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ontents contents

Introduction ................................................................1 Intoduction ..............................................................................3 Councillor’s Visions Toward 2050...........................................4 Vision, Mission & Principles....................................................6 The Place ................................................................................7 Mosman’s Management Plan – MOSPLAN ..........................8 Our Finances ........................................................................12 Our Workforce Plan ..............................................................14 Managing Our Assets ...........................................................16


Governance .............................................................20

contents

Governance Introduction ......................................................23 Council, Community & Consultation ....................................24 Resource & Asset Management ..........................................28 Community Safety ................................................................32

Environment ............................................................36 Environment Introduction .....................................................38 Urban Planning .....................................................................40 Planning & Built Environment ...............................................46 Sustainability, Environment & Health ...................................50 Parks & Recreation ...............................................................54 Transport & Traffic .................................................................58

Social ..............................................................................62 Social Introduction ................................................................64 Community Development & Services ..................................66 Library & Information ............................................................70 Cultural Development & Services ........................................74

Economic ...................................................................78 Economic Introduction .........................................................80 Local & Regional Economy ..................................................82

Appendices..............................................................86 A NSW State Plan – Points of Alignment.............................90 B Community Engagement & Consultation .......................92 C Community Profile ............................................................94 D Financial Forecasting .....................................................110

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duction introduction

Proud to be Mosman Protecting our Heritage Planning our Future Involving our Community

4

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


1


introduction

2

introd

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Introduction For almost 20 years, Mosman Council has led the way and benefited from careful management planning. This year, Councillors have developed a series of visions towards 2050 and these take the lead position in MOSPLAN on the following two pages. The 10 year Community Strategic Plan; the 4 year Development Plan and the 1 year Operational Plan incorporate objectives leading to the 2050 visions. Through this plan, the Council seeks to ensure that the community’s wishes are carried out and that the characteristics that make Mosman unique, are strengthened. These include the many beautiful bays and beaches, the conservation areas that maintain Mosman’s heritage, the rich history and the safe, healthy, vibrant harbour-side lifestyle that can be enjoyed by all. This plan is based on community feedback gathered during ‘Street Speak’ conversations and online consultation designed to capture and establish shared objectives for Mosman’s future. It will be realised with continued commitment from both the community and Council combined with a high level of collaboration with the many other agencies and organisations that are involved in Mosman.

duction

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vision

vision 2050

Urban Planning

Domestic scale architecture maintained except on Spit/Military corridor. Traditional strip shopping centre appearance and vitality reinforced. A maximum population of 30,000 in 2050 (presently 28,356) A maximum 700 new dwellings provided over the next 40 years. A diversity of housing choice to ensure a demographic mix including ‘ageing in place’. Adoption of sustainable lifestyle and building options for new and existing buildings encouraged. The special natural and man made qualities of foreshore and open space areas protected and enhanced. Mosman’s heritage conserved. Spit Junction recognised as having potential for imaginative commercial/retail/residential development to complement the traditional Military Road strip shopping precinct and the new village hub and commons.

Environment

Climate change addressed using strategies that include mitigation, adaptation and resilience measures in order to play our part in the global future. Long-lasting sustainable behaviours fostered and improved through raised awareness/knowledge of sustainability concepts. Lifestyle and the environment enhanced through sustainable building practices. Biodiversity preserved and enhanced on both private and public property including beaches, reserves, bushland and green open spaces. Green renewable energy sources, and energy efficiency and conservation measures adopted for both private and public property. Total water cycle management approaches used that maximise conservation, efficiency, reuse and recycling of water including stormwater harvesting and reuse. Waste reduced significantly through avoidance, minimisation, reuse and recycling via local and regional initiatives.

Transport

State/Federal Governments lobbied regarding rail option on Roseville corridor. Bus and ferry services for Mosman and the Northern Beaches improved so that people prefer using public transport as the mode of choice. No further expansion of capacity of the Spit/ Military corridor, but reallocation of that capacity to give buses priority when needed. No further elimination of parking along the corridor. Wynyard bus interchange capacity issues solved. Reliance on private vehicles for short journey to work/recreation trips reduced. Community transport expanded. Opportunities for pedestrian and bicycle transport maximised at local and regional levels. Local accessibility within Mosman improved for the convenience and lifestyle of residents. Northern Beaches linked more directly to the metropolitan freeway network.

Sustainable transport taken up using an integrated network of walking and cycling paths throughout Mosman. Sustainability outcomes improved by lobbying Federal and State Governments to advocate for stronger policy and legislation. Sophisticated approaches such as sustainability indicators, lifecycle management and systems-thinking used to address sustainability challenges.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Community

Economy

Community services enhanced for all age groups including affordable child care, parent support groups, youth, ageing in place and people with a disability.

Diversity and safety in centres with a mix of business and residential uses in proximity to leisure and entertainment throughout the day and evening.

Cultural facilities developed including the enlargement of the Library and Art Gallery, and provision of a local performing arts theatre.

A tourism destination built on our artistic heritage and marketed in conjunction with local business representatives and landholders.

Community connectedness for all age groups encouraged by:

Roles of small and large business centres reinforced by diverse local outlets catering for the community, especially the elderly.

ƒ enhancing volunteering opportunities ƒ facilitating intergenerational activities ƒ providing social outlets such as Men’s Sheds and community gardens ƒ involvement & enjoyment of Festival activities ƒ neighbourhood activities such as street parties ƒ people friendly community spaces Innovative and accessible consultation methods continuing to be provided for residents to engage with the Council and become involved in community life. Active recreational pursuits encouraged, especially for young people through provision of sports facilities and support of local sporting groups.

The unique character and heritage of all Mosman’s business centres enhanced by appealing, highamenity public spaces. A range of suitable accommodation options for visitors including B&B and small residential hotels. Shops and services easily accessible by walking, riding, driving or community/public transport. Business activities including home businesses and clusters meeting emerging work patterns and expectations.

Health and wellbeing of residents improved through developing programs and linkages that promote healthy lifestyle, and working with other levels of government and medical practitioners to ensure the provision of local health services including mental health services. Cultural and spiritual diversity, celebrated.

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introduction

vision

vision 2050


duction introduction

Vision

Proud to be Mosman Protecting our Heritage Planning our Future Involving our Community

Mission To protect and enhance the distinctive qualities of Mosman in a responsive, friendly and caring way. Both are supported by a set of values: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

integrity leadership selflessness objectivity

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

accountability openness honesty respect

Principles SUSTAINABILITY and INNOVATION are valued highly by Mosman Council and the community together with collaborative partnerships with neighbouring councils especially SHOROC comprising Mosman, Manly, Pittwater and Warringah. These principles underpin MOSPLAN - our Community Strategic Plan. Council firmly believes that it is important to have an ambitious, visionary plan for Mosman that positions us ready for change and able to make decisions with better consultation and our own local government authority.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


introduction

Mosman occupies 8.7 km2 and is surrounded on three sides by the waters of Sydney Harbour and Middle Harbour; it features many beautiful bays and beaches punctuated by rugged headlands and sandstone cliffs. In this context the harbour plays a significant role in the life of the local community. Mosman Council maintains 90.6 kms of sealed roads and 34 hectares of bushland.

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duction introduction

Mosman’s Management Plan - MOSPLAN Including Councillors’ visions towards 2050

The Community Strategic Plan is the overarching document that expresses Council’s long-term strategic direction for the local government area of Mosman. It contains longterm objectives, priorities and financial implications. This Plan is supported by two other documents, the Four Year Delivery Plan, and the One Year Operational Plan. The three tiers are known as MOSPLAN.

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Document

Purpose

Responsibility

Review Cycle

Community Strategic Plan

To express the long term, 10 year and beyond, strategic direction of Council, the objectives, the priorities and their financial implications.

This is the commitment to the Mosman community by the Council.

Once every 4 years – usually following Council elections.

Delivery Plan

The Delivery Plan supports the objectives of Council's 10 year Community Strategic Plan.

This 4 year plan is a commitment to the elected Council by the General Manager and the Administration. Key officers are responsible for ensuring the outcomes within the forward financial plan.

Every year this plan is reviewed to ensure that the programs are on track to achieve the 4 year and 10 year objectives.

Operational Plan

This one year plan drives the outcomes to be achieved through the 4 year Delivery Plan.

This is the responsibility of the General Manager and the Administration. Specified officers are directly accountable for the actions and associated budget.

Every year this plan is reviewed in conjunction with the 4 year Delivery Plan. Each action is reported quarterly to Council to monitor progress.

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


introduction

There are many more documents that support and inform MOSPLAN. The supporting documents focus in detail on specific areas of service delivery. The Environmental Management Plan and the Community Environmental Contract are integrated into MOSPLAN. The employees of Council each have a position description and individual performance plans with links to the actions and objectives listed in MOSPLAN. In this way the objectives of MOSPLAN are achieved. In addition, managers and staff are measured on the achievement of those objectives and actions. MOSPLAN ensures that Mosman Council can deliver services to the Mosman community effectively, efficiently and in a planned logical and financially viable way, always working towards achieving the community’s short and long term objectives. For details regarding the alignment of MOSPLAN with the NSW State Plan please refer to Appendix A.

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duction introduction

The three tiers of MOSPLAN are each set out under four themes:

Governance

Environment

Social

Economic

This pie chart represents percentage expenditure across the four themes:

Environment

60%

Social

14%

Governance

25%

10

Economic

1%

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


introduction

The four themes divide into 12 programs which then divide into 70 sub programs – each sub program addresses a specific service area. At the one year operational level the subprograms list the actions that must be carried out to achieve the objectives of the four year Delivery and ten year Community Strategic Plan.

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duction introduction

Our Finances

Sustainable infrastructure improvement and replacement continues to be the biggest driver of Council’s forward financial position.

Our extensive range of high quality, cost effective services and facilities are maintained but will of course always be reviewed in the light of our community engagement processes and affordability. Matching grants from Commonwealth and State Governments in recent years has meant our debt service ratio has increased and our unrestricted current ratio has eroded. Deliberate decisions have been taken to address community and environmental infrastructure shortcomings. In recent years, fair value asset revaluations combined with a massive injection of funds into capital works have increased the gap between cash funding availability and depreciation offsets. While some Councils have chosen to under-value both depreciation and work backlogs our commitment is to an open and transparent approach to asset management. Debt Service Ratio - Consolidated

Unrestricted Current Ratio - Consolidated 2.00

9.0000%

1.80

8.0000%

1.60

7.0000%

1.40

6.0000%

1.20

5.0000%

1.00

4.0000%

0.80 0.60

3.0000%

0.40

2.0000%

0.20

1.0000%

0.00

0.0000%

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Financial discipline and adherence will be required to achieve the forecast ratios over the life of the plan.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


introduction

Rate pegging has not matched the consumer price index however the 10-year plan shows that the reliance on rate revenue (exclusive of capital revenues) decreases over the next decade by 5.5%. Notwithstanding this fact, the plan reflects a determination to move from a net working funds deficit to surplus in 2013/14. The 10-year financial plan acknowledges a decline in industry major financial indicators, but at no stage is the Council’s financial autonomy brought into question.

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duction introduction

Our Workforce Plan

Council employs 163 full time equivalent staff. There are slightly more female employees than male and the average age is 44 years. The Workforce plan identifies five areas that may present challenges over the coming years and that must be addressed, monitored and managed at Mosman Council, these are: ƒ An ageing workforce, multi-retirements and the potential loss of corporate knowledge, 31% of employees are over 50 years of age ƒ The exiting from the organisation of the General Manager ƒ The skills shortage making it very difficult to fill some positions ƒ Attracting employees to fill vacant positions ƒ Retaining existing staff The workforce plan lays out a number of strategies that are specific to each program delivery area. To assist in ensuring that the services are not threatened, there are a number of corporate strategies that can be put in place to address the identified issues. Many have already been implemented through the Enterprise Agreement (2009). At the present time the retention rate is over 90% an improvement of 8% since 2006.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Council Workforce FT&PT 2009

introduction

Genders of Council Staff

Retention Rate 2004-2010 100.0% 95.0% 90.0% 85.0% 80.0% 75.0% 70.0% 65.0% 60.0% 55.0% 50.0% 2004-5

2005-6

2006-7

2007-8

2008-9

2009-10

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duction introduction

Managing Our Assets

We own and use approximately $0.5 billion of non-current assets. These include: ƒ Marine structures ƒ Parks and ovals ƒ Buildings ƒ Footpaths and Roads ƒ Retaining Walls There has been direction from State and Federal levels for Local Government to develop and implement asset management policies to manage, account for and plan for assets in a sustainable way. By working to these plans, Local Government can ensure appropriate funding is directed to key assets and the community is delivered an appropriate level of service. Mosman’s adopted framework for asset management is built on best practices and is open and transparent. The key elements include: 1. Asset Management Policy – This establishes the direction and identifies why we are undertaking this approach 2. Asset Management Strategy – This details the means by which we will go about ensuring assets are managed in a suitable way. 3. Asset Management Plans (AMP) for Individual Asset classes – These provide the detail to manage each asset and include items like assets conditions, life cycle analysis, replacement costs and future maintenance.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


introduction

Our journey into best practice asset management has already started with the adoption in 2009 of our Council Asset Management Policy and Asset Management Strategy. In 2009 the draft Buildings AMP was completed and 2010 saw the draft Stormwater AMP achieved and the engagement of a consultant to complete the Road AMP. There are many challenges ahead as the condition of Council’s assets becomes clear. Both the draft Stormwater AMP and Building AMP have shown that there is significant work and expenditure needed if we want to maintain our assets according to best practice. It is also expected that the Road AMP will provide further information to guide us into the future. One of the particular challenges that will become more apparent in the coming years is maintaining our current rate of investment in our renewal of assets while matching this with the costs of the asset’s depreciation. Whilst achieving this previously, with the development of these detailed AMP’s we will face significant challenges. This places a great importance on identifying the true life of an asset and the costs associated with its management.

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duction introduction

Managing Our Assets

Asset Management System

ASSET MANAGEMENT POLICY

Asset Management Classes

Adopted by Council 2009

ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

Governance and Management

Adopted by Council 2009

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANS

CIVICA AIM system implemented 2005 Ongoing development

Established 2006

Under development for each asset class Work undertaken inhouse

Skills and Process

Ongoing development

Levels of Service

Under development for each asset class

Currently being developed

Work undertaken inhouse

BUILDINGS

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STORMWATER

ROADS

PARKS

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010

MARINE


introduction

Our Journey So Far...

Past

Each Asset Class Controlled by Individual Officer Lack of Integration Researched Systems

Data Collection

2006 - Pruchase of CIVICA Asset Register Developed Conditional Audits Developed Development of Asset Class Management Plans

Present

2009 - Asset Management Policy and Strategy Developed 2010 - DRAFT Stormwater and Building AMP Complete and Contract for Roads AMP entered into

Develop Forward Works Program

Future

Automated Maintenance Sustainable Operations REDUCE RISK

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ernance governance This theme addresses the civic leadership of Council and Council administration. It covers: Council meetings; civic involvement; communication; community safety; ranger services; financing and budgeting; maintenance of Council property and assets; Council itself (internal processes) including information technology and human resources.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Towards 2050

Your Councillors’ Visions The Council of 2008 – 2012

Governance Innovative and accessible consultation methods continuing to be provided for residents to engage with the Council and become involved in community life.

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governance New Pic

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gove

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


The Governance theme comprises the following program areas:

Council, Community & Communication Practising participative ethical local government for the Mosman community through: ƒ leadership and good governance ƒ high quality service provision ƒ icommunicating and providing opportunities for participation in Council’s decision-making processes

Resource & Asset Management Building financial strength and enhancing the community’s assets through: a strong sense of care and responsibility financial resources which are strengthened and developed effective asset management strategies open and accessible information services effective management of risk knowledgeable, professional and friendly staff proud to work for Mosman. ƒ implement sustainability principles into Asset Management practices ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Community Safety

ernance Proactive, well promoted and efficient services:

ƒ aimed at enhancing community safety and combating criminal activities ƒ involving collaboration between Harbourside Local Area Command, Mosman Council, the community and emergency services ƒ recognising the roles and responsibilities of each authority.

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ernance governance

Council, Community and Consultation Context

This Program facilitates the democratic processes. It focuses on good governance and public participation. It seeks to provide a professional and efficient framework to service the needs of the community with the highest probity whilst acknowledging the limitations placed on Council, particularly by the State.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Council, Community and Consultation

Major Issues ƒ Meeting the statutory obligations of the Local Government Act 1993 and other pertinent legislative requirements ƒ Maintaining and ensuring openness, transparency and accountability of Council business and decisions ƒ Ensuring adherence to MOSPLAN and the Governance Plan ƒ Improving information flow, consultation and resident involvement across all demographics ƒ Providing a consistent and high quality frontline customer service function for all of Council’s key activities.

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ernance governance

Council, Community and Consultation Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have continual improvement in the provision of support and services to councillors and the community.

Federal Government

For the community to have total confidence in the Council as an ethical and continually improving organisation that practices good governance, promotes and nurtures ethical behaviour and strives to apply best practice principles to all that it does. To have a pro-active approach to setting the direction and evaluating the performance of the Council through information and consultation, including e-communication, resulting in a community which proudly identifies with the local area and which fully supports the direction and management of Council. To have achieved constitutional recognition of local government. To have innovative and accessible consultation methods continuing to be provided for residents to engage with the Council and become involved in community life.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Council, Community and Consultation

Council Priorities ƒ Consulting with and keeping the community informed of Council’s future plans, issues, its achievements and challenges.

Financial Implications Increasing use of e-communication strategies may involve additional resources.

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ernance governance

Resource and Asset Management Context

This Program provides the platform for Council to operate efficiently and effectively. It provides financial management, including financial information, information technology, asset management, corporate information management, insurance and risk management, contracts administration and human resource management for the organisation as a whole, to ensure consistency and accountability.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Resource and Asset Management

Major Issues Infrastructure and asset management, risk management and human resource management are at the forefront of this Program’s activities. Issues that continually need to be addressed are: ƒ The continued development and implementation of long term asset management strategies ƒ Ensuring Council’s long term financial autonomy and sustainability ƒ Addressing skills shortage which is making attraction and retention of staff a growing issue ƒ Technological advances in communication and consultation

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ernance governance

Resource and Asset Management Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have provided directly or on behalf of other levels of government adequate, equitable and appropriate services and facilities for the community and to ensure that those services and facilities are managed efficiently and effectively; and are always of a high quality consistent with the requirements of the Mosman community.

Federal Government State Government

To have Council’s unrestricted current ratio at 2:1. To have business systems which will meet the increasing demands for management information and that add value to the Council and community by providing integrated, accurate, timely, cost effective and responsive service. To have Mosman Council regarded as an employer of choice by all its stakeholders. To have risk management strategies in place to ensure Mosman is a safe place to live, work and play. Integration of sustainable practices into Council’s Asset Management planning and implementation.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Resource and Asset Management

Council Priorities ƒ Refurbishment of public amenities to meet the community’s expectations. ƒ Development of additional revenue streams to ensure Council’s sustainability. ƒ Being aware of opportunities to receive funds from other parties and government agencies to offset the cost of major projects. ƒ Application of sustainable practices such as water management, recycling and alternative energy sources.

Financial Implications The ability to undertake infrastructural works is governed by the ability to raise, generate and service funding.

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ernance governance

Community Safety Context

This program sets out the means to create closer relationships between the Police and the Council so that we understand each other’s roles and responsibilities in order to improve community safety, crime prevention strategies and emergency recovery. Key to this is the Collaborative Management Plan between Council and the Harbourside Local Area Command which identifies who is accountable for strategic management planning and key issues. This program also addresses the management of emergencies and preparedness for responding to all types of potential disasters in the region.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Community Safety

Major Issues ƒ Continually being proactive in ensuring that Mosman is a safe community and crime is kept to a minimum ƒ Assisting the community in understanding the levels and types of crime and providing simple security advice to improve safety ƒ Providing visible Police and Ranger services ƒ Addressing ongoing community safety issues including young people’s exposure to drugs and alcohol, safe driving, and the safety of older people as well as graffiti of public spaces and private property ƒ Providing security and ensuring that all safety measures are in place for major events.

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ernance governance

Community Safety Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have a manned Police Station in Mosman.

To have a community where individuals are aware of and accept their respective responsibilities necessary to maintain a safe community. To have responsible and informed animal owners. To have a responsive and effective emergency management networking covering Mosman.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Community Safety

Council Priorities ƒ Maintain a high level of collaboration with emergency and enforcement agencies

Financial Implications Nil

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onment environment

This theme addresses and encompasses: urban planning; heritage planning and protection, development assessments; ecological sustainability; biodiversity conservation; waste management and street cleaning; environmental health management; water, air and noise management; sustainability education; transport, traffic, roads and cycling; open space management; recreational facilities including the Swim Centre.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


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Towards 2050

Towards 2050

Your Councillors’ Visions The Council of 2008 – 2012

Your Councillors’ Visions The Council of 2008 – 2012

Urban Planning

Environment

onment Domestic scale architecture maintained except on Spit/Military corridor. Traditional strip shopping centre appearance and vitality reinforced.

A maximum population of 30,000 in 2050 (presently 28,356) A maximum 700 new dwellings provided over the next 40 years. A diversity of housing choice to ensure a demographic mix including ‘ageing in place’. Adoption of sustainable lifestyle and building options for new and existing buildings encouraged. The special natural and man made qualities of foreshore and open space areas protected and enhanced. Mosman’s heritage conserved. Spit Junction recognised as having potential for imaginative commercial/retail/residential development to complement the traditional Military Road strip shopping precinct and the new village hub and commons.

Climate change addressed using strategies that include mitigation, adaptation and resilience measures in order to play our part in the global future. Long-lasting sustainable behaviours fostered and improved through raised awareness/knowledge of sustainability concepts. Lifestyle and the environment enhanced through sustainable building practices. Biodiversity preserved and enhanced on both private and public property including beaches, reserves, bushland and green open spaces. Green renewable energy sources, and energy efficiency and conservation measures adopted for both private and public property. Total water cycle management approaches used that maximise conservation, efficiency, reuse and recycling of water including stormwater harvesting and reuse. Waste reduced significantly through avoidance, minimisation, reuse and recycling via local and regional initiatives. Sustainable transport taken up using an integrated network of walking and cycling paths throughout Mosman. Sustainability outcomes improved by lobbying Federal and State Governments to advocate for stronger policy and legislation. Sophisticated approaches such as sustainability indicators, lifecycle management and systemsthinking used to address sustainability challenges.

38

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Towards 2050

Your Councillors’ Visions The Council of 2008 – 2012

Transport State/Federal Governments lobbied regarding rail option on Roseville corridor. Bus and ferry services for Mosman and the Northern Beaches improved so that people prefer using public transport as the mode of choice. No further expansion of capacity of the Spit/ Military corridor, but reallocation of that capacity to give buses priority when needed. No further elimination of parking along the corridor. Wynyard bus interchange capacity issues solved. Reliance on private vehicles for short journey to work/recreation trips reduced. Community transport expanded. Opportunities for pedestrian and bicycle transport maximised at local and regional levels. Local accessibility within Mosman improved for the convenience and lifestyle of residents. Northern Beaches linked more directly to the metropolitan freeway network.

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environment The Environment theme comprises the following program areas:

Urban Planning Improving the built environment by: ƒ Monitoring and reviewing planning controls, guidelines and policies to ensure desired outcomes ƒ Identifying, protecting and conserving heritage items and areas ƒ Protecting Mosman against the pressures of State Government driven planning policy ƒ Developing policies which reflect our community’s expectations for high quality in-fill development and for preserving and enhancing open space ƒ Promoting and coordinating actions to ensure the built and natural environment is appropriately maintained and enhanced ƒ Promoting planning, and providing meaningful opportunities for community involvement in the planning process.

enviro Built Environment

Providing effective development assessment services by:

ƒ Having clear and comprehensive guidelines for development applications

ƒ Enabling our community to be confident that any developments will meet approval conditions, legal requirements and community expectations

ƒ Assisting elected members and professional staff to make fair and equitable decisions that reflect the rights of applicants and the public interest.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Environmental Management & Health Achieving outstanding environmental performance through delivery of core environmental improvement programs and by incorporating environmental sustainability considerations into all of Council’s functional responsibilities including: ƒ Ensuring that principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) are included in Council’s corporate activities ƒ Managing and enhancing biodiversity of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems ƒ Ensuring sustainable management of water and the atmosphere ƒ Conserving and enhancing the health, well-being and harmony of the community ƒ Achieving a long term sustainable regional waste management solution ƒ Effectively and efficiently managing cleaning and environmental services contracts.

Parks & Recreation Encouraging enjoyment of open spaces and recreational facilities by: ƒ Ensuring high quality and well maintained parks, ovals, other sports facilities and open spaces ƒ Providing, organising and facilitating recreational and sporting activities ƒ Encouraging and celebrating sport and physical activity for both fun and fitness.

onment Transport & Traffic

Pursuing a sustainable transport solution for Mosman by:

ƒ Reviewing safe speed limits throughout Mosman ƒ Advocating strongly for better State Government transport planning and more reliable services ƒ Lobbying and planning for a well thought out and soundly funded solution to our through traffic problems and congested streets, in co-operation with other authorities ƒ Exploring opportunities for an integrated transport approach involving a variety of modes.

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onment environment

Urban Planning Context

This program includes strategic land use planning and heritage management. Planning is undertaken within the framework of the NSW planning system and its associated legislation. Program work can be grouped into four main areas: 1. Prepare plans and policies to regulate land use, control development and guide good design 2. Manage heritage planning 3. Engage the community in planning and promote planning projects 4. Advocate for Mosman’s interests in regional and state planning issues

Much of the work is at the direction of the State Government. The objectives of the program work towards maintaining Mosman’s built environment and ensuring any change is for the better and is incremental. The Urban Planning and Built Environment programs are closely related.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Urban Planning

Major Issues Required works under the State Government’s planning reform program, including a new comprehensive LEP, are underway. The public exhibition of the draft LEP was undertaken in 2009. In 2010 work will continue on finalising the new LEP. Associated projects that are dependent on the draft LEP include: ƒ Civic Improvement Plan for the business centres ƒ Redevelopment options for the Civic Centre site The review of all development control plans has been undertaken having regard to the changing planning landscape of the NSW planning reforms and the state-wide exempt and complying development codes. Advocating Mosman’s position throughout this period of change is a priority. Local plans need to evolve to be consistent with state strategic plans and legislation.

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onment environment

Urban Planning Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have the local character of Mosman maintained by:

State Government Department of Planning

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Conserving its heritage Ensuring sustainability Meeting community needs Effective land use planning, including protection of the foreshore Requiring high quality development Improving amenity.

SHOROC

To have Mosman recognised as a desirable place to live, work and create with a population of 30,000 by 2050 (700 additional dwellings). To provide development opportunities along The Spit/Military Road corridor.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Urban Planning

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Streetscape improvements along Military Road Completion of the new Mosman Local Environmental Plan Investigating the redevelopment of the Civic Centre site Identification and prioritisation of facilities upgrade through management plans

Financial Implications The streetscape improvements plan has been budgeted for ($120,000), however, its implementation is contingent upon – ƒ finalisation of the local environmental plan (LEP), and ƒ raising the necessary funds for a major capital investment

The protracted timeframe for the LEP caused largely by State Government delay has led to increased costs in relation to staff time.

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onment environment

Planning & Built Environment Context

This program manages the development assessment process through the implementation of environmental plans, policies and guidelines. Specifically the program is responsible for: ƒ Providing high-quality customer service ƒ Assessing development proposals

ƒ Ensuring all approvals meet nominated building, construction and ecologically sustainable development requirements ƒ Implementing building certification and fire safety responsibilities ƒ Investigating and resolving building related customer requests.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Built Environment

Major Issues Mosman has a unique natural and built environment which requires special attention and consideration. This program tries to meet the competing interests associated with rights to develop versus the need to protect this unique natural and built environment. Community expectations relating to development are likely to be affected by State Government reforms involving: ƒ Continuing expansion of exempt and complying development in residential areas without the opportunity for resident input ƒ Greater involvement in approvals by private certifiers ƒ Encouraging sustainable building practices with new development ƒ Meeting housing and population targets. Providing community information and adapting effectively to such changes will be critical to achieving program objectives. The impementation of Draft Mosman LEP 2008 which is based on the State Government’s standard instrument is also likely to affect development outcomes. 47


onment environment

Planning & Built Environment Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have the local character of Mosman maintained by:

Various State Government authorities

ƒ Conserving its heritage ƒ Ensuring sustainability ƒ Adopting sustainable building options for new and existing buildings ƒ Meeting community needs ƒ Providing diversity of housing choice including ageing in place ƒ Effective land use planning ƒ Protecting and enhancing the natural and man-made qualities of the foreshore ƒ Requiring high quality development ƒ Improving safety and amenity ƒ Maintaining domestic scale architecture except on Spit/ Military corridor.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Built Environment

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ To undertake development assessment in a timely and consistent fashion. ƒ To adopt sustainable lifestyle and building options for new and existing buildings.

Financial Implications The expansion of exempt and complying development is likely to reduce Council’s income from fees and charges related to development applications.

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onment environment

Sustainability, Environment & Health Context

Contemporary environmental and sustainability problems facing Council and the community are complex and challenging. This program provides a framework to respond to these challenges in an innovative, strategic and proactive manner. It also positions Mosman Council to lead change towards sustainability and deliver outcomes that reflect the longer term vision of Council and community as well as organisational priorities. This will be realised through collaborative planning and practice within Council, within the Mosman communtiy and external stakeholders including neighbouring Councils, SHOROC, State and Federal governments. This program aims to preserve and enhance Mosman’s environment for the ongoing health and wellbeing of our ecosystems and our community. Specifically, this program is responsible for the management of: ƒ Environmental/sustainability, policy and planning ƒ Climate change and air quality ƒ Total water cycle ƒ Terrestrial and aquatic envrionments ƒ Engagement and education for sustainability (staff and community) ƒ Community invovlement to assist Council integrate sustainability into policy, planning and impementation, for example, Mosman Sustainability Group ƒ Environmental health and compliance ƒ Food surveillance and safety ƒ Waste avoidance, minimisation, recycling and safe disposal ƒ Cleaning Services – street sweeping, beach cleaning, graffiti, Council buildings and public amenities.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Sustainability, Environment & Health

Major Issues The major areas of focus include: ƒ Addressing global problems, such as climate change, at a local level ƒ Ensuring that all Council decision-making, planning and operations incorporate sustainability thinking, principles and practices ƒ Ensuring integration between the environmental, social and economic spheres of sustainability as well as between the various sectors of the environment - water, waste, energy, biodiversity, atmosphere, built envrionment ƒ Providing effective and innovative community engagement and learning programs to enhance knowledge and bring about longlasting sustainable behaviours ƒ Reducing Mosman’s ecological footprint through waste avoidance, resource recovery, efficient and reduced water use, energy efficiency and uptake of renewable energy ƒ Developing indicators and collecting data to measure and assess progress towards sustainability ƒ Fulfilling an increasing number of environmental/sustainability responsibilities with limited resources

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onment environment

Sustainability, Environment & Health Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

Climate change addressed using strategies that include mitigation, adaption and resiliance measures in order to play our part in the global future.

Department of Environment and Climate Change

Long-lasting sustainable behaviours fostered and improved through raised awareness/knowledge of sustainability concepts. Lifestyle and the environment enhanced through sustainable building practices. This objective is part of Mosman Council’s 2050 vision. Biodiversity preserved and enhanced on both private and public property including beaches, reserves, bushland and green open spaces. Green renewable energy sources and energy efficiency and conservation measures adopted for both private and public property. Total water cycle management approaches used that maximise conservation, efficiency, reuse and recycling of water including stormwater harvesting and reuse. Waste reduced significantly through avoidance, minimisation, reuse and recycling via local and regional initiatives. Sustainable transport taken up using an integrated network of walking and cycling paths throughout Mosman. Sustainability outcomes improved by lobbying Federal and State Governments to advocate for stronger policy and legislation. Sophisticated approaches such as sustainability indicators, lifecycle management and systems-thinking used to address sustainability challenges.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Sustainability, Environment & Health

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Implement strategies for addressing climate change ƒ Adopt green renewable energy sources and energy efficiency measures ƒ Foster sustainable behaviours within the community ƒ Reduce, conserve and reuse water ƒ Significant waste reduction ƒ Sustainable building practices ƒ Sustainable transport ƒ Enhance bushland and biodiversity ƒ Lobby State and Federal Government for stonger sustainability policy and direction ƒ Sophisticated and innovative approaches to achieve sustainability outcomes

Financial Implications Achieving the above objectives will require significant resources in the coming years. Final budgetory costings will be determined based on specific projects selected to achieve these objectives.

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onment environment

Parks & Recreation Context

Council provides a network of public open space which serves as a venue for various forms of formal and informal recreation for all age groups in the community. Council consults with the community in order to plan and facilitate the ongoing protection and enhancement of open space particularly parks, playgrounds, civic spaces and sporting facilities. This is done to ensure that recreational opportunities and facilities are compatible with the varying needs of our community. Council celebrates and encourages sport and physical activity for both fun and fitness. The preparation, adoption, and staged implementation of a plan of management for the Drill Hall Common site has been significant in terms of Council’s open space and recreation facility planning for the future and its completion is now imminent.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Parks & Recreation

Major Issues With increasing awareness of health issues in Australia the focus on active and healthy lifestyle continues to grow in importance. High demand on sporting ovals and facilities, particularly during the winter season, continues to be an issue which Council is managing at present with a high level of liaison, support and understanding of user groups. This will continue to be an issue into the future as populations increase as there are limited opportunities in the LGA to develop new facilities. In catering for the community’s recreation needs, the focus remains on exploring the most effective ways to maximise the use of parks and recreation resources, including the soon to be completed Drill Hall Common multipurpose sports hall. Balancing demand for use of existing facilities and the need to maintain them at an acceptable level will continue to be a major challenge. 55


onment environment

Parks & Recreation Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have sustainable recreational facilities including:

SHFT

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Parks and Gardens Bushland areas Civic spaces Sporting facilities Beaches and marine structures Swim Centre Playgrounds

that are maintained and embellished to meet the changing needs of the Mosman community.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Parks & Recreation

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Completion of the Drill Hall Common precinct to provide for a variety of all weather sporting facilities. ƒ Implementation of water reuse schemes extensively in open space areas to reduce reliance on main water supplies. ƒ Preservation of biodiversity in areas including beaches, reserves, bushland and green and open spaces.

Financial Implications Dependent on revenue generation and grant funding.

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onment environment

Transport & Traffic

Context

This program provides the framework to maintain Mosman’s roads, footpaths and cycleways. It addresses the management and maintenance of infrastructure/street assets and facilities as well as road and pedestrian safety. In addition, this program defines the areas that Council will endeavour to influence, with particular reference to regional and local traffic and transport issues that affect the Mosman community and are determined at State and Federal levels.

Major Issues Traffic and transport issues are also a priority and are of significance to the Mosman and general Sydney communities. Decades of indecision by government both at the State and Federal levels have left a legacy of very poor transport infrastructure – particularly public transport. It is an issue that Council has little input and control over and yet the community has high expectations of the Council to demand better accessibility. Council has been working on an agreed approach on regional transport with its SHOROC partners and this will continue as part of the SHOROC Regional Directions 2010-2036. The maintenance of existing road infrastructure continues to be a priority. In the last five financial years Council has not been able to provide determined levels of funding for concrete and asphalt road maintenance. A Road Asset Management Plan is being undertaken in 2010 to determine a Forward Work Program and establish priorities for the next 20 years. In addition to this, Road Safety continues to be a priority with behavioural change and education being integral to the Road Safety Action Plan.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Transport & Traffic

Council’s approach to regional transport is now based on: ƒ No further expansion of capacity on Spit/Military corridor ƒ Reinforcement of the role played by public transport (buses and ferries) ƒ Advocacy for a linkage from the Northern Beaches to the Sydney Freeway network other than by the Spit/Military corridor ƒ Improving opportunities and amenity for pedestrians and cyclists ƒ Discouraging through traffic in local streets ƒ Lobbying for a rail option on the Roseville corridor

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onment environment

Transport & Traffic Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have the State and Federal Government support a rail option on the Roseville Corridor.

RTA STA Sydney Ferries Police SHOROC

To have the Northern beaches linked more directly to the Metropolitan Freeway Network. To have an improved bus and ferry network so that public transport is the transport mode of choice. To have no further expansion of the Spit/Miitary Road corridor but reallocation of that capacity to give buses priority when needed. To have no further elimination of parking along the Spit and Military Road corridor. To have a well maintained network of roads and footpaths. To reduce the reliance on private vehicles for local trips through the expansion of community transport and pedestrian and cycling facilities. To have an upgraded car park at Mosman Junction. To have a multi-modal sustainable transportation network which meets the community’s needs in terms of safety, user comfort and local access and amenity. To have minimal incidences of traffic accidents. To have an asset management program that comprehensively and sustainably maintains and protects all of Council’s assets (infrastructure and natural).

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Transport & Traffic

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Lobbying for the provision of a sustainable transport system to address existing problems on the Spit/Military corridor with a view to improving local access and amenity ƒ Lobbying for a rail option via the Roseville corridor ƒ Improving internal access within Mosman.

Financial Implications Various costs attributable to consultants associated with information gathering.

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social social

The social theme is the people theme. It covers areas such as community needs and services for all ages and abilities; volunteering; Aboriginal culture and heritage, library services, the website and electronic engagement; art gallery; cultural activities; festive events and friendship communities.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Towards 2050

Your Councillors’ Visions The Council of 2008 – 2012

Community Community services enhanced for all age groups including affordable child care, parent support groups, youth, ageing in place and people with a disability. Cultural facilities developed including the enlargement of the Library and Art Gallery, and provision of a local performing arts theatre. Community connectedness for all age groups encouraged by: ƒ enhancing volunteering opportunities ƒ facilitating intergenerational activities ƒ providing social outlets such as Men’s Sheds and community gardens ƒ involvement & enjoyment of Festival activities ƒ neighbourhood activities such as street parties ƒ people friendly community spaces Innovative and accessible consultation methods continuing to be provided for residents to engage with the Council and become involved in community life. Active recreational pursuits encouraged, especially for young people through provision of sports facilities and support of local sporting groups. Health and wellbeing of residents improved through developing programs and linkages that promote healthy lifestyle, and working with other levels of government and medical practitioners to ensure the provision of local health services including mental health services. Cultural and spiritual diversity, celebrated.

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social

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


The Social theme comprises the following program areas:

Community Development & Services Promoting community wellbeing by addressing community needs through: ƒ Social planning and community development, based on meaningful community consultation and engagement and comprehensive needs assessment ƒ Facilitating the development and coordination of community services, programs and facilities in conjunction with Commonwealth, State and community-based agencies ƒ Delivering high quality, affordable community services responsive to resident needs and with the valued support of volunteers ƒ Advocacy, consultation and collaboration with Commonwealth and State Government on social issues impacting on Mosman residents.

Library & Information Satisfying the information, leisure and lifelong learning needs of the community in a welcoming and inclusive place through: ƒ Providing high quality Library services and resources ƒ Acting as a gateway to the world wide information network ƒ Conserving and developing Mosman’s history ƒ Collecting and disseminating information on community services, activities and events

social

ƒ Maintaining close liaison with local educational institutions.

Cultural Development & Services

Encouraging and fostering strong community spirit and pride in our cultural heritage by: ƒ Providing, organising and facilitating cultural activities, programs and venues

ƒ Planning and coordinating civic and community events involving residents for the enjoyment of our community.

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social Community Development & Services Context

Council’s roles in Community Services are varied and include planner, catalyst, enabler, advocate and provider of services. This Program is informed by the Community Profile and the Social Plan. The following social justice principles apply: ƒ Equity - there should be fairness in the distribution of resources ƒ Access - people should have fair access to economic resources and services essential to meet their basic needs and improve their quality of life ƒ Participation - people should have the maximum opportunity for genuine participation and consultation about decisions affecting their lives ƒ Rights - rights are recognised and promoted. Community engagement is critical in identifying social issues and the strategies required to address them. Over 600 volunteers assist in the delivery of community services. Services provided directly by Council include children’s, youth, aged and disability services. Council actively works with multiple government and non-government agencies to ensure effective coordination and integration of services. Council is a key resource for community groups, collecting and disseminating information, providing advice and ancillary assistance.

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Community Development & Services

Major Issues With the rise in population mobility and lone person households, building community connections and engagement across generations is important. Engendering a community spirit of caring and neighbourliness, providing facilities that act as community hubs, and facilitating programs that bring people together will mitigate against loneliness, disconnection and isolation. The demand for child care places for 0-2s, pre-school places, and out of school hours care will continue as well as support for children with special needs. A key focus for young people will be promoting their healthy development and positive transition to adulthood, including their broader engagement in the community. Support for parents in undertaking the rewarding but challenging role of parenting children and young people is a community-wide imperative. The ageing of the Mosman community and the number of people with a disability or a mental illness presents challenges for Council and other service providers in responding to social isolation, increased service needs and demands on carers. Maximising volunteering opportunities will be vital to sustain service provision and will require creative strategies to recruit and support volunteers as traditional sources decline. Advocacy for the retention and enhancement of local services, including community health services and facilities, in light of Commonwealth/State rationalisation, will also be required.

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social social

Community Development & Services Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have Council lead and positively shape community well-being, respond strategically to the social impact of change, and advocate for social justice on behalf of the community with external organisations and agencies and Commonwealth and State Governments.

Commonwealth & State Government & non-govt organisations

To have a well informed and engaged community, that has access to a wide range of community services and programs. To have Council and other service providers deliver high quality, integrated community services and programs that are accessible and inclusive, strengthen social capital and contribute to the health and wellbeing of the community. To have well designed and accessible community facilities which are recognised as community hubs which support the effective delivery of community services and programs and promote healthy lifestyle. To have highly valued and supported volunteers with a range of skills engaged in work which makes a positive contribution to the community.

NSCCAHS, GPs, non-govt organisations

To have a cohesive, harmonious, and caring community, where residents are supported throughout their life cycle and that is inclusive of people with a disability, people from culturally, spiritually and linguistically diverse backgrounds, and people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent.

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Council Priorities

Community Development & Services

Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Consider enhanced community facilities in conjunction with the feasibility study for the Civic Centre precinct area ƒ Increase availability of high quality, affordable child care at the Mosman Bowling Club site ƒ Enhance promotion of and access to information by residents of Council and other community services and programs ƒ Promote active recreation and healthy lifestyle for all age groups, including children, young people, and active and frail older people ƒ Improve the regular community shuttle bus service, Mosman Rider ƒ Maximise and actively promote volunteering opportunities ƒ Engage with and connect young people more into the community as a whole.

Financial Implications There are significant financial implications in relocating community services and redeveloping Council’s community facilities for children, youth and older people, which should be considered in conjunction with the Feasibility Study for the Civic Precinct. The cost of the redevelopment of the Mosman Bowling Club site is estimated at $2.8M. Council’s Forward Financial Plan includes borrowings of $1M in both 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 with loan costs met via Council’s Contributions Plan noting that Council has submitted a funding application through the Commonwealth Government Infrastructure Program.

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social social

Library & Information Context

The Library provides a range of services for the residents of Mosman. These include lending services, reference and information services, home library service, local studies service, community information, Internet access and training, children’s services, young adult services, and outreach and promotional activities. This Program also focuses on the educational needs of the community both formal and informal. Mosman has been a member of the Shorelink Library Network since its inception in 1983 and has a range of obligations under the Shorelink Deed of Agreement relating to this membership. The Program also encompasses Council’s online presence. The Council website www.mosman.nsw.gov.au is a key component of Council’s communications strategy. It is supported by a growing number of satellite sites for specific-focus projects and through online channels such as email newsletters, news feeds, blogs and community sites, and a presence on ‘social network’ sites. The objectives in this program are further developed in Council’s Community Engagement Strategy and in SHOREPLAN, the Shorelink Library Network’s Strategic Management Plan.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Library & Information

Major Issues There is expressed Council and community desire for the Library to be extended. There is a demonstrated need for a multipurpose building which will: ƒ accommodate information and leisure services, resources and activities for all age groups ƒ provide cultural and lifelong learning opportunities ƒ include areas for events, exhibitions and seminars ƒ incorporate an information technology centre, designated ‘zones’ for various age groups and a heritage centre to preserve and display Mosman’s unique Local Studies material.

The need for continuous improvement in communication with the community and promotion of Council’s services, facilities and events was identified in community consultations. 71


social social

Library & Information Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have the Library recognised as a community hub and a “place of connectedness”.

To have an enlarged library building that is a functional, multipurpose space accommodating intellectual, cultural, recreational and information services, lifelong learning opportunities, resources and activities for all age groups. To have library services that are free, accessible and which anticipate and fulfil community expectations. To have resources including books, audio-visual material and material published in electronic format, which cater for the information, lifelong learning and leisure needs of all ages. To have information technology resources which support the Library’s services and to maintain external partnerships such as the Shorelink Library Network in order to provide the community with access to resources held in the Library and beyond.

Shorelink Library Network

To have a Local Studies Collection that celebrates Mosman’s heritage, reflects all eras of Mosman’s history and is appropriately housed, exhibited and preserved for future generations. To have information on Council services, facilities and events effectively disseminated in a range of media so that residents are aware of opportunities to participate in and contribute to a vibrant community life. To have a web presence that provides the best possible means of interacting with our community.

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Library & Information

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Expand and redevelop the Library into a multipurpose building ƒ Ongoing improvement of communication with residents and promotion of Council’s services, activities and events.

Financial Implications There are significant financial implications in extending the Library, which should be considered in conjunction with the Feasibility Study for the Civic Precinct. Improvement of Council’s communication strategies is ongoing and is addressed in each year’s budget estimates.

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social social

Cultural Development & Services Context

Council facilitates or provides a range of cultural activities. These include a series of cultural events including art exhibitions and musical events many of which occur in the Mosman Art Gallery & Community Centre. Council owns a significant collection of Australian paintings as a result of the Mosman Art Prize (dating from 1947) and other acquisitions. The creation of the Mosman Public Art Trust has acted as a catalyst for Council to develop a long-term strategy for the incorporation of a range of public art in Mosman. To engender community spirit and identity Council also provides, supports or participates in a range of community events, including the Mosman Festival, which are managed in accordance with Council’s Special Event Management Policy. Council also supports other events such as the Mosman Sculpture Fesitval and various other annual activities such as Shakespeare by the Sea, Hunter Uncorked and the Balmoral Burn. Council has Friendship Community relationships with six communities, within Australia and overseas which aim to foster friendship and share knowledge and experiences.

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Major Issues

Cultural Development & Services

There is expressed Council and community desire for: ƒ an expansion of the Art Gallery to increase programs and provide spaces for art workshops and classes on a regular basis and provide more support for local artists. Some such spaces are available in the Mosman Art Gallery & Community Centre but there are competing demands on these spaces between Children’s Services and Cultural Services ƒ the retention and further development of all existing cultural services and programs ƒ the desire for more community entertainment including in the Mosman Festival ƒ an appropriately equipped and comfortable performance space for concerts and other live performances.

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social social

Cultural Development & Services Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have strong community spirit through people of all ages, backgrounds and beliefs respecting and caring for each other, involving themselves in planning and enjoying the Mosman Festival and other cultural activities and entertainments, both community-wide and at neighbourhood/street level and celebrating individual and community achievements.

To have a local performing arts theatre and a vital performing arts scene in Mosman where musicians, singers, actors and dancers of all ages can develop their skills and present their work for the benefit and enjoyment of the local community. To have highly regarded public art which engages residents and visitors alike.

Mosman Public Art Trust

To have optimum income from the Mosman Art Gallery & Community Centre as a comfortable, high quality venue for hire, whilst being sensitive to community needs and aspirations. To have a vital visual art scene in Mosman where the Mosman Art Gallery & Community Centre is highly regarded and recognised as one which celebrates our artistic heritage and fosters art for all ages with an enthusiasm for contemporary visual arts and crafts and design, and the processes associated with their production. To have enlarged the Mosman Art Gallery to accommodate the expansion of the range of programs and workshops. To have a broad range of cultural programs and civic, community and commercial events which maximise community involvement and are widely promoted. To have Friendship Agreements which foster friendship, goodwill and cooperation between our communities.

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Cultural Development & Services

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Extending the art gallery to expand the range of programs and workshops ƒ Provide venue and support for performing arts ƒ Increased community based events and entertainment.

Financial Implications Clearly there are significant financial implications not only in providing a performing arts venue which should be considered in conjunction with the Feasibility Study for the Civic Centre environs, but also in extending the Art Gallery. The latter could be achieved to some extent by relocating children’s services should a suitable location be identified, or through Council withdrawing from the provision of Before and After School Care.

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onomic economic The economic theme covers subjects such as local business liaison and support; local employment; marketing Mosman; tourism and regional planning and cooperation.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Towards 2050

Your Councillors’ Visions The Council of 2008 – 2012

Economy Diversity and safety in centres with a mix of business and residential uses in proximity to leisure and entertainment throughout the day and evening. A tourism destination built on our artistic heritage and marketed in conjunction with local business representatives and landholders. Roles of small and large business centres reinforced by diverse local outlets catering for the community, especially the elderly. The unique character and heritage of all Mosman’s business centres enhanced by appealing, high-amenity public spaces. A range of suitable accommodation options for visitors including B&B and small residential hotels. Shops and services easily accessible by walking, riding, driving or community/public transport. Business activities including home businesses and clusters meeting emerging work patterns and expectations.

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economic

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


The Economic theme comprises the following program area:

Local & Regional Economy Promoting our local and regional economy by: ƒ Consulting business people in the area across a range of initiatives and services including such matters as planning controls relating to business and commercial areas ƒ Liaising with the business community and tourist authorities and attractors to encourage the vitality of the business sector and the enjoyment of residents and visitors ƒ Having strong relations with neighbouring councils in order to plan for future infrastructure in a cohesive manner, to share knowledge and resources where appropriate, and to attract State and Commonwealth funding into the SHOROC (Shore Regional Organisation of Councils) region, comprising Mosman, Manly, Pittwater and Warringah Councils.

onomic

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onomic economic

Local & Regional Economy Context

This Program considers the needs of the local and regional community in regard to hospitality, retail, restaurants, business, tourism/visitors and regional development.

Council’s role in economic development is as catalyst, strategic planner, advocate, and evaluator, in partnership with the private sector and other community and regional leaders, particularly through SHOROC. Council has to balance the sometimes competing needs of local residents and businesses whilst also recognising the realities of the marketplace. Nevertheless, Council aims for vibrancy and diversity in its retail areas and the retention of their heritage characteristics and local business operations Objectives in this program area are further developed in the SHOROC Regional Strategy.

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Local & Regional Economy

Major Issues Local business issues relate to the appearance of Military Road in particular from Spit to Mosman Junction and car parking. Community concerns relate to diversity of businesses, shopping hours and pedestrianisation of the area. Targeted tourism compatible with the Mosman lifestyle and artistic heritage is seen as an economic development opportunity. Major regional issues affecting Mosman are housing, health, jobs and transport underpinned by key principles of liveability and sustainability. These issues are being addressed on a regional level through SHOROC Regional Directions.

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onomic economic

Local & Regional Economy Long Term Objectives

Involves External Bodies/Partners

To have a vibrant economy in Mosman through:

SHFT NPWS Zoo Mosman Chamber of Commerce Mosman Village Retailers Assoc.

ƒ Keeping the unique character and heritage of all Mosman’s business centres enhanced by appealing, high-amenity public spaces. ƒ Reinforcing roles of small and large business centres with diverse local outlets catering for the community, especially the elderly. ƒ Business activities inclusing home businesses and clusters meeting emerging work patterns and expectations. ƒ Having shops and services easily accessible by walking, riding, driving or community/public transport. ƒ A range of suitable accommodation options for visitors including B&B and small residential hotels. To have Mosman recognised as a tourism destination, building on its artistic heritage and marketing effectively and appropriately; welcoming visitors in a manner which is sustainable, which enhances the lifestyle of residents and the economic opportunities for local business, and which reduces any adverse effects. To have the SHOROC region recognised for its economic wellbeing, quality of life, efficient transport systems, service orientation, shared resources and practices, community spirit and natural and clean environment.

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SHFT NPWS Zoo Mosman Chamber of Commerce Mosman Village Retailers Assoc.

SHOROC

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Urban&Planning Local Regional Economy

Council Priorities Councillors nominated priorities as being: ƒ Improving the streetscape (see Environment Theme, Program 3.03) ƒ Encouraging alfresco dining (see Governance Theme, Program 2.02) ƒ Developing pedestrian zones (see Environment Theme, Program 3.03) ƒ Branding Mosman - an identity that is consistent, coherent and compelling.

Councillors nominated regional economic priorities as being: ƒ Traffic and transport issues. ƒ Access to higher quality health services. ƒ Continuation of innovative Kimbriki waste and recycling services.

Financial Implications The main financial implications relate to the extent of works necessary to beautify the Military Road area from Spit to Mosman Junctions and the smaller business areas. Regional issues carry significant financial implications at the state level in particular. 85


endices appendices

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endices appendices

Appendices..............................................................74 A NSW State Plan – Points of Alignment.............................78 B Community Engagement & Consultation .......................80 C Community Profile ............................................................82 D Financial Forecasting .......................................................98

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Appendix A

A

– NSW State Plan – Points of Alignment

points of alignment

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The table below shows the NSW State Plan themes and the programs of MOSPLAN that are in alignment with those goals and contribute directly or indirectly to achieving them.

State Plan Themes Keeping People Safe

MOSPLAN aligning objectives Safer Communities Working towards reducing crime through education.

Building Harmonious Communities

Community Programs

Healthy Communities

Community Programs/Promotions

Providing appropriate programs and Increasing participation and integration in community activities.

Working towards improved health through education programs and promotions regarding obesity, alcohol, drugs and smoking. Customer Friendly Services

Customer Service Delivery

Opportunity and Support for most vulnerable

Community Programs/Social Plan

NSW Open for Business

Through Asset Management System

Practical Environmental Solutions

Environmental Management Plan

Improved Urban Environments

Parks, Sporting, Cultural and Recreational facility Management Programs

Providing training and developing a culture with strong customer service focus.

Increased access for participation in community activities for people with disabilities.

Ensuring that maintenance of assets is carried out using best practice principles.

Programs to make progress on greenhouse reductions and better environmental outcomes for native vegetation, biodiversity, land and coastal waterways.

Programs encouraging responsible use and increased use of open spaces. Ongoing Art and Cultural activities.

MOSPLAN Program

7

8

8

2

8

2

5 & CEC

6 & 10

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Appendix B -

B

Community Engagement and Consultation

community engagement The Community Engagement Strategy contains three key strategies – inform, consult, involve. Each has a specific goal and accompanying promise to the community and a set of methodologies. The Community Engagement Strategy is underpinned by a set of principles. To review MOSPLAN – the Community Strategic Plan, various consultative processes were used. Multiple Councillor workshops were held over a 6 month period to develop their 2050 Visions now incorporated throughout MOSPLAN. A list of stakeholder groups was compiled which included: ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Residents in the Mosman Local Government Area Business owners operating in the Mosman Local Government Area Volunteers from a broad range of services State organisations, Utilities, RTA, Police and others that provide services in the Mosman Local Government Area

A strategy of how to reach each of these stakeholder groups developed including: ƒ Provision of an online forum ƒ Six ‘Street Speak’ consultations held in busy locations on weekday mornings and evenings and weekends to consider 2050 Visions. ƒ Media promotion of the online forum and the ‘Street Speak’ Conversations. ƒ Flyers regarding the online forum and ‘Street Speak’ distributed in the library, at the Civic Centre and at other venues and events. ƒ Personal invitations were sent to more than 500 residents, Council’s 600 volunteers and to any person who had expressed interest.

The comments from the ‘Street Speak’ Conversations and online forum were recorded and where appropriate, were recommended for inclusion as objectives or actions in MOSPLAN. The resulting document was made available to the community, was placed on the website and sent to all Councillors. The outcomes of all the consultations together with input from professional staff and the financial data were incorporated into the new framework for MOSPLAN ready for 92

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


consideration by the Council. Following adoption by the Council the draft plans are to be placed on public exhibition. After 28 days, MOSPLAN is to return to Council for final consideration and adoption. Following is an example of the brand developed to promote the Community Engagement. This followed through all collateral to create a homogenous look.

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Appendix C - Community Profile

C

community profile

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Overview of demographic trends and implications for social planning The following information provides a snapshot of the Community Profile of Mosman based on 2006 ABS Census data and data complied by i.d Solutions, including forecasts of Mosman’s population trends to 2031. Comparative data from the Sydney Statistical Division is also included. The Community Profile, atlas and population forecasts for Mosman local government area are available from Council’s website at http://www.mosman.nsw.gov.au/mosman/people While Mosman’s total population size has had and is anticipated to continue to experience minimal growth, the most marked implication for Council will be responding to an ageing community. This will require integrated planning and inter-sectoral collaboration with Commonwealth and State Government and the community sector to address emerging social, environmental and other issues. An increased proportion of people aged 60 and over, many of whom may be fully or partly retired and living alone, may create increased community expectations regarding opportunities to pursue social connections, leisure, learning and recreation, fitness and a healthy lifestyle. This may lead to significant increased demand for library services, cultural development programs, active fitness and recreational facilities and programs. There is an opportunity to build social capital through engaging healthy, active ‘baby boomer’ retirees in volunteer services. With a significant rise in very old residents, the challenge will be to ensure residents and their carers have access to comprehensive community care services and residential care options. As Council is a major provider of community care services, this will require Council to regularly monitor and review service delivery and pursue opportunities to increase resources and expand service provision. There is a very strong correlation with advancing age and disability, and it is therefore likely mobility and access issues will become even more prominent. It will be necessary for Council to ensure the built environment and future urban development and infrastructure appropriately addresses these considerations. More flexible forms of transport that meet the needs of people with mobility impairments may be indicated. Population ageing will also impact on other organisations and sectors in the community, such as the business community, and Council may be able to assist these organisations in responding to a changing client/customer base in positive and creative ways. While it is anticipated that there will be a small reduction in the number of children 0–4 years, it is considered that this is not significant enough to result in reduced demand for services. Other social and economic trends such as the state of the Australian and global economies

95


and impact on families, female workforce participation, and shared parenting will likely see continued high demand for child care places and related services. Similarly, the slight reduction in children 5-11 years of age, may not impact greatly on demand for services and facilities, as other social trends may come into play. These trends include increased community concern regarding childhood safety, obesity and health and the move away from informal play to more structured activities, with resultant demand for sporting and recreational facilities and programs and organised out of school hours care. Regardless of a very slight reduction in young people aged 12-17 years, increased societal pressures and challenges facing young people will require the maintenance of positive and proactive strategies to support them in making an effective transition to adulthood. The continued trends of high population mobility and growth of lone person households, particularly of people aged over 65 years, will also increase the need for strategies that inform the community, strengthen community connections, encourage neighbourliness, and prevent social isolation. Mosman’s high population mobility may be partly due to the relatively high level of multi unit developments and rentals along with an increasingly global employment market, with people moving to and from Mosman to take up interstate and overseas job contracts. Mosman’s greater concentration of higher density dwellings is also likely to account for smaller households (including lone person and people aged 65 years and over).

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Mosman’s Population The estimated resident population of Mosman as at June 2008 (most current estimate) was 28,356 and this increased by 336 or 1.2% from 28,020 in 2007. There were more females at 54.3% than males at 45.7% of total population in Mosman (50.7% and 49.3% respectively for Sydney). There was relatively high population mobility with 2,670 or 10.2% of the population having moved within Mosman, and 8,321 or 31.7% of the population having moved to Mosman from another location since 2001. ƒ 17.8% of total residents having relocated from intrastate (within NSW) ƒ 3.2% of total residents having relocated from interstate ƒ 10.3% of total residents having moved from another country.

Age Structure Major differences between the age structure of Mosman and Sydney were: ƒ a larger percentage of 60 to 69 year olds (9.8% compared to 7.8%) ƒ a larger percentage of 50 to 59 year olds (13.7% compared to 12.2%) ƒ a smaller percentage of 18 to 24 year olds (6.8% compared to 9.9%) ƒ a smaller percentage of 12 to 17 year olds (6.2% compared to 7.9%) The largest changes in age structure between 2001 and 2006 were: ƒ 60 to 69 (+682 persons) ƒ 85 and over (+109 persons) ƒ 25 to 34 (-472 persons) ƒ 18 to 24 (-253 persons) Children aged 0 to 4 years increased to 1,583 or 6% (below Sydney at 6.6%) from 1,503 or 5.8% in 2001. Children 5 to 11 years increased to 2,138 or 8.1% (below Sydney at 9.1%) from 2,045 or 7.9% in 2001. Young people aged 12 to 17 years decreased to 1,631 or 6.2% (below Sydney at 7.9%) from 1,624 or 6.3% in 2001. Young adults aged18 to 24 years decreased by 253 to 1,774 or 6.8% (below Sydney at 9.9%) from 2,027 or 7.8% in 2001. Adults aged 25 to 34 decreased by 472 to 3,790 or 14.4% (below 15.3% for Sydney), from 4,262 or 16.4% in 2001. People aged 35 to 49 years were 6,162 or 23.5% and 50 to 59 years at 3,599 or 13.7% and these groups remained relatively stable.

97


People aged 60 to 69 years increased to 2, 581 or 9.8% (significantly above Sydney at 7.8%), increasing by 682 from 1,899 or 7.3% in 2001. The 2% growth is significant in that Sydney only grew by 0.2% from 7.1% in 2001. People aged 70 to 84 years were 2,219 or 8.5% (above Sydney at 7.3%), increasing by 51 from 2,200 or 8.5% in 2001. Older people aged 85 years and over were 759 or 2.9% (above Sydney at 1.6%), an increase of 109 from 650 or 2.5% in 2001.

Age structure Age group (years) Usual Residence data 0 to 4 5 to 11 12 to 17 18 to 24 25 to 34 35 to 49 50 to 59 60 to 69 70 to 84 85+ Total

Mosman Council area 2006 number 1,583 2,138 1,631 1,774 3,790 6,162 3,599 2,581 2,219 759 26,236

% 6 8.1 6.2 6.8 14.4 23.5 13.7 9.8 8.5 2.9 100

2001 Sydney Statistical Division % 6.6 9.1 7.9 9.9 15.3 22.5 12.2 7.8 7.3 1.6 100

number 1,503 2,045 1,624 2,027 4,262 6,157 3,581 1,899 2,200 650 25,954

% 5.8 7.9 6.3 7.8 16.4 23.7 13.8 7.3 8.5 2.5 100

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics, Census of Population and Housing, 2006, and 2001.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010

Sydney Statistical Division % 6.7 9.5 8 9.9 16 22.6 11.5 7.1 7.3 1.4 100

Change 2001 to 2006 80 93 7 -253 -472 5 18 682 19 109 282


Transport The largest changes in household car ownership between 2001 and 2006 were for three vehicles and more (+56 households); no vehicles (-117 households); and one vehicle (-103 households). Of Mosman households, 12.2% do not own a vehicle (12.6% for Sydney), 41.4% own one vehicle (36.6% for Sydney); 29.4% own two vehicles (30.2% for Sydney); and 8.1% own three vehicles or more (11.5% for Sydney). For journey to work, 3,624 or 27.8% caught public transport (bus/ ferry/train); 5,623 or 43.2% drove a car; and 982 or 7.5% worked at home.

99


Households There were 11,131 households, and the average household size was 2.3 persons. The majority of households were family households at 59.1%. Couples with children 15 years and under increased slightly by 75 from 2,064 or 31.1% in 2001 to 2,139 or 32.2% of family households in 2006 (compared with 32.8% for Sydney). Lone person households numbered 3,479 or 31.3% of total households compared with Sydney at 21.8%.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


101


Housing Of Mosman households, 34.4% reside in a separate house (57.1% for Sydney); 19.3% occupied a medium density dwelling, including semi-detached, terrace, townhouses and villa units, plus flats and apartments in blocks of 1 or 2 stories (17.4% for Sydney); and 34.8% in high density flats and apartments, that is flats and apartments in 3 storey and larger blocks (17.3% for Sydney). Housing characteristics included: ƒ 3,872 or 34.3% owned their dwelling (30.1% for Sydney), decreasing by 909 from 4,781 or 42.4% in 2001 ƒ 2639 or 23.4% were purchasing (31.1% for Sydney), increasing by 869 from 1,770 or 15.7% in 2001 ƒ 3,767 or 33.4% were renting (29.7% for Sydney), decreasing by 53 from 3,820 or 33.9% in 2001. ƒ 59.8% of households purchasing their home in Mosman were paying $2,000 a month or more in mortgage repayments, compared with 40% for Sydney. ƒ 30% of households renting were paying high rentals ($450 per week or more) compared with 10% for Sydney.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Education, Income & Employment Mosman residents have high qualification levels, with 41.1% having university degrees, well above that for Sydney at 20%, and rising from 37.6% in 2001. There are a larger proportion of high income households (those earning $1,700 per week or more) in Mosman at 48.8% compared with 29.6% for Sydney. Mosman was rated as second least disadvantaged local government area in Sydney Statistical Division in ABS Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) of Disadvantage in 2006. However, the assumption that Mosman residents are all wealthy needs to be checked as 23.1% of Mosman households have a weekly income of $999 or less (less than $52,000 per annum). Low income households (those earning less than $500 per week) represented 8.3% of Mosman households (16.8% for Sydney).

Mosman residents had a low unemployment rate at 358 or 2.6% (below Sydney at 5.3%), decreasing from 444 or 3.1% in 2001. There are a high number of professionals at 5,142 or 39% of all occupations compared with Sydney at 23.8%, and high number of managers at 3,093 or 23.5% compared with Sydney at 13.2%.

103


Mosman residents primarily work in the local government areas of Sydney City at 36.1%; Mosman at 20%; North Sydney at 12.9%, Willoughby at 5.3% and Warringah at 3%. Of persons working in Mosman, the main areas of residence are Mosman at 35.3%; Warringah at 12.2%; North Sydney at 9.6% and Manly at 6%. The main industries employing Mosman residents were Professional, Scientific and Technical Services at 2,484 or 18.9%; Financial and Insurance Services 1,913 or 14.5%; and Health Care and Social Service at 1,164 or 8.8%.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Unpaid Work/Volunteering Questions on volunteering and unpaid work were first included in the 2006 Census. Mosman has a higher proportion of volunteerism with 22.3% of residents aged 15 years and over volunteering for an organisation or group in the past 12 months, compared with Sydney at 14.8%.

Internet Connection Mosman households had a high level of broadband internet connection at 57.1% compared with 45% for Sydney.

People with a Disability Demographic data on people with a disability has to date been very limited. Questions were first included in the 2006 census on persons needing assistance with self care activities/body movement activities/communication and the reasons for this. Overall, 2.9% of Mosman’s population reported needing assistance with core activities, compared with 3.8% for Sydney. A larger percentage of persons aged 85 years and over reported needing assistance, with 312 (41.1% of this total age group) or 1.2% of total population compared to 0.7% for Sydney.

Religion and Cultural Diversity The major religious beliefs of Mosman residents were Christian at 64.8%; Buddhism at 1.5%; Judaism at 1.1%; and Hinduism at 0.5%. The number of people who indicated ‘No Religion’ was 19.2% and ‘Not Stated’ was 11.5%. Overseas born residents represented 7,832 or 29.9%, an increase of 0.2% of total population since 2001 (29%) and less than Sydney at 31.7%. The majority of Mosman’s overseas-born residents came from other English speaking countries such as the United Kingdom (2,638); New Zealand (800); United States of America (477) and South Africa (422) whereas Sydney is more diverse. Residents from non-English speaking backgrounds were 3,238 or 12.3% of the population, compared with 23.9% for Sydney. The main languages other than English spoken at home in Mosman were German at 236 (0.9%); Cantonese at 233 (0.9%); Japanese at 231 (0.9%); Italian at 218 (0.8%) and French at 189 (0.7%). There is a low proportion of people identifying as being from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent at 26 or 0.1% compared with 1.1% for Sydney. However, this is an increase of 8 from 18 identifying in 2001.

105


Country of Birth Mosman Council area top 10 overseas birthplaces ranked for 2006 (persons) 2006 Usual Residence data United Kingdom

10.1

number % 2,416

9.3

Sydney Statistical Division % 4.7

Change 2001 to 2006 222

3.5

2.1

-102

New Zealand

800

3

2

902

USA

477

1.8

0.4

511

2

0.4

-34

South Africa

422

1.6

0.7

419

1.6

0.6

3

Germany

228

0.9

0.5

222

0.9

0.5

6

Japan

228

0.9

0.2

228

0.9

0.2

0

China

214

0.8

2.6

203

0.8

2.1

11

Hong Kong

160

0.6

0.9

167

0.6

0.9

-7

India

144

0.5

1.3

144

0.6

0.9

0

Ireland

135

0.5

0.3

143

0.6

0.4

-8

23.9

3,153

12.1

22.9

85

Non-English speaking backgrounds Main English speaking countries TOTAL OVERSEAS BORN Australia Not stated

106

number % 2,638

2001 Sydney Statistical Division % 4.3

3,238

12.3

4,594

17.5

7.8

4,548

17.5

8.3

46

7,832

29.9

31.7

7,701

29.7

31.2

131

16,326 2,078

62.2 7.9

60.4 7.9

16,768 1,486

64.6 5.7

62.3 6.5

-442 592

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Population Forecasts to 2031 Population forecasts have been prepared for Mosman up to 2031. This provides a useful planning tool for Council and other organisations in forecasting demographic changes between now, in 10 years (the life of Council’s Strategic Plan) or further. The forecasts indicate that the total population will remain relatively stable, from 28,445 in 2011 to 29,388 in 2031, an increase of 943. This equates to an average annual growth of 0.17%.

Summary Data Total Populations Households Private Dwellings Average Household Dwelling

Forecast Year 2011 28 445 12 485 13 143 2.28

2021 28 641 13 037 12 698 2.21

2031 29 388 13 512 14 198 2.18

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Households The most significant changes in households will be a decline in the number of couple families with dependents from 3,216 or 25.7% in 2011 to 323 or 22.4% in 2031 and an increase in lone person households from 4,237 or 33.9% in 2011 to 5,006 or 37% in 2031. Household size will decline slightly from 2.28% in 2011 to 2.18% in 2031.

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


Age Structure The main change to the age structure between 2011 and 2031 will be a significant increase in people aged 60 years and over from 23.7% to 29.1%, and this is particularly marked for people aged 70-84 years who will increase from 8.8% to 13.7%. There will be a very small reduction in children aged between 0-4 years from 5.7% to 5.5% and children 5-11 years from 7.5% to 7.2% and a very small reduction in young people aged 12-17 years from 5.9% to 5.7%.

Forecast age structure, Mosman Council area (Persons) 2011 Age group

Number

2021 % Number

2031

2011-2031

%

Number

%

Change

0 to 4 years

1,628

5.7

1,531

5.2

1,576

5.5

-52

5 to 11 years

2,147

7.5

2,045

7.0

2,062

7.2

-85

12 to 17 years

1,694

5.9

1,632

5.6

1,616

5.7

78

18 to 24 years

1,694

7.0

1,983

6.7

2,003

7.0

2

25 to 34 years

3,962

13.8

3,843

13.1

4,000

14.1

38

35 to 49 years

6,526

22.7

6,203

21.1

6,206

21.8

-320

50 to 59 years

3,676

12.8

3,689

12.5

3,652

12.8

-24

60 to 69 years

3,470

12.1

3,339

11.6

3,468

12.2

-2

70 to 84 years

2,542

8.8

3,627

12.3

3,910

13.7

1,368

803

2.8

814

2.8

902

3.2

99

85 and over years

109


Appendix D - Financial Forecasting

D

financial forecasting

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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


FINANCIAL PARAMETERS USED TO FORMULATE 10 YEAR MODEL

Operating Revenues Ordinary Rates

2.60%

Annual Charges

3%

User Charges & Fees

3%

Other Revenues

3%

Operating Grants & Contributions 3

%

Operating Expenditure Salaries

3.20%

Casual Wages

3.20%

Employee Costs Other

3%

Materials & Contracts

3%

Depreciation

2%

Other Expenses

3%

Capital Items Contractors

3%

111


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MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010

Net Operating Result before Grants and Contributions provided for Capital Purposes

Net Operating Result for the Year

Discontinued Operations - Profit/(Loss) Net Profit/(Loss) from Discontinued Operations

Operating Result from Continuing Operations

(2,837,000)

106,000

-

106,000

12,417,000 378,000 9,191,000 4,096,000 6,814,000 39,000 32,935,000

Employee Benefits & On-Costs Borrowing Costs Materials & Contracts Depreciation & Amortisation Impairment Other Expenses Interest & Investment Losses Net Losses from the Disposal of Assets Joint Ventures & Associated Entities Total Expenses from Continuing Operations

(69,642)

2,687,103

-

2,687,103

12,861,232 463,544 9,690,125 4,200,000 4,767,674 31,982,575

18,612 34,669,678

13,000 33,041,000

Expenses from Continuing Operations

19,742,407 5,237,742 300,000 4,793,295 1,820,877 2,756,745

2009/10 $

18,951,000 5,324,000 339,000 3,445,000 2,026,000 2,943,000

2008/09 $

Revenue: Rates & Annual Charges User Charges & Fees Interest & Investment Revenue Other Revenues Grants & Contributions provided for Operating Purposes Grants & Contributions provided for Capital Purposes Other Income: Net gains from the disposal of assets Joint Ventures & Associated Entities Total Income from Continuing Operations

Income from Continuing Operations

INCOME STATEMENT - CONSOLIDATED

Mosman Municipal Council 10 Year Financial Plan for the Years ending 30 June 2020

(1,083,217)

(13,217)

-

(13,217)

13,739,186 813,996 10,024,354 4,800,000 4,950,333 34,327,869

34,314,652

20,445,000 5,711,912 310,000 5,007,568 1,770,172 1,070,000

2010/11 $

(1,172,764)

(572,764)

-

(572,764)

14,228,691 776,276 10,298,318 4,896,000 5,087,148 35,286,433

34,713,669

20,847,538 5,939,870 387,596 5,144,795 1,793,871 600,000

2011/12 $

(1,353,040)

(753,040)

-

(753,040)

14,678,952 659,257 10,600,902 4,993,920 5,405,067 36,338,098

35,585,058

21,260,725 6,114,174 481,411 5,282,658 1,846,090 600,000

2012/13 $

(1,144,099)

(544,099)

-

(544,099)

15,170,243 559,356 10,922,563 5,093,798 5,387,423 37,133,384

36,589,285

21,840,743 6,293,708 532,697 5,422,262 1,899,876 600,000

2013/14 $

(1,105,858)

(505,858)

-

(505,858)

15,677,974 471,270 11,253,574 5,195,674 5,544,351 38,142,843

37,636,985

22,436,659 6,478,619 600,723 5,565,709 1,955,275 600,000

2014/15 $

(1,079,108)

(479,108)

-

(479,108)

16,231,190 377,073 11,594,215 5,299,588 5,705,986 39,208,052

38,728,945

23,048,910 6,669,078 685,510 5,713,111 2,012,336 600,000

2015/16 $

(1,245,329)

(645,329)

-

(645,329)

16,803,784 280,938 11,934,776 5,405,580 6,072,470 40,497,547

39,852,219

23,677,947 6,865,250 773,336 5,864,577 2,071,109 600,000

2016/17 $

(1,869,135)

(1,269,135)

-

(1,269,135)

17,396,431 191,366 12,285,553 5,513,691 6,043,949 41,430,990

40,161,855

23,489,842 7,067,307 852,838 6,020,222 2,131,646 600,000

2017/18 $

(1,929,077)

(1,329,077)

-

(1,329,077)

18,009,831 141,855 12,646,853 5,623,965 6,220,572 42,643,076

41,313,999

24,128,818 7,275,427 935,590 6,180,166 2,193,998 600,000

2018/19 $

(2,004,711)

(1,404,711)

-

(1,404,711)

18,644,701 100,462 13,018,993 5,736,444 6,402,494 43,903,095

42,498,384

24,785,255 7,489,790 1,020,590 6,344,528 2,258,221 600,000

2019/20 $


113

Total Equity

Retained Earnings Revaluation Reserves Council Equity Interest Minority Equity Interest

EQUITY

Net Assets

Non-Current Liabilities Payables Borrowings Provisions Investments Accounted for using the equity method Liabilities associated with assets classified as "held for sale" Total Non-Current Liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIE S

Current Liabilities Payables Borrowings Provisions Liabilities associated with assets classified as "held for sale" Total Current Liabilities

LIABILITIES

Non-Current Assets Investments Receivables Inventories Infrastructure, Property, Plant & Equipment Investments Accounted for using the equity method Investment Property Intangible Assets Non-current assets classified as "held for sale" Other Total Non-Current Assets TOTAL ASSET S

Current Assets Cash & Cash Equivalents Investments Receivables Inventories Other Non-current assets classified as "held for sale" Total Current Assets

ASSETS

BALANCE SHEET - CONSOLIDATED

Mosman Municipal Council 10 Year Financial Plan for the Years ending 30 June 2020

419,569,000 108,655,000 528,224,000 528,224,000

6,306,000 116,000 6,422,000 17,646,000 528,224,000

6,420,000 1,776,000 3,028,000 11,224,000

101,000 500,139,000 423,000 36,609,000 537,272,000 545,870,000

5,013,000 500,000 2,820,000 115,000 150,000 8,598,000

2008/09 $

422,256,103 108,655,000 530,911,103 530,911,103

7,871,327 154,672 8,025,999 20,325,948 530,911,103

6,576,288 1,984,332 3,739,328 12,299,949

375,000 119,783 505,581,280 441,612 36,609,000 543,126,675 551,237,051

4,501,051 125,000 3,218,461 113,523 152,340 8,110,375

2009/10 $

422,242,886 108,655,000 530,897,886 530,897,886

8,824,723 186,448 9,011,171 22,224,487 530,897,886

6,909,160 1,796,605 4,507,552 13,213,316

375,000 125,380 507,227,441 441,612 36,609,000 544,778,433 553,122,373

4,572,553 125,000 3,368,830 117,439 160,118 8,343,940

2010/11 $

421,670,122 108,655,000 530,325,122 530,325,122

7,410,827 218,810 7,629,637 21,461,802 530,325,122

7,128,349 1,413,896 5,289,920 13,832,166

375,000 128,469 505,328,364 441,612 36,609,000 542,882,444 551,786,924

5,041,874 125,000 3,451,820 120,649 165,138 8,904,480

2011/12 $

420,917,083 108,655,000 529,572,083 529,572,083

6,046,180 252,142 6,298,322 21,146,060 529,572,083

7,387,332 1,364,647 6,095,760 14,847,738

375,000 131,387 503,379,521 441,612 36,609,000 540,936,520 550,718,143

5,831,091 125,000 3,530,229 124,194 171,109 9,781,623

2012/13 $

420,372,983 108,655,000 529,027,983 529,027,983

4,887,790 286,474 5,174,264 20,836,382 529,027,983

7,577,953 1,158,390 6,925,774 15,662,118

375,000 135,004 501,411,599 441,612 36,609,000 538,972,215 549,864,365

6,836,217 125,000 3,627,427 127,962 175,544 10,892,150

2013/14 $

419,867,125 108,655,000 528,522,125 528,522,125

3,724,316 321,837 4,046,153 20,808,296 528,522,125

7,817,980 1,163,474 7,780,690 16,762,144

375,000 138,723 499,395,324 441,612 36,609,000 536,959,659 549,330,422

8,205,488 125,000 3,727,339 131,840 181,096 12,370,763

2014/15 $

419,388,018 108,655,000 528,043,018 528,043,018

2,497,801 358,260 2,856,061 20,816,450 528,043,018

8,072,622 1,226,515 8,661,252 17,960,389

375,000 142,545 497,411,462 441,612 36,609,000 534,979,619 548,859,467

9,601,991 125,000 3,830,045 135,831 186,982 13,879,848

2015/16 $

418,742,689 108,655,000 527,397,689 527,397,689

1,856,453 395,776 2,252,229 20,844,353 527,397,689

8,382,545 641,348 9,568,232 18,592,124

375,000 146,474 495,382,756 441,612 36,609,000 532,954,843 548,242,042

10,892,640 125,000 3,935,622 139,820 194,117 15,287,199

2016/17 $

417,473,554 108,655,000 526,128,554 526,128,554

1,314,658 434,417 1,749,075 21,395,277 526,128,554

8,601,986 541,795 10,502,421 19,646,201

375,000 147,157 493,485,709 441,612 36,609,000 531,058,478 547,523,831

12,043,249 125,000 3,953,955 143,930 199,219 16,465,353

2017/18 $

416,144,477 108,655,000 524,799,477 524,799,477

881,777 474,218 1,355,995 22,133,245 524,799,477

8,879,734 432,882 11,464,635 20,777,251

375,000 151,208 491,640,680 441,612 36,609,000 529,217,501 546,932,722

13,173,605 125,000 4,062,814 148,163 205,639 17,715,221

2018/19 $

414,739,766 108,655,000 523,394,766 523,394,766

413,988 515,212 929,200 23,019,280 523,394,766

9,166,574 467,789 12,455,716 22,090,079

375,000 155,373 489,831,590 441,612 36,609,000 527,412,575 546,414,046

14,336,966 125,000 4,174,714 152,522 212,269 19,001,472

2019/20 $


114

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010 (9,642,280)

Net Cash provided (or used in) Investing Activities

(1,984,332) 765,668

(1,776,340) 1,773,660 (511,949) 5,013,000 4,501,051

Net Cash Flow provided (used in) Financing Activities

Net Increase/(Decrease) in Cash & Cash Equivalents

plus: Cash, Cash Equivalents & Investments - beginning of year

Cash & Cash Equivalents - end of the year

4,572,553

4,501,051

71,503

2,750,000

3,550,000

Receipts: Proceeds from Borrowings & Advances Payments: Repayment of Borrowings & Advances

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

(6,446,161)

(9,802,280) (6,446,161)

-

160,000

5,751,996

(12,784,887) (9,904,814) (813,996) (4,902,994)

(12,039,990) (9,633,124) (463,544) (4,740,492) 7,356,671

20,342,682 5,683,326 310,000 2,840,172 4,982,507

2010/11 $

19,465,737 5,164,340 300,000 4,577,622 4,726,122

2009/10 $

Receipts: Sale of Investment Property Sale of Infrastructure, Property, Plant & Equipment Payments: Purchase of Investment Property Purchase of Infrastructure, Property, Plant & Equipment

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Net Cash provided (or used in) Operating Activities

Receipts: Rates & Annual Charges User Charges & Fees Interest & Investment Revenue Received Grants & Contributions Other Payments: Employee Benefits & On-Costs Materials & Contracts Borrowing Costs Other

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

CASH FLOW STATEMENT - CONSOLIDATED

Mosman Municipal Council 10 Year Financial Plan for the Years ending 30 June 2020

5,041,874

4,572,553

469,321

(1,796,605) (1,796,605)

-

(2,996,923)

(3,156,923)

160,000

5,262,848

(13,311,868) (10,219,939) (776,276) (5,056,660)

20,791,341 5,923,858 387,596 2,393,871 5,130,926

2011/12 $

5,831,091

5,041,874

789,217

(1,413,896) (1,413,896)

-

(3,045,078)

(3,045,078)

-

5,248,191

(13,719,687) (10,508,914) (659,257) (5,367,681)

21,207,779 6,098,948 481,411 2,446,090 5,269,503

2012/13 $

6,836,217

5,831,091

1,005,126

(1,364,647) (1,364,647)

-

(3,125,876)

(3,285,876)

160,000

5,495,650

(14,216,825) (10,854,557) (559,356) (5,362,083)

21,775,127 6,274,800 532,697 2,499,876 5,405,971

2013/14 $

8,205,488

6,836,217

1,369,270

(1,158,390) (1,158,390)

-

(3,179,399)

(3,179,399)

-

5,707,060

(14,675,321) (11,168,055) (471,270) (5,511,648)

22,369,226 6,459,148 600,723 2,555,275 5,548,982

2014/15 $

9,601,991

8,205,488

1,396,504

(1,163,474) (1,163,474)

-

(3,315,726)

(3,475,726)

160,000

5,875,703

(15,194,636) (11,503,692) (377,073) (5,671,312)

22,979,611 6,649,026 685,510 2,612,336 5,695,933

2015/16 $

10,892,640

9,601,991

1,290,649

(1,226,515) (1,226,515)

-

(3,376,874)

(3,376,874)

-

5,894,038

(15,714,155) (11,825,557) (280,938) (6,028,025)

23,606,729 6,844,601 773,336 2,671,109 5,846,937

2016/17 $

12,043,249

10,892,640

1,150,609

(641,348) (641,348)

-

(3,616,644)

(3,776,644)

160,000

5,408,600

(16,319,898) (12,207,978) (191,366) (6,014,997)

23,477,630 7,063,633 852,838 2,731,646 6,017,092

2017/18 $

13,173,605

12,043,249

1,130,356

(541,795) (541,795)

-

(3,778,936)

(3,778,936)

-

5,451,088

(16,876,140) (12,548,941) (141,855) (6,183,065)

24,056,330 7,253,570 935,590 2,793,998 6,161,599

2018/19 $

14,336,966

13,173,605

1,163,361

(432,882) (432,882)

-

(3,927,354)

(4,087,354)

160,000

5,523,596

(17,476,210) (12,918,157) (100,462) (6,363,895)

24,710,767 7,467,281 1,020,590 2,858,221 6,325,461

2019/20 $


115

2009/10

$ Net Description Result General Manager (400,200) Executive Officer - Corporate & Human (363,500) Director Corporate Services (176,000) Manager Finance 6,128,872 Manager Governance 452,608 Manager Ranger Services 1,780,156 Manager IT Services (1,267,000) Director Environment and Planning (385,591) Manager Urban Planning (377,528) Manager Development & Services (10,100) Manager Environment & Services (1,224,132) Manager Assets & Services (2,430,476) Open Space Co-Ordinator (2,183,239) Manager Infrastructure (797,700) Community Environmental Contract (451,405) Infrastructure Levy Section 94 Open Speace Reserve 107,953 Director Community Development (548,786) Manager Library Resources (713,770) Children's Librarian (143,750) Manager Library Services (605,950) Local Studies Librarian (96,700) Manager Cultural Services (375,800) Centre Services Coordinator (13,000) Youth Development Officer (196,863) Children's Services Development Office 19,130 Community Development Manager (230,396) ADS Development Officer (190,370) Community Volunteers Co-Ordinator (20,657) Mosman Festival (54,100) Events & Marketing Coordinator (12,528) (4,780,822)

10 Year Financial Plan for the Years ending SUMMARY OF ALL CENTRES/UNITS - ALL FUNDS (CONSOLIDATED) $ Net Result (402,500) (403,500) (183,000) 7,013,498 446,877 2,490,385 (1,397,350) (397,000) (426,154) (61,700) (1,287,752) (4,560,410) (2,235,850) (950,000) (433,456) 0 11,430 (589,576) (751,350) (150,750) (634,300) (100,450) (384,250) (24,000) (228,365) 33,205 (408,410) (186,430) (17,464) (63,150) (37,591) (6,319,361)

2010/11 $ Net Result (415,213) (415,869) (188,856) 5,655,687 468,203 2,547,927 (1,437,880) (409,704) (457,198) (40,826) (1,326,598) (2,732,897) (2,303,451) (850,417) (310,958) 0 22,414 (608,156) (774,702) (155,450) (656,043) (103,469) (394,769) (24,801) (235,405) 33,481 (421,171) (191,386) (18,124) (64,709) (38,841) (5,849,179)

2011/12 $ Net Result (598,328) (428,621) (194,899) 6,021,954 490,119 2,606,811 (1,479,657) (422,814) (471,387) (36,537) (1,366,547) (2,818,411) (2,373,105) (876,167) 145,197 (0) 22,414 (627,324) (798,786) (160,298) (678,481) (106,582) (405,624) (25,639) (242,670) 33,729 (434,332) (196,523) (18,809) (66,316) (40,132) (5,547,765)

2012/13 $ Net Result (441,857) (441,769) (201,136) 6,328,769 512,641 2,667,062 (1,522,719) (436,344) (486,026) (44,240) (1,407,673) (2,856,528) (2,444,875) (902,705) 166,074 0 22,414 (647,098) (823,625) (165,299) (701,634) (109,794) (416,824) (26,515) (250,168) 33,947 (447,906) (201,851) (19,520) (67,971) (41,466) (5,374,634)

2013/14 $ Net Result (455,814) (455,324) (207,573) 6,737,337 535,786 2,728,703 (1,567,107) (450,308) (501,128) (51,939) (1,450,009) (2,947,329) (2,518,825) (930,053) 200,688 (0) 152,414 (667,497) (849,242) (170,456) (725,525) (113,106) (428,382) (27,430) (257,905) 34,131 (461,905) (207,374) (20,258) (69,677) (42,844) (5,187,951)

2014/15 $ Net Result (470,212) (469,299) (214,215) 6,994,256 559,570 2,791,774 (1,612,860) (464,717) (516,709) (59,634) (1,493,592) (3,040,894) (2,595,021) (958,237) 223,595 0 152,414 (688,542) (875,663) (175,776) (750,178) (116,523) (440,307) (28,387) (265,890) 34,282 (476,343) (213,101) (21,024) (71,435) (44,267) (5,306,935)

2015/16 $ Net Result (685,065) (483,708) (221,070) 7,277,421 584,011 2,856,311 (1,660,021) (479,588) (532,783) (57,328) (1,538,458) (3,137,309) (2,673,532) (987,282) 247,191 (0) 152,414 (710,252) (902,913) (181,263) (775,618) (120,048) (452,613) (29,388) (274,131) 34,395 (491,235) (219,038) (21,819) (73,246) (45,738) (5,601,700)

2016/17 $ Net Result (500,388) (498,563) (228,144) 7,456,467 609,127 2,922,347 (1,708,633) (494,935) (549,366) (55,023) (1,584,644) (3,236,661) (2,754,427) (1,017,214) 0 (0) 152,414 (732,649) (931,016) (186,922) (801,868) (123,683) (465,310) (30,433) (282,635) 34,468 (506,593) (225,193) (22,644) (75,112) (47,258) (5,884,491)

2017/18

$ Net Result (516,195) (513,879) (235,445) 7,757,168 634,936 2,989,918 (1,758,742) (510,773) (566,474) (52,721) (1,632,190) (3,339,039) (2,837,780) (1,048,062) 0 0 152,818 (755,755) (960,001) (192,759) (828,956) (127,433) (478,413) (31,524) (291,411) 34,500 (522,433) (231,574) (23,500) (77,035) (48,827) (6,011,579)

2018/19

$ Net Result (532,502) (529,669) (242,979) 7,929,474 661,457 3,059,060 (1,810,392) (527,118) (584,125) (50,425) (1,681,136) (3,444,535) (2,923,664) (1,079,852) 0 (0) 303,123 (779,591) (989,894) (198,779) (856,908) (131,302) (491,933) (32,664) (300,467) 34,487 (538,769) (238,189) (24,389) (79,016) (50,449) (6,131,147)

2019/20


116

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

(2,000,000)

(1,500,000)

(1,000,000)

(500,000)

0

500,000

1,000,000

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,500,000

3,000,000

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Operating Result from Continuing Operations - Consolidated

2019

2020

(2,500,000)

(2,000,000)

(1,500,000)

(1,000,000)

(500,000)

0

0

2011

0

2010

5,000,000

10,000,000

15,000,000

20,000,000

25,000,000

30,000,000

35,000,000

5,000,000

10,000,000

15,000,000

20,000,000

25,000,000

30,000,000

40,000,000

45,000,000

40,000,000

35,000,000

50,000,000

45,000,000

Total Income from Continuing Operations - Consolidated

Income Statement Charts

CHARTS - ALL FUNDS (CONSOLIDATED)

Mosman Municipal Council 10 Year Financial Plan for the Years ending 30 June 2020

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Net Operating Result before Capital Grants and Contributions Consolidated

2010

Total Expenses from Continuing Operations - Consolidated

2019

2019

2020

2020


117

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2.162%

2010

2.162%

55.00%

2.163%

2.163%

2.164%

2.164%

2.165%

2.165%

55.50%

56.00%

56.50%

57.00%

57.50%

58.00%

58.50%

59.00%

2.166%

2.166%

60.00%

59.50%

2.167%

60.50%

Rates & Annual Charges Coverage Ratio - Consolidated

0.0000%

0.00 2020

1.0000%

0.20 2019

2.0000%

0.40

2018

3.0000%

0.60

2017

4.0000%

0.80

2014 2015 2016 Base Model

5.0000%

1.00

2013

6.0000%

1.20

2012

7.0000%

1.40

2011

8.0000%

1.60

2010

9.0000%

Unrestricted Current Ratio - Consolidated

1.80

Note 13 Ratio Charts

CHARTS - ALL FUNDS (CONSOLIDATED)

Mosman Municipal Council 10 Year Financial Plan for the Years ending 30 June 2020

2011

2012

2013

2014 2015 Base Model

2016

2017

2018

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Rates, Annual Charges, Interest & Extra Charges Outstanding Percentage - Consolidated

2010

Debt Service Ratio - Consolidated

2019

2019

2020

2020


First published in 1992 by Mosman Municipal Council This edition June 2010 ©1992 Mosman Municipal Council This publication is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review or as otherwise permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries and feedback should be made to: The General Manager Mosman Municipal Council PO Box 211 SPIT JUNCTION NSW 2088 Telephone: 9978 4000 Facsimile: 9978 4132 E-mail: council@mosman.nsw.gov.au Website: www.mosman.nsw.gov.au Copies of this plan and other plans in this set can be viewed online at Mosman Council’s website. www.mosman.nsw.gov.au

118

MOSPLAN Community Strategic Plan 2010–2020: Adopted 1 June 2010


MOSPLAN - 10 Year Community Strategic Plan