Mountaineer rents and sells Chariot ski trailers for pulling small children. Kids ski first, then when they’re whooped, settle them into the buggy for a nap while Mom and Dad check out the surrounding trails. North Star Preserve Trails: (Not shown on the map) Drive Hwy 82 East out of Aspen about one mile toward Independence Pass. Look for a small parking lot marked North Star / North Gate. The loop is maintained well with regular grooming and it’s a great spot to practice as it has minimal elevation gain and loss. Perfect for a lunch lap if you’re looking for something close to the business core that typically won’t get you into traffic trouble even during peak season.

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Snowmass Club Golf Course Nordic Ski Trails The majority of the trails in this area are rated as Blue because of the undulating terrain ranges in elevation by around 250 feet over the course. You’ll find rolling hills, and a few good climbs followed by downhill.

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West Buttermilk This “out and back” starts at a small three-car parking area on West Buttermilk Road. Spillover parking can hike back to the trailhead from the lot at the end of the road, near the West Buttermilk ski lift. The trail runs west to Sinclair Divide. The turn around off the Owl Creek Trail eliminates the steeper and more challenging terrain (see black) that drops down to the Two Creeks area.

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High School Trails Rated Blue because of the elevation gain and loss throughout the course loop. For those looking to try flatter terrain, check out the lower section that can be accessed close to AVSC and the high school by using some of the connector sections off of the main loop. Also note that the high school nordic racers utilize the loop and are often on course for training.

BLACK: 6

The Terminator Trail (shown in red for visibility on the map) This trail can be accessed from Two Creeks in Snowmass Ski Area or from the Tom Blake Trailhead. This section boasts a steep elevation gain and loss within a short distance and should truly be considered advanced, difficult and expert terrain. Map RICHARD CAMP

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Types of Nordic Skiing

The term Nordic Skiing can refer to a large quiver of options when delving into ski terminology, and it sometimes takes a few questions to determine what someone is ultimately looking to do.

Classic

Skinny skis with scales on the bottom for traction going uphill. Needs groomed track.

Skate

Skinny skis with smooth bottoms. Needs groomed swath. Requires forwardleaning motion which draws more cardio demand than classic skiing. Both Classic and Skate Skiing are typically done in controlled environments on preferably groomed courses that hold a swath of corduroy (Skate) next to a narrow set of tracks (Classic). The skis are skinny and the boots semi-flexible with free-heal bindings. The terrain for Beginners (Green) to Intermediate (Blue) and finally to Difficult (Black) offers a great training platform for beginning recreational-to-advanced, and also professional athletes.

Back Country (BC)

If balance is an issue, skinny skis might not work for you. You may try using oldschool Nordic / Backcountry (BC) skis. They are a bit wider underfoot, have scales for grip and when needed can be used with climbing skins for steeper sections. These skis can go anywhere – groomed or ungroomed trails. Semiflexible boots with free-heal bindings = occasional downhill grip factor.

Alpine Touring (AT)

Wider skis with scales and/or skins. These ski boots are more rigid than other Nordic styles, providing more stability. Their free-heal can be locked down for a controlled descent. Trail etiquette requires that the wider BC and AT skis not be used in the track set for Classic Skis, and it’s best to stay to the side of the trail. The BC ski option is a great way to get out on a course with minimal downhill ski experience. When you hear the following terms – Uphilling, Skinning, Alpine Touring, Telemark, Ski Mountaineering, SkiMo or Rondonnée – you are in principal hearing the same thing. These are variations of Alpine Touring setups that can be used for climbing uphill because they have free heals. These downhill/backcountry setups can, in theory, be used throughout the Nordic system as well as in the backcountry.

Etiquette

• Groomed tracks are designed for specific activities. Please respect the posted uses, which can include (or exclude) dogs, snowshoes, hiking and fat-tire bikes. • Please, please, please don’t walk on the Classic Track. • Uphill traffic (skiers, hikers, etc. going uphill) has the right of way. • Stay to the side when going uphill on a groomed ski run. • Share the track and yield to those who may need yielding to.

Resources: Detailed Maps of each Nordic ski area: www.aspennordic.com Cross Country Skiing Lessons: Aspen Cross Country Center (970) 925-2145 Snowmass Cross Country Center (970) 923-5700 Aspen Alpine Guides (970) 925-6618

Nordic Classes, Races & Fun(d) Raising Events: pages 54-59 24


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THESE ARE CERTAINLY WORDS TO LIVE BY, ESPECIALLY AT VALENTINE’S. However, in our community, one need not be so cavalier. Chocolate can be more than a little thing here. That’s because the Roaring Fork Valley is now home to an emerging artisan chocolate manufacturer, the likes of which are rarely found beyond big U.S. foodie destinations and the great European cocoa meccas. Meet Mark Burrows of Pollinator Chocolate, a local father, the voice of KDNK’s former “Geek Speak” radio show, studio photographer, honeybee rescuer, and entrepreneurial chocolate maker. To be clear, he is not a chocolatier, which is what you call someone who creates truffles or other confections with chocolate. Mark Burrows does something fundamentally different. He transforms raw cacao beans into pure gold. K ATHRYN CAMP The Art, Science, and Cultural Implications of Chocolate Chocolate begins its life near the equator. It starts as a seed inside a bean pod encased in a pumpkin-like fruit on a cacao tree. These fruits will grow to the size and shape of a football and they ripen in a variety of colors, ranging from deeply red-speckled orange to yellow-golden brown. When the thick, leathery rind is cut open, you find a soft juicy pale-orange or yellow flesh similar to cantaloupe that tastes tart and sweet, like lemonade. Children living in the forests of India, Central America, West Africa, and the Amazon where cacao trees grow often enjoy the fruit and then discard its pulpy lavender-colored seeds, as the tough little kernels are bitter and their nutty flesh is hard to access. If these children are fortunate, they can enjoy cacao for what it is, a regionally prolific source of food, and they can savor it as a rare treat in the form of the delicacy we know so well. A lot of kids are not so blessed. In West African communities where most of the world’s commercially cultivated cacao is grown, it is quite likely, according to a recent exposé published by the Washington Post,

that these children are among more than 1.3 million victims of child slavery engaged in cacao production on the Ivory Coast. Another 900,000 children in Ghana are estimated to be forcibly working in the cacao trade. Countless others around the globe are conscripted through economic necessity to work in cacao production because this trade has become the low-wage lifeblood of the equatorial regions. This is despite a twenty-year decree by the world’s largest chocolate manufacturers to end the practice of child labor. A Local Alternative Whenever we encounter hard truths on a global scale, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. It’s so far away, how can I make a difference? Online petition? Letter to whom? Boycott? That’s the thing about Pollinator Chocolate founder Mark Burrows – he can give you the facts while treating you to a taste of his alternative. He brings consciousness to each step of the process, from plantation to packaging, so that you can well believe the adage that we do indeed vote with our dollars. This can 25


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offer a good conversation starter for your just-gottaconsume tween and your oh-dear-you-really-are-thatcynical teen. Burrows works with fair trade wholesale suppliers who seek growers with sound ecological practices. Each of his 70% dark chocolate bars is labeled with the farm of origin in the region and country where the beans were cultivated or wild-grown. Pollinator’s cacao beans are tended by farmers who directly benefit from their work hand-harvesting, cutting, scooping, cleaning, fermenting and sun-drying the beans. They live in Sao Tome, India, Vietnam, Mexico, Venezuela, Madagascar, Bolivia, and other locations Burrows is curious to explore – where growers eschew commerciallydriven large-scale monoculture farming that leads to deforestation and pesticide proliferation. By joining a demand for an all-around better way of producing the raw product, Pollinator Chocolate is part of a worldwide small-scale economic engine working toward making real change in cacao production. It begins by returning the cacao tree to its natural habitat as an undergrowth plant. In the wild, you’ll find it in tropical forests growing alongside coconut, palm, and other rainforest species. Leaves from the upper canopy drop, decompose and feed microorganisms in the soil. These feed the midges who then pollinate the cacao flower and thereby renew the cycle of life, literally one bean at a time. It’s a self-sustaining ecosystem, reliant on wild pollinators, which inspired the name Pollinator Chocolate. This, and Mark Burrows’ longtime communitywide advocacy for the honeybee whose queen graces his biodegradable packaging.

Inspiration

“Once I discovered the incredible range of true chocolate flavors and the subtle taste differences between locations of origin, I couldn’t settle anymore for chocolate brands where every bar tastes the same. It’s rare to find terroir-driven chocolate in the U.S., and I want to change that,” Burrows explains. “So I immersed myself in learning this art.” He took up his craft like an old-world journeyman, by traveling to meet European and American experts. He tasted chocolate from all over the world to school himself on the possibilities and to develop a gauge of excellence. He pulls out a stash of some 200+ bars from far and wide and eagerly breaks off bits to taste. He built his reference “library” around flavor, beautiful packaging, stories behind the chocolate, and teachers behind the stories. The result – a boutique collection of distinct, singleorigin bars. You may assume that three delectable mouthfuls in and they all taste alike. However, far to the contrary, the flavors grow more complex and sharply identifiable with each next taste. Like wine, the first blast may resonate with vanilla or tart dried cherry, or coffee, mellowing to a silky finish that reminds you, in a good way, of a campfire or even green olives. Lavender, roses, and citrus wash over your pallet. You try another bar from a different origin, and a whole new world opens up. Taste the “50% Dark Milk,” made from combining multiple bean sources with raw naturally-dehydrated cream from Sustainable Settings, and you actually taste the fresh-cut grass of the Crystal River Valley.

PHOTOS

(Left) Mark Burrows sets up trays of Pollinator Chocolate bars to cool at room temp after an intensive five-day process. {KC} (Right) There is a direct line from flower to the Pollinator kitchen, in which each stage of production considers the human and ecological impact.

“I want to host chocolate tastings the way you host wine tastings,” Burrows says, “so we can all become connoisseurs. They’ve identified 200 unique flavors associated with wine and more than 400 such profiles associated with chocolate. You have to try it to believe it.”

Day One

An open bag of raw cacao beans fills the room with an earthy, rich, somewhat floral aroma. Burrows pours the dried beans, similar in shape and color to almonds, onto a large metal tray. He combs through one bean at a time, discarding bits of husk, dried grass, and pods nicked cleanly open by machetes during harvest, causing an incomplete fermentation. Next, Burrows pours the beans into a home-variety coffee roaster that he adapted for cacao. Soon a fruity, astringent aroma wafts out, a flavor that deepens to a dark, banana-like scent as the temperature inside the roaster climbs to the desired 260 degrees. These beans will cool overnight.

Day Two

Burrows pulls out an appliance he found on Roaring Fork Swap, a commercial Champion Juicer, the kind he used to make wheatgrass shots twenty-something years ago when he ran the natural foods department of Clark’s Market in Aspen. He uses it to grind the roasted cacao beans. These will then be winnowed in a contraption created by a small-scale cacao broker from Oregon with whom Burrows took a roasting workshop. Imagine a shop vac, a hopper and a series of tubes attached to a five-gallon bucket. Burrows explains the physics involved in separating the lightweight hulls from the heavier bits, resulting in a large bowl containing the cracked meat of cacao beans and a cannister of feather-light dry hulls. After a second pass through the hopper, you’re left with pure “gold” in tiny, mottled-brown cacao nibs.

Days Three, Four and Five

A mélanger {French, mel-ahngz}, made of a stainless steel bowl outfitted with a granite base and granite rollers, turns the cacao nibs into the smooth, silky rich texture we all recognize. The process is elemental, slow, and decidedly not high-tech. Friction warms the bowl, extracting cocoa butter from the cocoa solids, while the heavy stone rollers grind the nibs while continually emulsifying the mixture into an ethereally smooth texture. To bring the chocolate down from 100% to 70% cacao, Burrows adds a formulaic amount of organic cane sugar, which will lose its granularity and blend in over three days of rolling until it becomes merely a layer of sweetness, a hint of something sublime that lifts the flavors and brings them together.

End of Day Five

The mélanger has finished. The Off switch brings the room to a sudden, quiet stillness – the kind of peacefulness you can only perceive at the cessation of constant noise. In this stillness, the chocolate seems embued with life, so glossy it’s reflective. Burrows measures the temperature and adds an intuited amount of cool, hard chocolate to bring this batch to perfect temper. “Tempering is how you align the crystals molecularly, so you get a bar that snaps when you break off a piece,” Burrows explains. “With insufficient crystallization, you get a bar that is too soft. With too much, your bar will crumble.”

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Details Pollinator Chocolate

30g bars – 70% Cacao and 50% Dark Milk 120g – drinking chocolate

Batch –

MAIN STREET, CARBONDALE

Check out Pollinator’s limited edition “Cellar Door” chocolate bars infused with Batch “Dark Corner” stout, available only at the brewery’s Main Street Carbondale location.

Deja Brew –

1101 GRAND AVE, GLENWOOD SPRINGS

New products are always on the horizon, starting with Deja’s Brew’s “Cool Brew,” a perfect mid-day coffee boost.

Pollinator Chocolate.com When he’s gotten it tempered exactly right, Burrows pours his chocolate carefully into leaf-patterned candy molds showing the cacao fruit, a perfect symbol for a brand laser-focused on origin. Each tray gets placed onto a vibrating platform to release minuscule air pockets in the mixture. These rise to the surface and glisten as they pop, like pieces of glitter on the surface. This step results in a shiny, smooth final product that, after cooling slowly at room temp, gets hand-packed with the Pollinator Chocolate label in a clear, corn-based plastic sleeve (that can eventually go straight into your compost). The end result of this entire process – manufacturing chocolate on a human-scale by one individual over five days – results in around eighty 30g bars that Burrows sells for less than $6 each. It’s not snarfing chocolate. It’s the kind you sit with and taste slowly, so you can observe its tooth and its viscosity, so you can experience the transformation as it melts and releases layer upon layer of flavor.

Next

The Cottage Food Act, passed by Colorado’s legislature in 2012, opened the door for this type of small-scale industry. It provides a regulatory means for direct-to-consumer sales by artisan food producers, a way to incubate a new idea before investing in the commercial space and equipment needed to leap into larger-scale production. Having tested the waters through local tastings and pop-up venues, Burrows is preparing to take his chocolate production to the next level by subleasing space in a commercial kitchen. Licensing for retail distribution will be his next hurdle. “I want to create ‘pillow chocolates’ for local hotels, and this requires a retail license, which requires a commercial kitchen. By making this leap, I will also be able to work with brick and mortar shops in the Valley and elsewhere who are asking to sell Pollinator Chocolate,” Burrows shares his intentional-growth model. “With a commercial space, I’ll be able to scale-up the cycle of production and hire people to work with me – but I’ll never turn this into something that takes humanity out of the equation.”

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His vision includes infusing a line of chocolate with medicinal mushrooms, bringing Water Buffalo milk from Erin’s Acres near Carbondale into his Dark Milk line, and soaking roasted cacao beans in Deja Brew dark coffee for a signature chocolate selection now available at the Glenwood Springs coffee shop. For Mark Burrows, the creative opportunities are boundless. It seems his commitment to high-integrity everything plus his soulful quest for flavor make a good recipe for success.


MOUNTAIN PARENT

LE ARNING TO SOAR with my

Superhero short memoir written by

JEN MOSS

A N N U A L

WELLNESS

E D I T I O N

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MOUNTAIN PARENT

LE ARNING TO SOAR with my

Superhero short memoir written by

JEN MOSS with

photography

CL AUDET TE COLLIER

BRENT MOSS

OUR STORY PIVOT S a ro un d o n e p rec i se mo m e nt~

A phone call one af ter noon in M ay 2016 almost four year s ago. Ever y life event before, and ever y moment since is redef ined now in relation to the infor mation we re ceive d that af ternoon . T he rest of that par ticular day is a blur, and yet some details are cr y stalline in my memor y. We were at Sopris Park celebrating our then five-year-old son Jax’s last day of preschool. It was a beautiful, warm spring day, and everyone was enjoying being outside. My mother Claudette Collier, who was visiting, walked our almost-two-year old daughter Addy back to our house near the park, so I could focus on Jax. The leap then between pre-k and kinder felt exciting, even monumental. Around 3:00 PM, my mother hurried back out to the park. She said she’d stay with the kids. I needed to go talk with my husband Brent. I will always remember the looks on my friends’ faces as everything stopped and I raced home. We’d been seeking answers about our daughter Addy for seven months. Brent told me what the doctor said: “We think your daughter has 4H Syndrome Leukodystrophy.” I heard the words. I saw Brent’s notes scribbled on a piece of paper… I studied them in disbelief and sobbed for what seemed like hours.

B .C . B E F O R E C H I L D R E N

The story of how we arrived at this moment starts like that of many transplants from elsewhere in the U.S. who move to our Valley, who meet here, who fall in love with each other and with this place. I set out for Colorado in the fall of 1997. I packed up my red Saab and my chocolate lab Dakota and we hit the road with the dream of living in the mountains. I had a great life growing up in Chicago and spending weekends with family at our lake house nearby in Wisconsin. I had graduated from Bradley University in Peoria, IL, and for two years, I felt fulfilled at a great job working as a graphic designer in the city. However, I had deep ties to the Aspen area, and much like the lake house, Colorado has always held a special place in my heart. So I left one place I loved for another. Brent and I met shortly after I moved to Carbondale. A fellow Midwesterner himself, we instantly connected. We worked hard, played hard and dated eight years while

renovating an 1886 home. We married in 2005 then decided to do it again. This time – a bigger home with room for kids, a place where family can visit.

O U R B A BY B OY

In July 2011, our son Jax was born and my motherly instincts kicked in, just like everyone predicted, the moment I gave birth. We named him after my grandfather whom we credit with getting me here – Grandpa Leon started skiing Ajax in 1955 and if not for his love of our Valley, I may have never started visiting here at age four. So Leon Jax just felt right. Like many new parents, we were scared to bring this tiny human home from the hospital, but everything fell into place. (What a gift!) Jax has been a strong kid from the get go – an early walker, riding a strider at 14 months, skiing at age 2½ and ripping on a pedal bike by age 3. Mothers used to flinch when they watched Jax whiz around the playground, but that was Jax, and even though he made me nervous too, we let him rip. I always laugh and say “Jax: scaring moms on the playground since 2012.” Waldkinder Adventure School proved to be a good fit for Jax and for us. Karen Grey’s fun outdoor preschool allowed him to explore his boundaries and taught us to let him do so. It will always be a part of him and helped shape him into a kind, smart, loving child – a perfect combination of traits for the big brother he would become at age three.


A LIT TLE SISTER

We named our second child Adele after my great grandmother, who lived life to its fullest, whom we considered “way before her time.” Into fitness and healthy eating her whole life, she got the kids at the lake doing calisthenics every day before anyone knew what calisthenics were. She attended beauty school after raising four boys, so she could provide orphans with haircuts, helping them feel good about themselves. Grandma drove before it was popular for women to drive; she bought the car she wanted, and the tractor she wanted, and enjoyed her freedom. She never stopped reading and eating healthily and lived to 99. Our daughter’s drive, her attitude, and her will certainly follow in Great Grandma Adele’s footsteps. We call her Addy.

M I L E S TO N E S

When you take your second child to their well-check appointments and bring up your concerns, your doctor will likely tell you to give it time, and not to compare the siblings. Yet at 15 months, Addy was not pulling herself up to standing, nor walking or standing without support. She had not cut her first tooth. She made none of the pre-talking sounds you expect by age one. Friends tried to diagnose her, and although appreciated, it was frustrating. We had to start somewhere, so we started with a pediatric dentist and mouth x-rays to learn that Addy’s teeth were all present. They simply hadn’t come through yet. Next, we sought help from Dr. Ellen Brooks to understand the developmental delays we were seeing. She gave Addy a thorough examination and a micro-array genetic test, a basic screen to identify or rule out certain conditions. We waited for test results.

IN THE MEANTIME

Dr. Brooks suggested that we contact Mountain Valley Developmental Services’ Early Intervention team. We immediately completed the paperwork and started speech, physical, and occupational therapies. Thankfully our support team worked at our home. Addy needed to get to know three different specialists working with three different treatment modalities, for three scheduled appointments each week, so being at home made a big difference. Consider the time and work this is for an adult, and then think of a 1½ year-old having the patience to sit and learn and be watched. Through the therapists, I learned ways to help Addy cope with day-to-day challenges. For example, I learned how to support Addy’s positioning, so she could be more stable while standing. We worked together on Addy’s eating and swallowing, using straws to help strengthen the muscles in her mouth. One of the best ideas came in helping to minimize Addy’s frustration when trying to communicate. I made laminated signs of images, such as our dog Oly, Addy’s stroller, our house, swings at the park and even our bottle of almond milk – and these flashcards gave us visual cues that helped Addy show us what she wanted. We spent seven months investigating Addy’s condition. Genetic tests proved inconclusive, and each little bit of therapy found us asking “what’s next?” Addy was improving slowly but we needed answers, and the paperwork started stacking up. Appointments with pediatricians, specialists, PT, OT and Speech therapy took every bit of our time, while we were still trying to work, raise our children and be good parents.

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F I N A L LY, A D I AG N O S I S

At age 22 months, Addy underwent an MRI at Denver Children’s Hospital. This meant sedating her, which terrified us. We kissed her and held her hand while she was put to sleep. We waited forty-five minutes until they came to get us as she was starting to wake up. Then, we waited six long days over Memorial Day weekend for Addy’s MRI results. The answer finally came with the fateful phone call when we first heard of 4H Syndrome Leukodystrophy. We immediately started gathering information. Leukodystrophy is so rare that learning about it proved challenging. The specialists at Denver Children’s Hospital had never heard of 4H Syndrome but suggested a single gene test which confirmed the diagnosis later that summer.

FINDING ANSWERS, CO N N E C T I O N A N D E X P E R T S

My mom and Brent’s parents, Lynn and Gary Moss, scoured the internet for information and found the three foremost experts in the United States. They started calling and emailing them right away. All responded immediately and their sensitivity to our situation was amazing. I also reached out to a client and friend who directed us to CHOP – the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia – with a center dedicated to all Leukodystrophies. With the whole family quickly researching and reaching out, we learned of a United Leukodystrophy Foundation (ULF) conference in Omaha, Nebraska at the end of June, just weeks away. The diagnosis was not confirmed by any

WE SPENT SE VEN MONTHS I N V E S T I G AT I N G A D DY ’ S CO N D I T I O N . G e n et i c test s p ro ved i n c o n c l u s i ve , and each little bit of therapy found us asking “what’s nex t? ”

Leukodystrophy experts at the time of the conference, but our parents, Brent, and Addy attended anyway. I wasn’t ready to face the realities yet so I stayed back to be with Jax as someone usually does. We try not to bring him to Addy’s appointments especially if we don’t have to. It was helpful for Brent to meet other families dealing with Leukodystrophy. They also met experts who were able to observe Addy, and “unofficially” review her MRI and genetic test results, and confirmed that “yes, she does have 4H.” The annual ULF conference has become an important component in keeping us updated with advancements and changes, and in connecting us with other 4H families. So our parents make it a point to attend each year. At ULF during the summer of 2018, we visited with one of only two 4H experts in North America. It was wonderful to meet her and her team in person, and have her see Addy after nearly 2 years of long distance treatment.

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B E CO M I N G F LU E N T I N L E U KO DY S T R O P H Y

Now I know how to talk about Addy’s condition. Leukodystrophies make up a group of genetic disorders that affect the central nervous system, disrupting the growth or maintenance of the myelin sheath, which insulates our nerve cells. Currently there are 52 known types of Leukodystrophies, and several unknown. Leukodystrophies can emerge in infants, children, and adults. There is no cure for this progressive, degenerative disorder. Treatment is only supportive. Addy’s specific type of Leukodystrophy is 4H Syndrome, also known as POLR3-Related Leukodystrophy. 4H is short for hypomyelination (slow formation of myelin in the brain), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (hormone deficiency) and hypodontia (slow or lack of tooth eruption). People with 4H suffer from motor problems, resulting in ataxia and loss of or inability to walk. They often develop difficulties swallowing, which leads to problems with eating and breathing.

S TAY I N G W E L L

One of the critical issues with this condition is that Addy’s body cannot handle sickness, broken bones, or any serious injury. She has no reserves to recover from illness, so a simple cold that you can recover from in a week is not simple in our household. It can take Addy a month to get her strength back from any “minor” illness. This is terrifying for me and hard for others to understand. Every single time someone enters our home, we ask them to wash their hands. It doesn’t matter if they “just washed.” I don’t take Addy to the grocery store. We skip a lot of birthday parties. Last Christmas, Addy contracted RSV and pneumonia. She was hospitalized, hooked up to tubes, breathing devices, IV fluids and antibiotics. My sister, Beth Walker, flew in immediately from Florida to help take care of Jax so he didn’t have to be at the hospital every moment. He was so scared for his little sister. We all were. For weeks after getting out of the hospital, Addy spent 20 minutes 3x per day wearing a chest therapy vest that shook her whole upper body and kept her lungs clear of mucous. Addy was not allowed to go to her preschool or be out of the house for more than a month.

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LE U KO DYS TRO PH Y is a genetic disorder that af fe cts the central ner vous system , disr upting the

SHE HAS NO RESERVES

grow th or maintenance of the myelin

to rec o ve r f ro m i l ln es s~

sheath , which insulates our ner ve cells .

so a simple cold that you can recover from in a week is not simple in our household.

Currently there are 52 known t yp e s of L euko dystrophies , and several unknown .

PA P E RWO R K H E L L

L euko dystrophies can emerge in infants ,

Filling out forms, keeping documentation, talking and meeting with different agencies, navigating the convoluted State and Federal assistance programs – this is a full time job. For one agency, I had to list every item of care I give to Addy and how many minutes each item takes each day. Here’s an example, breakfast time. Addy needs to sit in her highchair or be strapped into a booster seat. How long does that take? Since she can’t climb up on her own, it’s probably a 3-4 minute process. Then I prepare and cut up the food so she won’t choke on it, and get the correct utensils, cup with a straw and so on. After years of OT, she can now feed herself many things, but she cannot be left alone when eating, because with 4H Syndrome, the facial and throat muscles are affected, so swallowing at any time can be a hazard. There’s the fact that simply holding food on her spoon is hard for her, as is keeping her plate on the table. She can clean herself up after breakfast, but giving her the materials she needs to do this takes time. The agency needed me to account for every minute. Just to name what we do on a daily basis, and to stop and think about how much time each thing takes – this takes a lot of time and energy. I need to hire a sitter just so I can handle the paperwork, and the constancy of it can be overwhelming.

children and adults . There are only t wo 4H Syndrome sp e cialists in Nor th A merica . Treatment is only supp or tive . There is no cure for this progre ssive, degenerative disorder.

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SUPERWOMAN WEARS ARM CUFFS and our

Superhero WEARS A PURPLE POWER SUIT

As soon as we received Addy’s diagnosis, Francie Powell, our physical therapist at Valley View Hospital knew exactly what gear we needed and helped us procure it. Then, we embraced our new lifestyle. We test-drove seven different over-sized vehicles to find the best way to haul everything. Just to leave the house, it takes about 60+ pounds of gear, special food preparation, special cups and utensils, and of course 30+ pounds of a little girl. I recognized that I needed to strengthen my body in targeted ways so that I could carry everything without injury. So I reached out to Karen Bradshaw at Rising Crane Training Center. Now I attend a semi-private women’s class once a week, where Karen helps me train my arms, back, legs, abs – parts of my body that get maxed managing the gear. We’ll do anything we can to help enable Addy to get out and explore the world.

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A SUPERHERO SUIT

THE C R O CO D I L E WA L K E R

Imagine getting a two-year-old to lie still on an examination table while 40 points of measurement are first marked on her body, then recorded, centimeterby-centimeter. This is the first step of making Addy’s custom “Superhero Suit,” as we call it. We are now on our third suit. It’s called a Dynamic Movement Orthosis (DMO), this looks like a wet suit and needs to be worn all day except when Addy is sleeping. It provides her with support where her muscles are not strong. It also helps workout weaker areas of her body to make her stronger and more sturdy.

Addy has never been able to stand or walk independently. She uses a pediatric walker called The Crocodile, made by a company called R82, which has hip support and a seatbelt to keep her in place as she gets around. From the moment we got both her glasses and her walker - which happened around the same time - a whole new world opened up. Even with her mobility challenges, Addy loves to move. However, accessibility can be a challenge when pathways are not wide enough for Addy’s walker. My vision is to help create more places at our local parks and school playgrounds where Addy can get around independently to play and explore.

UPSEE

This helpful piece of gear came to us two years ago through Amanda Boxtel of the Bridging Bionics Foundation. We met Amanda at the 2017 Fall Fest in Snowmass Village, where she gave a demonstration of her Exoskeleton, a device she uses to walk. When Amanda saw Addy, she stopped us and asked for her story. The Upsee is a vest that Addy wears whenever we are in a place where the terrain makes using the walker too hard. Addy wears the vest which attaches to a waistband worn by an adult who can then help Addy walk without the strain of trying to support her by bending over to hold her hands.

GALILEO V I B R AT I O N T H E R A P Y

After becoming acquainted with Bridging Bionics, we started working once per week with Maria Grufstedt, PT at The Snowmass Club. The Galileo Vibration Therapy is a box that Addy stands on to help activate her core while building balance. This strengthens the connections between Addy’s brain and her body, increasing neuroplasticity. This therapy has also helped Addy gain strength and confidence when standing and walking.

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A D DY ’ S OA S I S a b a c kya rd h a ve n

where ever y thing is s afe & within reach

S o A ddy c an r un af ter Jax and O ly. Plant , dig & pick b er r ies . Play games she c an reach and touch . S oak and re ceive therapy in the hot tub. Whe el up and down ramps to the back p orch . Enjoy a quiet moment in her swing chair. E xplore the back yard indep endently.

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C R E AT I N G ACC E S S I B I L I T Y

Addy is happiest when she’s outside, playing games, or chasing her brother. But often, playgrounds and other kidfriendly spaces are not accessible with the Crocodile. Our community rallied around us to help manifest an idea I had shortly after Addy’s diagnosis – to create “Addy’s Oasis.” This is an outdoor adventure area in our yard where Addy is safe, where every aspect is conducive to her needs. I imagined creating pathways, so Addy could navigate the yard with her walker, completely independent of our help. My brother, Brian Collier, seized the opportunity to help us through the Polar Plunge fund raiser at a beach along the shores of Lake Michigan in Chicago. Anyone can participate in the plunge to raise money for different causes. Brian and my Uncle Danny Deasy jumped into freezing Lake Michigan and a huge group of family and friends came to support them and we celebrated with a party afterward. In addition to the amazing individual efforts from friends and community members, two local businesses stepped up to help with things we could have never done without them. Todd Merriam and his team from Aspen Valley Landscaping started the installation process with their equipment and team work. Jake Boyles and the crew at Crystal River Spas helped make one of our most cherished activities come to fruition with a hot tub that they installed and continue to service for us. Start to finish, the project took six weeks and now our yard is easily navigable for Addy. She can do things other kids do, while utilizing the medical devices she requires, like her walker. Addy now has a therapeutically supportive haven to play independently with her friends, and to grow and nurture her love of the outdoors.


A D DY I S H A P P I E S T WHEN SHE ’ S OUTSIDE

p l ay i ng ga m es o r c h a s i ng h e r b roth e r.

But often, playgrounds and other kid-friendly spaces are not accessible with the Crocodile.

M AKING FRIENDS

Addy loves to be around other children. But sometimes, meeting new people can be awkward. I jump in and encourage people not to be afraid or intimidated by her or her walker. When we are out some people stare with curiosity so I politely introduce them to Addy and tell them her sign language name to break the ice. If you’re ever in doubt, just smile, look her in the eyes, and say “Hello.” She appreciates this just like everyone does. Just know that Addy tends to get overwhelmed easily and it can get hectic for us in a hurry – so if we scoot away, don’t take it personally. We’ll try to play again soon.

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THE LIT TLE GENERAL

Addy’s nickname is the “Little General” because she can direct anyone with her sweet “come here” gesture. Her sparkling blue eyes are so expressive that sometimes she doesn’t need words to show you how she feels. However, this gift cannot fully compensate for the fact that Addy has never talked. She communicates mostly with sign language and gestures. We realized early on that Addy was gesturing to communicate, effectively creating her own sign language. So we started to use YouTube and American Sign Language (ASL) apps to learn more standard sign language so we could actively teach her to communicate in ways that other people can understand. Two years ago, the speech team at Children’s Hospital assessed Addy’s language and communication. Addy sampled four devices to see which one worked best for her. She now uses an iPad with TouchChat software to help her communicate, though her preference continues to be signing. While we were at Powers Lake in Wisconsin during the summer of 2018, I found an amazing caregiver, Michelle Clark, who lived in the next lake town over. She teaches sign language at a local school for the deaf. Addy enjoyed Michelle’s company and adjusted to the new sign language immediately. We brought 40 new signs home with us that summer when we returned to Carbondale! After seeing how much Addy benefited through her relationship with Michelle, I began to spread the word around my Carbondale circle in search of another angel caregiver, and we found Ali Wade. We call her “Miss Ali” and she has become Addy’s friend, caregiver, and teacher. To have found two people whom I trust completely to take care of Addy is a blessing.

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G O I N G TO S C H O O L

When Addy turned three, she aged out of MVDS Early Intervention services, so she enrolled in Crystal River Elementary School’s preschool two-half days a week to see how she liked it and to receive the necessary therapies through the public school environment and its the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process. This was a wonderful opportunity for Addy and we saw how much she grew in this environment with the dedicated teachers we met at CRES. When it became time to make decisions about where Addy would spend her elementary years, we transitioned to Carbondale Community School because of our relationship with CCS that began around the time of Addy’s diagnosis. We felt during a time of such stress in our household, it would not serve Jax to enter a new social world with the pressures of 5-day-per-week school. So we decided to give Jax a “grace year” at Waldkinder, his preschool. This turned out to be the best thing for our family, for many reasons, especially because Jax got to continue “the old normal” while so much was changing. By the time Addy was ready for kindergarten, Jax was thriving in second grade at CCS, and one of our biggest hopes was for our children to attend school together. Addy’s IEP meeting was the second largest the district has ever had. Their dedicated approach to getting to know Addy, making her feel welcome and comfortable, creating an infrastructure where Addy could use her walker easily and safely – it’s all something we never imagined. Even the students went above and beyond. The kids came over to help us build Addy’s Oasis, and played with Addy to get to know her better, just because they wanted to.

E N D O F S C H O O L DAY,

a s s o o n a s s h e sp ot s m e

she squeals “Mah-mah!” and takes off toward me in her walker. It’s amazing. In that moment she is independendent, and running toward her mama ready to give me a huge hug just like all of the other kids.

The CCS kindergarten walls have laminated ABCs posters that not only show letters and pictures, but sign language as well. The teachers are using sign language in classes now, and some classes are singing songs and signing along during school performances. Recently, Addy’s classroom para-professional Lori Westhoff, Ali Wade and I completed an eight-week ASL course at CMC and learned over 200 signs. It’s a beautiful thing to watch the other kids at CCS learn Addy’s language and I hope to see that grow in the years to come.

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TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY & CONVENIENT AFTER-HOURS CONCUSSION CARE FOR KIDS CARE IN BASALT Our specialized team uses progressive care and state-of-the-art technology to treat adult and pediatric brain injury patients.

Appointments: 970.544.1177 0401 Castle Creek Road, Aspen aspenhospital.org |

Open weekends and evenings, when you have urgent medical needs and your doctor’s office is closed. Walk-ins welcome! Monday – Friday, 3:00 pm – 11:00 pm Saturday & Sunday, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Call the clinic: 970.544.1250 234 Cody Lane, Basalt

AspenValleyHospital

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family thing, or something that’s needed for an upcoming appointment, school, paperwork, doctor or therapy visit. What I can say is this – now, I am able to talk about our joys, challenges, and what it took to get where we are today. I get to share how Addy is thriving and living life to the fullest. No one could have felt more overwhelmed than we did – and now, here we are living our “new normal” life that seemed impossible three years ago. It’s never easy, it’s never what’s expected, but it is our life as a family and we continue to live it to its full potential every day. One big shift is that I have found more time for “me.” I have started working out, seeing a therapist, going to breakfast with friends and spending some 1-on-1 time with Jax, Brent, and Oly. I ignored my own well being for a long time. From the beginning of Addy’s diagnosis, my friends, family and others gave me lots of wise advice about self care. But I was in “go mode,” focused on Addy and Jax, just getting through. Not taking care of “me” was not the smartest move, and I feel fortunate to have so many people ready to catch me when I fall, there to pick me up and listen. Brent has found his personal wellness groove as well, and it allows him to deal with the everyday stresses of life. We both understand that if we aren’t strong for the children, then we can’t be the best we can be as parents.

I ’ L L S AY I T.

Pa re nt i ng Addy i s p hys i c a l ly & e m ot io n a lly de m a n d i ng. We all ne e d a break sometimes . T he lake is where I can ref le ct , re charge, relax . I leave a little lighter, ready to face “real life.” I T TA K E S A V I L L AG E .

I’ll say it. Parenting Addy is physically and emotionally demanding. We all need a break sometimes. We are blessed to have wonderful friends, a generous community and a great family support system here. Brent’s parents live here, and Addy and Jax love spending time with their Papa and Grandma. And my mom visits at least every few months. Just having those extra few hours to spend on “me time” or “our time” as a couple is time well spent. My friends have played an important part in helping me through all of this. When they pull me aside at a party or at school pick up to give me a hug or ask how I am doing, I know I am loved and that I will get through this. It is through their kind and supportive words that I can shift my day from “I’m not going to make it” or “I can’t deal with Addy’s squirming and whining” to “Yeah, I can do this. Life goes on even after the worst thing happens.”

OUR NEW NORM AL

I’m often asked what’s it like on a daily basis just get through the day. That’s a tough question to answer, because every day brings something new, whether it’s a

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Ever since Addy’s diagnosis the kids, Oly, and I spend the summers in Powers Lake, Wisconsin, which is about an hour from Chicago where I grew up. The Lake is where I can reflect, recharge, and relax. I think the kids do too. Brent visits when he can get away from work. We have a ton of family support there, plus plenty of friends for Jax and Addy. I leave the lake each August, a little lighter and ready to face “real-life” back in Colorado.

OUR SUPERHERO

Addy is a superhero even without wearing a special superhero suit or having a rare disease. She’s growing by leaps and bounds, and learning new things all the time. Here’s her latest superpower: after sleeping with us for five years, Addy now sleeps in her own bed. She shares a room with Jax and they both love it. Speaking of heroes, Jax has never asked what’s wrong or what’s different about Addy. He’s just accepting of who his sister is, and he loves and treats her with respect, love, and care – with the occasional brother sister fight (which can feel refreshingly “normal!”) Each May, I relive every little detail of that first phone call. No one expects to find out that their child has a rare and devastating disease. When I look back, it feels like I was dying and in a sense I was. With leukodystrophy, there are so many unknowns. How long will Addy be mobile? How long will she be able to enjoy parties and events? And even how long she will be with us on this earth? There are no answers, so as her biggest advocates, Brent and I feel our mission is to give our little angel a life of happiness and love that she deserves. We are her world – we’ll do whatever it takes to ensure happiness in her lifetime. I try not to get stuck in the grief, sadness, and overwhelming nature of caring for a child that needs so much. Instead, I try to focus on the positives that have unfolded since that day, and how far our little girl has come. She’s truly an amazing person. She works harder than anyone I know. We’re blessed to have her in our lives, and she makes us better human beings. In a way, I like to think that Addy might turn me into a Superhero too.


TE A M A D DY c r it i c a l c a re p ro v id e rs

from 4H Syndrome researcher s to M ama & Daddy’s wellness supp or t Leukodystrophy Specialists: Dr. Genevieve Bernard – Pediatric Neurologist Montreal Children’s Hospital; McGill University & Research Team Dr. Adeline Vanderver Dr. Nicole Wolf The United Leukodystrophy Foundation (ULF) The Yaya Foundation for 4H Leukodystrophy POLR3 Caretakers Facebook Group

Addy’s Children’s Hospital Team (Denver & Grand Junction) Dr. Abby Collins – Movement Disorder Specialist Dr. Padmini Palat – Pediatric Neurologist Dr. Joyce Oleszek – Pediatric Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Dr. Benjamin Hughes – Pulmonologist

Additional Specialties:

Audiology, Speech & Communication, Feeding & Swallowing, Genetics & Metabolic

Addy’s Outside Specialist Team Dr. Adrienne Ruth – Children’s Eye Physicians, Grand Junction Kathryn DiFrank – Pediatric Physical Therapist, Carbondale John Morris – Western Slope Orthotics, Grand Junction Amanda Boxtel – Bridging Bionics Foundation Maria Grufstedt – BBF Physical Therapist, Snowmass Club NuMotion – Wheelchair & Mobility equipment, Grand Junction

Jen & Addy’s Chiropractic & Naturopath Team: Dr. Lauren Whittaker & Dr. Jade Wimberley LUX Wellness Center, Carbondale

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SUPERHEROES let u s i nt ro d u c e y o u

to our wellness adver tiser s

PRIMARY CARE A S P E N VA L L E Y P R I M A RY C A R E A sp e n , B a s a lt

(970) 279-4111 aspenhospital.org Aspen Valley Primary Care is Aspen Valley Hospital’s new family medicine and internal medicine practice with locations in Aspen and Basalt. The clinic offers comprehensive medical care for adults and children, focused on health and wellness, disease management and treatment of acute and chronic illnesses. As an advanced primary care practice, benefit from a team-based approach to a vast array of resources, including behavioral health, nutritional counseling and more. Monday – Friday, 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM.

R OA R I N G F O R K FA M I LY P R AC T I C E AT VA L L E Y V I E W B a s a lt ( Wi l l it s), C a rb o n d a le (970) 384-7115 (970) 963-3350 vvh.org/roaring-fork-family-practice

From newborn babies to great grandmas, we take care of your entire family with up-todate, evidence-based care. Our care doesn’t end once your appointment ends: we help you navigate the health system, ensure your after-hours questions are answered by a Roaring Fork Family physician, and offer extended Saturday and evening appointments.

S I LT FA M I LY P R AC T I C E AT VA L L E Y V I E W S i lt

(970) 876-5700 Vvh.org/sfp The only family medicine provider in Silt, Silt Family Practice is proud to provide care for patients of all ages with Spanish speaking providers, walk-in availability and same day access.

Jen’s Self-Care: Karen Bradshaw, Personal Trainer Rising Crane Training Center, Carbondale Kate Carei-Eakins, Massage Therapist Illuminating Wellness, Willits Annie VanDruten, Colorado Community Acupuncture, Megan King, Gaia Tree Acupuncture, Carbondale Allison Daily, Pathfinders

LEARN MORE:

Te a m A d d y . c o m

AFTER HOURS CARE AF TER-HOURS M E D I C A L C A R E I N B A S A LT B a s a lt

(970) 544-1250 aspenhospital.org Where do you go for urgent medical needs on the evenings and weekends? After-Hours Medical Care in Basalt (operated by Aspen Valley Hospital) provides a broad spectrum of care by board-certified physicians who are trained to diagnose and treat a variety of conditions, such as: upper respiratory infections, flu, sprains, simple fractures and more. Walk-ins are always welcome. Mon. – Fri., 3:00 – 11:00 PM; Sat. & Sun., 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM


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SUPERHEROES

B I R T H & I N FA N C Y

let u s i nt ro d u c e y o u

to our wellness adver tiser s

DENTISTRY A L L K I D S D E N TA L P E D I AT R I C D E N TA L & O R T H O D O N T I C S

ASPEN BIRTH CENTER A sp e n

(970) 925-1120 aspenhospital.org It’s where families are born! Every step of the way, the Aspen Birth Center at Aspen Valley Hospital provides exceptional, personalized care for all new mothers and their families. From birth center classes and preparation, to labor and delivery, to the Bosom Buddies support group, we help new mothers during this exciting new time of parenting.

G l e n w o o d Sp r i ngs

(970) 928-9500 akdsmiles.com Award-winning locals’ choice for kids, teens and adults for orthodontic care and pediatric dental needs for years. Schedule your child’s first appointment right after their first birthday in the nurturing, interactive environment.

C A R B O N DA L E FA M I LY D E N TA L

8 STRAIGHT SLEEP

i n- h o m e c o n s u lt i ng v a l le y w i de 8straightsleep.com Teaching your child to sleep can be overwhelming. Sarah provides tools, support and even some laughs along the way, as you navigate these exhausting waters. Don’t worry, sleep is just around the corner. For over six years, she has worked with many families to instill healthy sleep habits in babies and young children. Specialized tools and techniques have changed the lives of sleep deprived parents, which makes for a happier, healthier home.

C a rb o n d a le

(970) 963-1616 carbondalefamilydental.com With the Solea Laser, we are able to perform anesthesia-free fillings, infant frenectomies, and other restorative and cosmetic procedures in less time and without lasting numbness. Dr. Nardecchia are experienced with the youngest of patients and can provide caring exertise for your whole family.

VETERINARY R E D H I L L A N I M A L H E A LT H C E N T E R C a rb o n d a le

(970) 704-0403 redhillvet.com Red Hill Animal Health Center provides complete veterinary health and wellness care, including surgery and dentistry. They also offer overnight boarding, daycare and grooming service. They supply a wide variety of specialized prescription and nonprescription diets and nutritional products through their in-house or online pharmacy.

W I L L I T S V E T E R I N A RY H O S P I TA L Wi l l it s , G le n wo o d Sp r i ngs (970) 510-5436 willitsvetcom Willits Veterinary Hospital is located in Basalt, and now has a new Glenwood Springs location. At Willits Vet we the experienced doctors offer a wide range of services including wellness and preventative care, pain management, vaccines, surgery, radiography, computed tomography, dentistry, acupuncture, and lots of love and care for your pets.

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FA M I LY B I R T H P L AC E AT VA L L E Y V I E W G l e n w o o d Sp r i ngs (970) 384-7200 vvh.org The experienced team at the Family Birthplace supports all birth plans. The nurses are trained in natural birthing methods and also work with experienced anesthesiologists to support mothers. The hospital has a Level II Newborn Intensive Care Nursery to take care of babies born early, as well as those that need a little extra help getting started on life. The Family Birth Place is designated a Baby Friendly facility, meaning that the team offers the highest support to help mothers start breastfeeding after delivery.

TERESA WEINSTEIN P O S T PA R T U M D O U L A

i n- h o m e c o n s u lt i ng v a l le y w i de (619) 665-5691 teresasdoulaservices.com Parents of newborns deserve extra support. Teresa has been a postpartum doula for 17 years and is a mother of 3. She provides education and guidance for recovery from birth, assistance in breastfeeding and newborn care. Teresa provides in home care for the entire family during this beautiful transition and she also loves to cook.

T H E FA M I LY N E S T B I R T H A N D P O S T PA R T U M D O U L A S

C a rb o n d a le , i n- h o m e/i n- h osp ita l se r v i c es (970) 216-5365 familynestcolorado.com The Family Nest offers families evidence-based information, support services, and community connections from pregnancy through parenthood. Lead Doula, Hillery Lynn, is an Early Childhood Educator, a DONA certified Birth Doula, DONA trained Postpartum Doula, Childbirth Educator, a Certified Independent Placenta Encapsulation Specialist, and a BOLD Method for Birth prenatal class teacher. Book a free consultation.


SPECIALISTS

OPTOMETRY

D R . H E AT H E R M U R P H Y E A R , N O S E & T H R OAT S P E C I A L I S T

20/20 E Y E C A R E

A sp e n

(970) 544-1460 aspenhospital.org Dr. Heather Murphy at Aspen Valley Hospital provides comprehensive medical and surgical care for both adult and pediatric patients. Areas of expertise include chronic nasal and sinus conditions; voice and swallowing disorders; ear infections, enlarged tonsils and adenoids; facial plastic surgery; hearing issues and vertigo; head, neck and thyroid surgery.

H E A R T A N D VA S C U L A R P R AC T I C E AT VA L L E Y V I E W G l e n w o o d Sp r i ngs

(970) 384-7290 vvh.org/heart-and-vascular The Heart & Vascular Center at Valley View is home to a distinguished group of cardiologists and a cardiovascular surgeon who diagnose and treat heart and vascular diseases, including many rare and complex disorders. A multidisciplinary team is trained to care for many diverse conditions.

T R AU M AT I C B R A I N I N J U RY ( T B I ) P R O G R A M AT A S P E N VA L L E Y H O S P I TA L A sp e n

C a rb o n d a l e , G l e n w o o d Sp r i ngs 970-945-2020 2020eyecare.com 20/20 Eyecare offers the most advanced equipment available in the industry today, allowing them to detect potentially sight-threatening eye conditions at an earlier state for all ages. They are devoted to helping patients achieve and maintain their best vision by providing same-day eyewear services, advanced state-of-the-art vision technology and convenient locations and hours.

RESIDENTIAL & EXPERIENTIAL SERVICES A S C E N D I G O AU T I S M S E R V I C E S C a rb o n d a le a n d v a l le y w i d e (970) 927-3143 ascendigo.org Ascendigo’s mission is to elevate the spectrum by empowering people, inspiring lives and shattering expectations. As a nonprofit based in Carbondale, we offer summer, fall, and winter adventures camps, as well as adult Life Enrichment and Outreach services for individuals of all ages with autism. Ascendigo’s programs provide rewarding, challenging outdoor experiences with positive, autism-specific support for all levels of ability, behaviors, and functioning.

(970) 544-1177 aspenhospital.org As one of the most progressive and comprehensive brain injury programs in Colorado, the TBI Program at Aspen Valley Hospital allows a specialized team of physicians and therapists to treat adults and children using individualized programs for each patient. Brain injuries can be incredibly complex. Our team uses a personalized approach with different rehabilitation therapists and the latest technologies to improve long-term outcomes.

P E D I AT R I C PA R T N E R S AT VA L L E Y V I E W G l e n w o o d , E agl e , S i lt , Wi l l it s

4 W I N D S FA R M

G l e n w o o d Sp r i ngs (970) 930-1019 4winds.farm 4winds Farm is a holistic women’s wellness campus in Glenwood Springs specializing in empowering women through substance abuse, mental health and unresolved trauma. Each program is highly customized by guest, based on her individual needs and goals. Located on 134 acres near Sunlight, 4winds offers both retreats and in-resident programs. Consultations are always encouraged.

(970) 947-9999 vvh.org/pediatric-partners Parenting is a rewarding but tough job. The team at Pediatric Partners helps keep your child healthy your stress low. Serving newborns to college-aged adults, the practice offers wellness visits, immunizations, physical exams, sick visits and more, extended hours, emergency care and more.

M E N T A L H E A LT H M I N D S P R I N G S H E A LT H

WO M E N S ’ H E A LT H AT VA L L E Y V I E W

A sp e n , G le n wo o d Sp r i ngs , G ra n d Ju n ct i o n

G l e n w o o d , E agl e , S i lt , Wi l l it s

(970) 945-2583 mindspringshealth.org

(970) 447-4110 vvwomenshealth.org

Mind Springs Health offers a full continuum of care and range of therapies for mental illness, behavioral challenges, and/or addiction. They work with all ages and provide customized treatment plans for all clients including children & adolescents. Mind Springs Health offers services in locations from Frisco to Rangley. The new West Springs Hospital in Grand Junction is the only psychiatric hospital between Denver and Salt Lake City, and services children and adults.

Through obstetric, fertility, gynecology, and comprehensive women’s health services, the practice helps guide women through some of the most important decisions in their lives, as well as offers essential preventive care. Services are offered for women from premenstrual to post-menopausal.

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FITNESS A S P E N R E C R E AT I O N D E PA R TM E N T A sp e n

(970) 544-4100 aspenrecreation.com There are activities to improve health and wellness at the ARC (Aspen Recreation Center) and the Red Brick Center in each season. The pool at the ARC offers swim lessons, a lazy river, a hot tub and slide. You’ll find fitness classes for adults and classes for kids covering everything from team sports like basketball, to individual sports that kids love like martial arts or ice skating, along with several parent-tot offerings.

B A S A LT R E C R E AT I O N B a s a lt

(970) 279-8111 basalt.net During the winter season Basalt Recreation partners with the local schools to organize basketball for youth. It is convenient for parents and especially fun for kids. Adults can enjoy learning pickleball as well. Upcoming spring and summer activities will include an array of fitness activities, such as baseball, tennis, swimming and special programs such as camps, organized day hikes and theatre - all with a kid-centric focus.

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C A R B O N DA L E PA R K S & R E C C a rb o n d a le

(970) 510-1290 www.cssarbondalerec.com Carbondale’s indoor climbing wall is a great winter fitness activity. Kids can work on coordination and strength while having tons of fun. For busy parents, check out the popular lunchtime and 5:30 PM HIIT and interval training classes. Bring your tween along. The department facilitates ice skating and even special schools-out programming.

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G L E N WO O D CO M M U N I T Y C E N T E R G l e n w o o d Sp r i ngs

(970) 384-6301 glenwoodrec.com The Community Center has it all – indoor climbing, an aquatics center, a gymnasium, a fitness center and even an ice rink. Parents can keep up with thier own fitness goals by utilizing the KidKare option while taking classes. Youth programming and parent-child classes are offered at the Community Center associated Community Arts Center.

Maria B. Wimmer Broker Associate 970.274.0647 maria@masonmorse.com mariawimmerhomes.com

S N OWM A S S V I L L AG E R E C R E AT I O N Snowmass

(970) 922-2240 snowmassrecreation.com Parents can enjoy HIIT, yoga, body pump, cycling and CRX classes. The indoor rock climbing wall is a great winter activity, but families can also follow that up with more fresh air by using the outdoor ice skating rink.

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GOOD

S PO R T S

Up for a

CHALLENGE Q&A WITH

TA N N E R JA DW I N

Special Olmpics and NASTAR ski racer AND

DE BOR A H SU LLI VA N

Challenge Aspen Rec Program Director

Deborah Sullivan {DS} – When did you start skiing? Tanner: This is my 6th season skiing. I told my parents I was interested in skiing, so they found me a coach at Challenge Aspen. During my second season, I started racing Special Olympics and then from my third to now my sixth year, I have also done NASTAR Nationals. {DS} : How did Challenge Aspen help you get started? Tanner: Challenge Aspen helped by assigning me a one-on-one coach, first Leslie, then Bob and Jim. I felt safer with a coach, otherwise I might have been too scared to try. {DS} : Beside skiing, have you thought about other benefits from participation with Challenge Aspen?

I didn’t realize I had the talent for skiing until I tried it. I might try something new again... maybe snowboarding.” . . . TA N N E R JA DW I N

Tanner: I have more friends. I was able to move away from home with a roommate for two years. And now I am living on my own. I got involved with Mountain Valley Developmental Services. They help me with Social Security and other benefits. My apartment is small, especially the bathroom. It’s like a hotel, but I like it. Living by myself, I can keep things clean. I also changed jobs, working now for Mr. Vac, but I don’t have as much hands-on as I did with my old job.

PHOTO

(Above) Tanner Jadwin Credit: Jim Mallouk

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Aspen

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 0861 Maroon Creek Rd, Aspen (970) 544-4100 aspenrecreation.com

• FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION AND CURRENT FEES GO TO ASPENRECREATION.COM •

CELEBRATE YOUR BIRTHDAY

SPEND THE DAY AT THE ARC

Have your party in the green room at the Aspen Recreation Center. The party rental includes access to swimming, climbing and skating if available that day. At the Red Brick Recreation Center, in addition to renting the room you can rent a bounce house, pay for access to the trampoline, aerials and more. For an additional fee let us help you with the party planning. Choose from 7 different themes or color schemes plus, we will set it up and take it down. Learn about maximum number of participants, costs, rules and more on the website.

When it is cold outside, play inside at the Aspen Recreation Center. On the weekends or during your days off from school, enjoy all the ARC has to offer. Swim in the kid pool, float around the lazy river and splash into the pool from the two-story water slide. Try the climbing tower or go ice skating. Parents of older children can relax in the hot tub, sauna and steam room while the kids enjoy playing in the pool. Please see our website for climbing tower and skating hours.

SPRING BASKETBALL LEAGUE

AFTERSCHOOL CLUB

Ages: Kindergarten to 2nd grade Registration Dates: 2/17 - 3/22 Program Dates: 3/31 – 5/8 Where: Aspen Elementary Gym This program introduces the fundamentals of basketball with an emphasis on fun in a developmental environment. Kinder Teams practice once per week. 1st/2nd Grade Teams practice twice per week, with games on Fridays. Both teams have a games on 5/8/2020. The program is volunteer based, and we need volunteer coaches to make it happen.

All activities listed are included with admission or with your recreation pass.

Ages: Kindergarten – age 10 Dates: Aspen School District Calendar Time: Daily 3:15 – 5:30 PM except Wednesday 1:55 – 5:30 PM Where: Aspen Elementary School Fee: $15 per day, Wednesday $20 The Afterschool Club is a state licensed program that includes homework help and lots of fun recreational activities like crafts, games and field trips on Wednesday.

KARATE

ADULT ACTIVITIES

Ages: 5 - 18 Dates: February and March Time: Tues/Thrs Advanced Belts: 3:45 - 4:30 PM Beginner Belts: 4:30 - 5:15 PM Where: Aspen Recreation Center Fee: $96 per month | $15 drop-in Elaine Kozel is a certified 2nd Degree Black Belt through the International Tang Soo Do Federation. She will teach your kids the basics of karate, including self-discipline and gross motor skills. $35 for new member uniform.

The Aspen Recreation Department has a variety of activities for adults too. Choose from pickleball, swim lessons, skating, climbing, working out, an indoor triathlon and more. Plus, there are over 40 fitness classes a week at the two locations to choose from. Punch passes, monthly and annual recreation passes are available, see our website for information.

FULL DAY FUN CAMP

SWIM LESSONS

Ages: Kindergarten – age 10 Dates: Feb. 17, Mar. 12 & 13, 23-27, and 30, Apr. 17 & 20, May 8 Time: Drop off: 7:30 – 9:30 AM Pick up: 3:30 – 5:30 PM Where: Aspen Elementary School Fee: $44 per day online Play with Recreation Department staff on the days school is out. The days will be packed full of fun and educational activities. This is a state licensed program.

Try indoor golf on the Full Swing golf simulator at the Aspen Golf Club. To book a tee time go to www.aspengolf.com

Ages: Six months and up Dates: Monthly Times: Day and time based on specific class Where: Aspen Recreation Center Fee: $40 per month online Beginners learn to be safe in the water and develop basic swim skills in a fun environment with their instructor. Various levels of classes to choose from. Private lessons are available for kids and adults, book online.

YOUTH ART CLASSES AT THE RED BRICK CENTER FOR THE ARTS | REDBRICKASPEN.COM PRE-K ART STUDIO

Dates: Most Wednesdays during the school year (no class: 3/25) Times: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Ages: PRE-K Fee: Free, suggested donation to cover supply costs Pre-K Studio explores many mediums and elements of art through new projects each week. Open to all Pre-K aged students with guardian or parent.

FULL DAY ART CAMP

Dates: March 13 Time: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM Ages: K – 4th Grade Fee: $60 Campers explore a theme through a variety of mediums such as papier-mâché, ceramics, mosaic, painting and collage. Weather permitting campers may head outside for more art making, exploring and play.

AFTER SCHOOL ART PLAY

Dates: Most Wednesdays during the school year. (no class: 3/25) Time: 2:15 - 4:00 PM Ages: K – 4th Grade Fee: $20 Each week children explore a theme through a different medium such as collage, painting, papiermache, ceramics and more. Art Play is a time for children to use their imagination, be with friends and have fun!

• LEARN MORE AT ASPENRECREATION.COM •

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PHOTO

(Above) Tanner Jadwin racing in the 2019 NASTAR Nationals at Squaw Valley. Credit: Deb Sullivan

ALL ARE INVITED Show up and Cheer

Plan on skiing in order to get to the race courses Special Olympics Regional Games Ski Cooper – Thursday, February 6 Special Olympics State Games Copper Mountain, Saturday and Sunday, February 22 & 23 NASTAR Nationals Adaptive Clinic Snowmass, March 24-29

CHALLENGE ASPEN (970) 923-0578 ChallengeAspen.org

Rec Programs:

Lessons, guides and ski buddies for anyone with a disability, ages 5+ Locals Ski Program Thursdays and Saturdays from early December until March. Skiers go out with their Challenge Aspen buddies for a day of recreational skiing or ski race training, depending on the skier’s interest and ability. Social Wellness Program Year round, 3-4 days per week for Roaring Fork Valley residents. A wide variety of activities: swimming, bowling, movies, game day, pound/stretch class (exercise and yoga), bike riding, horseback riding, river rafting, sailing, stand-up paddle boarding, visiting Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park and other seasonal activities. Plan Ahead for summer camp overnight programs at a ranch above Ruedi Reservoir, with hiking, climbing, archery and other camp activities.

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Snowmass VILLAGE PARKS, RECREATION & TRAILS

2835 Brush Creek Road, Snowmass Village (970) 922-2240 snowmassrecreation.com

RECREATION CENTER PASSES

Whether you want to work out for the day or have ambitious fitness goals that may take a little longer, there are a variety of memberships for every budget. You don’t have to live in Snowmass Village to enjoy this great facility. Options include youth and adult one-time daily visits, monthly, yearly and a 20-visit punch cards.

MARCH MADNESS FITNESS CHALLENGE

Join in the fun with the March Madness Fitness Challenge beginning on March 1st. This challenge will be a bingo board event open to both members and non-members where spaces will be filled for participating in fitness classes, drop-in sports, programs and fitness challenges. Stop by the Recreation Center to get your board. Great prizes to be won!

Basalt

RECREATION DEPARTMENT 101 Midland Avenue, Basalt (970) 927-8214 x 400 Basalt.net/recreation

PICKLEBALL DATE NIGHT + SATURDAY MORNINGS

Ages: 10 - Adult Time: 5:45 - 8:00 PM Day: Saturdays 9:30 AM - noon Where: BMS Gymnasium Fee: $2 drop in fee. This is a great way for the whole family to get together for some fun competition with the pickleball crowd. Join us on Friday nights for entertaining competition with people from around the Valley. Pickleball is a wonderful way to get some exercise and meet new people.

K-2 MUD SEASON BASKETBALL

Ages: K - Grade 2 Time: Kinders-3:30 - 4:20 1st/2nd-4:30-5:20 Date: Feb 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27 Where: BES gym Fee: $30; $35 after deadline date This is an opportunity for the younger basketball players, both boys and girls, to get off the bench and on the courts with our K2 Mud Season Basketball League. Work on hoop fundamentals with games every practice day. End the season with a mini tournament for all players.

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FREE ICE SKATING

KIDS DAY CAMPS

HOST A PARTY

WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR AND LIFEGUARD COURSES

The outdoor skating rink at the Snowmass Village Recreation Center will be open throughout the winter and is open to the public for free use. Ice rink hours are 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM, seven days a week.

Have your next party at the Snowmass Village Recreation Center. We offer a variety of rental options that include use of the swimming pool, bounce houses, ice rink and indoor climbing wall. Price and times are dependent on packages.

UPCOMING PROGRAMMING

Basalt Recreation Department offers a variety of prgramming for all ages. In particular the Department offers league sports, day camps, day field trips and swimming programs from April - August. Stay on the lookout for our Spring/ Summer Guide with further information. Check in for possible SPRING BREAK programming, new theatre classes and mommy-and-me classes.

FLAG FOOTBALL YOUTH BASEBALL ARTS AND CRAFTS ROCK CLIMBING FLY FISHING DAY HIKES AND ADVENTURES SUMMER CAMP TENNIS SOCCER

Ages: 5 - 12 Time: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Dates: Feb.,17; March 12-13, 2327, 30; April 17, 20 Fee: $45 per day Join your friends for a fun filled day of recreation and adventure, utilizing the great facilities so close to home during the Winter and Spring school breaks. Activities will include indoor rock climbing, swimming, arts and crafts, gym games, playground and using other rec center amentities.

Snowmass Village Recreation is looking at hosting Water Safety Instructor and Lifeguard Certification courses this coming Spring. If you or somebody you know may be interested in participating in either of these courses, please e-mail Brian Froelich at bfroelich@tosv.com


Carbondale RECREATION & COMMUNITY CENTER

567 Colorado Avenue, Carbondale (970) 510-1278 carbondalerec.com

CHILDREN’S LEVEL 1 CLIMBING (BEGINNER)

CHILDREN’S LEVEL 2 CLIMBING (INTERMEDIATE)

INTRO TO HOCKEY

Age: 8 + Time: Wed., 3:45 - 4:45 PM Session 2: February 5, 12, 26 Session 3: March 4, 11, 18 Fee: $45/session Children must have shown an ability to master the skills learned in Level 1 to move up to this program. It is also excellent for kids ages 9 and up who have higher strength to weight ratios and an interest in climbing. In Level 2 we will focus on technique, problem solving, and learning how to belay. Must receive instructor approval to register for this class.

Ages: 7 - 9 Time: 4:00 - 5:00 PM Days: Tuesdays & Thursdays Dates: January 7 - February 6 **ice permitting Fee: $60 These lessons are for those who have some skating skills with little or no hockey skills. Participants will develop their skills and learn the basics of the game in a recreational environment. Hockey helmets with full face mask and an appropriatelysized hockey stick are required for all participants. Shin pads, elbow pads, and hockey gloves are recommended. **Coaches are needed for this program. If you are interested, call 970.510.1279.

FORK AND PAN KIDS’ COOKING CLASSES

SCHOOL’S OUT TRIPS: SILO

YOUTH HOCKEY

Age: 6 - 8 Time: Mon., 3:45 - 4:45 PM Session 1: January 6, 13, 27 Session 2: February 3, 10, 24 Session 3: March 2, 9, 16 Fee: $45/session An introductory climbing class for younger children and first-time climbers. This course focuses on building confidence and basic technique through games and fun activities while teaching safe practices, fundamental vocabulary, and an ageappropriate introduction to climbing equipment.

Ages: 8 - 12 Time: 2:00 - 4:00 PM Day: Wednesdays Session 1: Feb. 5, 12, 19, and 26 Session 2: Mar. 4, 11, 18, and 25 Cost: $40 per 4 class session $15 drop in with approval Boost your child’s kitchen confidence with these two different, four-class cooking series. They will work together in a fun, hands-on environment, making foods they love while making new friends, too.

Ages: 8 - 12 Time: 10 AM - 5 PM Date: Fri., March 27 Fee: $55 Registration Deadline: One week prior Includes 2 hours of jump time (trampolines, dodgeball, foam pit, and ninja course). ***Parents please sign the Get Air waiver during registration (available online).

STORYTIMES

THE BOOK BUNCH

Ages: 0 - 24 months Lapsit storytime. Learn songs, bounces and rhymes to share with your child with a few stories thrown in. Storytime lasts about 20 minutes with stay-and-play following.

Book Bunch is a book club especially for kids 2nd through 5th grades. Children will meet with children’s librarian Allison to talk about their favorite books and what they are currently reading. Activities may include finding surprising read-alikes and writing reviews to display in the library and on the website. Book Bunch meets on the last Wednesday of every month.

BABY TUESDAYS / 10:30 AM

PRESCHOOL WEDNESDAYS / 10:15 - 10:45 AM Ages: 3 - 5 years

TODDLER WEDNESDAYS / 11:00 - 11:30 AM

Ages: 2 - 3 years

AFTER SCHOOL WEDNESDAYS

WEDNESDAYS / 2:30 - 4:00 PM

A new activity every week for school-aged children. Featuring science experiments, crafts and games. Always creative and always fun.

THE LAB

pitcolib.org

Ages: 9 - 14 Time: 5:00 - 6:30 PM Days: Tues. and Thurs. Dates: Jan. 7 - Feb. 6 **ice permitting Fee: $60 This program is for more advanced players who are looking to take their skills to the next level without the stress and time commitment of more competitive hockey programs. Players will work on the fundamentals of the game along with learning and practicing more advanced skills and strategies.

THE LAB is a makerspace located at the Pitkin County Library. What is a makerspace, you ask? It’s simple! A makerspace is an intellectual space that fosters the ideals of creativity and collaboration. Patrons will be given the opportunity to create, invent and learn all manner of things through various hands-on activities.

WEDNESDAYS / 3:00 PM GRADES 2 - 5

STORY TIME AT THE COLLECTIVE IN SMV THURSDAYS / 10:00 - 10:30 AM THROUGH APRIL 9 Storytime for all ages. Free.

3D PRINTING WORKSHOP

SATURDAY, FEB. 14 & FEB. 29 4:00 PM

Come join us for our first ever 3D printing winter workshop series. Patrons will learn about 3d printing and walk away with their own print! This is an opportunity to talk and experience everything this technology has to offer. Facilitators will go over basic techniques for success and provide hands-on instructions using our 3 printers.

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W H AT ’ S

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Today?

MONDAY FOR

KIDS JAZZ TECHNIQUE & CHOREOGRAPHY

4:15 – 5:15 PM CMC GLENWOOD SPRINGS For teens. Starting March 16. The basics of jazz dance in a fun and welcoming environment. Focuses on fun combinations and across-the-floor work with optional Hip-Hop moves. Improve flexibility, sense of rhythm and coordination. Build body confidence. Spring performance at the Glenwood Vaudeville Theatre, 4/27.

FOR

PHOTO

Looking for the best naptime setup ever? Start your child on cross country skis. After an hour in the fresh air, gliding along at their pace, take a break, enjoy a picnic lunch and then nest your little one into their Chariot for a ride. Tuck them under a warm blanket, and take a lap or two or three while they snooze. The Chariot shown above seats one. They also come in two-seaters perfect for siblings. The skis can be swapped for bike tires, making this your year-round ultimate accessory. Looking for trail ideas? Check out our Trail Map article on pages 21-24. Photo: Susan Jackson.

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PARENTS EARLY CHILDHOOD MAKE AND TAKE WORKSHOPS

5:00 PM – FIRST MONDAY CARBONDALE LIBRARY Monthly. Simple ways to read, write, sing, talk, and play with children to get them ready for school. Presented free in partnership with the Early Childhood Network.

TUESDAY ART START

11:00 AM ASPEN ART MUSEUM This free drop-in program for children up-to-age 5 with their caregivers explores fun ways to interact through art. Projects emphasize early childhood artistic development and creativity. A fun way to meet other parents who value art and expression.

BELLYDANCE

7:00 - 8:30 PM ART FUSION STUDIO, BASALT Explore an ancient art form while you tone abdominal muscles and strengthen the entire body while enjoying world music, unique exercise, and movement meditation.


WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

EARLY RELEASE WEDNESDAYS

CREATIVE FLOW CHARLOTTE’S WEB

ASPEN MOUNTAIN SKIING HISTORY TOUR

KIDS ART STUDIO CLASS

ACES SNOWSHOE TOURS

11:00 AM - 1:00 PM MEET AT THE GUEST SERVICE CABIN BELOW THE SUNDECK. Perfect for families with tweens and teens. You can learn about the mining and ski history lying literally beneath your feet as you tour Aspen Mountain with a longtime local historian. Free, lift ticket required.

SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS 1:00 PM - 1:45 PM ART FUSION STUDIO, BASALT Kids ages 4-6 will learn about composition, light and shadow, human and animal bodies, complementary colors, and how to tell a story with their creations. An optional Yoga/Dance & Theater class begins at 2:00 PM. Kids can stay for light & healthy snacks and then stretch, dance, and learn about performance arts.

CHUCK WAGON DINNERS

DYNAMIC WORKOUT

UPHILL BREAKFAST CLUB

ASPEN ART MUSEUM FREE GUIDED TOURS

RESTORATIVE YOGA

2:30 – 3:30 PM GWS LIBRARY Elementary-aged students are invited to a revolving line up of scheduled activities. Week One: Cooking Science; Week Two: Roaring Fork Outdoors Volunteers programming; Week Three: Carbondale Arts Rosybelle concept inside the library; Week Four – Americore communitybuilding.

5:00 – 7:30 PM LYNN BRITT CABIN, SNOWMASS Date-night worthy or familyfun three-course dinner. Ride a snowcat from Base Village to a slopeside cabin for dinner + live entertainment. Children age 2 & under: Free

3:30 - 5:00 PM CREATIVE FLOW STUDIO, CARBONDALE Four weeks; Wednesdays or Thursdays, starting 2/19 Get to know E.B. White’s masterpiece through art. Create life-on-the-farm 3-D collages, complete with barns, pigs, spiders and webs, and other delightful barnyard animals from this classic story.

8:30 – 9:30; FEB 3 - APRIL 30 MONDAYS AND THURSDAYS TAC FITNESS After school drop-off, stretch and work your core. Focus on body alignment and proper exercise techniques using mat work. Offered through CMC.

8:45 – 10:00 AM BUTTERMILK MOUNTAIN Uphill ski or snowshoe to the Cliffhouse restaurant for a hot breakfast. An awesome weekly workout with your besties or spouse before wrapping up your work week.

1:00 PM ASPEN ART MUSEUM Need a day off the slopes and looking for something fun while your kids are in ski school? Drop-in at the museum for a free spotlight tour. Offered every Wednesday and Saturday.

all aboard!

10:00 AM OR 1:00 PM ASPEN OR SNOWMASS MEET AT TOP OF GONDOLA Looking for a way to enjoy the mountains without skiing? Explore spruce and fir forests at the top of these ski areas on a two-hour guided snowshoe tour with a naturalist from Aspen Center for Environmental Studies (ACES). Rocky Mountain winter ecology, animals, snow science. Offered every day.

4:30 – 6:00 PM TRUE NATURE HEALING ARTS Quiet, supported postures using bolsters and blankets. Restorative yoga helps relieve stress and calm the nervous system. Gentle and long-held poses facilitate deep release in connective tissue guiding you towards total relaxation.

Excellence in academics, arts, and outdoor education at the Roaring Fork Valley's independent school for PreKindergarten to Eighth Grade 

Families from neighborhoods all over the valley choose Aspen Country Day School

see for yourself!

FOUR SCHOOL BUS ROUTES Basalt Old Snowmass

Carbondale Willits

Kindergarten Classroom Visit Day February 12 visits & tours year-round

Buttermilk Cemetery Lane

Snowmass Village Aspen

Woody Creek

schedule a tour today! www.aspencountryday.org/visit 970-925-1909  

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W H AT ’ S

H A PPE N I N G

February SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS:

M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T. C O M

FEB 2: SKI FOR SISU

9:00 AM – 2:00 PM SPRING GULCH, CARBONDALE A community skiathon that raises money to support the Spring Gulch Nordic Trails. Skiers collect pledges per kilometer skied and compete to see who can ski the most laps in five hours. Compete, do a few laps for fun, or just cheer for the racers. Fun for the whole family.

FEB 7: AYC’S FAMILY FEUD

6:00 – 11:00 PM HOTEL JEROME, ASPEN Join Aspen Youth Center for an evening of delicious libations and food, silent & live auctions, and a hilarious game show – the Aspen version of Family Feud featuring teams of local families, colleagues, and buddies. Funds benefit AYC, which provides free after school and holiday programming for Roaring Fork Valley kids in grades 4+.

FEB 9: OWL CREEK CHASE

FEB 11: MUSICAL STORYTIME

FEB 13: SAFE RELATIONSHIPS FOR TEENS

FEB 15: ASCENDIGO BLUE

FEB 21: FEMINISM EDIT-A-THON

FEB 24: SOPRIS 100 WOMEN WHO CARE

9:00 AM – 21 K CLASSIC RACE 9:30 AM – 21 K SKATE RACE START: SNOWMASS GOLF COURSE NORDIC CENTER The Owl Creek Chase is a challenging, fun and scenic Nordic ski race that follows the Owl Creek Trail from Snowmass to the Aspen Golf Course. (See our Trail Map article, pages 2124, with an overview of the trail system.)

5:30 - 11:00 PM HOTEL JEROME, ASPEN A lively star-studded evening of fundraising, curated cocktails and dinner stations, a live auction, special guests, and entertainment. All proceeds benefit Ascendigo Autism Services, which serves local, regional and national populations of youth and adults across the autism spectrum.

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10:30 AM NEW CASTLE BRANCH LIBRARY Ms. Holly welcomes caregivers and their young children to a joyous celebration of winter. When you hear Ms. Holly’s ukulele, you’ll want to skip, jump, and sing! Ms. Holly is a preschool teacher from the Waldorf School on the Roaring Fork who created this free program to build community among parents of young children through stories, songs and music.

11:00 AM ASPEN ART MUSEUM Join museums and universities across the country to edit, enhance, and add Wikipedia entries on female figures in the art world. Bring your laptop and receive tutorials from museum staff on the editorial process. Childcare and refreshments will be provided in this free, communityorganized event.

6:00 – 8:00 PM RE 1 SCHOOL DISTRICT OFFICES, GLENWOOD SPRINGS Parents and teens from throughout the Valley are invited to this discussion of teen dating and friendship, safety and resources for supporting all kids. Presentation and discussion with lead therapist for River Bridge Child Advocacy Center.

5:30 - 7:00 PM RIVER VALLEY RANCH BARN, CARBONDALE Each woman contributes $100 and 3 organizations pitch their cause. Everyone votes, and the chosen organization receives the proceeds from the evening.


FEB 8: TASTE OF SUNLIGHT

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM SUNLIGHT MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT Join the Ski Spree Mountain Treasure Hunt followed by the Taste of Sunlight with great food and free music. 25 awesome prizes up for grabs!

ASPEN-SNOWMASS USASA SNOWBOARD COMPETITIONS FEB 14: VALENTINES DATE NIGHT

7:00 – 8:30 PM CARBONDALE CLAY CENTER Couples are invited to an all-inclusive night of romantic fun, using the pottery wheel to create an unforgettable piece of art. Create and paint your piece all while enjoying wine, chocolates, fruits and cheeses, and music.

FEB 27: SLEDDING UNDER THE STARS

6:00 – 8:30 PM ASPEN YOUTH CENTER A special free evening for middle school students only. Bring your own sled, helmet and headlamps. Dress warmly for an outrageously fun night zipping down the ARC's big sled hill with your friends. All are welcome.

Every Saturday and Sunday through March 1, you can find AVSC Snowboard teams showing their best moves on the slopes. Come out and cheer for our local athletes and get to know the competitive programming available in our community. (photo: Smug Mug) SATURDAY, FEB 1 Halfpipe: Snowmass

SUNDAY, FEB 2 Slopestyle: Snowmass

SATURDAY, FEB 8 Slopestyle 2: Snowmass

SUNDAY, FEB 9 Boardercross + Skiercross: Buttermilk

SATURDAY, FEB 15 Boardercross + Skiercross 2: Snowmass

SUNDAY, FEB 16 Boardercross + Skiercross 3: Buttermilk

SATURDAY, FEB 22 RailJam: Snowmass

SUNDAY, FEB 23 Slopestyle 3: Snowmass

TEAMAVSC.ORG

SUNDAY, MARCH 1 Railjam + Halfpipe: Buttermilk

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W H AT ’ S

H A PPE N I N G

March

MARCH 1: 50TH ANNUAL SILVER BOOM RACE

8:30 – 9:45 AM REGISTRATION 10:00 AM START SNOWMASS CROSS COUNTRY SKI CENTER The final race of the Aspen Cup Race Series. 5/15K Nordic Skate race plus 1K Kiddie Boom race. Followed by a BBQ and raffle. Fun for all ages.

SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS:

M O U N TA I N - PA R E N T. C O M

MARCH 6: DEFIANCE CHALLENGE

9:00 AM - 8:00 PM SUNLIGHT MOUNTAIN RESORT A fun 10-hour lift-served event where teams of 2 ski/ride 40 of Sunlight’s expert runs to raise funds to assist the Sunlight Volunteer Ski Patrol in acquiring equipment and training. Half of the proceeds will go to support the family of Jaime Tudryn, a former Buttermilk Patroller who passed away on Christmas Day 2018. Event also includes a silent auction and dinner.

PHOTO

SNOW SAFETY TIP: Taking in the view is part of the fun and so is making time to swap stories with your ski buddy. Show your kids places where it's good to stop and take a break. Help them see where certain spots aren't visible from above or may obstruct a trail. Best choices are away from main thoroughfares where ski traffic can get bottlenecked. Blind spots, trail merges and areas underneath big rolling jumps are dangerous. Set an example, show kids where to go, and help them to be aware that others might not take the same precautions. Of course, if they're wishing to jib, show them your tail-grab fakey-to-180, then spot their landing. (Photo: Anna Stonehouse)

j. deam law

970-216-5365 familynestcolorado.com facebook/familynestcolorado Birth & Postpartum Doula Support • Childbirth Classes • Meet the Doula Nights • Support Groups for Moms & Dads • Certified Placenta Encapsulation • Breastfeeding & Baby Care Classes • Community Gatherings

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Family Law Mediation Services Jackie@jdlawmediation.com

970.710.9644


MARCH 7: AMERICA'S UPHILL

MARCH 7: WILDE CREATURES FROM TALL STORIES MARCH 9: FULL MOON DINNER 5:30 PM WHEELER OPERA HOUSE Hauntingly beautiful tales for everyone aged 5 to 105 told with original live music and a generous dash of comedy. Storytelling musicians bring Oscar Wilde’s classic fairy tales to life in Tall Stories’ magical new show, direct from London’s West End and the Sydney Opera House.

5:00 – 8:00 PM BUTTERMILK MOUNTAIN Skin or hike under the full moon up Tiehack on Buttermilk Mountain to dinner at the Cliffhouse restaurant. Free hot chocolate around the Cowboy Cauldron over a roaring fire. À la carte dinner options, snacks, and a cash bar.

MARCH 13: RETRO SKI FILMS

MARCH 15: PRENATAL YOGA RETREAT

MARCH 17: WILD & SCENIC FILM FEST

MARCH 19: ANTIQUE SNOWMOBILE DEMONSTRATION

MARCH 19: ENCHANTMENT THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS PETER RABBIT TALES

MARCH 21: THE MASK YOU LIVE IN

7:00 AM - 9:45 AM ASPEN MOUNTAIN Aspen's spring ritual – a 3000 foot climb up Aspen Mountain from the Little Nell to the Sundeck using snowshoes, track skis, telemark skis or alpine touring gear. This year’s race benefits ACES Children’s Environmental Education programs. Breakfast at the Sundeck after the race is included.

5:30 - 6:45PM LIMELIGHT HOTEL, ASPEN The Aspen Historical Society presents vintage Aspen ski films from the 1960s. Here's an aprés ski event that every skier in the family will enjoy, served up with food and beverage specials offered at the Limelight bar. Kids menu and family-friendly vibe.

4:00 – 5:00 PM BUTTERMILK MOUNTAIN Experience a first-generation snow machine from the 1930s. Originally commissions by Aspenite DRC Brown in 1938, the vehicle runs again, moving across the snow on giant pontoonshaped “screws.” Gear-heads of all ages will enjoy seeing this wild ride!

9:00 AM – 5:00 PM RADIENT MAMA'S YOGA – (785) 760-2963 Time and space to devote fully to you, your baby, & your pregnancy. An active morning practice + afternoon restorative practice, nourishing organic lunch, beverages, and yummy snacks. Empowerment and meditation with other mothers, and guidance creating your own sacred altar & self-massage oil.

5:30 PM THE WHEELER OPERA HOUSE Live theatrical performance based upon the beloved tales of Beatrix Potter. Peter Rabbit, Flopsy and Benjamin Bunny are all grown up! Flopsy and Benjamin are married with bunnies of their own when the nasty badger, Tommy Brock, decides to steal the babies. Peter and Benjamin set off on an adventure to rescue them, and along the way, relive their childhood misadventures with Mr. McGregor.

6:30 – 9:30 PM WHEELER OPERA HOUSE ACES and Patagonia Snowmass showcase internationally acclaimed short films that both inform and inspire attendees to take action. Proceeds benefit ACES' Tomorrow's Voices program, which provides civics and environmental leadership education to regional high school students.

2:00 - 4:00 PM BASALT REGIONAL LIBRARY Media, peers, and even adults encourage boys to disconnect from their emotions, devalue authentic friendships, objectify and degrade women, and resolve conflicts through violence – creating identity issues boys must navigate to become “real” men. (Best suited for parents – depictions of violence and sexuality might not be suitable for younger teens.) Film will be screened at all libraries from Aspen to Parachute. See your local librarian for other dates and times.

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W H AT ’ S

H A PPE N I N G

Spring Break PROGRAMMING

to support working parents during the weeks off school

+ STAYCATION IDEAS

for after work so you can make these no-school nights extra special

W H AT ' S A W O R K I N G PA R E N T T O D O ?

We live in a destination resort where many parents work in the ski industry. This can make Winter Holidays and Spring Break challenging, if not somewhat heartbreaking. You want your children to enjoy their time off. You wish you could play with them, and yet your job is making sure others enjoy their vacations. However, here's the bright side – Staycation. We live in a place with many fun and affordable Spring Break programming options for kids (such as ski school shown here, which can be a generous perk for employees of Sunlight Mountain Ski Resort as well as Aspen Snowmass Skiing Company. (photo: Jordon Cruet)

CHILDREN'S SPRING BREAK PROGRAMMING ASPEN RECREATION DEPARTMENT THEATRE ASPEN FULL DAY FUN CAMP FEB. 17, MAR. 12 & 13, 23-27, AND 30 K– AGE 10 DROP OFF: 7:30 – 9:30 AM PICK UP: 3:30 – 5:30 PM ASPEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Play with Recreation Department staff on the days school is out. The days will be packed full of fun and educational activities. This is a state licensed program.

SPRING BREAK DRAMA CLUB MARCH 23 – 27; 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM K - GRADE 5 ASPEN: Red Brick Center for the Arts CARBONDALE: Carbondale Community School A week of creativity and fun led by area professionals, experts in drama, music, dance, set design, costuming and fun. Drop-in or full week options. Plan ahead for a showcase performance on March 27.

ASPEN YOUTH CENTER

TOWN OF CARBONDALE

MARCH 23-27 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM GRADES 4+ A safe and supportive environment, free for any child living in the Roaring Fork Valley who is in Grade 4 or older. Something different planned every day, with facilities for free play, including a gameroom with pool, foosball, airhockey and board games.

ROCK BOTTOM RANCH

SPRING RANCHERS MARCH 23 – 27 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM K - GRADE 4 Explore the life of a rancher and a naturalist with ranch work, regenerative agriculture, ecological investigations and spring-themed activities. Registration required; opens February 3.

SNOWMASS RECREATION CENTER

SPRING BREAK DAY CAMPS AGES: 5 - 12 TIME: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM DATES: FEB.,17; MARCH 12-13, 23-27, 30 Join your friends for a fun-filled day of recreation and adventure, utilizing the Snowmass Rec facilities. Activities will include indoor rock climbing, swimming in the heated saltwater pool, arts and crafts, gym games, playground and other rec center amentities.

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FRIDAY, MARCH 27 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM AGES: 8 - 12 School’s Out trip to Silo in Glenwood Springs. Take a field trip to the fun house – time to jump, bounce and play on trampolines, dodgeball, foam pit, and ninja course. Registration deadline one week prior.

TREEHOUSE OR HIDEOUT

SKIING LESSONS WITH ASPEN SKIING COMPANY 9:30 AM – 3:00 PM AGES 3-12 A safe, fun, and nurturing program staffed with experienced professionals specializing in early childhood education as well as ski instruction. Indoors or outdoors, kids love all the new, stimulating experiences. The youngest have their own private learning area, while older, more accomplished skiers get to explore the mountains with an instuctor.

YMCA OF THE ROCKIES SNOW MOUNTAIN RANCH

Looking for an easy getaway to make the most of your days off during Spring Break? Take the family to Snow Mountain Ranch, with lodging ranging from family bunk rooms to private cabins, there is an option for every budget. Archery, dog sledding, sleigh rides, and 120 km of Nordic trails will make this nearby escape feel like a real break.

APRÉS WORK & APRÉS PLAY Spring Break = lots of evening activities planned with families in mind. Here are some Staycation ideas with themes and bedtimes appropriate for tweens and teens.

MARCH 20:

ASPEN MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL THE LONGEST WAVE 6:30 PM THE WHEELER OPERA HOUSE Parent + tween or teen – Mastering the world's longest waves, this legendary windsurfer discoveres his vulnerablities as a competitor, mentor and father.

MARCH 21:

JUSTIN WILLMAN: MAGIC FOR HUMANS 7:30 PM THE WHEELER OPERA HOUSE If you've seen this magician on Netflix, you've been wowed by his street magic and social experiments. Clean enough for kids, clever enough for grown ups.

MARCH 22:

AN EVENING OF OCEAN FILMS 6:30 PM THE WHEELER OPERA HOUSE Adventure Entertainment's annual tour of the finest ocean adventure and conservation films of the year.

MARCH 27

ASFB PRESENTS: DIAVOLO 7:30 PM ASPEN DISTRICT THEATRE AGES 10+ Top 10 finalist on NBC’s America’s Got Talent, Diavolo shatters boundaries and soars beyond the grasps of gravity with dance, acrobatics, and gymnastics.


W H AT ’ S

H A PPE N I N G

On Campus SCHOOL ENROLLMENT

Campus Tours Open Houses Application Deadlines OUTSIDE CLASSROOMS

Do you know that every elementary, middle and high school in the Roaring Fork Valley offers some form of Outdoor Education? Beyond your basic field trip, these experiential lessons give kids handson learning about local geology, ecology and even the physics of snow. We are not only close to several state and national parks with outstanding educational programs, our Valley is also home to experts who can support our teachers in every aspect of planning. As you are considering schools, ask about this curriculum. Where might your child go? What will they learn? How can parents get involved? Wishing you'd gone to such a school? Same here.

AMBLESIDE AT SKYLARK

(970) 930-1804 Families are invited to come experience Ambleside for a school visit & observation – meet the warm staff and teachers and take a tour of the classrooms and campus. To register call Admissions at the number listed.

EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION FROM ASPEN TO GLENWOOD SPRINGS ASPEN COMMUNITY SCHOOL

ASPEN COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL

CARBONDALE COMMUNITY SCHOOL

COLORADO ROCKY MOUNTAIN SCHOOL

CORNERSTONE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

MARBLE CHARTER SCHOOL

ROSS MONTESSORI SCHOOL

ST. STEPHENS CATHOLIC SCHOOL

TWO RIVERS COMMUNITY SCHOOL

WALDORF SCHOOL ON THE ROARING FORK

(970) 923-4080 Open houses: Feb 11 and 20 March 4 and 17 8:30 – 9:30 AM Kindergarten through Grade 8. Submit lottery applications by April 3.

(970) 963-2562 Application deadline February 1 for priority application deadlines and rolling admissions accepted after that date.

(970) 925-1909 Wednesday, February 12: Kindergarten Classroom Visit Day, 8:30 -9:30 AM for parents and children who will be age 5 by September 1 of 2020, to learn about the Kindergarten program, to explore the classrooms, and to meet the teachers. Please RSVP. Applications received by mid-February will be notified of admission by the first week in April.

(970) 927-9106 Enrollment now open. Call to schedule a tour of the school. Cornerstone Christian School provides education for Pre-K through 12th grade. It offers STEM programming, FLEX tuition and is CCAP accepted.

(970) 963-9647 The lottery deadline for the 2020/2021 school year is Friday, April 3, 2020. All applications received after the lottery are considered on a space-available basis. Carbondale Community School Information Night is Thursday, February 20, 2020 from 5:00 - 6:00 PM.

(970) 963-9550 Marble Charter School is now enrolling for the 2020-2021 school year. Please call the school office for information and to schedule a tour of our school.

ASPEN SCHOOL DISTRICT

(970) 925-3760 Open enrollment for district-eligible students. Contact AES Parent Teacher Organization to schedule a tour. Local preschools also schedule tours during April.

ROARING FORK SCHOOL DISTRICT (RE-1)

(970) 384-6000 Registration for all students entering kindergarten in the 2020-21 school year in the Roaring Fork Schools will occur on Friday, April 17 from 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM. Children must be five years old on or before October 1, 2020 to enroll in kindergarten for next school year. Full- and half-day kindergarten is offered at no cost to parents. KINDERGARTEN INFO NIGHTS FOR RE-1 Basalt Elementary – April 9 at 5:30 PM Carbondale Community School – Feb. 20, 5:00 PM Crystal River Elementary School – April 2 at 5:30 PM Glenwood Springs Elementary School – April 2, 5:30 - 6:30 PM Riverview Elementary School – April 7, 5:45 - 6:45 PM Sopris Elementary School – April 6, 6:00 PM

(970) 963-7199 March 3, Open House from 5:00 - 6:00 PM. Deadline for Letter of Intent (returning students) and Lottery Application (new students), is April 3, 2020. Lottery will be held Wednesday, April 8, 2020.

(970) 384-5200 February 18 and March 10 come to the Informational Meeting for prospective families. TRCS will hold a lottery on April 8 if demand exceeds space for the 2020/2021 school year.

(970) 945-7746 Contact the school for details and to RSVP for “Tour Tuesdays” in February. Pre-K – 8 grade. Variable tuition model.

(970) 963-1960 School Tour on Thursday, March 5 from 8:30 - 10:30 AM. Come visit the classrooms, hear students play music, and ask questions of the teachers. Adults only. Please RSVP. Pre-K through Grade 8. A fully accredited Waldorf School.

Please see school websites for dates of Feb. and March school tours.

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ROCK AND ROLL ACADEMY’S Winter Rock Concert welcomed music lovers to a free concert at BELLY UP in Aspen, where student bands performed songs that they learned and polished during RRA’s 15 week fall semester. (Photo: Stephanie Rae Photography) • The Winter Band Concert at Glenwood Springs High School brought families and community members together for holiday orchestral and jazz tunes. (Photo: Taylor Rose Smith) • ASPEN COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL’S Holiday Sing Concert is a tradition that brings school families, alumni and community together at HARRIS CONCERT HALL for a beloved annual tradition. This year’s theme was “Music from the Movies.” (Photo: ACDS alumna Megan Harvey Bourke )

Where Children Love to Learn.

Why Ambleside at Skylark? Our purpose is to cultivate a child’s innate curiosity. We encourage this love of learning, guide it by the formation of excellent habits, and build a powerful relationship network around them consisting of you, their parents, their teachers, their peers and most of all, their Heavenly Father.

Come see how we do it. Contact Sage O’Neil, Admissions Coordinator to schedule your visit today 970.930.1804 or soneil@theskylarkschool.org

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• Fourth Grade student leaders from ASPEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL raised funds to create and deliver holiday care packages of flowers, trail mix, fresh fruit, candies, crackers, lip balm and playing cards for community police, firefighters and ambulance teams. • A social highlight of the holiday week is always AVSC’S AUDI CUP RACE and the aprés ski party following it. (Photo: Smug Mug) Sixteen teams participated in the fund raiser which brought in nearly $900,000. • These funds will help reduce the cost of ASPEN VALLEY SKI & SNOWBOARD CLUB’S programs for 2,400 local athletes, some of whom are shown here on the 8-Saturday ASK PROGRAM Carbondale-to-Snowmass bus.

rockandrollroaringfork.com

REGISTRATION IS OPEN AND BANDS ARE FORMING NOW 15 WEEK AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM STARTING JANUARY 27

A play-based program in a positive and dynamic social atmosphere. Kids form bands, learn songs they love & present a rock concert. No musical experience necessary. Instruments provided.

GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY

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S.O.S.

S U RV I VA L K I T

SUMMER CAMP SIGN-UPS 1

MOUNTAINPARENT’S GUIDE TO SUMMER PROGRAMS - APRIL + MAY 2020 WHAT? SUMMER CAMP? IT’S NOT EVEN SPRING BREAK! The snow is fabulous and continuing to fall, thank heaven. And it’s already time to think about what your childrenwilldoduringthreefunmonthsoffreetimestartingthisJune. You’ll have deadlines, meetings, appointments – plus your own summer bucket list.

Arts & Crafts. Rock & Roll. Horses. Theatre. Hiking. Biking. Swimming. Soccer. Tennis. Golf. Trampoline & Trapeze. Bluegrass. Clay. Driver’s Ed. Dance. Rock Climbing. Orchestra. Gardening. Sleepaway. Dinosaurs. Creative Writing. Photography. Gymnastics.

FIND A CAMP. PROMOTE A CAMP. Advertising

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Lauren Suhrbier, Publisher editor@mountain-parent.com

MOUNTAIN-PARENT.COM


The Roaring Fork Valley Co-op has everything you need to keep your animals healthy and active!

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Great New Items (at deep discounts!)

Large & Small Appliances We offer brand new “scratch & dent” large appliances with minor cosmetic imperfections and “damaged box” small appliances like toasters, Crock-Pots®, and blenders at discounted prices over “perfect” appliances.

WeBuild Custom Cabinets The vocational cabinet shop at the Crowley Correctional Facility has been supplying cabinets for Habitat homes for years. We are excited to be able to offer these affordable high quality custom cabinets to our valued customers.

And A Lot More Great Stuff We buy new items like American-made high-quality mattresses in three comfort and longevity levels as well as SPC flooring, carpet squares, home improvement supplies, and more directly from manufacturers and sell them to you at deep discounts.

When you shop at our Habitat for Humanity ReStore, you’ll see why people say we’re the best ReStore in the country. Why pay more when you can make us your first stop for big savings on almost everything you need for your home.

53 Calaway Court, Glenwood Springs

For more info & hours: HabitatRFV.org

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Get 10% off your entire purchase when you download our app:

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Profile for Mountain Parent Magazine

February - March Mountain Parent Magazine  

In this edition of Mountain Parent Magazine learn about Nordic skiing trails near Snowmass Village, CO., local chocolate maker Pollinator Ch...

February - March Mountain Parent Magazine  

In this edition of Mountain Parent Magazine learn about Nordic skiing trails near Snowmass Village, CO., local chocolate maker Pollinator Ch...