Page 1

Most l yMedi cai d TheMedi cai dBi gPi ct ure You Need.I nUnder5Mi nut es .

IS IT D EA D? Job l i s ngs PAGE 18

Jo b s

Heal t h Ref or m News Page5

HEALTH REFORM

XX Spr i ng2010 SPECI AL ANALYSI S-MEDI CAI D FI NANCI AL REALI TYA SCARY STORY TOLD W I TH PI CTURES P.10 Qual i t y

+I nnova on News P. 3

Fr aud RxUpda t e NewsP. 15 P .1 3


4th Annual

Medicaid & Medicare Marketing & Enrollment Congress

Advanced strategies to optimize enrollment, maximize retention and ensure compliance in an era of change Medicaid Toolkit

Medicare Toolkit

• Drive Creative Partnerships with Advocacy Groups to Expand Outreach Dollars under Limited Budgets

• Receive Key Updates on Healthcare Reform and its Impact on Marketing to Increase Plan Compliance

• Maximize ROI on Marketing Initiatives in Tight Budgets

• Integrate Marketing Across Different Media Channels to Grow Age-In and Current Enrollee Market Share

• Master Meeting EPSDT Well Visit Goals Through Innovative Checkup Outreach Programs • Improve Member Retention and Quality Outcomes For Better Regulatory and Financial Outcomes • Grow Maternal Post-Partum Visit Rates through Overcoming Barriers to Improve HEDIS Scores • Understand the changing demographics of your plan and community to provide culturally competent services and give providers to the tools to make necessary changes

• Create Compliant Customer Service Approaches to Identify and Respond to Today’s Senior Population • Understand the Evolving Medicare Sales Strategy to Prepare for a Post-Reform Environment • Explore Innovative Marketing and Retention Strategies for Medicare SNP Plan Growth • Leverage Best Practices to Maintain Quality and Boost Enrollment During Peak Periods

Actionable Insights from the Plans & Thought Leaders You Admire Most Aetna • Amerigroup • Amerihealth Mercy • Blue Cross Blue Shield of AL • Blue Cross Blue Shield of MN • Blue Cross Blue Shield of SC • Boston Medical Center Healthnet Health Plan • CareSource • Community Partners • Louisiana Dept of Health & Hospitals • Medica Health Plans • Molina Healthcare of Ohio • Neighborhood Health Plan • Oklahoma Healthcare Authority/SoonerCare • OmniCare • Passport Health Plan • Priority Health • State of Maryland • UCare • UC Berkeley • UPMC Health Plan

March 22-23, 2010 • Hilton Baltimore • Baltimore, MD Mention priority code XP1514MMad when registering

www.iirusa.com/mmo


QUALITY AND INNOVATION NEWS 

ƒ

Very few doctors see enough Medicare patients to report reliable quality metrics 

ƒ

CMS releases meaningful use regs for EHRs 

 ‐ Kristin Patterson and MM Staff      Sample size does not compute   

Calculating Medicare Quality Metrics - Not Enough Patients Seen to be Accurate 328

The whole  world  may  be  abuzz  with  using  quality  metrics  to  reform  payment  ‐  there's  just  one  big  problem.  According  to  a  study  published  in  JAMA  in  December  2009,  most 

180

primary care  physicians  don't  even  see  enough  Medicare  patients  to  calculate  the  current  Medicare  quality  measures  with  statistical  validity.  Put  simply,  their  Medicare  patient  traffic  is  too  low  to  tell  if  they  are 

Average Seen by Physicians

Mammography Sample Size Needed

improving quality or cost. The lowest sample size needed is 328 patients (for mammography) and the  highest needed is more than 19,000 patients (for hospital prevention). Most physicians see less than 180  Medicare patients each year. If Medicare quality and cost measurement are to be the standards moving  forward, this ain't looking good.1     Regulations Defining Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records Released    When  the  American  Recovery  and  Reinvestment  Act  of  2009  was  signed,  the  law  included  the  Health  Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH).   HITECH gives CMS the authority  to  establish  criteria  for  the  utilization  of  EHR  technology  within  the  healthcare  system.  Under  the  proposed regulation, meaningful use is defined by CMS and ONC as “an eligible professional or eligible 

3


hospital that,  during  the  specified  reporting  period,  demonstrates  meaningful  use  of  certified  EHR  technology in a manner that improves quality, safety, and efficiency of health care delivery, reduces  health  care  disparities,  engages  patients  and  families,  improves  care  coordination,  improves  population  and  public  health,  and  ensures  adequate  privacy  and  security  protections  for  personal  health information.”2    During  the  first  year  of  participation  in  the  program  both  eligible  professionals 

More news over at the Mostly Medicaid Blogs   

and hospitals  must  demonstrate  they  have  performed  one  or  all  of  the  following  criteria:  1)  acquired  and  installed an EHR system 2) trained staff,  deployed tools and exchanged data or 3)  upgraded  a  certified  EHR  system  by  expanding 

its

functionality

and

interoperability.3  

  blog.mostlymedicaid.com  where the best Medicaid minds mingle. 

Furthermore, participants  must  also  satisfy  additional  annual  requirements  such  as  30  percent  Medicaid  patient  volume  (for  professionals),  average  length  of  stay  of  25  days  or  fewer and 10 percent Medicaid patient volume (for hospitals).4    At  first  glance,  the  initial  cost  of  implementing  an  EHR  system  might  be  too  expensive  for  operating  budgets; however, eligible professionals can receive up to $63,750 over a six year period while hospital  payments are determined by a formula that benefits those with a high Medicaid patient volume.  If the  proposed  regulation  is  passed,  providers  should  consider  this  an  opportunity  to  implement  an  EHR  system at a lower cost. Moreover, incentive payments could begin as early as October 2010 to eligible  hospitals  and  January  2011  to  other  providers  which  would  help  ease  the  immediate  cost  burden  of  implementing or upgrading a system.5    The  proposed  regulation  contains  many  incentives  to  accelerate  and  facilitate  the  adoption  of  health  information  technology  by  individual  providers  and  organizations  throughout  the  healthcare  system. 

4


Participants will see that the costs of implementation will be offset by improvements to patient safety  and quality, reduction of medical errors and acquisition of a loyal patient base.            

HEALTH REFORM NEWS  ƒ

Updates on the madness 

ƒ

States that  have  already  broadened  health  care  coverage  say  that  the  Senate  overhaul  bill  unfairly penalizes them 

ƒ

Looking at managed care firms and incentives for reform 

ƒ

Medicaid expansion by having Medicare pick up the full tab for duallies 

 ‐Brendan Stern, Clay Farris, and  Kristin Patterson 

Given the direction of current political winds,  the Great Health Reform Debate may be over  soon – so we thought we’d talk about it one more time.     Updates on the madness  It has truly been head‐spinning to try to keep up with the health reform changes / ideas proposed each  day. In December, some senators were trying to lower the Medicare eligible age to 55 as well as extend  mandatory  Medicaid  coverage  to  families  with  incomes  up  to  $33,075.  Those  wacky  politicians  also  proposed  requiring  insurance  companies  to  spend  90%  of  premiums  on  services,  building  in  a  profit  limit. Sort of like only giving to charities who have lower admin costs?    

"We are,  in  a  sense,  being  punished  for  our  own  charity."

Oh, before we forget ‐ Harry Reid (who's admittedly on  our naughty list for his shameful pork slinging ‐ see last 

5


issue) compared  opposition  to  passing  his  health  reform opus to opposition to abolition. We know  that all's fair in love, war and US politics but that  low‐blow is just downright disgusting.     States  have  been  aware  for  a  while  that  they  would  be  the  one  paying  for  the  grand  federal  vision  of    healthcare  being  crafted  in  DC  right  now‐  but  now  states  are  also  starting  to  realize 

It Pays to Wait  Costs to Your State Under Health Reform  Proposals  What  you  pay  if  you  have  already  worked  to  expand  20%  Medicaid in your state    What  you  pay  if  you  have  NOT  already  worked  to  expand  Medicaid in your state 

5%

that the new financing model of Medicaid will be  pretty  unfair.  Unfair,  you  say?  Oh  yeah‐  especially  if  you're  a  state  that's  already  been  working  to  expand coverage. If you have already worked to increase your own Medicaid rolls, you'll get about 80‐ 95%  of  any  new  expansion  efforts  under  health  reform  paid  for  by  the  feds.  If  you  have  not  been  expanding  coverage  up  until  now,  you'll  get  back  95%.    Taxes  from  states  like  Arizona,  California,  and  New York will be going to bring other states up to speed.      And that's the same story for about 20 states that have already been expanding coverage before now.  NY's Governor Peterson has said that "We are, in a sense ,being punished for our own charity." Arizona  has calculated that the new taxes that the health reform package will exact from its state will be about  $17B.  If  it  would  not  have  expanded  coverage  already  (it  did  so  back  in  2001),  the  health  reform  bill  today for AZ would be about $1.4B.  In this formulation of the costs, Arizona would be overpaying for  health reform by about $16B.     Finally, EVERYONE will be paying for Nebraska Medicaid if sleezeball Ben Nelson's deal to get his state  exempted  from  paying  for  health  reform  goes  through.  In  case  you've  been  living  under  a  rock  ‐  the  Senator from Nebraska held out his vote for safe passage of the bill so he could bargain it for one huge  piece of pork. 6       

6


"The special  deal  for  Nebraska  was  wrong;  expanding  it  makes  it  even  worse.  Even  today,  Medicaid  struggles  to  serve  those  already  on  its  rolls,  and  a  full  40  percent  of  doctors  refuse  Medicaid  patients  because the federal government can't foot the bill. Adding 18 million more people to an already limping  program  is  not  the  reform  Americans  want  and  would  have  tremendously  serious  consequences."  – Senator Mike Johanns (R), Nebraska     Managed Care Firms and the Incentives for Medicaid Expansion  Managed  Care  Organizations  are  chomping  at  the  bit  as  the  prospect  of  expanded  state  Medicaid  programs,  positioning  themselves  to  reap  the  benefits  that  such  an  expansion  would  create  for  capitated health management businesses. In 2009 the health insurance industry lobby, America’s Health  Insurance  Plans,  released  a  Lewin  Group  report  to  substantiate  cost‐saving  claims  made  by  MCO’s  in  various  Medicaid  programs.  The  report,  Medicaid  Managed  Care  Cost  Savings  –  A  Synthesis  of  24  Studies,  while  not  the  most  unbiased  document  ever  written  on  the  topic  of  Medicaid  cost  savings,  nonetheless  reveals  a  great  deal  about  the  strategic  aims  of  the  managed  care  industry  as  it  seeks  to  position itself to favorably benefit from potential changes to the public insurance market.     Unsurprisingly, many of the current woes experienced by MCO’s serving Medicaid populations would  be redressed to varying degrees by expanding Medicaid:    1.

2.

Transitory Enrollment  –  Since  many  Medicaid MCO enrollees are covered by the  Transitional  Assistance  to  Needy  Families  program  (TANF),  their  short  enrollment  periods  cause  churning  and  raise  administrative  costs  for  the  group  as  a  whole.    Expanded  Medicaid  ranks  would  obviously  reduce  this  churning  and  help  to  flatten  the  cost  curve  beyond  the  few  months  of  eligibility  currently  enjoyed  by  TANF beneficiaries.  Oddly  enough,  AHIP  lists  poverty  as  a  barrier to MCO’s ability to coordinate care –  Language  barriers,  lack  of  transportation,  and  other  poverty‐related  issues  pose  a  hindrance  to  care  management  in  the  opinion  of  the  Lewin  Group.  The  Senate 

Democratic bill  in  its  current  form  would  standardize  Medicaid  eligibility  at  133%  of  the Federal poverty line, combined with the  increased  overhead  from  such  an  expansion,  this  could  help  dedicate  more  resources to the neediest enrollees.       3.

Prescription Drug  Rebates  –  MCO’s  do  not  qualify  under  the  Medicaid  Drug  Rebate  Program,  meaning  drug  companies  don’t  need to grant them the ‘lowest price,’ as a  state  Medicaid  agency  would  be  able  to  obtain.  Expanding  Medicaid,  along  with  granting  MCO’s  ‘most  favored’  status,  would  give  MCO’s  more  bargaining  power  and lead to reduced pharmaceutical costs. 7 

7


Another Way of Looking at  All of This    With  all  the  talk  over  healthcare  expenditures  breaking  the  bank,  the  funny  thing  is  spending  on  Medicaid  has  not  really  increase  proportionately  to  GDP.  The  punchline  –  WE’RE  SPENDING  WAY MORE ON EVERYTHING.               Have Medicare Pick up the Full Tab for Duallies to Finance Medicaid Expansion    Medicaid expansion has been one of the leading health reform proposals in both the House and Senate.  But with states facing budget gaps of at least $350 billion from 2010through 2011, having states fund  the expansion seems insane.8     The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act provided $87 billion from October 2008 through 2010 for  states  in  the  form  of  an  increase  in  the  federal  share  of  Medicaid.  However  these  stop  gap  funds  will  expire at the end of 2010 and a number of states have yet to experience a full economic recovery.9     

8


The House  bill  could  expand  Medicaid  eligibility  to  150  percent  of  the  FPL  and  the  Senate  Bill  could  expand Medicaid eligibility to 133 percent of the FPL.  Both bills plan to finance Medicaid expansion with  high  federal  match  rates  for  new  enrollees  and  current  match  rates  for  current  enrollees  and  new  participation of those currently eligible.10    The  result,  however,  would  be  continued  state  and  regional  variation  in  terms  of  costs  and  eligibility,  with  higher  costs  and  coverage  in  Southern  and  Western  states  compared  to  the  Northeast  and  Midwest.  There are different approaches to finance Medicaid expansion that argue for improvements  to the current system. Many of these actions, if undertaken, would be enough to cover the costs of new  enrollees.    

Dual eligibles  (those  receiving  both  Medicaid  and  Medicare  benefits),  for  example,  makeup  nearly  8.8  million of  the Medicaid population and account for  over  40  percent  of  overall  Medicaid  spending.    Although  dual  eligibles  constitute  just  17  percent of the Medicaid population, their care is split between programs, with Medicare responsible for  acute care while Medicaid pays for long‐term care services, dental care and other benefits not covered  under Medicare.11    If the federal government assumed all costs for dual eligibles through Medicare, including premiums and  other services not currently covered by Medicare, states would save approximately $69.8 billion dollars.   If  Medicaid  expansion  is  passed,  this  cost  saving  measure  would  be  able  to  cover  new  enrollees  and  avoid  perpetuation  of  inequities  within  the  current  system.  This  suggestion  is  only  one  of  many  that  question  the  relationship  between  Medicare  and  Medicaid.  Rather  than  working  independently,  the  benefits  of  some  Medicare  enrollees  are  being  financed  by  Medicaid  funds  which  forces  states  to  continually  restrict  Medicaid  eligibility  requirements  and  reduce benefits. The opportunity to reform the allocation  of  funds  and  sever  the  relationship  between  Medicare  and  Medicaid  systems  is  here.  Hopefully,  the  federally  government  would  look  at  alternative  financing  options  like this one before a bill is passed.  

If the  federal  government  assumed  all  costs  for  dual  eligibles  through  Medicare,  including premiums and other  services not currently covered  by Medicare, states   would save approximately   $69.8 billion dollars. 9


SPECIAL ANALYSIS 

MEDICAID FINANCIAL  REALITY‐  A  SCARY  STORY TOLD WITH PICTURES  ‐Brendan Stern    Much  has  been  said  about  the  fiscal  pressure  states  face  when  they  have  to  balance  their  budgets in tough times.  Here’s a sobering visual depiction of what that means.      Figure 1: Total Revenues from State and Local Taxes Billions

1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400

Total Revenues from State and Local Taxes

200 0 1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Source: www.census.gov/govs/www/qtax.html

Figure 1 shows total revenues from state and local taxes for all states between 1997 and 2009. Despite  the dot‐com crash in early 2000 and two subsequent wars, state revenues held strong for most of the  past decade before taking a dive in tandem with the housing market. To be fair, much of the increase in  tax revenues could be attributed to the housing bubble itself. Yet  there is no denying that the 

pie grew between 1997 and 2008: 78% according to the Census.  Rarely does one see  a truly state‐centric illustration of the Medicaid equation, but Figure 2 depicts only the state’s share of  Medicaid expenditures over the same time period:    

10


Figure 2: Total State Medicaid Expenditures

180 160 140

Billions

Total State Medicaid Expenditures

120 100 80 60 Total State Medicaid Expenditures

40 20 0

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Source: CMS

As the revenue pie grew, so too did state Medicaid expenditures: staying between 10% and 12 % of total  revenues until 2009. As Figure 3 illustrates, 2009 marks the first time that state Medicaid expenditures  grew  significantly  when  compared  to  state  tax  revenues:  from  an  average  of  about  10%  from  1997  –  2008 to 18% in 2009.      

Figure 3: Total State Medicaid Expenditures vs State Revenues

Total Revenues from State and Local Taxes

20%

1,400

18%

1,200

Billions

State Medicaid Expenditures as Percent of Total State Revenues

16% 14%

1,000

12%

800

10% 8%

600

6%

400

4% 200

2% 0%

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Source: www.census.gov/govs/www/qtax.html

11


Obviously there  has  been  increased  federal  assistance  made  available  to  states  to  help  cope  with  the  effects of rising unemployment and bulging Medicaid rolls, but if tax revenues do not rebound in short  order states will have difficulty navigating the post‐ARRA world without some type of reforms made to  the joint state and federal program. As a final illustration, Figure 4 depicts the percent change in state  tax  revenues  alongside  the  percent  change  in  state  Medicaid  expenditures:  something  (or  more  accurately, some people) must give.     Figure 4: Change in State Medicaid Expenditures vs Change in State Revenues Percent Change in State Tax Revenues

Percent Change in State Medicaid Expenditures 20% 10% 0%

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009 -10% -20% -30% -40%

Source: CMS & U.S. Census Data

12


Pharmacy        Update           

  The Atypicals Battle: Version 2.0      The atypicals issue we've been covering for 2 years now is back in the Medicaid news cycle. Rutgers and  Columbia just released a study showing that Medicaid kids are more likely to get atypical antipsychotics  (very  powerful  drugs  with  high  off‐label  usage)  than  privately‐insured  kids.  The  disparity  is  especially  concerning  given  the  severe  weight  gain  and  other  common  side‐ effects.  The  drugs  are  designed  for  severe  mental  health  issues  like  bipolar  disorder,  but  often  kids  are  being  prescribed  these  drugs  without meeting the indications for such conditions. These drugs are big  money  for  pharma  ‐  raking  in  nearly  $8B  in  Medicaid  sales  alone  for  2006.  The  Rutgers/Columbia  study  looked  at  data  for  seven  state 

According to the  study, Medicaid  kids are 4 times  more likely to  get the drugs. 

Medicaid programs  between  2001  and  2004.  According  to  the  study,  Medicaid kids are 4 times more likely to get the drugs.12    

13


We’re on Facebook and Twitter, too! Look us up searching “medicaid”  or “mostly medicaid”         

14


FRAUD NEWS    ƒ

NY Medicaid thinks $53M in overpayments is not worth going after 

ƒ

Gettin’ High on the Taxpayer’s Dime  

ƒ

And Other Fun Fraud Facts 

        We  all  know  some  money  is  going  to  get  wasted  when  you're  slinging  around  billions  (soon  to  be  trillions)  of  taxpayers'  dollars  ‐  but  come  on!  These  nuggets  from  NY  Medicaid  seem  like  the  punchline  of  some  really  bad jokes (see the nuggets sidebar).   Keep in mind all this happened in only  a  five  year  period  according  to  the  state  comptrollers  report.  The  state  comptroller DiNapoli‐ said "The state's Medicaid system is leaking millions  of taxpayer dollars." And that's just the waste identified in his most recent  audit. DiNapoli has ID'd more than $400M in improper payments (including  fraud)  over  the  past  3  years.  When  he  tried  to  get  the  NY 

Medicaid agency  to  go  after  the  $53M  lost  to  duplicate member numbers, he was told that that  was  not  a  lot  of  money  compared  to  the  billions  spent each year. Makes you feel good, right?  

A few  nuggets  from  a  recent  NY  Comptroller  Report      ‐ NY spent almost $200,000 in  taxi fare for one woman to go  see  her  kid  in  a  long‐term  care  facility.  That's  300 bucks  a day round trip.       ‐$53M  was  blown  because of  duplicate  member  IDs  for  26,000 members      ‐$20M  was  lost  because  someone  input  the  wrong  payment  rate  into  the  claims  system    

Putting it in context  In 2007, the median household income in the Bronx was $34,156. That $53M equals the annual income  of 1,531 people living in the Bronx. Bet they wouldn't mind if NY government officials tried to get some  of that back and give it to them, huh?13   

15


You Just Can't Get Ahead These Days- Must Be the Tough Economy, Right?

Gettin’ High on the Taxpayer Dime  

$53,000,000

As part  of  the  American  Recovery  and  Reinvestment  Act  of  2009  (ARRA),  the  Medicaid  program  will  receive  about  $87  billion  in  federal 

-$53,000,000

assistance due  to  a  greater  federal  share 

of

Medicaid

spending.

However, with  an  increase  in  federal  aid  to  state  Medicaid 

Waste due to duplicate IDs that NY Medicaid agency said was not worth recovering

programs, fraud  and  abuse  of  the 

Annual Income for 1,551 Bronx Residents

system is  likely  to  increase  due  to  loopholes exploited by beneficiaries, providers, criminals and pharmacies. An area of great concern for  the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) focuses on the fraudulent and abusive purchases  of controlled substances by tens of thousands of Medicaid beneficiaries and providers.   A  recent  report  by  the  Government  Accountability  Office  (GAO)  discovered  about  65,000  Medicaid  beneficiaries from five selected states (California, Illinois, New York, North Carolina and Texas) obtained  the  same  type  of  controlled  substance  from  six  or  more  different  medical  providers  during  2006  and  2007.  Prescription  drug  payments  to  these  particular  states  accounted  for  40  percent  of  all  Medicaid  prescription drug payments in 2006 and 2007. GAO determined that these beneficiaries were employing  techniques  such  as  doctor  shopping,  falsifying  Medicaid  enrollment  using  the  identity  of  dead  individual(s) and attributing prescriptions to dead doctors by pharmacies barred from receiving federal  funds, to obtain excessive amounts of controlled substances.  Investigations  by  GAO  also  uncovered  other  issues,  such  as  doctors  over  prescribing  medication  and  writing  controlled  substance  prescriptions  without  having  required  DEA  authorization. 

Such

activities have caused  the Medicaid system to overpay about $63 million. The $63  million in overpayments, however, does not include the additional cost to other related medical services 

16


and personnel,  such  as  doctor  and  emergency  room  visits,  that  precede  the  distribution  of  these  prescription drugs.14  In  some  instances,  beneficiaries  used  the  aforementioned  activities  to  either  support  their  own  addiction  or  profit  from  the  illegal  sale  of  these  drugs  on  the  street.  The  most  frequently  abused  controlled  substances  by  Medicaid  beneficiaries  were:  narcotic  painkillers  (e.g.  Lortab,  Vicodin,  OxyContin and Percocet), non‐narcotic stimulants (e.g. Adderall and Ritalin) and non‐narcotic sedatives  (Lunesta, Ambien). Most of these drugs are categorized as Schedule II or higher and have a potential for  abuse  and  physical  dependence.  With  an  estimated  20  percent  of  the  U.S.  population  having  used  prescription  drugs  for  non‐medical  purposes,  the  demand  for prescription drugs is steadily rising. This new market as 

The Empire STRIKES Back

well as  the  potential  profits  will  help  spur  an  increase  in 

The results  of  the  birth  of  the  Medicare  STRIKE force are in. Although the program  only  recently  begun,  OIG  reports  that  the  STRIKE  force  has  lead  to  charges  against  138 people, 44 convictions and $40.7M in  identified  funds  that  could  be  recovered  (see  our  Summer  2009  issue  for  background on the STRIKE force, a special  team used to target Medicare fraudsters).     

fraud and  abuse  cases  for  CMS.  Unfortunately,  states  and  CMS  have  yet  to  standardize  criteria  to  prevent  fraud  and  abuse of the system.  Although  the  Controlled  Substance  Act  of  1970  requires  that  any  person  who  manufactures,  distributes,  imports,  exports  or  conducts  research  with  controlled  substance  must register with the DEA, it does not require pharmacies  to  report  dispensing  information  at  the  patient  level.  This  loophole  makes  it  difficult  to  catch  and  prosecute  abusers  of  the  system  immediately.  Failure  points  in  the  national 

SOURCE: OIG  Releases  Semi‐Annual  Report  to  Congress.'Medicare Update. Dec 3, 2009  http://medicareupdate.typepad.com/medicare_upd ate/2009/12/oigsemiannualreport.html?utm_sourc e=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign =Feed%3A+MedicareUpdate+%28Medicare+Update   %29&utm_content=Google+Reader  

and state systems include:   1.

2.

Medicaid officials  (in  the  five  selected  states)  were  not  following  federal  regulations  by  checking  both  federal  debarment  (EPLS)  and  HHS  OIG  lists  to  determine  if  an  individual  or  entity  was  barred  from  federal  contracts  and/or  excluded  from  Medicare  and  Medicaid  programs  

3.

State offices  do  not  periodically  compare  Medicaid  beneficiary  database  to  death  records  

4.

No uniformity  in  the  application  process  into  the  Medicaid  program.  Duplicate  enrollment is likely to occur, which in turn,  makes  fraud  more  difficult  to  identify.15

States are  not  required  to  purchase  the  DEA’s registrant database  

17


Job Listings      Hey‐ We know it’s tough out there.  Here’s                                                             a few Medicaid‐specific opportunities.       Join our LinkedIn group for more contact info on job posters.    

Position / Description  Healthcare Analytic Consultant   Medicaid Guru needed! (Northeast) Medicaid Payer Relations Specialist   Have you managed Medicaid payer relations for a clinical lab? If so, we need to talk!   Lead Medicaid Program Analyst     Sr. Account Executive (Managed Care) To view details and apply referencing req  #1587, visit our web site at www.apshealthcare.com  PBM Project Manager for a >3 yrs long term State Healthcare(PBM)  assignment(Boston, MA)  "Medicaid Programmer Analyst" for one of the long term State Healthcare(MMIS)  Project(Raleigh, NC)   "Medicaid Programmer Analyst with Provider Exp" for one of the long term State  Healthcare(MMIS) Project(Raleigh, NC)   “Project Lead” AND “Team Lead/Tech Lead” positions for a State Healthcare(MMIS)  project(Jefferson City, MO)      MANAGED CARE EXECUTIVES ‐ SC, MS, GA, MA   Vice President of Operations     Organizational Change Management Leader     Software Quality Assurance Analyst / Tester ‐ State Healthcare Project.  

Mainframe Programmer Analyst ‐ State Project ‐ Long‐term   MICROFOCUS COBOL Programmer Analyst – State HealthCare Project  

Contact Info  Dan Lefeld   dan.lefeld@thomsonreuters.com  Mamie Woods  mamie@phcconsulting.com  Lou Boozer   lboozer@b2btalentsolutions.com  Jason Foss     Srinivasa Reddy   Dsrinivasad@s2tech.com   636‐442‐1000(Ext 225)   Srinivasa Reddy   Dsrinivasad@s2tech.com   636‐442‐1000(Ext 225)  Srinivasa Reddy   Dsrinivasad@s2tech.com   636‐442‐1000(Ext 225)  Srinivasa Reddy   Dsrinivasad@s2tech.com   636‐442‐1000(Ext 225)  Pamela Ratz DeVille  PamD@HealthCareerProfessionals.com  Peter Blau, Healthcare Executive  Search  Steve Kinnear  727‐446‐8494  skinnear@mypeakconsulting.com  Kiran V   636‐ 489‐0157 EXT ‐‐ 219   Fax : 314‐754‐9839   kranthiv@s2tech.com  Kiran V   636‐ 489‐0157 EXT ‐‐ 219   Fax : 314‐754‐9839   kranthiv@s2tech.com  Kiran V  

18


Position / Description 

Contact Info 

636‐ 489‐0157 EXT ‐‐ 219   Fax : 314‐754‐9839   kranthiv@s2tech.com 

Boston–Looking for a Consultant familiar with Medicare/Medicaid Cost  Principals,cost allocation methodologies, knowledge of the federal Medicaid  program and other health and human services programs.   Director Public Sector Claims ‐ New Mexico   Contract Operations and Specialty Health Plan Specialist ‐ Medicaid Division  Colorado Department of Health Care Policy & Financing   Exciting Facets Configuration Analyst / Facets Business Analyst/Facets PM and  Facets Architects   Physical Managed Care Contracts Specialist ‐ Medicaid Division Colorado  Department of Health Care Policy & Financing    

Matt McLaughlin  mamclaughlin@pcgus.com  Peter Peterson  Executive Recruitment Strategist at  UnitedHealth Group  Jim Vogel  Program Performance ‐ Colorado  Medicaid  Michael Brown  mbrown@hptechnologies.com  Jim Vogel  Program Performance ‐ Colorado  Medicaid   

 

19


REFERENCES 1

'Liberal Senators Press for Expansion of Medicare.'NYT. OBERT PEAR and DAVID M. HERSZENHORN. December 7, 2009  ;  Relationship of Primary Care Physicians’ Patient Caseload with Measurement of Quality and Cost Performance. JAMA.December  15, 2009   http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Content/Publications/In‐the‐Literature/2009/Dec/Relationship‐of‐Primary‐Care‐ Physicians‐Patient‐Caseload‐with‐Measurement‐of‐ Quality.aspx?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheCommonwealthFund+%28The+Com monwealth+Fund%29&utm_content=Google+Reader    2 "CMS  AND  ONC  ISSUE  REGULATIONS  PROPOSING  A  DEFINITION  OF  MEANINGFUL  USE  AND  SETTING  STANDARDS  FOR  ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD." Cms.hhs.gov. CMS, 30 Dec. 2009. Web. 29 Jan. 2009.  3

"CMS Information Related to the Economic Recovery Act of 2009." Health Information Technology. CMS, 15 Jan. 2010. Web. 

30 Jan. 2010. <cms.hhs.gov/Recovery>.  4

"CMS PROPOSES REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS (EHR) MEDICAID INCENTIVE PAYMENT PROGRAM." 

Details for:  CMS  PROPOSES  REQUIREMENTS  FOR  THE  ELECTRONIC  HEALTH  RECORDS  (EHR)  MEDICAID  INCENTIVE  PAYMENT  PROGRAM. CMS, 30 Dec. 2009. Web. 28 Jan. 2010. <http://www.cms.hhs.gov/apps/media/press/factsheet>.  5

"Medicare and  Medicaid  Programs;  Electronic  Health  Record  Incentive  Program;  Proposed  Rule."  Federal  Proposed  Rules. 

Regulations.gov,

13

Jan.

2010.

Web.

29

Jan.

2010.<http://http://www.regulations.gov/search/Regs/home.html#documentDetail?R=0900006480a7c4a8>. 6

 "States With Expanded Health Coverage Fight Bill." KATE ZERNIKE.December 26, 2009  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/27/health/policy/27states.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss  7 http://www.californiahealthline.org/articles/2009/10/13/california‐could‐incur‐high‐costs‐from‐plans‐to‐expand‐ medicaid.aspx; http://www.ahip.org/content/default.aspx?docid=27090;   http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gm81TTE7a0EUL9JlzVML1dnH2N2gD9BL9MB80  8

Bowen Garrett,  John  Holahan,  Lan  Doan  andIrene  Headen.  “The  Cost  of  Failure  to  Enact  Health  Reform:  Implications 

forStates.” Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Urban Institute, September 2009.  9

"American Recovery  and  Reinvestment  Act(ARRA):  Medicaid  and  Healthcare  Provisions.”  Medicaid  Spending  and 

Budgets.Kaiser Family Foundation, Oct. 2009. Web. 1 Feb. 2010. <kff.org>.  10

Holahan, John. "Alternatives for Financing Medicaid Expansions in Health Reform." Medicaid/CHIP. Kaiser Family Foundation, 

11 Dec. 2009. Web. 1 Feb. 2010. <kff.org>.  11

"Dual Eligibles:  Medicaid’s  Role  forLow‐Income  Medicare  Beneficiaries."  Resources  on  Dual  Eligibles  and  Issues  Related  to 

Their Transition to the New Medicare Drug Benefit. Kaiser Family Foundation, Aug. 2009. Web. 2 Feb. 2010. <kff.org>.  12

'Poor Children Likelier to Get Antipsychotics'. DUFF WILSON December 11, 2009. NYT      'Audit Says State Wasted $92 Million on Medicaid,'NYT. December 22, 2009   14 Fraud  and  Abuse  Related  to  Controlled  Substances  Identified  in  Selected  States.  Government  Accountability  Office.  13

Congressional Request, Sept. 2009. Web. 16 Jan.2010. 

www.smpresource.org/.../HealthCareFraud/Medicaid/GAO_Medicaid_controlled_substances.pdf‐;  Kiely,  Kathy.  "GAO  report:  Millions  in  fraud,  drug  abuse  clogs  Medicaid."  Usatoday.com.  USA  TODAY,  29  Sept.  2009.  Web.17  Jan.  2010.  <http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009‐09‐29‐Medicaid‐drug‐abuse‐fraud‐Michael‐Jackson_N.htm>. 

20


15

"In  U.S.,  Prescription  Drug  Abuse  Is Growing."  MedlinePlus.  Ed.  Wilson  M.  Compton.  National  Institutes  of  Health,  30  Dec. 

2009.Web. 15  Jan.  2010;  "Medicaid  Fraud  and  Detection."  Detection  and  Reporting  Fraud.  U.S.  Department  of  Health  and  Human Services, 5 Aug. 2009.Web. 18 Jan. 2010; "Prescription Drug Abuse." Medline Plus. National Institutes of Health, 31 Dec.  2009. Web. 18 Jan. 2010. 

21

Spring Issue  

Medicaid news

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you