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Contents 9 Foreword Welcome to another issue of Motions magazine!

summer 2009

10 Movers & Shakers

In This Issue

Making A Difference

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Take a lesson from these selfless individuals who see living life as helping others with theirs.

16 Fast Forward Keeping it Green on the Road

Check out these environmentally friendly modes of transportation. A National Monument

Former President Bush protects wildlife in the Pacific Ocean.

22 Techie Tools Palm Size Tools

A world of technology easily fits in your pocket.

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26 411 Mark Your Calendar

Summer events to keep on your radar Hittin’ the Beach in Style

Check out the latest in seaside trends. Jen’s Top Ten

Summer Must Haves

40 Dwellings House by the Sea

e Baker home is resort living brought home. Featured Showroom

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Designer's Direct makes interior design a breeze.

46 Dish Network Steak Haven

ree girlfriends hang out at Colors Red for a steak extravaganza. Delectable Desserts

Indulge yourself at these restaurants to experience post-meal nirvana for your taste buds. Happy Hour Hideouts

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Done with work? Don’t go home just yet. Take a look at some of these happy hour spots to de-stress after a long day.

58 Game On Backyard Trekking

Explore the hidden beauties within the region’s lush jungles.

62 En Route City Hopping

Hop on a plane ride north and venture beyond Tokyo to Japan's second metropolis, Yokohama.

On The Cover In Guam, swimsuits never go out of style as these women proudly display the latest gear from DNA Evolution. Check out the style pages for more. Photo by Arvie Munoz

66 Trendspotting Summer is Here!

Whether it's a day at the beach or a night on the town, big bags are in! summer 2009

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Contributors

RAFAELDEAUSEN Rafael Deausen is a 20-year old college student and self-proclaimed dreamer. He was one of the finalists in the competition for Australia’s “Best Job in the World,” as a Great Barrier Reef blogger. In this issue, he talks about technology and how they’ve gone pocket size.

JILLESPIRITU Jill Espritu is a former sports writer for the Pacific Daily News who loves trying new hobbies when she’s not hard at work as the assistant marketing communications manager at the Hilton Guam Resort & Spa. In this month’s Game On, she explores the jungles of Guam and hikes to Fonte Dam.

ARVIEMUNOZ Arvie Munoz was born in the Philippines and grew up on Guam. By trade, he is a wedding photographer for J Bridal International while dabbling in other types of photography during his spare time. Munoz shot this issue’s cover and style section. He says he is extremely fortunate to do something he loves despite being blind in one eye. When he can, Munoz travels to Japan with his wife Sayaka and their son Akira.

JENNIFERNEVES Miss Guam Universe 2008 first runner-up and first delegate of Miss Guam Earth, Jennifer Neves has an extensive background in pageantry. Armed with the motto, “Beauty with a Purpose,” Neves takes part in environmental and cultural immersion programs, such as tree planting ceremonies and countrywide tours. In this issue, she talks about her favorite summer items to carry and bring to the beach.

BRADRUSZALA Brad Ruszala cut his teeth as a sports writer for the Saipan Tribune and as the radio host of “e Sports Show with Brad and Shan.” While he serves as the CNMI correspondent for the Pacific News Center, Brad puts his creativity to work in IT&E's marketing department on Saipan.

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Summer 2009 • Vol. 1 • No. 3 www.motionsmagazine.com

Publisher Editorial Team

Contributors

Production Manager

Julian T. Cooper-Nurse Kathryn Barry Carlos Camacho Faye Varias Creative Services Rafael DeAusen Jill Espiritu Arvie Munoz Jennifer Neves Brad Ruszala Mark S. Burke

Creative Director

Norman Del Rosario

Graphics & Layout

Mark S. Burke Jon Barnhart

Production Assistant

Lynda Young

Business Sales Manager Traffic/Circulation Manager Distribution Executive Vice President President & CEO

Jay-R S. Dominguez Josie Redmond Micronesia Media Larry Knecht Ricky Delgado, Jr.

Motions is published by:

P.O. Box 24881 Barrigada, GU 96921 Tel: (671) 472-3495 | Fax: (671) 472-3498 email: office@yellowpagesink.com

For advertising, subscription information or editorial suggestions, contact us at office@yellowpagesink.com Motions Advertising Disclaimer All advertisers agree to hold the publisher harmless and indemnify it against any and all claims, losses, liabilities, damages, costs and expenses (including attorney’s fees) made against or incurred by the publisher, officers or employees with respect to, or arising out of, the content, text, graphics or representations of any ad published herein, including but not limited to the sole negligence and/or fault of the publisher. The publisher is not liable for any claims, losses or damages of any kind, arising from the wording, text, graphics or representations of any ad published herein, or the condition of the articles sold through the publication, or performance of services advertised in this publication. All advertising and/or performance of services advertising and/or submissions become wholly the property of Motions Magazine. Motions Magazine is a registered trademark of PTI Pacifica Inc. Copyright © 2009. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part in any form without the express written consent of the publisher is prohibited. We reserve the right to edit or refuse any ad and to reprint any photo for promotional use.

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Foreword

Looked up on Fodors.com, Guam is described as the largest island in Micronesia and the most cosmopolitan and energetic. Spain ruled the islands for 333 years and Hagåtña, the capital, has many historic buildings dating from this era. Also of interest are buildings from the Spanish colonial period. Many attractions are geared towards U.S. GIs at the local U.S. military bases. For other visitors to Guam, there are many outdoor and water recreation activities to enjoy. e CNMI is summarized as a chain of 14 islands volcanic in origin. ey host a variety of scenery including beautiful bays, spectacular cliffs, caves and mountains. Because of their location, they played a significant part in World War II and the many shipwrecks around the coast bear witness to this. ese, the numerous coral reefs and the clear water make them particularly good for diving. It may sound generic, but many of us don’t take enough advantage of what our islands have to offer. For example, did you know that there are three botanical gardens on Guam: Inarajan Shore Botanical Garden by the sea in the southern part of the island; the Nano Fall Botanical Gardens in Agat, where swimming can be enjoyed in the Nano River under rushing cascades; and the Pineapple Plantation in Yigo? Or that Goat Island off Tinian allows the hunting of goats only during a certain period of the year? We should all take advantage of the beauties this place we call home have to offer. Take a look at this issue’s highlights for just a sampling of places you have yet to visit or may frequent again to relive summer memories. Enjoy!

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Movers & Shakers

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Movers & Shakers Sarah Thomas Nededog Title: Executive Director Company: Sanctuary Inc. Village: Dededo Hobbies: Reading Pets: An English Staffordshire bull terrier named Highlite Necessities: An “old-school” organizer and a rosary Pet peeves: People not returning calls/e-mails, dishonesty and betrayal Program Heroes: 40 full and part time staff, 42 Americorps members, 15 board members and countless volunteers

epicted in Sanctuary Inc.’s logo are three small people figures joining hands, with one larger person figure embracing them, with the motto, “Helping Youth and Families Help emselves.” e logo is at the core of the organization’s work in providing guidance and support for the island’s youth and their families. It can be disheartening to know that even in a small island, known for its hospitality and strong family bonds, its adolescent population is not shielded from the effects of broken homes, drug, alcohol and sexual abuse and criminal activity; however, with the existence of organizations like Sanctuary and the people who volunteer to carry out its mission, some of these effects can be curbed. “Adolescence is such a crucial time for both teens and parents and if support is not provided when needed, severe consequences can last a lifetime,” says Sarah omas Nededog, executive director of Sanctuary Inc. Hundreds of teens take refuge in Sanctuary’s emergency and Transitional Living Program shelters every year and more than 2,000 are helped through its outreach and prevention programs, according to the organization’s Web site. omas-Nededog has been involved with Sanctuary Inc. since its inception in 1971. omas-Nededog served as interim director and consultant in 1985 and chaired the board of directors for six years afterwards. Currently, omas-Nededog is the executive director, a position she has held since 2003. e organization’s goals include ensuring that a full continuum of services exists for young people and their families with particular concern for core services of crisis intervention (24-hour response system), emergency shelter and case management. Additionally, the organization aims to expand its support groups for self esteem, tobacco cessation, anger management, drug use prevention, gender expressions for youth exploring their sexuality and suicide prevention. In 2004, Sanctuary instituted Sagan Na Homlo (a place for healing) – a drug and alcohol treatment program for adolescents. e following year, the organization started an organic farming entrepreneurship project to expand on its aquaculture farms. Last year, Sanctuary received full accreditation for all of its programs through the Council for Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). e organization has partnered with many groups and businesses to promote healthy lifestyles, ways to improve communication with and as youth, and to bring awareness to the plight of troubled youth. Sanctuary also provides crisis intervention, case management, independent living, substance abuse treatment, mentoring and tutoring, and support groups for youths and adults. “I believe the most rewarding aspect of my role is the responsibility that I have to affect policy in the organization and in the community,” omas-Nededog says. “I also have the opportunity to meet with and work alongside a tremendous and committed group of people including many who are young people. “And the best part of my job is that I have the luxury of talking anytime with our consumers who are on site to gauge their thoughts about our services, their situations and their perceptions of our community,” omas-Nededog adds. -JE

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Photos and stories by Jill Espiritu and Brad Ruszala

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Movers & Shakers

Margarita “Maggie” Deleon Guerrero Wonenberg Title: President Company: Commonwealth Health Center Volunteers’ Association Siblings: Wonenberg has 12 brothers and sisters Education: Marianas High School and Boise State University, Idaho Husband: Barry Wonenberg Children: Coral, 20; Vaughn, 18; Jacquelin, 17

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n a nutshell, Wonenberg left home, got an education, got married, returned to Saipan with a husband, started a family of her own, embarked on a new career and volunteered her time with a non-profit association. at’s the easy part. The Wonenbergs have since moved to the village of Sadog Tasi, where Wonenberg balances her home life and career with another full-time commitment to the people of the CNMI as president of the Commonwealth Health Center Volunteers Association (CHCVA). Since its inception in 1986, the CHCVA assisted the hospital administration and staff care for the patients and families and helped to furnish the facility with equipment and supplies though fund raising and partnerships with philanthropic organizations. Wonenberg first volunteered for the group 16 years ago, and her dedication was recognized recently when she was elected president of the CHC Volunteers following the departure of the former president to the U.S. Mainland. Whether they’re operating the hospital’s gift shop, volunteering at local sporting events, conducting fund raising raffles or gift wrapping at Christmas time, the CHC volunteers are always a part of the community. As the association’s face in the community, Wonenberg helps coordinate all of the volunteers’ activities throughout the year, wades through a myriad paperwork and her favorite, presents donations to those in need. “It’s important to know that the CHC Volunteers Association functions with the help of many people. e management and operation of the CHCVA is an example of how people from all walks of life can work together harmoniously for the good of the association,” said Wonenberg. Coordinating the CHC Volunteers, running a household and working a full-time job requires the same brand of harmonious cooperation between the different aspects of her life, but Wonenberg said that she has been able to maintain her focus on all three. “Sometimes it becomes overwhelming. As long as I do my job and get priorities done, I can do my volunteer work after hours or when I’m off,” she said. Wonenberg said being such an active member of the community is worth every second of free time she would otherwise enjoy by reading, shopping or going to the theater because she feels fulfilled though her connection to herself, her family and her community. As if being a mother of three, a probation officer, and the president of the CHC Volunteers Association wasn’t challenging enough, Wonenberg manages all of this while battling cancer. “e pain shall pass. … Cancer does not rule you, you rule cancer,” she said. e cure for Wonenberg’s cancer is a stem cell transplant and she already has a donor ready, willing and waiting in the wings. Her brother John and his wife, Lishi, committed the stem cells of their newborn son’s umbilical cord, Kaden, but that’s not the end of the story. According to her oncologist, Wonenberg is not ready for the procedure yet and will have to continue with her quarterly chemotherapy treatments until she suffers a relapse. “It’s okay to cry and feel like the world is unfair, but after a good cry, get back up and refresh your perspective. See the beauty around you and feel the happiness that it can give you. Above all, never give up.” –BR


Movers & Shakers n weekends, Assistant U.S. Attorney Karon V. Johnson trades in her power suit for a more comfortable and “grubby” appearance in her volunteer work at the Guam Animals in Need (GAIN) shelter in Yigo. Even on extremely hot afternoons, Johnson regularly visits the shelter to help direct other volunteers, clean kennels, care for shelter animals and anything else to keep the shelter running smoothly. “e most rewarding aspect for me is the shelter, definitely,” says Johnson, GAIN legislative chair and one of the organization’s founding members. “It’s hands-on work directly with the animals, and the grounds and buildings. In 2005, I built a 1,400 square foot cat house/work center, which was a lot of fun. “e next project is to replace 14 plywood kennels with concrete ones,” she adds. GAIN’s mission is to promote humane treatment of animals, to run a humane animal shelter and to support good laws for animal care. e main goal of the organization is to eliminate the stray animal population in Guam and have a society where every animal is well-treated. Unlike many other charity organizations, GAIN does not employ an executive director. Instead, volunteers, such as Johnson, do all of the organization’s work themselves. None of the generous donations from individuals and businesses go to administrative costs, but are reserved to directly benefit the animals, which is an extraordinary accomplishment, Johnson says. e shelter employees, led by Winnie Escobar, and volunteers commit hundreds of hours on their own time to assist with GAIN. “In theory, the shelter is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., but people are always there until 6 p.m., volunteering their own time to ensure everything gets done,” Johnson says. “Our shelter employees have to deal with animal cruelty and abuse – it’s a very, very hard job.” It was in January 1990 that Johnson was approached by Rebecca Tomzik, GAIN’s founder, to assist with the organization. Johnson has been active with the organization since then. For Johnson, it’s the opportunity to make a difference that motivates her to continue to work with GAIN. “Guam is so small, that dedicated people who are willing to work hard can really make a difference here, a major impact on the community that you couldn’t have in a bigger place,” Johnson says. “You can see the direct results of your time – it’s very gratifying.” - JE

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Karon Johnson Title: Founding Member Company: Guam Animals In Need Inc. Village: Yona Hobbies: Sailing and skiing Pets: Two dogs and four cats, all from the GAIN animal shelter Kudos: Johnson’s husband, Robert Kutz, GAIN’s attorney who spends many hours doing pro bono work for the organization, plus fixing shelter plumbing and lawnmowers First job: Clerk/typist at NASA in Washington, D.C. Pet peeves: “People who don’t care and people who don’t contribute to the community. One of my fundamental principles of life is – pay what you owe. Another is – help carry the load. So many people coast through life just taking, and never give anything back.” Program heroes: Cindy Bartels – GAIN president, Shirley Miller – GAIN secretary, Susan Tomiak – GAIN treasurer, Faye Varias – GAIN publications/publicity chair, Corrine Lopez – Education, George Taylor and Denise Holdridge, plus approximately 320 dues paying members, shelter employees and several volunteers

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Movers & Shakers handful of parents sat in chairs along a wall facing a group of more than 50 children, all comfortably seated in multiple single file lines neatly arranged by height. After a short musical introduction, the children began to sing “e Climb” by Miley Cyrus in unison. Onlookers provided a hearty applause and at least one parent was moved to tears as the song came to an end. Amazingly, no group practice and no vocal coaching were ever held. “I know all the kids know the words to that song,” omas M. D. Quidachay, youth director for HATSA Chalan Pago-Ordot says. “ey won’t sing it individually when you ask them to, but once you put them all together and play the CD, they all just begin to sing the song together.” HATSA is an acronym which stands for “Helping Achieve rough Skills and Aspirations.” Initiated in 2006 by former Ordot-Chalan Pago mayor Pedro Borja, in conjunction with the Department of Youth Affairs Americorps Program, the HATSA program started as an after-school program for students from Ordot-Chalan Pago Elementary School. After about a year and a half, the program ended, much to the dismay of its young participants. Seeing the need for an after-school program for children, Quidachay, along with Bruce San Nicolas, revived HATSA and the program grew from the initial 10 students to about 30 students from various elementary and middle schools. e program expanded to include summer sessions and grew to accommodate more than 50 children. Sessions have been moved to the Chalan Pago community center from the district mayor’s office to allow for the increasing number of participants. “When I was growing up, I never had the opportunity like the kids today of having after-school programs like HATSA,” Quidachay says in his small office adorned with congratulatory and commemorative plaques. “Making a difference in the young lives of every student enrolled in the program is the most rewarding aspect of my role with HATSA. “What we try to do here is teach them the fundamental values of team work and respect. e children here are future leaders of our island, and if, for example, one of them is elected governor of Guam, the reward for me is that (he or she) was part of a program that made history,” Quidachay adds. HATSA’s mission is to provide a safe, healthy, and nurturing environment that enables them to give youth and their families the knowledge, skills and opportunity that leads them to become productive and responsible citizens. During after school and summer sessions, children enrolled have the opportunity to utilize HATSA’s computer lab, with enrichment in reading, language arts and mathematics. e program also includes physical education activities, including volleyball, baseball and basketball. Other activities include the opportunity to interact with guest speakers from the Guam Police Department, Department of Agriculture, Department of Parks and Recreation, Office of the Attorney General, V.A.R.O, and the Guam National Guard among others. “e children really motivate me to keep working with HATSA,” Quidachay says. “What better motivation is there than playing a role in developing the future of our island and the world around us.” -JE

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Thomas Quidachay Village: Mongmong Hobbies: Running, hanging out with friends and family Pets: Two chihuahuas, Nana and Tiny First job: 24th Guam Youth Congress representative Pet peeves: “I don’t like rude people. I believe that we should all respect on another.” Program heroes: Kimberly Cruz-Camacho, Brandon Champaco, Kimberly Camacho, Lia Gogue, Mariano Manglona, Sherrie Guthertz, Ian Castil, Terilyn Francisco, Fabriana Quichocho, Jake Quichocho, Bruce San Nicolas, Tyler Taitague

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Fast Forward

Car: Mini Dealer: Prestige Automobiles

he BMW group takes on challenges and seeks innovative solutions — this is not only a question of attitude, but also a way to assure the future. Today, the BMW Group is the world’s most sustainable automotive manufacturer. In the U.S., the recent report entitled “Automakers’ Corporate Carbon Burdens” published by the Environmental Defense Fund found that the BMW Group had reduced fuel consumption and CO2 emissions in the U.S. more than any other automotive company between 1990 and 2005. In Europe, the BMW Group also achieved fuel consumption levels that were the best among any premium auto manufacturer between 1995 and 2008, exceeding the voluntary commitment made by the Association of European Automobile Manufacturers to reduce average CO2-emissions by 25 percent from 1995 to 2008. Such achievements have enabled the BMW Group to be ranked as the most sustainable automotive company in the world for the past four consecutive years as reported in the Dow Jones Sustainability Indexes (DJSI). Innovative fuel and emission reduction solutions are part of the Efficient Dynamics program of the BMW Group, which is integrated throughout the company´s fleet. Since the spring of 2007, well over one

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million vehicles incorporating Efficient Dynamics measures have reached customers around the world. e launch of BMW Advanced Diesel this year will deliver further potential for fuel consumption reduction in the U.S. Later this year, the company will also introduce innovative hybrid systems. In addition to these efforts, the BMW Group is testing more than 600 electric MINI E vehicles in everyday city life settings in Germany, U.K. and the U.S. MINI E is a technological achievement in its own right with a maximum reach of 250 kilometers. BMW Group’s long-term goal is sustainable mobility. ey aim to launch their first Megacity Vehicle with a fully electric drive or an ultraefficient combustion engine by 2015. e whole intention is to contribute to a responsible future without compromise on the quality of the driving experience. For further information, visit Prestige Automobiles. Take a look into its showroom and test drive the current BMW and MINI available. You may call 671-633-2698 to book an appointment today. Content provided by Prestige Automobiles


Fas t Forward

ince the very beginning, one of the main goals at Honda has been to provide reliable, efficient transportation. e new 2010 Insight extends this objective into a new era of hybrid technology that is both affordable and accessible to everyone. To this end, the new Insight was designed to be a five-door hybrid with high fuel economy, an accessible price and superior value. One of the ways Honda has been able to make this car so affordable is to leverage existing technologies that we have developed for and perfected in other models such as the Civic and the Fit. ese include some engine and chassis components. To retain value while lowering costs also requires ingenious and imaginative engineering solutions. For that, we looked to our talented engineers—and the IMA® system. e whole idea behind the design of the Insight was to make hybrid technology accessible to a greater number of people. And more hybrids re-

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placing conventional gas engine vehicles out on the road can only improve things for the environment. To that end, the Insight was designed for excellent fuel economy, of course, but the goal was also practicality and affordability. With an EPAestimated 43 mpg, the Insight ranks as one of the more efficient cars out there. EPA numbers are important, but the way you drive also affects the fuel economy you achieve. e Insight features a remarkable new system that helps boost your efficiency and monitor your own driving habits to maximize your mpg for your driving conditions. It’s called Eco Assist™ and it includes a green ECON™ button that, when pressed, regulates certain vehicle functions to maximize efficiency. e system also features a real-time feedback system to help promote driver awareness of efficient driving habits on a daily and ongoing basis. (Continued on next page)

Content submitted by Prestige Automobiles, Cars Plus and Triple J

Car: Insight Hybrid Dealer: Triple J Honda

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Fast Forward

Car: Civic Hybrid Dealer: Triple J Honda

eanwhile, the Honda Civic Hybrid is a hybrid version of the Honda Civic sedan. Honda added a continuously variable transmission and an Integrated Motor Assist hybrid system similar to that of the Insight, creating a fuel efficient hybrid sedan. For three decades, Honda has played a leading role in meeting environmental challenges. e Civic Hybrid is living proof that environmentalism and style can go hand in hand. e benefits of the refined gasoline-electric powertrain on the Civic Hybrid are never more evident than when you watch those little numbers adding up at the pump. And with an EPA-estimated city/

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highway rating of 40 city/45 hwy mpg, you’ll spend a lot less time there at the gas station. e air also benefits with the Advanced Technology Partial-ZeroEmission Vehicle (AT-PZEV) rating, which is the most stringent emission standard achieved by a gasoline-powered vehicle in the U.S. Both the Honda Insight and Civic Hybrid are distributed exclusively by Triple J Honda, located in Tamuning beside McDonald’s. For more information, please contact Alan Perez, Honda Sales Manager at 648-6111. Content provided by Triple J Honda


Fas t Forward he Hyundai Accent, which gets up to 35mpg, and was voted Most Dependable Sub-Compact Car by J.D. Power & Associates. is is one of the most fuel-efficient vehicles out there, and boasts “more interior volume than a Corolla or Civic.” is vehicle has low emissions, high fuel efficiency, advanced standard safety technologies, and is the epitome of quality and reliability. Although the 2009 Hyundai Accent sedan and three-door hatchback compete in the subcompact market segment, they are classified as compact cars by the Environmental Protection Agency thanks to their efficient packaging and roomy interiors.

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Reviewers give strong praise to Hyundai’s five-year, 60,000-mile bumper-to-bumper warranty and 10-year, 100,000-mile powertrain coverage — among the longest warranties in the industry. ey are also impressed with EPA fuel-economy ratings of 27 mpg city and 33 mpg highway with the manual and 26 mpg city and 35 mpg highway with the automatic. Real-life mileage averages around 30 to 34 mpg, tests reveal. Many reviews say the Hyundai Accent provides the most value in its price class. Information provided by Cars Plus

Car: Hyundai Accent Dealer: Cars Plus

otorcycles have always been associated with freedom and excitement. Motorcycles are also a fuel-efficient alternative to driving a car. Kawasaki offers a variety of MPGfriendly bikes so you don’t have to think twice about taking a ride. From sport bikes to cruisers, Kawasaki has a bike that will put a smile on your face and keep money in your pocket. Kawasaki motorcycles are available through Cycles Plus Guam. Your daily commute doesn’t have to be expensive and boring. You shouldn’t have to worry about driving to hang out with family and friends. Riding a Kawasaki motorcycle keeps more money in your wallet and puts the thrills back on the road. Motorcycles are much easier to maneuver than cars. e superior performance of Kawasaki motorcycles delivers exhilaration at every turn. Not only will you get great gas mileage, you’ll have more fun when you’re on the road. Bikes can park where cars cannot. Motorcycle-parking zones provide an alternative to circling the parking lot hoping that a spot opens up. Kawasaki motorcycles are also more space efficient when it comes to parking in your garage.

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MotorCycle: Kawasaki Vulcan 500 Dealer: Cycles Plus

Information provided by Cycles Plus

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Fast Forward

On Jan. 6, 2009, former President George W. Bush used the authority granted to him by the 1906 Antiquities Act and signed an executive order creating three marine monuments, including the Marianas Trench Marine National Monument. In doing so, the president protected wildlife in more than 195,280 square miles of the Pacific Ocean from commercial fishing and undersea development. While many celebrated the declaration as a milestone for environmental conservation, some complained the monuments fell short of protection goals, while others charged it infringed upon their indigenous rights.

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The Process e wheels for the Marianas Trench Marine Monument were set in motion three years ago when President Bush barred fishing and energy extraction from a huge swath of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Bush’s creation of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument was at that time the world’s largest conservation area, setting the stage for something even greater in the future. As Bush’s final term began to wind down, word circulated that the president was interested in the creation of additional protected areas to


Fas t Forward leave an environmental “blue legacy” before he left office. With the clock ticking, the Pew Charitable Trust began researching possible locations for conservation in the Marianas. Other organizations looked at areas in American Samoa and coastal areas of the U.S. Mainland.

The Proposal Environmentalists sought the protection of the waters surrounding the islands of Maug, Uracus and Asuncion because of their pristine already existing constitutional protections. e uninhabited islands lie at the top of the Marianas chain and the lands are protected under local conservation laws, but the Commonwealth lacked the resources and jurisdiction to administer control over the surrounding waters. Local fishermen thought that the federal government was using the monument as a mask to gain control over indigenous waters, but the water was already being administered by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

Education Campaign Organizers of both sides of the monument issue began education campaigns throughout the CNMI in hopes of gaining support from its constituents. After collecting more than 6,000 signatures from residents and visitors as well as letters from students, island leaders and businesses, the Friends of the Monument petitioned Bush to designate a large area where fishing and mining would be banned. Soon thereafter, the White House ordered an assessment of several sites in U.S. territorial waters in the Pacific for increased conservation and protection.

The Visit In the fall of 2008, the Bush administration sent its environmental adviser to the Commonwealth to assess the political waters surrounding the monuments issue. Upon his arrival on Saipan, James L. Connaughton was greeted at the airport and at his hotel by a crowd of monument supporters. His whirlwind tour of the CNMI included several interviews with the public, local media and government officials.

The Outcome President Bush officially declared the monument’s existence, but he did so after making several concessions. e adjusted monumental protections extend 50 miles from the coastal areas within the Marianas Marine National Monument, but that’s a far cry from the 200 miles sought by activists. In addition to the reduced areas of protections, commercial fishing continued to be permitted portions of the monument.

No Further Progress Compiled by Brad Ruszala

Bush’s Executive Order called for the creation of an Advisory Council consisting of three officials from the CNMI, one representative from the Department of Defense and one from the United States Coast Guard. Nearly six months later, there is no council in place. ere are however provisions in the declaration provide for special considerations and recommendations from the CNMI Governor, the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Homeland Security. In the meantime, monument proponents are pushing for greater protections through Representative Gregorio “Kilili” Sablan while opponents search for ways to water down those in place. summer 2009

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Techie Tools

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Techie Tools

The iPod Touch Being a former owner of the first generation iPod Touch, not to mention a huge Mac geek, let me throw out some info on what you may not know about your first gen iPod Touch, or even second generation iPod Touch revamped with goodies and much, much more. A standard and MUST for handhelds now is, of course, an Internet browser. Safari on the iPod (or iPhone) is a great development for easy browsing through wi-fi or 3G network (iPhone only). is really opened doors for the new App Store from Apple which has more than 15,000 different applications and has hit more than 1 billion downloads, costing you anywhere from zero to $3. With the new built in speakers and microphone on the second generation iPod Touches, you can even download the Skype application and have voice conversations through your iPod Touch on wi-fi or leave yourself voice messages.

The Nintendo DSi I’m very new to the handheld gaming device world, but I’m glad I started with the DSi. At a wallet biting price of $169, you can get yourself a new DSi in baby blue or black. If you’re just finishing off that last payment for tuition like me, if you have the original (bulkier) Playstation 2, a Nintendo DS Lite, and a few controllers lying around you can own your very own DSi for $70.00 and change. Just a word to the wise, if you’re an owner of the Nintendo handheld devices, just know that with the addition of two cameras on this baby, you’re losing your ability to play your Gameboy Advance games or Guitar Hero on the DS. e DSi only supports DS game cartridges. Jump on board and on the Wii Shop download the Web browser and others with the free 2000 Wii points that comes with your new DSi. e Web browser does an alright job with simple pages, but with higher more complicated pages with Flash, Java and advanced HTML, don’t be too sad when your DS doesn’t want to work. What’s great is the addition of an SD card for you to store photos and music on, or pull them off of other devices like digital camera’s and computers to use your DS. I haven’t had a chance to try them, but the speakers sound great on the DS and the photo editing software can be pretty fun.

Going Green

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By Rafael DeAusen

Amazon.com launched its new Kindle 2, a virtual book reader, where pages come to life on your LCD. Paper free books, go figure. ere’s even an iPod Application for the Kindle, to read them on your iPod. e only issue with this is, what do you need a unitasker for? Unless you’re a big reader who wants to save some money on books, eBooks aren’t going to be taking over newspapers, magazines and textbooks just yet. You can’t leave notes, highlight or bookmark specific pages on your Kindle either.


Techie Tools

The Power of the Netbook According to an article called “e Netbook Effect” published in Wired Magazine, the creation of the netbook, the pocket version of a laptop, was almost accidental. Basically, all the creators wanted was a super cheap laptop to appeal to the budget consumers. However, when Asustek launched the Eee PC in fall 2007, it sold out the entire 350,000-unit inventory in a few months. Eee PCs weren't bought by people in poor countries but by middle-class consumers in western Europe and the U.S., people who wanted a second laptop to carry in a handbag for peeking at YouTube or Facebook wherever they were. In the process of creating a laptop to satisfy the needs of poor people, its creators revealed something about traditional PC users. ey didn't want more out of a laptop — they wanted less. It turns out that about 95 percent of what people do on a computer can now be accomplished through a browser. Netbooks have ended the performance wars. It used to be that when you went to an electronics store to buy a computer, you picked the most powerful one you could afford. Because, who knew? Maybe someday you'd need to play a cutting-edge videogame or edit your masterpiece indie flick. But most of the time, we do almost nothing. Our most common tasks — email, Web surfing, watching streamed videos—require very little processing power. What netbook makers have done, in effect, is turn back the clock: eir machines perform the way laptops did four years ago. And it turns out that four years ago (more or less) is plenty. It is now reasonable to design computers that outsource the difficult work somewhere else.

The Big Question With so many things being handheld, portable and multi functional, the big question remains: Where do I throw my cash money? e DSi is not as responsive as my iPod Touch. Loading menus, switching between items and photo editing was slower on the DSi, but it has two cameras versus none on the iPod Touch. With the DS titles you have to spend at least $15on a new game, whereas

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the iTunes App Store has more affordable games, many of them free. You can’t carry your whole life on a DS, but your contacts, e-mail and calendar are easily synced to your iPod Touch. But you don’t have to carry cartridges to play games on the iPod, they’re all built in, which means you’re limited to memory. For me, I sold my iPod Touch to get the 3rd generation iPhone coming out soon. I didn’t feel a need to have two cell phones. I also finally have the DSi to share with myself and my little brother (we returned his DS Lite for a $70 cash back at Game Stop). So, of course, the answer is preference. Do you need a palm pilot-slash-organizer? Are you sucked into your e-mail constantly and can’t live without Internet? Do you enjoy your music library? Grab an iPod Touch or iPhone if you want everything condensed into one device. Do you love gaming? Do you have a library of DS games? Do you have a PS3 and have a PS2 gathering dust? Upgrade yourself and save big when you get the DSi. But don’t forget that every once in a while, you need to put all these fun “life in the palm of your hand” devices and go out and enjoy the island life.

Rafael DeAusen is a contributor for Motions magazine and runs the Web site collegeguam.com.


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Shopping List Bijoux Caronel The Plaza 671-647-4450 Cycles Plus Route 8, Maite www.cyclesplusguam.com 671-472-8326 DNA Evolution The Plaza www.myspace.com/dnaevolutionguam 671-649-2370 Lemon Drops www.myspace.com/lemon_drops 671-727-6077 Puppy Love Guam www.puppyloveguam.com 671-688-6294

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ummer is here and in full effect. What better way to celebrate your summer vacation than with some of my favorite summer must haves for this season? Here you’ll find some things I can’t leave the house without — my favorite summer remedy for great skin and the best place to shop for affordable swimsuits. Happy summer and happy shopping!

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7. Camera What a place to take pictures with family and friends — at the beach. Catch those spontaneous moments with them and cherish those memories forever.

8. Maui Jim Polarized Sunglasses Polarized lenses can eliminate glare from seven different directions and protect your eyes from damaging rays. I take my Maui Jims with me and I’m ready to go.

1. Clarins Sun Care Cream in SPF 20 A must have for everyday use. If you don’t want the “oily” look from the cream, try the Clarins Sun Care Spray. Just a light mist and you are covered. e sunscreen can be purchased at DFS Galleria.

9. Reading Matters Catching up on the latest news, I usually have the following in my beach bag: Motions Magazine, PDN, Marianas Variety, a fitness magazine and the book “Self Matters.”

2. Roxy Cowboy Hat Got it from Primo Surf, must for accessorizing and protecting my face.

3. Green Swimsuit My favorite retail store for a great swimsuit is Loco Boutique, discounted swimsuits that fit any budget. Green is my color for the season.

4. “I am not a Plastic Bag” Bag

10. Banana Boat Aloe After you’re back from the beach, its time to wind down. If you’ve got sunburn, use aloe either from your yard or store bought. My favorite is the Banana Boat version purchased from any ABC store on-island.

See you at the beach!

Got mine on e-bay for $16.00 and another at the Chamorro Village. I use a bag made from natural materials that fits everything from my ipod to my towel, sunscreen etc. Make a fashion statement with anyone of these bags.

5. Snacks To replenish myself, I always have one of these: Quaker Oatmeal Raisin Bar, Planters Trail Mix, Fresh Fruit made at my home and a smoothie from Froots.

6. Fiji Water A must have at the beach, you’ll need to hydrate while out there in the sun. Fiji water is my fave.

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Dwellings

Poised with the best view of Tumon Bay, the Bakers’ residence is resort living brought home.

I build resorts, so naturally, I

wanted something big and open

that feels very comfortable. – Donna Baker

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From the outside of the compound, a massive doorway opens up to a well-manicured lawn, with steps leading up to the entryway. A tall, Indonesian head sculpture stands guard at the entrance, while large square tiles lay as stepping pallets in a freshwater pond that leads to the front door. Upon entering the home, large pieces of artwork immediately draw the eye, many of which are custom made. Donna said most were acquired during her family's travels. Taking a left from the entrance, the living room and formal dining area sit on the left and the kitchen is positioned to the right. Straight ahead is an entire wall's view of the ocean looking north. Donna said this is so there is always a view of the sunset, no matter what time of year. A glass-ball chandelier — custom made by Jude's childhood friend — hangs above the dining table. However, because the couple learned that people usually gravitate toward the kitchen during parties, they

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By Faye Varias. Photos by Arvie Munoz

hen city dwellers go on vacation, they often seek tropical destinations with few buildings in sight. Part of the beauty of living on Guam is just that — we live it. We can lay on the sand and swim in the ocean within minutes, regardless of where on the island we happen to be. For Jude and Donna Baker, that's literal. eir house is built within few feet of Tumon's sandy shore. "Every day is paradise in Guam," said Donna. Her number one goal was to have an open layout to appreciate the surroundings, which meant limiting the use of walls. She also wanted continuity from the inside of the home to what's outside, so she utilized sliding doors and glass along the wall that looks out into Tumon Bay. e modern, two-story residence houses five bedrooms, nine bathrooms, a gym that occupies the entire basement and an enclosed, three-car garage. In addition to Jude and Donna, it is home to their two children and shared pets — three dogs and two cats — with her brother who lives next door.


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built large kitchen islands with ample countertop space for food and drinks. Bar seats also line one side of the islands and a breakfast nook sits on the opposite side, with a picture window allowing a view to the side of the house. Much of the furniture possesses earthy tones, especially the dark, rich cabinetry, which Donna designed and custom ordered through Far Eastern Furnishings. She utilizes texture and color to give the home a comfortable, simple feel. To the right of the entryway sits a guest room, a large laundry room — with two washers and two dryers — and the children's playroom. Although, Donna said, adults play in there as well, especially since there's a tire swing that can hold the weight of an adult.

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Upstairs, the master suite lies parallel to the living space downstairs, so the master bedroom opens up to a balcony view of the beach as well. The master bathroom includes a his and her sink and separate toilets and shower. A hallway filled with photos and more artwork lead the way to the other bedrooms, which include a decorative pink room, suitable for the Bakers' two-year-old daughter as well as a simple boy's room for their two-year-old son. Moving to the back of the house, an infinity pool lined with river rocks is the ultimate view of relaxation as the Bakers retreat to their beach-side cabana to view the sunset. ere is a fountain and outdoor fireplace as well. "We are very fortunate to live here," said Donna. However, she said


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you don't have to have a big budget to live in style. She added that each person has their priorities. For her, it was the cabinetry and appliances, so those were her big-ticket items. Many of the accessories were things she picked up at Ross or Home Depot. "I know the cat will scratch on the rug," she said as she pointed out her centerpiece rug in the entryway, indicating it was only $100 at K-Mart. "It's not how much you spend," she said. "It's how it's presented." She advises people to keep it simple, use a lot of texture, but most of all, it should feel like home.

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Designer’s Direct Main Location 118 Martyr St. Hagatna (Next to Bank of Hawaii) 671-477-6677 Yigo Town Center (Behind Bank of Guam) 671-653-6601

Story & Photos by Alex Salazar

hinking about decorating your home? Don't know where to start or which direction to go? Well, trust that you are not alone. Decorating a home can be overwhelming, especially if you don't have the skills or abilities to hire a professional decorator. But guess what ... you don't have to. At Designer's Direct, you can get professional help at zero cost. Designer's Direct can help you decorate the home of your dreams and make every project easy. So how does it work? Yvonne Rodriguez, manager at the store said all you need to do is ask! "We can go into a customer's home and make suggestions as to which pieces work well together," she said. When the customer is done, they don't even have to worry about where to put their old furniture — Designer's Direct will haul it away as well. Having been a flagship furniture store in Guam for decades, Designer's Direct is a place where you can shop for couches, office furniture, dining sets, accessories — pretty much what you need to decorate your home. e professionals at Designer's Direct will help you narrow down your choices depending on what you're looking for — both aesthetically and fitting to your budget. Most people dream of the "perfect" home. To some, it could be a massive, multi-level house and to others, a comfortable townhouse. Regardless of your idea of "perfect," Designer's Direct will help you achieve that goal. If you don't have a decorating plan already, talk to one of the professionals there. You must know what you're looking for, for what room and for how much money. And the people at the store can help you with that. ey can help you with a step-by-step plan to design your room exactly the way you want it. ey can even help you arrange furniture, layout a floor plan and help recommend items. Working with an interior designer can sometimes be intimidating, but it doesn't have to be. e professionals at Designer's Direct have the training and insight that can help you achieve your goal. And get this, the store does trade-ins! Rodriguez said, "It's something we used to do and have just recently started up again." Basically, if you have furniture that's still in good condition, you can have it evaluated by the store, who will then give you a trade-in value for the items. You can then use that value toward purchasing your new furniture. "We just want to make it easy for the customers," said Rodriguez. "We want to emphasize that while we do carry high-end products, we will work with any customer to fit any budget."


Dish Network

Steak Haven

Three girlfriends hang out at Colors Red for a steak extravaganza. t’s another one of those casual get-togethers – if we didn’t meet up on the particular night planned, we wouldn’t see each other for another two weeks or so. at usually happens when we’re all busy with work and our schedules don’t match up – not even the weekends. Our perfect “re-acquaint ourselves with our best friends” location happened to be Colors Red restaurant – on a Monday evening. e only detriment to having dinner at Colors Red restaurant on a Monday evening is not coming early enough to grab limited window seats on the lower level of the restaurant. e second floor is closed on select weekdays we were told. Otherwise, if thoroughly enjoying the ambiance, the bar, the food and service was a crime, we’d need to be evaluated for our high recidivism rate. Attracted to a separate steak menu, featuring 30 of the restaurant’s signature steaks, I announced that my intention to give up meat was merely an intention and not set in stone, at least until after tonight. I went ahead and ordered the Argentinean steak. Sam commented that time and time again, I prove that my convictions are weak. If I believed that cutting meat from my diet would improve my health, I’d believe it until I give in, like in front of a steak menu. Basically, I’d be a

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vegetarian until I wasn’t. I was a bit confused since this time, health-nut Sam skipped the salads and went straight to ordering the Red steak. Shane decided that there would be no third-party involvement in our little spat about giving up meat for health reasons and ordered the Coconut Crusted Crème Dory from the main menu – the neutral fish in our group. At least there was one thing we all agreed on – crab cakes! Luckily the appetizer menu included Malaysian crab cakes with pickled vegetables and spicy basil remoulade. Sam and Shane decided that they’d also order the spicy sauté of escargot with fresh herbs and Parmesan crisps, much to my dismay because I would never volunteer to eat escargot – ever. Feeling like a silly kid knowing that Sam and Shane would gang up on me with the escargot order, I one-upped them and ordered a cocktail from the bar. Cocktail in hand, I sipped and sipped until the drink helped to quell my feeling of uneasiness of a busy week at work ahead of me. Sam and Shane were relieved too, since a volatile Alex is a disaster waiting to happen. Deep into lighthearted conversation, we were greeted by our crab cakes and escargot. We fought for the last crab cake, and decided to do what wise King Solomon would do and split it. Escargot was a different story – although the


Dish Network appetizer was great, it wasn’t the kind of escargot Sam expected. Shane commented that the escargot tasted like a regular meatball. e Argentinean steak, churrasco style with chimichurri sauce, convinced me that meat still needed to be incorporated into my diet. When I lived abroad, I once stayed near an Argentinean steak house, with the best arrachera and churrasco in all of Mexico, at least to me. Red’s Argentinean steak reminded me of those days, where my reward for a good day’s work was a naturally tough, yet flavorful cut of grilled steak from the steak house. Sam received her Red steak, which the menu describes as garlic herb rubbed with cognac demi glace. It was an enjoyable steak, although the consensus was that the Argentinean steak had a more bold, almost explosive flavor with its chimichurri sauce in comparison to the Red steak. Although at first it seemed like a battle of the steaks, Shane’s crème dory won the top food award at our table that night. Sam and Shane agreed that the crème dory tasted similarly to a type of fish they sampled in Australia – a smooth, almost silky white meat fish. I likened it to a butterfish, although its biological nomenclature would have really been the only way to determine to which fish family the crème dory belonged. Unfortunately, none of us carried our phones

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Photos and Story Alex Salazar

equipped with EVDO. Sam was subconsciously glad, because I would have made for boring company, sounding like a wannabe taxonomist the rest of the night if I decided to do the research on the Internet. Dessert came next. Since none of us have a true sweet tooth, we opted for the dessert tasting platter, which worked well for all of us. After a great meal, great company, and great service, we all decided that work could wait another day. Our work stresses quickly dissipated and we agreed that these restaurant outings need to be more frequent to prevent succumbing to insanity. We’re lucky to have found Colors Red restaurant that night and we’ll probably be lucky to find it again and again.


Dish Network

Delectable Desserts Indulge yourself at these restaurants to experience post-meal nirvana for your taste buds.

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Dish Network

Carol Perez Meskla Carol Perez — Meskla

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Photos and story by Jill Espiritu and Brad Ruszala

hen Carol Perez’s family gets together for barbecues and parties, she can get overwhelmed with requests to cook up some of their favorite dishes and desserts. Lucky for us who aren’t part of her family, we can always find her delectable desserts at Meskla restaurant in Hagatna. “All the desserts at Meskla seem to be good sellers,” said Perez, the pastry chef at Meskla. “Personally, I don’t have just one favorite, but I can say that I usually do more ‘quality checks’ on the cheesecakes.” Perez, half Caucasian and half Vietnamese, was born and raised in Guam. She began her career with Guam Community College’s culinary program. At Guam Community College, she sat in classes taught by such chefs as Peter Duenas, owner and executive chef at Meskla and Christophe Durliat, executive chef of Hilton Guam Resort & Spa. Perez eventually was elected president of the Culinary Arts Students Association and also was afforded the opportunity of an internship in Vietnam for four weeks. Perez’s work experience includes her stint as the assistant pastry chef at Sam Choy’s under Maggie Flores, who Perez considers her mentor, for about two years before settling in her pastry chef position at Meskla. Her years of instruction, as well as on the job experience have contributed to her knack for creating delicious desserts and her artistic presentation skill.

Perez said it’s her life experiences, paired with a strong regard to appealing the senses that inspire her in creating new desserts. During her internship in Vietnam, she gained valuable experience in French culinary tradition. e former French colony still infuses traditional French method in its pastry making and presentation, she said. “I would say consistency is the most important aspect of pastry making,” Perez said. “Anyone can grab a plate and put something together that looks similar to another dessert. In the end, all the flavors have to be in there, too. “So, even if another pastry chef takes over, as long as all the flavors are in there and it looks appealing as well, the customer’s happy,” she added. In addition to scrumptious desserts that can be ordered off of the restaurant’s menu, Meskla also offers guests the opportunity to special order cakes or desserts for special occasions. Since Meskla’s grand opening earlier this year, Perez already has created many personalized cakes for various birthday and graduation parties. Even with the sights and aromas of pastries and desserts surrounding Perez all day, she admits, with a smile, that she doesn’t get tired of them and like many of us, she has a sweet tooth. “As a pastry chef, I have to try all the pastries and desserts to make sure they’re put together right,” Perez said in defense of her sweet tooth. With Perez’s dedication to her craft and her artistry in dessert presentation, we can be assured that any of her desserts are consistently delicious. – JE


Dish Network

Gabrielle Colombo and Demon Tumangger — Hyatt Regency Saipan hef Gabrielle Colombo serves the Hyatt Regency Saipan as its Chef de Cuisine, but he could easily be referred to as the conductor of the Regency’s Culinary Orchestra. His guidance and standards of excellence demand the best out of his staff, while allowing them the freedom to explore their creativity within the limits of the Hyatt brand. “We have certain standards for fresh products and we have to keep these standards, these brand standards,” he said. Despite spending nearly two decades honing his craft, the last four of which have been on Saipan, Colombo said that he still appreciates the compliments he receives from customers on a daily basis. “When people say something is very good, I feel very proud. I feel younger, happy, more motivated and have more energy,” he said. Colombo credits his highly trained international staff for all of the accolades he receives. Italian by birth, Colombo’s staff includes a veteran Pastry Chef from Indonesia who has thrilled local residents and tourists alike with his passion for perfection. Chef Desman Tumangger has 15 years of experience, and much like the varied ingredients in his creations, his staff of Chinese, Indian, Chuukese, Indonesian, Chamorro and Filipinos works together in

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Gabrielle Colombo Desman Tumangger Hyatt Regency Saipan

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harmony producing pleasures for the palate. For our feature, Chef Desman produced two of his favorite desserts: Mango Snow Spumoni and the ever popular Chocolate Dome. Chef Desman described his spumoni as “simple, but nice” and stressed that all of his creations are made from scratch. Unlike magicians, Chef Desman was all too willing to share his spumoni secrets. “It’s not very difficult and anyone can make it,” he said. e key ingredients are the best quality mangoes, and Chef Desman said that process starts far in advance of mango season by forging strong relationships with local farmers. While it is a seasonal dish, Chef Desman said that you can enjoy the dish all year long if you harvest the mangoes, peel them and store them in your freezer. Chef Desman described the Chocolate Dome as the Hyatt’s specialty. At one point his staff was eager to curb the dome and branch out with a new list of desserts, but they were unable to do so. “We tried to stop making it a while back but we kept getting too many requests from our regular guests,” he said. e Chocolate Dome is a warm dessert made with a French style that is very light and requires minimal cooking time. Chef Desman said that the Dome has evolved over the years with a combination of influences. “Why can’t we find any of these in a book? Because we substitute and combine different ingredients. What the guests like, we keep. What they don’t like, we take out. We’re not stuck with what the books say. We have to constantly improve,” he said. – BR


Dish Network

Mark Duenas — Sweet Relief ust a simple appreciative nod of awestruck satisfaction from customers is enough validation for the countless hours Sweet Relief pastry chef Mark Duenas puts into his desserts. “I like seeing customers’ initial reactions of excitement upon seeing a dessert presented to them,” Duenas said. “en after trying the dessert, they give that head nod that said the dessert met or exceeded their expectations. It’s very rewarding.” Duenas has over eight years working with pastries and desserts. Duenas embarked on his pastry voyage beginning at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse in the restaurant’s pastry kitchen while living in Portland, Oregon. Later, Duenas received more on the job training at award winning bakery, Piece of Cake, and finally at Papa Haydn for about three years. Both Piece of Cake Bakery and Papa Haydn, established in the late 1970s, have won numerous nationwide awards for their pastries and cakes. Papa Haydn’s desserts have been featured in such publications as Gourmet Magazine, e Oregonian and Willamette Week, among other local and national media. e cakes from the restaurant have such a loyal following that a cake delivery service to cities across the United States had to be started to meet the demand, its Web site states. Duenas returned to Guam about four years ago to begin on a restaurant and pastry shop venture with Chris Bejado, Geoffrey Perez and Ed Cruz. Proa Restaurant, located at the main entrance to Y’pao Beach Park, was introduced and later, Sweet Relief was born, where Duenas currently is the pastry chef. At Sweet Relief, Duenas, with the help of kitchen staff, rolls out several desserts daily, including the popular banana fritters, crème brulees and several types of cakes among others. “Even items not on the daily menu that people know about from before, they’ll ask about them,” Duenas said. Duenas and his team won second place in last year’s Chef’s Cup with their

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Chocolate Wasabi Cheesecake entry, an unusually delicious combination. “at year, the theme was Asian,” Duenas said. “Geoff pulled different desserts with different Asian ingredients, like sesame oil, hoisin sauce and wasabi. It turned out that chocolate and wasabi paired well. We entered it into the competition and won second place.” In addition to daily desserts, Duenas takes orders for cakes for different events, including weddings and birthdays. Cakes can range from simple sheet cakes, multiple tiered cakes, to more abstract designs. e abstract designs, which utilize various geometric shapes from rectangles to circles to triangles, are a new style of cake package offered by Sweet Relief. Each cake can be different types of cake, Duenas said. “One of our cooks here wanted to give a cake to his girlfriend, but he wasn’t sure which type,” Duenas said. “He said she liked carrot cake, chocolate and apples. I thought about it and asked, why can’t we have a sampler style cake? We could give him everything he wanted in one package.” Duenas said he and his staff will work with guests to create the perfect dessert or cake for their special occasions. With enough lead time, special orders for ingredients not available in Guam may be made. For extravagant wedding cakes for example, orders should be made at least a month in advance for proper planning and shipment of ingredients from off island. “Standards for cakes have gone way up,” Duenas said. “People will watch the show Ace of Cakes on the Food Network and ask to have really big specialty cakes.” Although Duenas and his team will take the challenge of making these large specialty cakes as seen on television, the amount of work required to make them, as well as factoring in Guam weather constraints and the shipment of specialty items can make them quite pricey. e result, though, would be mind-blowing and the talk of the town for years. With the satisfaction of overcoming these challenges, as well as his love and dedication to his craft, he sees pastry and dessert making a lifelong career. Now that’s a sweet relief for all of us. -JE

Mark Duenas Sweet Relief summer 2009

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Photos and story by Jill Espiritu and Brad Ruszala

Done with work? Don’t go home just yet. Take a look at some of these happy hour spots to de-stress after a long day.


Dish Network

Where Everyone Is Family sk most people what they’re looking for in a good Happy Hour spot and you’ll get a similar answer from all of them. If you’re looking for good music and cold drinks at a good price, then look no further than Godfather’s Bar. Nestled in the heart of Saipan’s party district rests a little piece of the big city where everyone’s family. It’s hard to say what first catches your eye when you walk through the door at Godfather’s. Is it the collection of news clippings and photographs of famous and infamous members of the Gambino crime family or is it the girls? Okay, it’s the latter by a mile, but that’s not to say that in between glances at the waitresses that you won’t notice the pictures John Gotti, Sammy e Bull, Frank Nitti and Al Capone on the wall. While there isn’t an official Hall of Fame for organized crime, Godfather’s Bar offers an homage to the notorious “Goodfellas” with an amorous salute to their history. e Godfather’s concept was born out of Scott Dottino, Ron Biggers and Dave Rogers, who were determined to have a little fun with the business. “Well, between me, Ron and Dave we figured we had over 100 years between us drinking in bars during our life. We decided that Saipan needed some kind of new bar scene, and that’s when we decided to have live bands every night. No other bar had that,” said Dottino. So why the gangster theme? “We went with the mafia theme because most people are fascinated by the ‘Mafia,’ which is just a word that was made up by the media years ago. We try to be unique from any other bars that we have visited ourselves and being that I am from New York, I have seen and know that kind of business well. I will not say anymore than that!” Godfather’s regular and good friend, Dr.

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Ed Cornett, provided most of the paraphernalia that adorns the walls, but Dottino said that he welcomes additions from his customers all of the time. “We also have come up with many ourselves along with pictures and history stories about different ‘mafia’ families. Also customers randomly will bring in ‘mafia’ propaganda for us to hang in the bar.” You don’t have to worry about Tommy Guns firing but you never know when Godfather’s will randomly pour free shots for everyone at the bar. “What we take pride in at Godfather’s Bar is our service, quality of customers, staff, and you know at anytime you can come to Godfather’s and see someone you will know. It’s kind of like an after work meeting place, only with cheaper

prices on drinks and friendly waitresses.” Without a doubt, one of the main draws to Godfather’s is the wait staff. e bar’s website boasts the hottest servers on island, and that’s not an overstatement. e Godfather’s girls tempt the most “untouchable” eye with their shapely figures and form-fitting uniforms. Upon your arrival at Godfather’s bar, you won’t get more than a couple of steps through the door before you’re greeted by Leah, Cora, Emmy, Vanessa, Edz, Beah, Mary Ann, Beah 2, Melody or Jinky. Just don’t take them for granted, as good looks and hot bodies aren’t their only qualities. “e hot chicks we have are hard workers and great with customers and that is a main quality we look for when hiring staff. Personality is everything, along with honesty,” said Dottino.


Dish Network

Aside from its huge crowd of regulars, Godfather’s Bar has seen its share of VIP’s over the years, including USA Gold medal Olympic Medalists Phil Dalhausser, Filipino actor Chris Peralta, New Zealand’s Katchafire Band, Bonten Tatto Family from Japan, Greg Macalesee from Crime Stoppers, the former manager for Jane’s Addiction, Aaron Cohen and Uncle Willie K from Hawaii. In addition to dropping in for a visit, Willie K also played for the Godfather’s crowd two nights in a row. “What we take pride in at Godfather’s Bar is our service, quality of customers, staff, and you know at anytime you can come to Godfather’s and see someone you will know,” said Dottino. With great drink prices, a pool table and live music every night, God’s is the place to go for Happy Hour from 4pm ‘til 7:03pm. But why the extra three minutes? “Happy Hour used to end at 7pm but that changed one night when a regular customer that came in and asked for a drink at 7:03pm. He complained when that it was still before 7pm and he should get Happy Hour price, when actually his watch was fast and he was wrong. We changed it after that and made a permanent joke out of it for everyone,” said Dottino. –BR summer 2009

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Business Schmoozing t the end of play, friendly competition within the business community becomes a little more friendly than competitive. Happy hour, at many bar and lounge establishments, is the prime time to meet a hodgepodge of members of Guam’s business community and government sector with, surprisingly, a common goal – to relax after a hard day’s work. “I spend the day at a high level of stress, so I’d like to distress in a nice atmosphere with good service,” said Kristal Koga, namesake of clothing line, e Kristal Kollection. “I find in Guam that the places I seem to gravitate to are Sam Choy’s on Wednesdays or ursdays, Café Havana on ursdays and Fridays and Outrigger’s Bambu Bar to hear Jesse (Bais) and Ruby (Santos).” Happy hour can play a dual role for Koga. In one instance, she can be out at an establishment to meet with a business client, or in some cases, she produces a fashion show to showcase her new line of clothing, which includes styles and designs typically worn in the office. In both cases, Koga agrees that happy hour is the most opportune time to accomplish her business goals. “When meeting with clients one on one, I find that happy hour is a great way to get to enjoy with them, get to know them better, build a relationship and still get home in time to tend to family obligations and prepare for the next day,” said Koga.

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Koga said that in choosing a certain venue, live music and spacious seating are some of her imperatives. From her experience living in Hawaii, she tends to enjoy establishments which feature live music, as it was common in most places there. As for the spacious seating, it just makes business sense. “Spacious seating with lots of room between tables, so, though it may be quite chatty and noisy, you can’t hear in detail what the next table is discussing, is a very important aspect for me,” said Koga. Cafe Havana, located at Hyatt Regency Guam, provides a spacious locale, with a semielevated rectangular bar surrounded by tables and separated booths. Happy hour includes drink specials and complimentary pupus. With its design conducive for her fashion shows, Koga has chosen to hold many of her shows at Café Havana during happy hour, after which clients also are able to purchase clothing on the spot. “I find it very relaxing for my clientele to attend a show after work, where they can enjoy good service and offerings of the happy hour establishment, paired with our fashion,” said Koga. “e venues where I find it a perfect fit to host our shows are Sam Choy’s and Café Havana. I have a history of working with both establishments, as well as their management.” –JE


Dish Network

A Relaxing Night for Two or many couples, happy hour can be seen as a mini celebration for the completion of another long day at work, where their reunions helps them to de-stress before heading home. Newlyweds Rex and Jeralyn Abaya have spent several happy hours together to catch up with each other after work and also to unwind before returning home to prepare for the coming day. In finding the best spot for happy hour Rex Abaya seems to find himself looking for places that offer the best drink specials, food specials or places with new promotions for happy hour. “I like to look for places that are new or have new promotions usually just to see what they have to offer,” said Rex Abaya. “From there, if the promotion is ongoing or if the new place offers a comfortable environment I may choose to frequent it for future happy hour meetings.” Jeralyn Abaya agrees with her husband. She also added that depending on how she feels after work, the volume of music at certain locations also is a determining factor when she chooses her happy hour spot. “Sometimes, I just want to go out for a drink or two and, more importantly, chat about things that stressed me out at work,” said Jeralyn Abaya. “In that case, I wouldn’t want to go to a place where the music is too loud and I’d have to compete when I’m talking. “Other times, I just want to de-stress. I’ll be a bit tired after work and not want to have to worry about carrying too much of a conversation. is

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is when I look for places with good music or a live band to watch,” she added. e Point, located at Sheraton Laguna Resort Guam, provides an elegant, yet comfortable backdrop for happy hour, particularly on Friday evenings. With drinks specials presented by Titan Imports and complimentary pupus, the lobby level bar is frequented by many couples during happy hour. Many stay past happy hour, as well. Cocktails, which are concocted from one or more of a variety of liquor brands including Chivas Regal, Kahlua, Alize, Jameson, Patron, Absolut, Tarantula, Wild Turkey and Malibu among others, start from $4 depending on its alcohol components. Shots range from $4 to $7. Glasses of wine start from $5, and if a bottle is purchased, the establishment practices a bottlekeep concept, where the bottle purchased is reserved for that particular purchasing party. e guests constantly have their glasses re-filled until the bottle is empty. For several weeks, e Point also has been promoting new Tequila Rose sample tastings from happy hour and into the night until 10PM Additionally, raffles are held where guests are able to win small prizes, as well as complimentary bar tabs for three drinks on the menu, among others. is all happens while Acoustic Soul performs on stage to entertain the bar’s guests. In July, Titan will be promoting the new Mango Absolut. –JE

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Game On

Hiking just isn’t normally a priority on my list of things to do. It must have been the hike to Lost Pond about 10 years ago when I was crossing some knee-deep water along wet rocks and I slipped and dropped my old-school SLR camera into the ocean. e waterlogged camera could not be fixed because the salt from the ocean water corroded its interior metal parts. It also could have been the hike I took when I was in Chiapas, Mexico, to see the Misol-Ha cascade. I was told to be careful walking along the extremely thin edge of a cliff to the site because if I were to slip and fall, I would tumble to my death. e warning was just as frightening in Spanish as it would have been in English. e ledge wasn’t roped off to assist visitors then like it is now.

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To me, taking a hike to see beautiful natural wonders or hidden relics is a love-hate relationship. I could think of all the excuses not to go, but when I do, I’m amazed at what a little trek through jungles or along beaten paths could produce — a breath-taking waterfall, historical relics and natural rock formations among others. In my little adventure one Sunday morning, I discovered remnants of Fonte Dam, built in 1910, as an order from then U.S. president William Howard Taft to supply fresh water to Hagatna. Although the dam does not serve its original purpose today, the almost 100-year old red brick spillway dam definitely is a site to see. e trek is fairly easy, thanks to a project led to completion by Boy Scout Will Smith to make the trail to the dam site wider, clearer and safer.


Game On

Just as my hiking luck would have it, on my way over back to the trail from the river, one of my feet slipped right into some muddy, murky water. I kept my balance so I wouldn’t fall completely in the river. I guess it was nature’s way of giving me a constant reminder of my little Sunday afternoon hiking excursion to Fonte Dam. Heading back to the trailhead, I was greeted by a few dogs and their owners walking the trail as well. e hike seemed to be like a leisurely walk for them with their pets. Quite easy to find and relatively simple to access, Fonte Dam is a part of Guam’s history I would recommend anyone, of any hiking skill level, to see. Stop with the excuses and just do it — that was my mantra that sunny afternoon and it should be yours, too.

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By Jill Espiritu. Photos by Faye Varias.

A plaque with the inscription “Fonte Dam” marks the trailhead, located near the Nimitz Hill fire station. As soon as I saw the plaque, I knew I was in the right place to begin the hike to the dam. I felt like an interloper disturbing nature as I continued my trek through lush greenery and the jungle. I walked through some parts of the trail, jumped down in some areas and ran down slight slopes. After nearly 30 minutes, I found myself standing at the peak of the dam looking down the red brick structure. It was an anomalous sight – to be surrounded by the thick of the jungle, lined by beetle nut trees of various sizes, only to find a completely man-made structure in its interior. I descended to the river area to see the dam and its water cascade from a different angle. Opting not to swim, I stood on some rocks in the river to admire the dam before I would begin my trek back to the trailhead.


Game On

Recommended Hiking Supplies • • • •

Drinking water Sunblock Insect repellant Simple first-aid kit

Optional Items • Swimming gear (if you’re hiking to a waterfall or any other body of water) • Camera • Food or energy bars

To participate in group hikes in Guam, the Guam Boonie Stompers lead hikes to different sites weekly on Saturdays. Meeting point: Center court at Chamorro Village Meeting time: 9AM Fee: $2.00 per hiker over 12 years old Information: 671-653-2897 or through e-mail, davelotz@ite.net In the CNMI, several hiking trails are also available. To book a trek with a group, contact Marianas Trekking at 670-322-0770 or e-mail marianastrekking@saipan.com. You may also visit the company’s Web site at www. marianastrekking.com/english.html

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En Route

City Hopping Hop on a three-hour plane ride north and venture beyond Tokyo to Japan’s second metropolis, Yokohama. s recently as the 15th century, Yokohama was nothing more than an obscure fishing village home to barely 600 people. As the first Japanese port that opened its gate to the world in 1859, Yokohama created an interesting blend of Japanese and western cultures, commemorating its 150th anniversary of the port-opening in 2009. Today, it is Japan’s second largest city, with a fresh atmosphere, fine dining, historic parks and a multitude of shops. A popular date spot for locals, Yokohama is less than half an hour from Tokyo, making it an easy side trip for many visitors and a popular convention location for businesspeople. For those of us on Guam, traveling to Japan may be a bit scary, especially if we can barely say “konnichi-wa,” let alone try to figure out the rail system. But there are tons of ways to experience the city with a guide who speaks perfect English. Lucky for me, my guide on this trip was my multilingual father who’s been to Japan at least once a year in the past 20 years. Come with me as we discover the sights, sounds and tastes that reveal the lure of the Japanese culture.

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En Route

Photos and story by Alex Salazar

Yokohama

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Down to Business As an animal lover who someday wishes to own a pet business, my trip to Yokohama had one main purpose — attend the Japan Pet Fair and Business Show. However, as most business people will discover, there is so much more to Yokohama than the convention center. Sum It Up: Yokohama has an extensive range of convention facilities from the world-class complex, Pacifico Yokohama to the Nissan Stadium, which hosted the FIFA World Cup final in 2002. Yokohama is also known as the city rich in excitement with unique attractions such as the world’s biggest Chinatown, expansive shopping districts, such as Queen’s Square, and a traditional Japanese garden and hot-spring facility. Must See: Visitors can’t miss the view of Yokohama from the top of the Landmark Tower, the tallest building in Japan standing at 970 feet. e observatory is located on the 69th floor, with the Sky Garden offering a 360-view of the city, from where you can see Mt. Fuji on a clear day. You can also enjoy cocktails with a view on the 70th floor, which houses the five-star Yokohama Royal Park Hotel’s Sky Lounge Sirius. e hotel takes up floors 49 to 70 of the tower. When to Go: While the view from Landmark Tower is excellent during the day, the nighttime view is spectacular as the city comes to life when lights come on.

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En Route

Local Style Dining Japanese cuisine offers a great variety of dishes and regional specialties. Many of them fall under the following categories: rice dishes, such as sushi and fried rice; seafood dishes, including sashimi and grilled fish; noodle dishes, such as ramen and udon and many more. Sum It Up: ough many dishes are distinctly Japanese, some foods are influenced by other countries, such as the chahan, which came from the Chinese. One restaurant of note is Gansen, a small eatery in Akihabara. If you ever wondered if there was anything better than the chahan and karaage one of our local spots are known for, you have to check out this place. As with many foreign countries, there are certain behaviors considered taboo at the dinner table, such as burping, talking about unappetizing topics, and blowing your nose. Table manners to be noted include emptying your dishes to the last grain of rice, moving all your dishes to their original places, including putting your chopsticks back in their paper slip, serving other people beverages before serving yourself and waiting for everyone at the table to be served before starting your meal. Must See: Unloading of the tuna at the fish market. e Tsukiji Fish Market is the biggest wholesale fish and seafood market in the world and also one of the largest wholesale food markets of any kind. e “inner market” is the licensed wholesale market, where the auctions and most of the processing of the fish take place, and where licensed wholesale dealers (approximately 900 of them) operate small stalls. e “outer market” is a mixture of restaurants and wholesale and retail shops that sell kitchen tools and supplies. Pull up a stool in front of one of the many ramen stands and enjoy hot soup on a cold day. When to Go: e best time to visit the Tsukiji Fish Market is at the break of dawn when the products arrive by ship, truck and plane from all over the world. e auctions start at 5:20 a.m. and tourists can watch the proceedings from 5 to 6:15 a.m. e market is closed the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month, Sundays, and holidays.

Up and Around e view of ships sailing in and out of the harbor and seagulls flying overhead combine to make you enjoy the taste of Yokohama as a port city. But because the city is so close to Tokyo, there’s a plethora of things to see around the area as well. Sum It Up: Within Yokohama, scenic views are a plenty, with Yamashita Park offering a romantic view of the Bay Bridge as ships pass and the Harbor View Park overlooking the Yokohama Port. Interesting places include the curry and ramen museums. A little outside the city, Ueno Park offers a picturesque backdrop during the spring. It is also home to Ueno Zoo, Japan’s first and most famous zoo. For those of us that are kids at heart and want to go to Disneyland, you don’t necessarily need to travel 13 hours to do so. ere’s one in Tokyo. Must See: Cherry blossom season. Viewing is easy. Finding a place to do so can be difficult. Cherry blossom viewing traditionally involves a picnic party under the blooming trees and have been held in Japan for many centuries. Today, they are held in public and private gardens and parks across the country. Famous cherry blossom spots can get very crowded, and the best picnic spots are fought after. A popular place to view cherry blossoms is at Ueno Park, where many “spots” are taken by 8 a.m. It’s amazing that even with so many people, it’s a rarity to see trash, because everyone respects their hometown. I was particularly struck by the trash bins, which had eight different containers to sort different types of waste. When to Go: Unless your convention dates are set, the best time to visit Japan is during spring, between March and April, when cherry blossoms are in full bloom. It is one of the main reasons many travelers visit Japan. e most important factor in determining the blooming time of cherry trees is the geographical location. Basically, the milder the climate, the earlier the cherry blossoms open. summer 2009

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NIKKI GARRETT

Š 2008 Oakley, Inc.

available at

&

dna dna evolution open daily //10am-11pm // The Plaza//T umon Bay Guam 649-2371 // www.dn aevo.com


Motions Vol. 1 Issue 3