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Rights Catalogue SPRING 2014


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contents

Frontlist Exercise in Action: Yoga Exercise in Action: Strength Training Exercise in Action: Core Anatomy of Exercise Encyclopedia Anatomy of Stretching and Training for Golf Ultimate Juices & Smoothies Encyclopedia Ultimate Cocktail Encyclopedia Beatles: Here, There, and Everywhere Ali: The Official Portrait of the Greatest... Illustrated History of Weapons: Pistols Illustrated History of Weapons: Rifles Illustrated History of Weapons: Knives Illustrated History of Weapons: Swords Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weaponry Illustrated Encyclopedia of Small Arms Atlas of Military History Kings & Queens of Great Britain: EQA Popes: Every Question Answered

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 17

Fitness Exercise in Action: Yoga Exercise in Action: Strength Training Exercise in Action: Core Anatomy of Exercise Encyclopedia Anatomy of Stretching and Training for Golf Anatomy of Functional Training Anatomy of Strength & Conditioning Anatomy of Cycling Anatomy of Running Anatomy of Core Stability Anatomy of Exercise for Women Anatomy of Exercise: 50+ Anatomy of Stretching Anatomy of a Healthy Back Anatomy of Muscle Building Anatomy of Core Training Anatomy of Yoga Anatomy of Massage Anatomy of Pilates Anatomy of Exercise Anatomy of Strength Training

3 4 5 6 7 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 25 25

Children’s Fact Atlas series

26

Gift Wisdom of Animals Series Cat Cuties I Love You, Mom Mutt Mugs Llama Sutra The Mutt Book Brick Book Series: Animals

27 28 28 28 29 29 30

Popular Culture Beatles: Here, There, and Everywhere Ali: The Official Portrait Brick Book Series: Celebrities A Field Guide to Monsters Guitar Heroes Must-See Movies

10 11 31 32 32 32

History and Religion Illustrated History of Weapons: Pistols Illustrated History of Weapons: Rifles Illustrated History of Weapons: Knives Illustrated History of Weapons: Swords Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weaponry Illustrated Encyclopedia of Small Arms Atlas of Military History Kings & Queens of Great Britain Popes: Every Question Answered Illustrated History of Weaponry Presidents: Every Question Answered Fifty States: Every Question Answered Illustrated Life of Jesus Atlas of World Religions

12 12 13 13 14 15 16 17 17 33 33 33 33 33

Sex Sex 101 Advanced Sex Sex Masters Fetish 101 New Kama Sutra

34 34 34 35 35

Coming Soon Dogopedia! The Ultimate Resource...

36


frontlist

EXERCISE IN ACTION

NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

Exercise in Action: Yoga

EXERCISE IN ACTION

7 5/8” x 10” Exercise in Action: Yoga explains how, by 160pp drawing our attention to the simple movements of yoga, the body becomes an entry point to 4-color throughout something bigger and better than ourselves. As well as toning and stretching muscles Paperback for strength and flexibility, concentration on May the three2014 parts of a pose—the entry, hold, and exit—helps to finely develop awareness, $24.95 US Retail stopping the distracting cyclical thoughts that

YOGA

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run endlessly through our minds. The mind

An instant visual guide to learning yoga

YOGA

slows down and clears out. Our nervous Correct form is vital in yoga, and the inventive design used in Exercise in system begins to rebalance, and therefore all Action: Yoga systems helps(circulatory, the reader understand how to perform each pose in a way the other physiological respiratory, immune, and endocrine) also begin never-before seen in book form. Author, Betsy Kase is a certified instructor to rebalance. This snowball effect delivers better health, mood increased energy, with overstabilization, twenty years’ experience.

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and overall positive effects at all levels: physical, emotional, and psychological.

Rights Sold: English (North America)

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Betsy Kase

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Warrior I

TARGET MUSCLES trapezius

Virabhadrasana I

1 ThIngS TO ThInk ABOUT

Standing poses are really important to create strength in the legs and open up the groin. The Warrior 1 is a classic standing pose that increases the energy of the body and creates stamina.

om

latissimus dorsi

2

4

• Look back at your back foot and make sure it doesn’t cross the midline of your mat. Move your foot 3 off to the side.

obliquus internus

gluteus medius

obliquus externus rectus femoris

gluteus maximus

sartorius

biceps femoris

Step 1 Stand at the front edge of your mat.

vastus medialis

Step 2 Bend your knees and step your right foot back three feet on an angle, with your toes pointing to the front right corner of the mat.

adductor magnus

bACk And LEGS

Step 3 Square your hips to the front and press into the outer edge of your back foot.

Betsy Kase

Step 4 Reach your arms out to your sides, turn your palms up, inhale, and stretch your arms overhead. As you exhale, bend your left knee over your left ankle.

MOdIFICATIOn Place your hands on your hips.

Step 5 Take three breaths. Step 6 To exit, exhale, put your hands on your hips, and straighten your front leg. Step your back foot up to the front of your mat. Repeat for the other leg.

Energized Flow

45-60 minutes

1 Cat pose/Dog pose, p. 17

2 Downward Dog, p. 20

3 high Lunge, p. 28

4 Standing Forward Bend, p. 88

5 Warrior II, p. 32

6 half Moon pose, p. 46

10 Warrior I, p. 30

11 Revolved Triangle, p. 40

30 • Standing and Balancing Poses

7 Chair pose, p. 26 158 • Workouts

8 Twisting Chair, p. 110

9 Side Crow, p. 124

12 Plank, p. 116

13 Knees-Chest-Chin, p. 68

14 Cobra pose, p. 53

15 Bridge, p. 62

16 Supported Shoulder Stand, p. 128

Standing and Balancing Poses • 31

Extended Side Angle

TARGET MUSCLES

Utthita Parsvakonasana

biceps brachii

The Extended Side Angle pose is a combination of the Warrior II and Triangle poses, and takes your flexibility and strength to a new level. hold this pose for three breaths, and try to increase that over time. Challenge yourself to keep your front knee bent, transitioning through Warrior II, to exit the pose. Move gracefully, with a sense of purpose.

17 Corpse pose, p. 153 Workouts • 159

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2

Step 1 Stand in the middle of your mat. Step your feet wide so that when you stretch your arms out to the sides, your heels fall under your wrists.

Step 6 Draw your shoulder blades together on your back to open your chest.

Step 2 Turn your right heel out. From the top of your left thigh, turn your whole left leg and foot out. Step 3 Inhale with your arms out to the side. Expand and lengthen through your spine, exhale, and bend your left knee over your ankle, as your knee presses toward the outer edge of your foot.

sartorius

semitendinosus

semimembranosus

Step 7 After three breaths, inhale, press into your feet, and engage your legs. As you exhale, lift your torso back up into the Warrior II pose. Straighten your left leg, point your toes forward, put your hands on your hips, and hop or walk your feet together.

rectus femoris

3

ThIngS TO ThInk ABOUT • Watch your front knee: keep it in line with your ankle. • Activate your legs, and keep pressing through the back leg.

AbdOMInALS And hAMSTRInGS

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Step 4 Place your left forearm on your left thigh, trying to keep your torso straight. Stretch your right arm over your right leg, turn your palm up, and lift it up over your ear. Step 5 Stretch from the outer edge of the right foot to your right fingertips.

36 • Standing and Balancing Poses

www.moseleyroad.com

MOdIFICATIOn Place your bottom hand on your thigh or on a block.

Standing and Balancing Poses • 37


EXERCISE IN ACTION

STRENGTH TRAINING

frontlist NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

Exercise in Action: Strength Training

EXERCISE IN ACTION

7 5/8” x 10” 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback May 2014 $24.95 US Retail

To build strength, it helps to know exactly which muscles you are working on in each exercise, and the detailed, full-color photography and anatomical illustrations in this book will help you focus on the correct muscles every time. Concise, step-by-step instructions ensure you maintain the all-important good form that’s needed to avoid injury and to obtain the maximum health benefits from each exercise. Exercise in Action: Strength Training is organized by muscle groups so that you can focus on a particular area during each training session or combine exercises from different chapters to design your own fullbody workout. Exercise in Action: Strength Training also provides a series of stretching exercises to warm up and cool down before and after each session, as well as a series of specially designed programs for a fabulous fullbody workout.

STRENGTH TRAINING

An instant visual guide to efficient strength training

Exercise in Action: Strength Training combines innovative design with clear instruction to help readers the get the best from their workout. Each book in the series features unique overlaid photography that illustrates how to perform the exercises more clearly than any other book on the market.

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Rights Sold: English (North America)

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Hollis Lance Liebman

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Front Raise The Front Raise effectively isolates the anterior, or front part, of the shoulder, resulting in a stronger and more delineated frontal region. It is most effective for those who have difficulty performing overhead pressing. You can also perform this as an Alternating Front Raise, raising and lowering each arm in sequence.

Lateral Raise

TARGET MUSCLES anterior deltoid

The Lateral Raise strengthens the deltoids, but also makes the shoulders appear wider. Its location at the side means that the small deltoid muscle can contribute to the desired V-taper of the practitioner.

trapezius pectoralis major erector spinae rhomboids rectus abdominus

TARGET MUSCLES anterior deltoid trapezius pectoralis major erector spinae rhomboids rectus abdominus

Step 1 Start off in a standing position with a pair of dumbbells in hand and hanging at your sides, palms facing your thighs.

triceps brachii

Step 1 Begin in a standing position, holding a pair of dumbbells at your sides with your palms facing each other.

REAR

Step 2 Raise your arms upward. Rotate your palms so they are facedown at the top of the movement and your arms are parallel to the ground.

FRONT

ShoULdERS

triceps brachii

Step 2 Raise your arms directly out to the sides, with slightly bent arms, and turn the thumbs slightly downward as you raise your arms parallel to the ground.

REAR

FRONT

ShoULdERS

Step 3 Lower and continue to complete 10 to 12 repetitions.

Step 3 Complete 8 to 10 repetitions.

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Hollis Lance Liebman

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Bodyweight Workout CORRECT ACTION

Specializing in strengthening the overall body on its own merits without the use of additional resistance.

CORRECT ACTION

• Maintain an upright stance throughout the exercise • Arms slightly bent throughout the movement • Your palms rotate downward as you raise your arms

• Maintain posture throughout the exercise • Keep your arms slightly bent throughout the movement • Have your thumbs pointed slightly downward as you raise your arms

AVOID

1 Burpees, p. 41

2 Perfect Push-Up, p. 81

3 Decline Push-Up, p. 82

AVOID

• Raising your arms above parallel to the ground • Excessive speed or momentum • Allowing the lower back to take over the movement

4 Plyo Kettlebell Push-Up, p. 88

• Raising above parallel to the ground • Excessive speed or momentum • Allowing the deltoideus anterior to take over the movement

100 • Shoulder Exercises

5 Sit-Ups, p. 56

6 Lateral Low Lunge, p. 36

Shoulder Exercises • 101

7 Hyperextension, p. 136

Standing OneLegged Curls Standing One-Legged Curls isolate the hamstrings and are designed to effectively finish off training of the hamstrings during your workout.

TARGET MUSCLES erector spinae gluteus maximus biceps femoris semitendinosus

Kettlebell Pass The Kettlebell Pass is a lunge variation with a shortened range of motion. It is a strength builder for many parts of the body, but also develops the coordination required for many sports. Timing plays a critical factor in its proper execution.

semimembranosus

8 Twisting Hyperextension, p. 137

9 Vertical Dips, p. 122

Step 1 Begin by standing up straight with your feet together and your arms by your sides. 156 • Workouts

Workouts • 157

Step 2 Exhale as you bend one leg back and upward in a curling motion until fully contracted at the top, near the glute muscles. Step 3 Inhale as you lower your leg back down slowly to lengthen the muscle. Continue to complete 12 to 15 repetitions per leg.

GLUTES And hAMSTRinGS

CORRECT ACTION • Look for a controlled range of motion • Look for peak contraction • Aim at full extension

transversus abdominis biceps femoris

10 Plyometric Push-Up, p. 90 gastrocnemius

TARGET MUSCLES

deltoideus anterior

Step 1 Start by holding a kettlebell in one hand, with your back straight and your legs bent at the knees.

semitendinosus semimembranosus

Step 2 Stand up straight and, at the top of the motion, pass the kettlebell to your other hand. Step 3 Return to your original position with your knees bent. Continue to complete 10 repetitions, alternating the hand that begins the exercise holding the kettlebell.

REAR

FRONT

hAMSTRinGS

AVOID • Speedy repetitions • Short range of motion • Leaning your upper body backward

1

2

CORRECT ACTION • Look for proper timing and tempo during repetitions • Keep your back flat throughout the movement • Strive for a proper range of motion

AVOID • Excessive speed • Bouncy repetitions • Shallow or incomplete passes 28 • Leg and Hip Exercises

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3 Leg and Hip Exercises • 29


frontlist

EXERCISE IN ACTION

NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

Exercise in Action: Core

EXERCISE IN ACTION

7 5/8” x 10” Core exercises train the muscles in your 160pp pelvis, lower back, hips, and abdomen to work in harmony. A strong core gives better 4-color throughout balance and stability, whether on the playing field or in everyday activities. To build core Paperback strength, it helps to know exactly which May 2014 muscles you are working on in each exercise, and the detailed, full-color photography and $24.95 US Retail anatomical illustrations in this book will help

CORE

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you focus on the correct muscles every time.

An instant visual guide to developing a strong core

Concise, step-by-step you to perform exercises correctly, Exercise in Action: Other booksinstructions tell youensure how maintain the all-important good form that’s Core shows you how, using a unique image-overlay technique that needed toTraining avoid injury and to obtain the maximum health benefits from each exercise. clearly shows the flow of movement in each exercise. Exercise in Action: Core also provides a

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CORE

series of stretching exercises to warm up and cool down before and after each session,

Rights Sold: English (North America) as well as a series of specially designed programs for a fabulous workout.

2

Hollis Lance Liebman

3 Abdominal Hip Lift

The Hand Walkout builds strength in your anterior core and lats very quickly. It trains the abdominals isometrically and is an excellent alternative to the ab-wheel rollout. Since it requires no equipment, you can do it anywhere.

rectus femoris iliopsoas

The Abdominal Hip Lift strengthens the rectus abdominis (the muscle between the ribs and hips) and the obliques. Try to work up to two sets of 10 to 12 repetitions, with a short break between. This is a very good exercise for improving the strength of your lower abdominal muscles.

m

Hand Walkout

TARGET MUSCLES

vastus intermedius

tensor fasciae latae transversus abdominis

TARGET MUSCLES

latissimus dorsi rectus abdominis

pectoralis major

transversus abdominis

rectus abdominis

Step 1 Stand straight, arms at your sides.

Step 1 Lie down with your legs in the air and crossed at the ankles, knees straight. Place your arms on the floor, straight by your sides.

obliquus internus

triceps brachii

ABDOMINALS

Step 2 Pinching your legs together and squeezing your buttocks, press into the back of your arms to lift your hips upward. Step 3 Slowly return your hips to the floor. Repeat ten times, then switch with the opposite leg crossed in the front.

Step 2 Bend forward from the waist, and place your hands on the floor in front of you, at a distance slightly wider than your feet. Keep your knees as straight as possible.

obliquus externus

CORRECT ACTION • Your legs remain straight and firm throughout the exercise • Your neck and shoulders are relaxed as you lift the hips

AVOID • Jerking your movements or using momentum to lift the hips

Hollis Lance Liebman

coracobrachialis pectoralis minor deltoideus anterior

Step 3 walk slowly forward on your hands, one “step” at a time, as far as you can—ideally to a full plank position. Step 4 Return by walking back toward the starting position and pushing your hips upward, folding the torso at the hips.

brachialis

CORE AND LATS

CORRECT ACTION • Your spine and legs remain straight • A controlled, steady movement

AVOID • Bending your knees • Allowing your spine to sag in the middle • Bending your elbows

MODIFICATION

Keeping your hips on the floor, raise your arms toward the ceiling. Reach toward your toes as you lift your shoulders off the floor.

Swiss Ball Jackknife

TARGET MUSCLES

obliques

glutes hip flexors

erector spinae

The Swiss Ball Jackknife is a strength builder— primarily in the trunk and hips. For proper performance, you need to use coordination, timing, accuracy, and strength. Step 1 Assume a push-up position with your arms shoulder-width apart and your shins resting on the Swiss ball. Step 2 Bend your knees, rolling the ball in toward your chest, keeping your arms straight the whole time. Step 3 Extend your legs and repeat for 20 repetitions.

rectus abdominis thighs

hamstrings

TRUNK AND HIPS

Swiss Ball Crunch

TARGET MUSCLES obliques

rectus abdominis

erector spinae

The Swiss Ball Crunch is a highly effective core strengthening exercise. A small step forward or backward can greatly decrease or increase the tension on the abdominal muscles. Step 1 Begin by lying on your back on a Swiss ball with your head and neck supported, legs bent, your palms placed on your ears, and your elbows flared outward. Step 2 Raise your head and shoulders off the ball while contracting your trunk toward your waist. Keep your lower-back grounded on the ball. Step 3 Lower your torso and repeat for 25 repetitions.

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64 • Body Weight Exercises

Body Weight Exercises • 65

ABDOMINALS

CORRECT ACTION • Maintain a precise and short range of motion • Tension on the abdominals • Contract the muscles at the top of your abdominals

AVOID • Using the neck • Bouncy and speedy repetitions • Raising your lower-back off the ball

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TARGET MUSCLES

Sit-Up The Sit-Up is to the abdominals what the bench press is to the pectorals: a highly effective exercise. The iconic Sit-Up is widely used on a daily basis and for good reason: it’s the perfect exercise for the rectus abdominis. It is similar to a crunch but Sit-Ups have a fuller range of motion and condition additional muscles.

CORRECT ACTION • Keep a tight core throughout • Proper breathing • Keep your shoulders above your hands

AVOID • A haphazard pattern • Rounding your back • Excessive speed 22 • Swiss Ball Exercises

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rectus abdominis

and raising your trunk off the ground, contracting your abdominals while lifting up toward your knees.

Step 3 Lower and repeat for 20 repetitions.

TARGET MUSCLES

rectus abdominis obliques

Step 2 Push through your heels for support and raising your trunk off the ground.

Step 1 Begin by lying on your back with your legs bent and your hands behind your head. Step 2 Start by pushing through your heels for support

The Alternating Sit-Up is an advanced variant on the classic sit-up that effectively targets the obliques, in addition to the rectus abdominis. It is an exercise upon which the foundation of abdominal and core strength is built.

Step 1 Lie on your back with your legs slightly bent and your hands behind your ears.

2 Swiss Ball Exercises • 23

Alternating Sit-Up

Step 3 Rotate to the left so your elbow touches your opposite knee, and contract your abdominals.

erector spinae

ABDOMINALS

CORRECT ACTION • Lead from your belly button • A controlled lowering • A precise range of motion

AVOID • Overusing your neck • Stressing your lower-back • Swinging upward wildly

54 • Body Weight Exercises

www.moseleyroad.com

Step 4 Lower and repeat, rotating to the other side. Perform 15 repetitions per side.

erector spinae

ABDOMINALS AND OBLIQUES

CORRECT ACTION • Lead from your belly button • A controlled lowering • A precise and sharp rotation

AVOID • Overusing your neck • Stressing your lower-back • Pulling your head too far forward

Body Weight Exercises • 55


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frontlist

AnAtomy of ExErcisE EncycLoPEDiA

AnAtomy ExErcisE of

EncycLoPEDiA HOLLIS LANCE LIEBMAN

serratus anterior

deltoideus

rectus abdominis

triceps brachii

obliquus internus*

transversus abdominis*

Anatomy of Exercise Encyclopedia

NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

9” x 11” 392pp 4-color throughout Paperback and Hardcover Spring 2014 $40.00, US Retail

The Anatomy of Exercise Encylopedia is a one-of-a-kind book: a comprehensive illustrated encyclopedia of sports- and activity-specific exercises, featuring state-of-art anatomical illustrations that not only describe the perfect form for each exercise, but clearly show the muscles being targeted. This book guides you step-by-step through more than 60 of the perfect exercise routines for every sport or activity you can think of. If you’re a golfer, there’s a routine for you - in fact there are three! Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced - whatever your sport of choice, your can find the perfect routine. Plus, in addition to the sports routines, there are also workouts for specific functions and situations: At Your Desk, Pregnancy, Knee Problems, Belly Buster, Cardio Plan, Core Stability, 60+, Weight-free, Bigger Arms, Stronger Chest, and more.

obliquus externus

Rights Sold: English (World)

Day One A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 Day Two: Rest Day Three: A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Day Four: Rest Day FIve: A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 Day Six: Cardio 30-45 minutes Day Seven Rest

BEGINNER ROUTINE 2 Day One

WORKOUT LEVEL 2

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15

Day Two: Rest

Day Three:

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15

Day Four: Rest

Day FIve:

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15

INTERMEDIATE ROUTINE 1 Day One A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 G 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 3 sets 12-15 Day Two:

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Day Three:

A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 G 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 3 sets 12-15

Day One

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15 O 3 sets 30-120 seconds Q 3 sets 30

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Day Seven

Day Three:

Rest

Day FIve: A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 G 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 3 sets 12-15 Day Six:

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Day Seven Rest

INTERMEDIATE ROUTINE 2

Day Two:

Day Six:

Day Four: Rest

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15 O 3 sets 30-120 seconds Q 3 sets 30

Day Four: Rest

Day FIve:

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15 O 3 sets 30-120 seconds Q 3 sets 30

ADVANCED ROUTINE 1 Day One

S 3 sets 20

Day Four:

A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 G 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 3 sets 12-15 P 3 sets 20 S 3 sets 20

Day Two:

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Day Three:

Day Six:

A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 G 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 3 sets 12-15 P 3 sets 20

F

C

Barbell Squats page 152

G

D

Reverse Fly page 102

H

Dumbbell Lunge page 154

Barbell Curl page 108

One-Legged Step Down page 168

Day Two:

Day Seven

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15 O 3 sets 30-120 seconds Q 3 sets 30

R 3 sets 15 T 3 sets 20

Stiff-Legged Barbell Deadlift page 184

J

Dumbbell Calf Raise page 194

K

Dumbbell Shin Raise page 196

L

Day Six:

Day Two:

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Low impact cardio 30-minutes

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Day Seven

Day Three:

Day Six:

Day Three:

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Rest

Day One

M

N

Turkish Get-Up page 204

Star Jumps page 172

O

Mountain Climber page 174

P

Burpees page 176

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20

Day Four:

Day FIve:

Q

Wood Chop with Resistance Band page 218

R

Hip Abduction and Adduction with Band page 220

S

Swiss Ball Rollout page 222

T

Day Two: Rest

Day Three:

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20

The Windmill page 232

Day Four:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Day FIve:

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20

Day Six: Rest

Day Seven Rest

Day Four:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 30 seconds per leg L 30 secs per leg

Day FIve:

Day Two:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Rest

Day Three:

Day Seven

A 20 secs per leg B 30 secs per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15

Rest

inTERMEDiATE ROUTinE 2

BEGinnER ROUTinE 2

Day One

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20 H 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Day Two:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Day Three:

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20 H 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Day Four:

Day FIve:

Day One

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20 H 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Day Six: Rest

Day Seven Rest

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Day Seven

J 3 sets 12-15 K 30 secs per leg L 30 secs per leg

A

Illiotibial (IT) Band Stretch page 237

B

Hip Flexor Stretch page 238

c

Goblet Squat page 166

D

Leg Extension with Rotation page 170

E

Adductor Stretch page 178

f

Hamstring Abductor Stretch page 179

G

Swiss Ball Hamstring Curl page 180

H

Inverted Hamstring page 182

Single Leg Calf Press page 192

J

Dumbbell Shin Raise page 196

L

Standing Hamstring Stretch page 242

Day Four:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Day FIve:

A 20 secs per leg B 30 secs per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 30 secs per leg 30 secs per leg

i

K Standing Quadriceps Stretch page 241

Day Six: Rest

Day Seven Rest

ADVAncED ROUTinE 2

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Day Six:

A 20 secs per leg B 30 secs per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20 H 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 30 secs per leg L 30 secs per leg

Day Two:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Day Three:

A 20 secs per leg B 30 secs per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20 H 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 30 secs per leg L 30 secs per leg

Day Four:

Low Impact Cardio 30 minutes

Day FIve:

A 20 secs per leg B 30 secs per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 E 3 sets 15-20 F 3 sets 15-20 H 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 30 secs per leg L 30 secs per leg

Day Six: Rest

Day Seven Rest

Rest

356

330

357

331

stAnDing KnEE cruncH

LEgs AnD HiPs: stAnDing KnEE cruncH BEst for

transversus abdominis*

• rectus abdominis • obliquus internus • obliquus externus • transversus abdominis • gluteus maximus

avoid • Tilting forwards as you switch legs.

1 Stand tall with your left leg in front of the right, and extend your hands up towards the ceiling, your arms straight.

iliopsoas*

• gluteus medius • tensor fasciae latae • piriformis • iliopsoas • gastrocnemius • soleus

do iT righT • Keep your standing leg straight as you raise up on your toes. • Relax your shoulders as you pull your arms down for the crunch. • Flex the toes of your raised leg. obliquus externus

exercises: upper body

ExErcisEs: LEgs AnD HiPs

Day One

Day Two:

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15

Day FIve:

Abdominal Hip Lift page 202

Cardio 30-45 minutes B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15 O 3 sets 30-120 seconds Q 3 sets 30 R 3 sets 15 T 3 sets 20

Day One

A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15

Day Seven

Day One

ADVAncED ROUTinE 1

30 minutes A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15

Rest

Rest

B 3 sets 12-15 C 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15 L 3 sets 20 M 3 sets 30 N 3 sets 15 O 3 sets 30-120 seconds Q 3 sets 30 R 3 sets 15 T 3 sets 20

inTERMEDiATE ROUTinE 1

Day One

Day Four: Low Impact Cardio

I

KnEE PROBLEMS EXERciSES USED in KnEE PROBLEMS WORKOUTS

BEGinnER ROUTinE 1 A 20 seconds per leg B 30 seconds per leg C 3 sets 10-12 D 3 sets 12-15 G 3 sets 10-12 H 3 sets 12-15

Cardio 30-45 minutes

ADVANCED ROUTINE 2

Day Three:

Chair Dip page 124

External Rotation Band page 90

Day FIve:

A 3 sets 8-10 D 3 sets 10-12 E 3 sets 12-15 F 3 sets 10-12 G 3 sets 12-15 I 3 sets 12-15 J 3 sets 12-15 K 3 sets 12-15 P 3 sets 20 S 3 sets 20

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Rest

B

Cardio 30-45 minutes

Day Six:

Cardio 30-45 minutes

E

Overhead Press page 86

WORKOUT LEVEL 2

BEGINNER ROUTINE 1

A

WORKOUTS fOR fUncTiOnS

SOCCER EXERCISES USED IN SOCCER WORKOUTS

KnEE PROBLEMS Rehabilitating the knee can be greatly helped through strengthening exercises. Knee rehab is important not only for lessening the burden on the knee joint, but also in preventing a weakening of the surrounding muscles of the knee. Stretching should be the first and last part of this workout. Low-impact cardiovascular exercise (stationary bike) should be included after the strengthening portion of the workout to increase endurance. Avoid strenuous or aggressive training.

WORKOUT LEVEL 1

SOCCER The object of Soccer is to kick the ball into the opposing team’s goal. An intense game, its players require strong cardiovascular reserves as they are running for miles on the playing field during the course of a game. The muscles used include the arms and shoulders for throw-ins and balancing. The core helps with stabilization and stamina. Development of the thigh muscles is key to kicking power, while strong calf muscles provide balance and kicking power.

WORKOUT LEVEL 1

WORKOUTS FOR SPORTS

•STEP-BY-STEP INSTRUCTIONS FOR OVER 200 EXERCISES•CLEAR ANATOMICAL ILLUSTRATIONS •OVER 150 CUSTOMISED AND SPORT-SPECIFIC PROGRAMMES

barbell rows

upper body: barbell rows infraspinatus*

trapezius rhomboideus* latissimus dorsi

teres major

1 Stand with your feet parallel and shoulder-width apart, your knees slightly bent.

triceps brachii rectus abdominis

erector spinae* deltoideus posterior

3 Bend at the waist to bring your torso forwards, keeping a straight back until it is nearly parallel to the floor. The barbell should be directly in front of you, allowing your arms to hang perpendicular to the floor and your torso. This is the starting position.

pectoralis major biceps brachii

triceps brachii

gluteus maximus

gluteus medius*

2 Lift the barbell with

TargeTs • Pelvic and core stabilisers • Abdominals • Gluteal area

tensor fasciae latae

LeveL • Intermediate BenefiTs • Strengthens core • Strengthens calves and gluteal muscles • Improves balance noT advisaBLe if you have . . . • Knee pain

gluteus maximus

obliquus externus

LeveL • Intermediate

annoTaTion Key Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

vastus lateralis

BenefiTs • Increases power to shoulders, back and arms

sartorius

noT advisaBLe if you have . . . • Back problems

gastrocnemius

* indicates deep muscles

soleus

000

obliquus internus*

brachioradialis

TargeTs • Deltoids • Back

rectus femoris

vastus medialis 3 Pause at the top of the movement, and then return to the starting position. Repeat the sequence with your right leg as the standing leg. Repeat 10 times on each leg.

rectus abdominis

do iT righT • Keep your torso horizontal throughout the exercise.

vastus intermedius*

piriformis*

2 Shift your weight onto your left foot, and raise your right knee to the height of your hips. Simultaneously go up on the toes of your left leg, while pulling your elbows down by your sides, your hands making fists. This creates the crunch.

brachialis

palms facing down, your hands about shoulder-width apart.

obliquus internus*

Trainer’s Tips • Exhale as you lift the barbell, and inhale as you lower it to the starting position. • Keep a slight bend of the knees, engaging your glutes and hamstrings. • Use manageable weights for this exercise – heavy lifting can lead to bad form and possible back injury.

000

semitendinosus

adductor magnus

semimembranosus

4 Lift the barbell towards your torso, keeping your elbows pointing in towards the sides of the body.

best for biceps femoris

avoid • Dropping your head during this exercise.

5 Slowly lower the weight to the starting position. Repeat.

42

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• deltoideus posterior • trapezius • rhomboideus • latissimus dorsi • teres major • infraspinatus • brachialis • brachioradialis • pectoralis major • biceps brachii

• triceps brachii • erector spinae • gluteus maximus • biceps femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus • adductor magnus • obliquus externus • obliquus internus • rectus abdominis

annoTaTion Key Bold text indicates target muscles Grey text indicates other working muscles * indicates deep muscles

43


frontlist Anatomy of Stretching & Training for Golf: Create the Perfect Workout to Improve Your Game

anatOmy

NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

6” x 9” 240pp 4-color throughout Paperback Spring 2014 $24.95 US Retail

OF Stretching & training FOr

gOlF

CREATE THE PERFECT WORKOUT TO IMPROVE YOUR GAME

7

Anatomy of Stretching and Training for Golf is written by Dr. Phil Striano. Dr. Striano is a Titleist Performance Institute level 2 certified medical golf fitness instructor, a k-vest level 2 certified instructor, and a certified chiropractic sports medicine physician—the perfect person to put together a series of exercises that will improve any golfer’s game, regardless of experience level.

biceps brachii

Rights Sold: English (North America)

triceps brachii

obliquus internus

rectus abdominis

gluteus maximus 22 • AnAtoMY, StrEtchinG, And trAininG for Golf

rectus femoris

GEttinG Your BodY rEAdY • 23

GEttinG Your BodY rEAdY

biceps femoris

Whether you are playinG Golf for the first time or a seasoned veteran gearing up for a championship season, it is important to put some time into your physical condition before hitting the course. While golf is not the most physically demanding of sports, injuries

gastrocnemius tibialis anterior soleus

do occur, however, they can be prevented in many cases. Preseason golf training is an important factor in preventing injury and should include cardiovascular and strength training, stretching and proprioceptive (balance) conditioning.

cArdIovAsculAr:

2) loss of focus. Your concentration will become dulled, resulting in missing easy putts and poor short game shots that you can routinely make. When a fatigued golfer starts missing on routine shots, they will become frustrated. When you are tired, your a bility to hit the “reset” button is diminished. At this point, it is much easier to let the wheels fall off the cart then to put them back on!

Since golf is a long duration sport, lasting at least four hours for casual rounds and even longer for competitive rounds, it is necessary to have the stamina needed to have the same swing on the last shot as it was on the first. fatigue can have many negative effects on the golf swing, both physical and mental.

the average distance a golfer will walk over 18 holes is about 5 miles. Add on a few wayward shots and factor in that courses are being designed longer, you can easily get to 6 miles per round. depending on your current fitness level, if you have difficulty walking 5 miles at a casual pace, you can most likely expect to fatigue while walking 18 holes. here is how to start a walking? running routine to play fatigue free golf.

Phil Striano

74 • AnAtoMY, StrEtchinG, And trAininG for Golf

AltErnAtinG rEnEGAdE roW AdvAncEd

another Great routine for the middle back, the Alternating renegade row also strengthens the abdominals, biceps, chest, latissimus dorsi, and triceps.

BAckS • 75

how to do It 1 With a kettlebell in each hand, plant

straightening the left arm and pushing that kettlebell into the floor.

yourself on the floor in a push-up position.

1) loss of muscular strength and coordination. When you get fatigued, your body will go into an energy conservation mode. the larger muscle groups will not have as much energy supplied to them from your body. in the case of the golf swing, your legs will not have as much strength to hold your balance and fire in the same coordinated motion that it had earlier in your round. Your upper body and arms will become more prevalent in the swing. fat and thin shots will result from this fatigue.

3 Lower your right arm, then repeat the

2 While staying up on your toes and

movement with the left. Complete 8–10 repetitions per arm.

keeping your core stable and parallel to the floor, pull the kettlebell in your right hand up towards your chest while

triceps brachii deltoideus medialis deltoideus anterior

pectoralis minor*

PrIMAry TArGeTS • trapezius • rhomboideus • latissimus dorsi • erector spinae • multifidus spinae BenefITS • Middle back • Abdominals • Biceps • Chest • Latissimus dorsi • Triceps

pectoralis major

biceps brachii

rectus abdominis

obliquus externus

CAuTIOnS • Avoid dropping or slamming the weight into the floor. PerfeCT yOur fOrM • Keep your core stable and straight on.

transversus abdominis*

44 • AnAtoMY, StrEtchinG, And trAininG for Golf

quadratus lumborum*

forEArM StrEtchES

trapezius rhomboideus*

strEtch

erector spinae*

32 • AnAtoMY, StrEtchinG, And trAininG for Golf

multifidus spinae* wrIst InjurIEs

introduction: WhY Golf? • 33

AnnotAtIon KEY  Black text indicates strengthening muscles Gray text indicates stretching muscles Italic text indicates tendons and ligaments indicates deep muscles

shouldEr InjurIEs

1 Stand or sit with your arms at your sides. 2 Bend your right forearm up from the

triceps brachii latissimus dorsi

ArMS, ShouldErS And chESt • 45

how to do It

Wrist flexion Perform this stretch adter a long phone converstaionor a stressful commute to release any tension in your hands and forearms—and of course, before your round of golf. Wrist extension imagine that you are holding the eraser end of a pencil under each arm—engage the muscles around your armpits to hold your imaginary pencils—keeping your shoulders perfectly positioned in the process.

elbow, creating a 90-degree bend. Your palm should be facing the floor.

3 Drop and flex your right wrist downward so that your palm faces inward.

5 Gently press your left fingers into the back of your right hand, bringing your right wrist to a 60- to 90-degree bend, while pressing your left thumb into the palm away from the body, creating a deeper stretch.

6 Release, switch hands, and repeat on the other side.

4 Place your left fingers over the back of your right hand, and your left thumb on the palm of the hand, directly on the right thumb muscle.

flexor digitorum extensor digitorum

extensor carpi radialis

palmaris longus flexor carpi ulnaris flexor carpi radialis

extensor carpi ulnaris

The repetitive strain that is put on the wrist at the top of the swing and also at impact can lead to tendon and ligamentous injury. A golfer that takes deep divots frequently is prone to this injury. Pain, decreased range of motion and swelling would be symptoms related to such injuries. Traumatic injury to the wrist can occur if the club strikes hard and set objects, such as rock and tree roots, on impact.

Much like injuries to the wrist, shoulder injuries predominantly occur as a result of too many repetitions, poor swing mechanics and traumatic force. The rotator cuff muscles off the shoulder can develop tendinitis and tears from overuse. Pain and decreased range of motion will present with these conditions.

extensor digiti minimi

flexor pollicis flexor digiti minimi

BenefITS • Wrists • Hands • Forearms CAuTIOnS • Avoid lifting or tensing your shoulders. PerfeCT yOur fOrM • Be sure to press your thumb into the meaty part of your palm, attached to the thumb, intensifying the stretch in your forearm and wrist.

extensor pollicis

extensor indicis

AnnotAtIon KEY  Black text indicates strengthening muscles Gray text indicates stretching muscles Italic text indicates tendons and ligaments indicates deep muscles

www.moseleyroad.com

PrIMAry TArGeTS • extensor carpi radialis • extensor carpi ulnaris • extensor digiti minimi • extensor digitorum • extensor indicis • extensor pollicis


8

frontlist

T h e U lT i m a T e

jUices & smooThies

jUices & smooThies

The U lT i m a T e

e n cyc lo p e d i a

The Ultimate Juices & Smoothies Encyclopedia: Your Essential Guide to Healthy and Delicious Drinks

6” x 11” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover January 2013 $29.95 US Retail

NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

From veggie juicer recipes to fruit smoothies, The Ultimate Juices & Smoothies Encyclopedia has it all! With over 300 pages of recipes, this encyclopedia contains the perfect recipe for whatever mood you are in. Whether you are seeking a juice remedy for a migraine, cleansers for a juice fast, a protein smoothie, or a chocolate truffle smoothie—you can find it in The Ultimate Juices & Smoothies Encyclopedia.

e n cyc lo p e d i a

Rights Sold: English (North America)

k i d - f r i e n d ly J u i c e s

g e t t i n g y o u r k i d s s ta r t e d o n J u i c i n g

g etti ng you r ki ds starte d on J u ici ng

Challenge your children to come up with a wide range of juices by

jill

combining different quantities of the

h a m i lT o n

following ingredients. Throw in some ginger too!

j i ll ham i lTo n

CarroTs Berries BeeTs Kale

yo U r e s s e n T i a l g U i d e To

apples

h e a lT h y a n d d e l i c i o U s d r i n k s

peaChes lemons As much as your child may love the fruit juices (and prefer broccoli camouflaged by other ingredients in juice form), resist the temptation to provide too much of the daily nutrition in that fashion. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests the following guidelines: No more than half the fruit and vegetable servings for the day should come in juice form. Juices should never be given to infants under six months old, nor to toddlers who are still drinking from a bottle. Children 1–4 years old can drink 6 ounces of juice a day; those over the age of 10, up to 12 ounces per day. All fruits and vegetables should be thoroughly washed before they are juiced.

A selection of berries

clEansing

76

Remedies

MastEr clEansErs

77

AnemiA

Cleanse rs miNty berry

super aNemia 1

super aNemia 2

2 cups blueberries 2 kiwis, peeled 16 strawberries 2 cups mint leaves, packed into the measuring cup

1 bunch organic spinach 1 bunch organic parsley handful of organic Swiss chard ½ organic lemon, peeled and seeded (or to taste)

1 bunch organic spinach 1 bunch organic parsley handful of organic Swiss chard 1 organic apple (cored, seeds removed) ginger to taste

After thoroughly scrubbing all produce, put ingredients through a juicer.

After thoroughly scrubbing all produce, put ingredients through a juicer.

Apple and mint

Cucumber, lemon, and ginger juice

Certain cleansing routines involve consumption of only a single juice over a week or more and no solid food, and are

After thoroughly scrubbing all produce, put ingredients through a juicer.

known as juice fasts; these may work for people who want to clear their system and start losing weight quickly. Other fasting regimens use a variety of juices that target different systems over a shorter period of time, and these juices can either be part of a juice fast or used with other foods or juices in a juice-heavy diet. You should always discuss a juice fast with your doctor because the imbalance caused by omitting some food groups and concentrating on others may exacerbate certain medical conditions. Detoxifying regimens need not be onerous: your favorite juices can serve as powerful cleansers. Fresh fruit and vegetables supply everything needed to detoxify, and can be mixed in various combinations. See the following pages for suggestions on jumpstarting your healthy, reinvigorated life in a new body!

104

Super Anemia 1

138

Minty Berry

139

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105


frontlist

T H E U LT I M A T E T H E U LT I M A T E C O C K T A I L E N C Y C L O P E D I A

COCKTAIL

The Ulitimate Cocktail Encyclopedia: Your Essential Guide to the Exciting World of Mixology

9

NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

6” x 11” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover January 2013 $29.95 US Retail

Whether you are having a party or just looking for a refreshing drink, this mixology encyclopedia is organized to help you choose the perfect cocktail for the right occasion. Complete with cocktail classics, summer specials, holiday drinks, and drinking games, The Ultimate Cocktail Encyclopedia will have everyone in the spirit for the perfect libation.

E N CYC LO P E D I A

YO U R E S S E NTIAL G U I D E TO TH E E X C I T I N G W O R L D O F M I X O LO GY

Rights Sold: English (North America)

shots & shoote rs

pickleback

prairie fire

1 oz peach schnapps

1 ½ oz Jameson’s Irish whiskey

1 oz tequila

½ oz lime juice Stir ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled shot glass.

n

3 drops of hot sauce of choice Combine ingredients in a shot glass.

pigSkin Shot

purple hooter

1 oz vodka

1 ½ oz citrus vodka

1 oz Midori melon liqueur

½ oz triple sec

½ oz simple syrup ¼ oz lemon juice

¼ oz black raspberry liqueur

Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled shot glass.

Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled shot glass.

pineapple upSidedown cake

rattleSnake

½ oz Bailey’s Irish Cream

1 oz white crème de cacao

½ oz vodka

1 oz Bailey’s Irish Cream

g

Dr i n ks

peppermint patty 1 oz white crème de cacao 1 oz white crème de menthe Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled cordial glass.

I N A S S O C I AT I O N W I T H i D R I N K . C O M

CocktailCover.indd 1

Pour a shot each of Jameson’s and pickle juice. The Jameson’s is to be drunk first and held in the mouth, then the pickle juice added.

¾ oz Frangelico

Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled shot glass.

o

1 ½ oz pickle juice

peanut butter and Jelly ¾ oz Chambord

l

shots & shoote rs

peach tart

½ oz butterscotch schnapps ½ oz pineapple juice

1 oz Kahlúa

Layer the ingredients in the order listed in a cordial glass.

Stir ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled shot glass.

Long drinks, aLso known as taLL drinks, are

2/19/14 10:31 AM

simpLy drinks in taLL gLasses with Larger

Pickleback

274

275

amounts of mixer than short drinks. some, Like highbaLLs, are simpLe and straightforward; others are compLex concoctions. what they have in common is a reLaxed quaLity, in that they present a reLativeLy Low concentration of aLcohoL and, often, an easy-drinking accessibiLity. u p Drinks

Martinis

harry’S Martini Short DrinkS

SoUrS

pisCo sour

puerto riCo sour

royAl sour kiss

2 oz pisco brandy

1 ½ oz light rum

¾ oz lemon juice

½ oz banana liqueur

1 ½ oz Crown Royal Canadian whisky

1 oz simple syrup

¾ oz lemon juice

Orange slice

1 oz simple syrup

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

Orange slice Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

¼ oz dry vermouth

Lemon peel

Mint sprigs

¼ oz sweet vermouth

Stir gin, vermouth, and Pernod with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with mint.

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

1 oz Pineau des Charentes

2 oz rum

½ oz apricot liqueur

1 oz apricot brandy

¾ oz lemon juice

½ oz dark rum

¾ oz lemon juice

1 oz simple syrup

¾ oz lemon juice

1 oz simple syrup

Orange slice

1 oz simple syrup

Orange slice

iDeal Martini

inCa Martini

1 ½ oz gin

1 oz gin

¼ oz Green Chartreuse

1 oz dry vermouth

½ oz dry sherry

Lemon peel

1

Shake gin and Chartreuse with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with lemon peel.

⁄8 oz fresh grapefruit juice

½ oz dry vermouth

4 dashes of maraschino cherry juice

½ oz sweet vermouth

Maraschino cherry

Dash of orgeat syrup

Dash of Angostura bitters

Shake gin, vermouth, and juices with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with cherry.

Shake ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

iMperial CoCktail Martini

inSpiration

2 oz gin 1 oz dry vermouth

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

hong kong Martini

power sour

rAspberry sour

rye sour

1 ½ oz bourbon

1 ½ oz vodka

2 oz rye

1 oz energy drink of choice

½ oz Grand Marnier

¾ oz lemon juice

¾ oz lemon juice

¾ oz lime juice

1 oz simple syrup

½ oz simple syrup

1 oz simple syrup

Orange slice

Orange slice

1 oz seedless raspberry puree

¼ oz Calvados

1 ½ oz dry vermouth

¼ oz dry vermouth

¼ oz simple syrup

½ oz maraschino cherry juice

¼ oz Grand Marnier

2 dashes of Angostura bitters Maraschino cherry Shake gin, vermouth, cherry juice, and bitters with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with cherry.

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

1 oz gin

1 ½ oz gin

1

Shake ingredients in a mixing glass with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Maraschino cherry Shake gin, Calvados, vermouth, and Grand Marnier with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with cherry.

Inspiration

202

Pisco Sour

140

Fill a mixing glass with ice and add vermouth. Swirl the ice and discard. Add the gin and shake well. Strain into a frosted cocktail glass and garnish with lemon peel.

1 ¼ oz gin

Dash of Angostura bitters

Combine all ingredients and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass.

Shake ingredients in a mixing glass with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

haSty CoCktail

⁄8 oz lime juice

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

¼ oz pineapple juice

2 oz gin

Orange slice

1 oz bourbon

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

¼ oz dry vermouth

¼ oz Pernod

1 oz simple syrup

rum sour

Combine all ingredients but orange slice and shake well with ice. Strain into a sour glass and garnish with orange slice.

2 oz gin

¾ oz lime juice

rAinbow sour

Orange slice

¾ oz sweet vermouth

½ oz sour apple schnapps

potrero sour

1 egg white

honolulu hurriCane Martini

in anD out Martini

1 ¾ oz gin

141

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203


10

frontlist The Beatles: Here, There, & Everywhere 9” x 12” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover September 2014 $49.95 US Retail

COMI N AUTU G MN 2014

This comprehensive, photo-rich book includes information on everything related to the careers of the Fab Four, be it awards, recordings, tours, concerts, television appearances, or films. Going beyond the history of the band, it also covers the former members’ solo careers, their personal lives, and has entries for other people who were connected to the band—friends, family, producers, promoters, writers, and journalists—making this a one-stop resource for all subjects related to The Beatles. Rights Sold: English (North America)

A GREAT QUOTE HERE ABOUT RUBBER SOUL AND/OR REVOLVER, PREFERABLY REVOLVER

CHAPTER NINE

A NEW MOOD ABBEY ROAD IN THE MID-SIXTIES

Playing the Palace

Playing the Palace

“IT DOESN’T MAkE ME MORE RESPEcTABLE, I’M STILL A ScRUFF.”

George Martin explains studio technique to The Beatles during the recording of their first LP exerio quo earumque consequo ex errum et

PAul McCARTNEy, oN HIs MBE

As 1965 ended, the band went back into the studio to cut a new album. All told, it had been a banner year, with the filming and recording of Help!, Ringo’s marriage to his sweetheart, Maureen Cox; a European tour; a successful second American tour; a meeting with Elvis Presley; George’s engagement to Pattie Boyd . . . and one other thing, a token of appreciation from a very special lady.

“AFTER ALL WE DID FOR BRITAIN, SELLING ALL THAT cORDUROY AND MAkING IT SWING, AND ALL WE GOT WAS A BIT OF TIN ON A PIEcE OF LEATHER.”

When the notices went out from Buckingham Palace announcing Queen Elizabeth’s list of MBE recipients for 1965, the Beatles were surely the surprise entry. The MBE, Member of the Most Honorable Order of the British Empire, is a prestigious award bestowed for singular achievements or services rendered to the Crown. It was usually awarded to statesmen, diplomats, members of the military, and other dignitaries, not rock and roll superstars . . . but the Beatles were getting accustomed to breaking down traditions. Harold Wilson, the new Labour prime minister and a Merseysider himself, had encouraged the queen to bestow the award. He felt the Beatles’ contribution to British culture ought to be recognized. As

GEoRGE HARRIsoN

he explained, “I saw the Beatles as having a transforming effect on the minds of youth, mostly for the good. It kept a lot of kids off the streets. They introduced many, many young people to music, which in itself was a good thing. A lot of old stagers might have regarded it as idiosyncratic music, but the Mersey sound was a new important thing. That’s why they deserved such recognition.” And while the MBE carried with it few privileges— notably, a payment of forty pounds a year and free admission to the Whispering Gallery at St. Paul’s Cathedral (which usually cost about a shilling)—it was presented by the queen herself. Although the Beatles were excited over the recognition—even tough Teddy Boys had to acknowledge notice from the Queen—they were also concerned that this award was too mainstream, that it would ruin their “street cred.” Ultimately they decided to accept. Brian, ever class-conscious, doubtless encouraged them in this course. (George supposedly went around telling people the MBE stood for Mr. Brian Epstein.) The ceremony was held on October 26, 1965, and the Beatles, all

“done up proper” in morning suits, dutifully made their way to Buckingham Palace. Rumor claimed they got stoned in the bathroom before the ceremony, but George insisted they were just “having a fag” to calm their nerves. When it was over, the four literally remarked that the queen was very nice, “but she didn’t have a lot to say.” Paul also reported to the press that the Palace was a “keen pad.” Both he and George used their medals to decorate their uniforms on the cover of Sgt. Pepper, reasoning, no doubt, that if you’ve got it, flaunt it!

148

Rubber Soul

Rubber Soul

“We were getting better, technically and musically. Finally, we took over the studio. In the early days, we had to take what we were given; we didn’t know how to get more bass. We were still learning. We were more precise about making this album, and we took over the cover and everything.”

Afterward, many previous recipients of the MBE were offended at what they considered the frivolity of the choice and sent their honors back. At the time, John Lennon responded by pointing out, “Lots of people who complained about us receiving the MBE [status] received theirs for heroism in the war—for killing people...We received ours for entertaining other people. I’d say we deserve ours more.” John returned his own MBE in November 1969—over England’s support of Nigeria in the genocide against Biafra—as a part of his continuing campaign for peace.

150

149

JoHn Lennon

RUBBER SOUL The sixth Beatles album (Lennon/McCartney, unless specified):

151

Side One: 1. DRIVE MY CAR Revolver

2. NORWEGIAN WOOD (This Bird Has Flown)

Revolver

3. YOU WON’T SEE ME 4. NOWHERE MAN

“RUBBER SOUL WAS THE POT ALBUM, AND REVOLVER WAS AcID. I MEAN, WE WEREN’T ALL STONED MAkING RUBBER SOUL, BEcAUSE IN THOSE DAYS WE cOULDN’T WORk ON POT.” JoHN lENNoN

Things never seemed to slow down for the Beatles during this period of their lives, and the early part of 1966 was no exception. George and Pattie Boyd were wed in January and went on their honeymoon in Barbados; in March John spoke to a British teen magazine about the Beatles being “bigger than Jesus,” comments that would come back to haunt him that summer. In June, Paul bought a farm in the remote Mull of Kintyre off the coast of Scotland. By then American protesters were burning Beatles’ records in anger over John’s comments—just as the band was setting out on a tour of the States. When the band went back into the studio in August, it must have felt like a quiet haven after the eventful earlier months.

Fresh sounds

FabFacts

in an wanted to record Revolver raw sound the The Beatles originally they could have gotten American studio, where would be prohibitive. discovered the cost they loved, but they Rigby” benefited that at least “Eleanor British Paul later remarked sessions, since he considered from the English studio the American ones.” violinists “better than from portraits cover drew the Revolver Klaus Voorman, who but he did go on to £40 for his artwork, Arts, in 1967. memory, only received Album Cover, Graphic win a Grammy for Best

The Beatles really hoped to break out of the studio rut with this album. They wanted the instruments to sound fresh and even foreign, they wanted the British engineers, who had been doing things the same way for decades, to emulate the raw sound quality of American records. And they wanted the LP to have a cohesive feeling; Prorehentur inctorempor rem volorro riorrorrum qui re numquia ped untiorrum estiorem aut ullam reped ere vera dolorib uscidig enienisimus.Gia vid evelest, illuptatio ius vollaboreped quia ditatem quiaerf erumquo mil ipsam, unt hit eossequissus et quid maiorpore poria denessinctio enderios digendigni Prorehentur inctorempor rem volorro riorrorrum qui re numquia ped untiorrum estiorem aut ullam reped ere vera dolorib uscidig enienisimus.Gia vid evelest, illuptatio ius vollaboreped quia ditatem quiaerf erumquo mil ipsam, unt hit eossequissus et quid maiorpore poria denessinctio enderios digendigni. Prorehentur inctorempor rem volorro riorrorrum qui re numquia ped untiorrum estiorem aut ullam reped ere vera dolorib uscidig enienisimus.Gia vid evelest,

156

as Paul said, it was intended to “show our versatility rather than a haphazard collection of songs.”

5. THINK FOR YOURSELF

John recalled that he and Paul knew they really had to get their act together and come up with some seriously good material. They began collaborating, either at Paul’s house in St. John’s Wood or at John’s home out in Weybridge. Paul noted that he composed songs or bits of melodies in his head during that long drive and, around this time, composed the single “Paperback Writer” while on the way to John’s.

6. THE WORD

(Harrison)

7. MICHELLE Side Two: 1. WHAT GOES ON (Lennon/ McCartney/Starkey)

2. GIRL

Revolver was released on Aug. 8, 1966, to critical and public acclaim. From the guttural countdown on “Taxman” to the droning incantations of “Tomorrow Never Knows,” the album was geared to attract attention. “I’m Only Sleeping” and “She Said, She Said” mark the beginnings of John’s emerging inner persona winning out over his controlled pop lyrics. Paul creates a mood in minutes with two spectral entries “Eleanor Rigby” and “For No One,” pays homage to his muse, Jane Asher, with “Here, There, and Everywhere” and presents another of his signature tributes to rock and roll jubilation with “Got to Get You Into My Life.” George managed two goodies, the acerbic “Taxman” and a pleasing up-tempo love song, “I Want to Tell You.” In Ringo’s playful recording of “Yellow Submarine,” it sounds like the Beatles (and the entire staff at Abbey Road) were sitting in a bathtub creating watery sound effects.

3. I’M LOOKING THROUGH YOU 4. IN MY LIFE 5. WAIT 6. IF I NEEDED SOMEONE (Harrison)

7. RUN FOR YOUR LIFE

Vid quam et aliquidest quodignim quam que eatem laboreptur seque non prorehentur inctorempor rem volorro uscidig enienisimus. Atibusa quist, natiur aspis et landit, comnis as esti officius eumquas eseceprempos utAgnis eos molecaest.

For the cover photo, the band had to chose from a series taken by Robert Freeman in John’s garden in Weybridge. Paul recalls that Bob visited the band at a friend’s flat one night and projected the slides from the shoot onto a piece of white cardboard. When he accidentally tilted the card, distorting the image and elongating their faces, they grew excited. Could he replicate that look in a photo? He told them he could—and the cover with the distinctive skewed perspective was born. Many people felt the image accurately reflected all the changes going on in the Beatles public and private lives. Some fans also describe the album’s sound as having a woodsy, mellow, “deep brown” aura, similar to the suede jacket John is wearing on the cover. According to Mark Lewishohn in The Beatles’ Recording Sessions (1988), the title came from something Paul kept saying during the recording of “I’m Down.” What he’d been repeating was, “Plastic soul, man, plastic soul,” which, he explained, was the term black blues musicians used to describe Mick Jagger. “That was Paul’s title,” John pointed out to Rolling Stone in 1970, “meaning English soul.”

CritiCal reaCtion Rubber Soul was released on December 3, 1965, just in time for the Christmas season. It charted in Britain on December 11 and

remained there for an astonishing 42 weeks. On Christmas Day it dethroned Help! at the top of the charts and stayed there for eight weeks. Critics couldn’t praise it enough—Robert Christgau in Esquire lauded it for its “innovation, tightness, and lyrical intelligence” and Rolling Stone raved, “they achieved a new musical sophistication and a greater thematic depth without sacrificing a whit of pop appeal.” In 2012, Rolling Stone voted it number 5 on their list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys insisted he’d “never heard a collection of songs that were all that good before. It’s like a collection of folk songs, and they’re all just really, really great songs. And not just about love. They’re about a lot of different things, but they all go together, somehow.” Rubber Soul inspired Wilson while he was crafting the Beach Boys’ superb concept album, Pet Sounds, while Pet Sounds, Paul’s favorite album of all time, in turn spurred the Beatles to create Revolver. But ultimately Wilson couldn’t handle this searing level of competition. When he first heard a recording of Strawberry Fields Forever, his marijuana-clouded brain insisted him he would never be able to equal it, and so he stopped work on a new album he was intending to call Smile.

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frontlist

THE OFFICIAL PORTRAIT OF “THE GREATEST” OF ALL TIME

11

ALI: The Official Portrait of “The Greatest” of All Time

ALI

ALI THE OFFICIAL PORTRAIT OF “THE GREATEST” OF ALL TIME

Perhaps the most recognizable person in the world, Muhammad Ali has experienced enough to fill several lifetimes. When he first laced up a pair of boxing gloves as a boy in Louisville, Kentucky, Ali never could have imagined just where this decision and his talents would take him. Fighting during the golden age of heavyweight boxing, Ali immediately distinguished himself as a force to be reckoned with. He backed up his brash personality and quick wit with equally fast hands. After wresting the heavyweight title from Sonny Liston in 1964, Ali spent the better part of the next two decades taking on the best that boxing had to offer. Look through his astonishing professional record and you’ll see names like Frazier, Norton, Spinks, and the aforementioned Liston not once, but multiple times. And let’s not forget other heavy hitters such as George Foreman, Earnie Shavers, and Larry Holmes. Indeed, Ali’s list of opponents reads like a who’s who in the Boxing Hall of Fame. The champ was as tenacious outside the ring as he was in it. When he refused military service in 1967 due to his religious beliefs, Ali paid for it by being stripped of his title and missing three years of his boxing prime. He would eventually win his fight with the government as well as his title back. In Ali, you’ll not only get to relive all of his great fights but also get a sense of the man himself. Though his name is pretty much synonymous with boxing, you’ll see how he used the ring and his stardom as a way to shake up the world.

11” x 14” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $49.95 US Retail

An official celebration of Muhammad Ali, one of the greatest champions of all time, this stunning portrait is authorized by Muhammad Ali Enterprises. His boxing skills were unparalleled, and his words have never been forgotten. From his birth in 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky to his first Golden Gloves win to the Rumble in the Jungle and the Thrilla in Manila, Ali: The Official Portrait of “The Greatest” of All Time is a complete and fascinating exploration of the man whose legendary motto was “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” Ali features photographs and descriptions of every one of his professional fights.

NANCy J. HAJESkI

Rights Sold: English (North America), Italian

18 Ali

Chapter one: Young Cassius ClaY 19

learninG To FiGhT NANCy J. HAJESkI 4:15 PM “I had it in my heart. I 10/3/12 believed in myself, and I had confidence. I knew how to do it, I had natural talent, and I pursued it.”

70 Ali

Chapter three: the heavyweight title 71

Liston quickly won several amateur boxing

Under Joe Martin’s tutelage, Clay immediately

O’Keefe. The fight consisted of three one-

took to boxing, working out at the Louisville

minute rounds, and Clay earned his first win

Columbia gym with other young would-be

via a split decision. Two years later, at age

pugilists. Martin even featured him on his TV

fourteen (and trained by Fred Stoner), he

tournaments on the outside, including the

show, Tomorrow’s Champions. Clay also worked

won the first of six Kentucky Golden Gloves

Golden Gloves, and word began to spread of this

with an African American trainer, Fred Stoner,

titles fighting in the light heavyweight division.

fearsome fighter. When he knocked out European

who taught the boy the “sweet science” of

He’d add two National Golden Gloves titles

bronze medalist Hermann Schreibauer barely two

boxing and coached him on how to move with

and a pair of national Amateur Athletic Union

minutes into the first round, St. Louis Golden

the fluid grace of a dancer. (During the last four

crowns to his growing list of achievements.

Gloves coach Tony Anderson labeled Liston the

years of Clay’s amateur career, he trained with

In all, he racked up a hundred amateur wins

strongest fighter he had ever seen.

legendary boxing cutman Chuck Bodak.)

by the time he was eighteen. Despite his

Called “Big Bear,” the six-foot, one-half-

Six weeks into his training, Clay climbed

inch Liston earned the nickname not for his height, but rather for his immense power and an unusually long reach, especially with his left

many accomplishments, Clay wasn’t exactly

into the ring for his first amateur bout against

gaining national notoriety, but all of that was

another unseasoned fighter named Ronnie

about to change.

arm. On September 2, 1953, Liston debuted professionally in St. Louis with a first-round knockout of Don Smith. Throughout the 1950s, he battled his way up through the ranks until 1962, when he bested champion Floyd Patterson with a shocking first-round knockout to gain the Clay knocked out Gary Jawish in Madison Square Garden in 1960 during the Golden Gloves competition.

heavyweight title.

doubters on the sidelines Based on the vulnerability Clay had shown to Henry Cooper’s left hook, sports journalists and boxing touts predicted the twenty-two-year-old challenger would quickly fall to Liston’s fearsome left fist. Jim Murray of the Los Angeles Times quipped, “The only thing at which Clay can beat Liston is reading the dictionary.” Joe Nichols of the New York Times refused to even attend, convinced it would be a pitiful mismatch. On the day of the bout, Clay was a seven-to-one

36 Ali

Chapter one: Young Cassius ClaY 37

shot, and forty-three out of forty-six onsite sportswriters picked Liston to win by a knockout.

caSSiuS clay, poeT

Sonny Liston became World Heavyweight Champion in 1962 by knocking out Floyd Patterson in the first round. His first title defense was a rematch in which Patterson lasted four seconds longer than he did the first time around.

156 Ali

Chapter six: return to the ring 157

“I said a lot of things in the heat of the moment that I shouldn’t have said. Called him names I shouldn’t have called him. I apologize for that. I’m sorry. It was all meant to promote the fight.” —Ali in 2001

Clay’s growing use of hyperbole to hasten his fame is displayed here in this poem from 1964. “This is the legend of Cassius Clay, The most beautiful fighter in the world today. He talks a great deal, and brags indeed-y, Of a muscular punch that’s incredibly speed-y. The fistic world was dull and weary, But with a champ like Liston, things had to be dreary. Then someone with color and someone with dash, Brought fight fans a runnin’ with Cash. This brash young boxer is something to see, And the heavyweight championship is his des-tin-y. This kid fights great; he’s got speed and endurance, But if you sign to fight him, increase your insurance. This kid’s got a left; this kid’s got a right, If he hit you once, you’re asleep for the night. And as you lie on the floor while the ref counts ten, You’ll pray that you won’t have to fight me again.

For I am the man this poem’s about, The next champ of the world, there isn’t a doubt. This I predict and I know the score, I’ll be champ of the world in ’64. When I say three, they’ll go in the third, So don’t bet against me, I’m a man of my word. He is the greatest! Yes! I am the man this poem’s about, I’ll be champ of the world, there isn’t a doubt. Here I predict Mr. Liston’s dismemberment, I’ll hit him so hard; he’ll wonder where October and November went. When I say two, there’s never a third, Standin’ against me is completely absurd. When Cassius says a mouse can outrun a horse, Don’t ask how; put your money where your mouse is! I AM THE GREATEST!” —1964

Ali facing life after his first professional defeat. Ali was down but not out; he and Frazier fought twice more, with Ali winning both encounters.

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frontlist NEW FO SPRIN R G 2014

Illustrated History of Weapons Series 9” x 11” 160pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $24.95 US Retail

Percussion-cap mechanism

Flintlock to Percussion System Conversions

The four books in this stunning new series feature weapons from all across the globe and across the complete history of each. Beautiful photography and clear text combine with revealing close-up details to reveal the fascinating history of the design and development of knives, swords, pistols and rifles.

Metal barrel

Hand grip

The advantages of the percussion system were obvious to all, and many people wanted to

BoutEt cavalry oFFicEr’s Pistol Nicholas Boutet was appointed head of the Versailles Armory by the new republican government of France in 1792 as the French Revolution really took hold. Boutet produced a series of solid, robust designs that served the French army well for a generation. This cavalry officer’s pistol was converted while in private hands, perhaps in the 1830s.

get their hands on a percussion-cap gun as quickly as possible. Buying an entirely new gun, Trigger guard

however, was a costly business, so many people chose instead to convert their existing flintlock gun to a percussion-cap gun. The amount of adaptation needed was not great. The barrel remained the same, as did the ammunition and gunpowder charge. It was only the hammer and nipple that needed to be acquired to replace the cock and pan.

Frizzen Flintlock cock

Converted mechanism

sPanish Dragon

Spring-out dagger

This dragon, a blunderbuss intended to be held in one hand, was made in Spain towards the end of the 18th century as a flintlock weapon. It was later converted to be a percussion-cap firearm, probably in the 1830s.

Rights Sold: English (North America)

Dual-FirE Pistol The only real drawback to a percussion-cap pistol was that it would not work if you ran out of percussion caps. This Swiss pistol was made to use percussion caps, but had a back-up flintlock just in case.

Trigger guard

Neatly fitted ramrod

naPolEon iii oF FrancE When the Emperor Napoleon died in 1821 he left a son, who died in 1832. The prestige of the imperial cause and the liberal policies it espoused were inherited by Napoleon’s nephew Louis Napoleon. The dashing young Louis Napoleon joined the Swiss army and earned a reputation as a competent officer and left-wing firebrand. In 1840, spurred on by reports of unrest in France, Louis Napoleon moved to England where he recruited a small force of supporters and bought enough percussion-cap weapons to arm them. On August 6, the little army landed at Boulogne. Louis Napoleon strode ashore calling on all loyal Frenchman to join him. He was at once arrested, disarmed and thrown into prison. Eight years later he tried the ballot box, got himself elected president of France and then declared himself emperor of France.

WogDon Pistol This unusual weapon was made by Robert Wogdon, a leading London gunsmith active from the 1760s until his retirement in 1803. The detachable wooden stock was designed to turn this long pistol into a short carbine that could be fired from the shoulder for added accuracy and stability. This sort of high-quality weapon would have been expensive to replace, so the conversion to percussion cap was a natural move.

Wooden shoulder stock

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Early FirEarms

DuEling Pistols

tWigg DuEling Pistols

accuracy anD rEliaBility Most pistol duels were fought at a distance of about 40 or 50 feet. Given the inaccuracy of flintlock pistols in the 18th century this was not as deadly as it may sound. Duels might be for one shot each, an agreed number of shots or until one or the other participant was hit. It gradually came to be accepted that honor had been satisfied so long as both men turned up ready and prepared to fight. Once this had been done, the seconds very often managed to sort out a form of apology that would remove the need for any shots to be fired. Alternatively, one of the participants might deliberately fire his shot into the ground at his feet, after which it was considered appropriate for the other to do likewise. A man who broke the conventions could find himself arrested for murder or ostracized by his friends and family.

John Twigg, a famous gunsmith who operated his business in London’s fashionable Piccadilly Street from 1776 to 1795, made this pair of pistols. He produced high-class firearms himself, but also employed a host of craftsmen to mass-produce cheaper weapons to his design. This particular pair has been considerably altered. In the 19th century, they were converted from flintlock to the new percussion-cap system, and at some point have had spring-loaded bayonets added.

Incised checkering on butt

Repeating Weapons

An illustration of the duel between Eugene Onegin and Vladimir Lensky, from the verse novel Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin

Octagonal barrel

peppeRboxes and deRRingeRs

engLish peppeRbox

Floral scroll engraved frame

This small pepperbox was made in England about 1850, but does not carry a maker’s mark to allow it to be dated more precisely. Its small size indicates that it was intended to be carried in a coat pocket.

English DuEling Pistols Benjamin Griffin and his son Joseph made guns in London from 1724 to 1770. They specialized in highRing trigger quality guns, made specifically to order by aristocratic clients. The guns often featured silver or silvergilt mounts, chasing and other details. This pair of Barrels pistolsshow is the described as a pairwavy of distinctive dueling pistols, pattern of steel though their short Damascus barrels would seem to indicate that they are personal protection weapons.

Scallop motif

Finely carved grip

MaRiette bReveté pistoL A finely made pistol produced in Belgium by Guillaume Mariette, who ran a small factory at Liege from 1832 to 1865. This particular pepperbox has four removable barrels of Damascus steel and an elaborately engraved frame. Unlike weapons made in Britain or America, this pepperbox fires the bottom barrel when the trigger is pulled.

Classic deep-cut scrollwork decorates the frame

WEllington vErsus WinchilsEa In 1829 the British prime minister—and victor at the Battle of Waterloo—was steering legislation through Parliament to free Catholics from centuries-old legislation restricting their civil rights. The Earl of Winchilsea accused him of “an insidious design for the infringement of our Removable liberties and the introduction of Popery into every barrel allows department of the State.” Wellington challenged cleaning and reloading the earl to a duel. The two met on March 21 at Battersea. When the signal was given to fire, Winchilsea hoWdah pistoL kept his arm by his side, pistol pointing down. Seeing this, Wellington fired wide. Lord British colonial officials in India found that they had a then apologized his words. need for a Winchilsea powerful handgun when out in more for remote

BElgian DuEling Pistols This fine pair of dueling pistols was made in Belgium during the middle of the 19th century. By this date dueling was the preserve of young, wealthy, aristocratic men, and so the weapons were usually of high quality and price. This pair uses the percussion-cap system, which was more reliable than the flintlock and so made dueling a considerably more dangerous activity than before.

areas, where they might unexpectedly encounter tigers, bears and other large aggressive animals at close range. At first the officials carried old rifles, cut down to a fraction of their length, but then sent back to Britain for weapons made specifically for this purpose. The result was the so-called howdah pistol, which took its name from the howdah—a carriage in which people rode on the back of elephants. The weapons were typically short, with a wide bore and robustly built to take a powerful charge of powder. This unmarked percussion-cap howdah pistol has two barrels.

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noRth & CouCh gaMeshooteR

MaRiette bReveté d26 This Breveté D26 was made in Liege by Guillaume Mariette. The five-barrel rotating cylinder is held in place by the ridged nut at the very front of the weapon. When the nut is unscrewed the barrels can be removed for cleaning or reloading.

Unlike most pepperbox pistols, this peculiar little weapon made in the United States in the 1860s was designed to fire all its barrels at the same time. It was marketed as a pistol to be whipped out and fired at small game when the opportunity presented, hence its name.

45

aLLen & thuRbeR peppeRbox This pepperbox pistol is marked Allen and Thurber, indicating that famous gunsmith Ethan Allen made it to a design patented by Thurber. The nipples and percussion caps at the rear of the barrels are masked by a nipple shield that stopped the caps from falling off. This model has six barrels and fires .36 caliber balls.

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the CUt anD thRUst of meDieval Weapons

9th CentURY

heCate

CRaig haRRison

Cold-forged fluted barrel

In November 2009 British sniper Corporal Craig Harrison of the Household Cavalry and his spotters were in a sniping position at Musa Qala in Helmand Province of Afghanistan. The weather was crystal clear, mild, dry and without wind. They spotted two Taliban machine gunners in a nest at extreme range, even for the L115A3 variant of the AWM sniper rifle. Harrison fired twice, killing the two Talivan fighters. The distance over which the shot was taken was later confirmed to be 2,707 yards - setting a new world record for a sniper shot.

Muzzle brake

The standard sniper rifle of the French Army is the Hecate, which is also used by the armed forces of other European Union states. It has a range of about 1,900 yards and fires the 12.7x99mm Nato cartridge. It has a 7 round detachable magazine and a 27.6 inch barrel. Unlike most sniper weapons the Hecate is not designed to kill people, instead it is designed to destroy equipment. The massively heavy bullet that it fires is effective against vehicles, radar, aircraft, radios, artillery and ammunition. The cartridges come in a variety of versions depending on the task in hand.

Scrome LTE J10 F1 10x telescopic sights

Zastava m76 Developed in Yugoslavia, and now used by the armed forces of the successor states, the Zastava M76 entered service in 1976. It was intended to be used by men of standard infantry units, allowing one or more men in a squad to achieve much better long range accuracy than was normal for infantry without the specialised training and equipment of a true sniper. It has a range of about 900 yards and fires in a semi-automatic action from a detachable 10 round magazine. It has proved to be a rugged and reliable weapon, seeing extensive service in the wars that wracked the Balkans in the 1990s.

The firsT firearms

Folding bipod barrel support Box magazine containing 10 rounds

Pistol grip

maTChloCKs

The gun has several features to make it more comfortable and use in action. The padded cheek rest can be raised or lowered, while the shoulder stock can be adjusted in length.

Iron hoops hold barrel to wooden stock

Ivory inlaid decoration

pp14/15 Not sure if this is an author or design issue but Cortez and the Aztecs looks out of place alongside 2 Indian guns. Also Hinckley have asked if it can be shown earlier alongside guns the match it date-wise? RUPERT”S answer: Primarily design, I think. However, I can write a piece about Shah Jahan of Delhi who used matchlocks in his armies if you want me to do so. There is a nice pic of him on campaign here: Rubber pad on shoulder butt

AKM Bayonet

shah Jahan of delhi 148

indian Torador An Indian matchlock of unknown date, but probably early 18th century. The barrel is 17½ inches long and has a slightly flared muzzle. It is bound to the stock by three brass bands, while the matchlock mechanism is decorated with brass plates to mask the workings. The white lines and stars are inlaid ivory, and the heel of the stock is covered with ivory. The high quality of decoration marks this out as a prestige weapon, which was clearly made for a rich client. The size of the weapon means that it was probably intended for a woman or older child and would have been used for hunting. Note the straight lines of the stock behind the trigger mechanism, a distinctive feature of weapons from the Indian subcontinent at this date.

Glowing match was held in this metal arm and lowered into the touch hole by the trigger. The length of match had to be constantly adjusted as it burned down

The most famous victory associated with the matchlock came in 1519 when Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortes invaded and conquered the Aztec Empire in what is now Mexico. Marching with just 600 men, 15 horses and 15 cannon, Cortes at first met with a peaceful welcome, but this soon turned to violence once his intentions became clear. The Aztecs were armed with clubs and with arrows and spears tipped with flint or obsidian. Although the Spaniards were outnumbered by about 40 to 1, they capitalized on the damaging effect that their matchlock firearms had on the stone-age Aztecs’ morale as much as they used their actual ability to inflict casualties. After battles fought at Otumba and Tlaxcala, the Aztecs capitulated and their empire became a possession of Spain. Ttext to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow text to follow. (175)

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indian maTChloCK rifle Highly ornamented brass triangular trigger shows the status of the gun’s owner

Silver highlighting as decoration

This Indian matchlock rifle has a wooden body, cast-iron barrel, and highly ornate silver and brass decorations on the firing mechanism. It was made in the early 17th century.

Cast-iron barrel

Brass plate hides mechanism

Knob unscrews to remove mechanism from gun

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frontlist

renaissance weapons

13

a maGnificenT seT of weapons

A Magnificent Set of Weapons

THe sabre of beTHlen Gábore The Gábor sabre and scabbard are adorned with hundreds of precious jewels. even the sabre’s fabulous damascus-steel blade is inlaid with gold.

Gustavus Adolphus owned a remarkable array of rapiers, but none of his weapons were as spectacular as the set he acquired from Bethlen Gábor, also known as Gabriel Bethlen, prince of Transylvania from 1613 until his death in 1629, and briefly (1620–1621) king of Hungary. Like

Note the intricacy of the work in gold and enamel as well as the classic Islamic geometric patterns.

Gustavus, Gábor was a Protestant, and the gift was likely a gesture of solidarity during a time of religious wars in Europe. This matching set of sabre, mace, and dagger was among the most prized possessions in Gustavus’s treasury. Richly worked with gold and inlaid with precious stones, these arms are dazzling to behold. But they are not merely ceremonial: both the sabre and the dagger have superb blades made of Damascus steel, the most sought-after blade material in history.

THe Gábor daGGer with a classic islamic hilt and a straight damascus blade, the Gabor dagger is every bit as ornate in its mountings as the exquisite sabre.

Intricate medallion of gold, turquoise, and rubies on grip

Renaissance Weapons Cabochon-cut rubies are set amid intricate damascene of gold on steel in arabesque patterns common to many prized Islamic blades.

THe Gábor mace The Gábor mace is clearly intended to be purely symbolic. while the blades of the other two artifacts are superbly made and theoretically fit for use in battle, the mace is completely plated in gold and encrusted with more than 250 jewels.

damascus sTeel

Abstract design cut out of blade

One of the great mysteries of swordmaking involves Damascus steel, the extraordinary steel used for centuries to forge blades in India and especially the Middle East. Damascus steel was made from ingots of wootz steel, an alloy apparently first developed in Sri Lanka before being disseminated by trade through India, Persia, and the Middle East. Wootz steel, forged in the style that produced Damascus blades, left mottled patterns in the metal somewhat similar to those of the pattern-welded blades of Europe—but the Damascus blades far excelled those created through ordinary patternwelding. They held a remarkably hard and sharp cutting edge while retaining a resiliency that made them nearly unbreakable. The precise technique for producing Damascus steel was lost by the 18th century; perhaps because of disruptions in trade cut off the supply of wootz steel to the Middle East. Modern researchers have found evidence that a very specific mix of impurities in the steel contributed to its excellence, but the actual “recipe” is gone.

Damascene of gold on steel

THe HilT of THe Gábor sabre The Gábor sabre is a scimitar of the kilij type. its damascus blade was forged by the egyptian swordsmith Hassan al-misri around 1300, and is among the finest of its kind. its gilded, enameled, and jeweled hilt, as exquisitely wrought as any in the world, is studded with many of the sword’s 70

weApons of The fAr eAsT rubies and over 30 cabochons of turquoise.

Later Chinese Swords

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P62-75_SWORDS.indd 66-67

lATer chinese swords

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JiAn A fine 19th-century wen jian, or scholar’s sword, with mountings of intricate cloisonné enameling.

10/02/2014 11:38

The chinese sword evolved continuously over the next millennium, as swordsmiths refined their techniques and absorbed outside influences. in the first millennium Bce, chinese swordmakers took up such practices as using rayskin for secure grips and applying clay coatings during the tempering process to differentially harden blades. from abroad came the persian hilt, damascus steel, and fine Japanese blades. during the later han and sui dynasties, single-edged straight blades with chisel-like points that influenced those made in Japan. in the 13th century, after repeated clashes with the Mongols, the dao, or curved, single-edged sabre, became an important part of the chinese armory.

Through it all, the jian remained as the ideal sword. Known as “the gentleman of weapons,” it actually evolved into two distinct forms. The first, the wu jian or battle sword, kept the heft and sturdiness of the classic straight swords of earlier periods. The second, the “scholar’s sword” or wen jian, was far lighter and more flexible, and had a rounded point. used only for self-defense and, later, some martial arts, the scholar’s sword was associated with the chinese literati. Many wen jian, like some on these pages, were beautifully mounted and skillfully decorated.

Gold-plated scabbard mounts

Gold-plated guard with scrollwork and floral cloisonné

lonG chinese sword medieVaL weapons

The Cut and Thrust of Medieval Weapons After the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, much of its order gave way to migrations, conflicts, and disarray. But these were hardly the “Dark Ages”

Intricate floral cloisonné on guard

A highly unusual sabre, made in China from the blade of a Japanese sword. The tang of the Japanese blade is still visible above the guard.

Viking runes along the spine of the blade

fAnG

chief weapon is clearly the bow, he wears a dao—a curved, single-edged sabre—at his waist.

be; much of the old order was absorbed into the new, and among the traditions to endure were those of weaponry. The Roman spatha evolved into the

RepRoduction of LombaRd swoRd

legendary swords of the Anglo-Saxons, the Vikings,

A modern reproduction of a 6th-century Lombard sword. Clearly modeled on the Roman spatha, this blade was made for slashing.

became more sophisticated and effective, new roles

An unusual stirrup-hilted, double-edged Chinese sword called a fang. The sharpened hook on the blade is intended for cutting the bridle or reins of an enemy’s horse.

Sturdy crossguard for the rigors of combat

Substantial, 122 bolted securely pommel

were found for such primal weapons as the mace

Thanks to Chinese epic films of recent years, when most Westerners think of a Chinese sword, they tend to envision the wen jian. This is actually fitting, as this sword has come to be regarded as the most elegant and exalted sword in Chinese culture. For centuries, officials and aristocrats wore such swords to the imperial court. During the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), the wen jian came to be closely associated with the martial art of Tai Chi Chuan. The blade of the wen jian, too flexible for the hacking and stiff parrying of conventional combat, was perfect for the internal disciplines of Tai Chi Chuan, in which one meets hardness with softness, redirects an opponents’ force, and uses strikes to transmit vital energy (chi) rather than crude physical force. The image shown here depicts a Taoist immortal carrying a scholar’s sword across his back.

chinese sABre

A striking image from The Seax of Beagnoth, the late 18th century found in England, and titled after the name— perhaps owner’s—inscribed in Viking runes along the spine of of a Qingthe Dynasty the blade. The single-edged blade is about 22 inches long. warrior. Though his

that Renaissance thinkers first characterized them to

and even the knights of the Crusades. And, as armor

though single-bladed swords such as the seax were common in the 5th through 7th centuries, the classic germanic sword is a double-edged, straight-bladed weapon that occupies a middling position between the Roman spatha and the cut-and-thrust sword of the later middle ages. their blades were of iron or steel, sometimes pattern-welded, and their mountings could be astounding works of art.

QinG dynAsTy wArrior wiTh dAo Viking seax

Long tang for balance and solidity between hilt and blade

The scholAr’s sword: The suBTlesT of BlAdes

geRmanic swoRds A scholar’s sword with a blade of just over 31 inches, fitted with beautifully made cloisonné enamel mountings. Note how the tip of the sword is slightly rounded rather than acute.

Germanic Swords the celts had established the finest swordmaking tradition in europe well before the decline of the Roman empire, and it was from the merging of northern forging techniques and Roman blade profiles that the germanic sword first arose. in germanic culture, the sword was the supreme weapon, and fine blades were handed down asElaborate heirlooms and given cloisonné work ceremonially as gifts.

Warrior in wolf costume with sword

Hook blade for cutting horse reins and bridles

A close view of the composite sabre’s hilt. The curved guard is carved with a lizard-skin pattern, and the grip is made of ivory carved and dyed red.

Forward-curved guard

Ornamental pommel cap

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and the flail.

6tH-centuRy swoRd HiLt

tHe gutenstein scabbaRd

A 6th-century CE AngloSaxon hilt unearthed on the Isle of Wight. The intricate, beautiful metalwork was a hallmark of fine AngloSaxon swords.

An ornate silver 7th-century Germanic scabbard. One of its images shows a warrior in a wolf costume holding a large sword.

geRmanic HiLt Though corroded with age and exposure, this Germanic hilt has been displayed in a manner that reveals how it was bolted together.

Thick, sturdy guard

Intricate gold serpentine design at base of blade mounted knigHts in combat from a 14th-century manuscript.

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greeK And roMAn Knives

Ancient blAdes

Greek and Roman Knives The great civilizations of Greece, from the early Minoan culture through the Mycenaean era to the city-states of the Classical period, had great traditions of weaponry. Though the primary combat weapon of ancient Greece was the spear, seconded by the short sword, archaeological evidence reveals that daggers were also common, and often used to showcase sometimes strikingly beautiful decorative

(Above) cretAn bronze And gold dAgger A remarkably well-preserved bronze dagger with gold appointments, dating to about 1750 bce. it reveals how hilts were mounted to blades in this era—note the role of the large rivets above the guard—and its gold hilt originally terminated in a disk-shaped pommel.

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work. Greek smiths and other artisans often inlaid blades with rich and intricate narrative scenes. In ancient Rome, the dagger was even more prominent in both

(Above) MycenAeAn bronze Knife A fine Mycenaean dagger unearthed at the prosymna site near corinth in southern greece. the large rivets would have been used to attach the hilt; they almost obscure the exquisite decorative detail of a dolphin, inlaid in the middle of the blade. the blade itself is two-edged and reasonably acute.

(right) bronze Knife froM sAntorini Another ancient greek dagger, in this case possibly Minoan. it comes from excavations at santorini. it reveals the same blade profile and three-rivet hilt attachment as many other examples, and its decorative inlay has been largely lost over the millennia.

(Above) roMAn dAgger A roman military dagger, or pugio, dating from the imperial period and unearthed at oberstimm in germany. this impressive weapon is a smaller version of a gladius, or roman short sword. the blade is most suitable for stabbing, but can also be used for slashing. the cruciform guard and balanced pommel set the pattern for the arming swords of Medieval europe.

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detAil of MycenAeAn Knife A remarkable decorative scene from a Mycenaean dagger blade of the 16th century bce. inlaid with gold, it depicts hunters taking on an enraged lion, who has already slain one of the hunting party. three of the remaining hunters use spears—the primary weapon of ancient greece—but one is armed with a bow and arrows. the lion is beautifully rendered.

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splendid roMAn pugio A remarkably well-preserved roman pugio unearthed at carnuntum, a roman military establishment and trading center on the danube in what is now Austria. the dagger has a classic cruciform hilt and balanced pommel, and its sheath is intricately decorated with geometrical designs. note the shoe, or protective tip, southeAstonAsiAn bronze Knives the sheath.

Ancient blAdes

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Southeast Asian Bronze Knives during the bronze Age, several cultures in southeast Asia, especially what is now vietnam, brought tremendous refinement to bronze metalwork. the dong son culture, which lived in the river valleys of northern vietnam, became famed for casting in bronze; dong son drums were exported all over

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east Asia, and they also produced impressive figurines. dong son daggers often incorporate cast figures into their designs, usually at the pommel. the sa huynh culture, which flourished to the south of the dong son, practiced many of the same casting techniques and used similar decorative motifs.

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figured dong son dAgger A bronze dagger of the Dong Son culture, from approximately 400 BCE. The entire handle is cast in the form of a human being, possibly wearing regalia of some sort. It may be that the dagger was used for ritual purposes. The broad, double-edged blade, about six inches long, tapers to a fairly acute point, its edges narrowing in a gentle curve toward the tip.

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dong son dAggers, 5th bce Five daggers of the Dong Son culture, which flourished in what is now northern Vietnam in the last millennium BCE. The Dong Son people were expert bronze casters—their bronze drums were traded throughout East and Southeast Asia— and that expertise is evident in these fine weapons, each of which has a distinctive hilt design and blade profile.

bronze dAgger, sA huynh culture A bronze dagger of the Sa Huynh culture, which flourished to the south of the Dong Son in the same time period. Though the Sa Huynh were skilled at working with iron, many bronze artifacts have also been unearthed in central and southern Vietnam. This dagger has a nicely flared handle and a pommel in the shape of an animal—either a boar or an elephant. Note how the small holes cast in the guard resemble those in Dong Son knives.

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frontlist

the illustrated encylopedia of

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weaponry: From Flint Axes to Automatic Weapons 11” x 14” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $49.95 US Retail

WEAPONRY

the illustrated encylopedia of

WEAPONRY FROM FLINT AXES TO AUTOMATIC WEAPONS Chuck Wills In Association with the Berman Museum

Beginning in the Stone Age, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weaponry travels through the Bronze Age to our present day, showing the tools humans have used to defend themselves all around the globe. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Weaponry will help readers better understand how the great battles of history were fought by learning the history of the weapons used to fight them: clubs, axes, spears, daggers, swords, bows, maces, pistols, rifles, machine guns, and everything in between are illustrated by 1,500 specially commissioned full-color photographs. Rights Sold: English (North America), Chinese SImplified

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Mausers

Wills

The Mausers

In the late nineteenth century and into the twentieth, the high quality of the German Mauser company’s boltaction rifles led to scores of nations adopting Mauser designs for their armed forces. According to company figures, some 100 million Mauser rifles were made in factories worldwide, from the single-shot M1871 through to the Karabiner 98k that was still in production at the Heading Text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here text goes here

end of World War II. Many of the countries that ordered large quantities of rifles from the German company did so to their own specifications. Some required calibers to accommodate the ammunition they manufactured, others opted for specific magazines or ammunition-feed arrangements. Shown here are just a few of the many early Mauser variants produced across the globe.

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GANGSTER PAYBACK Commanding an estimated annual income of $100 million a year, Chicago gangster Al Capone could afford to set up this soup kitchen for the unemployed in 1929.

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Gangster Warfare In January 1920, Prohibition—a federal ban on the “manufacture, sale, or transportation” of alcohol—went into effect in the United States. Intended to stop the crime and social ills associated with drinking, this “noble experiment” backfired badly. People still wanted to drink, “bootleggers” were willing to make or smuggle alcohol, and organized crime, seeing a chance to make rich profits, stepped in to control the trade in illicit

successful and orders poured in from around the world. While the Mauser’s straight-pull bolt didn’t allow for as rapid a rate of fire as, say, the British SMLE, it was strong, safe, and effective. In 1898 Mauser introduced the 7.92mm Gewehr 98—the finest bolt-action rifle ever made, in the opinion of many weapons historians. The G98 remained in service with the Germany Army until the mid1930s, when it was replaced by a shorter version, the Karabiner (KAR) 98. The three principal Mauser factories were destroyed during World War II; today, the company— now owned by Rheinmetall—makes mostly hunting rifles. Several former Mauser

Wilhelm (1834–1882) and Paul Mauser (1838–1914) followed in their father’s footsteps as gunsmiths at the royal armory in the German kingdom of Wurttemberg. When the government of the newly unified Germany sought an improved rifle in response to the performance of the French chassepot in the Franco-Prussian War, the brothers developed a single-shot bolt-action weapon, the Gewehr (rifle) Model 1871, which Germany adopted that same year. After Wilhelm’s death, Paul came up with a new 7mm design based on the newly developed box magazine. In Models 1893, 1894, and 1895, the rifle proved hugely

The Tommy Gun

hooch. Through the 1920s and beyond, gangsters fought each other and the authorities using a variety of powerful weapons, forcing law-enforcement agencies to catch up in the firepower stakes. Prohibition ended in 1933, but the Great Depression saw the rise of a new breed of outlaw, “motorized bandits” such as the Barker Gang, John Dillinger, and “Pretty Boy” Floyd, who roamed the roads of the Midwest and Southwest committing crimes.

“I have built my organization upon fear”

The most iconic weapon of the 1920s is surely the Thompson Submachine Gun. Much to the embarrassment of its inventor, John T. Thompson, who had developed it for military use, the weapon was eagerly taken up by gangsters in Chicago and other cities and put to deadly use in their battles with rival gangs and with the authorities. (Given the lax guncontrol laws of the era, criminals could easily obtain weapons—even automatic ones.) The Thompson soon earned a variety of nicknames, including the “Tommy Gun,” the “Chicago typewriter,” and the “chopper.”

Magazine holds 20 rounds

Perhaps the Thompson’s most notorious application came in the “St. Valentine’s Day Massacre” of 1929, when members of Al Capone’s gang murdered seven associates of a rival concern in a Chicago garage. The power of the Thompson’s .45 ACP rounds at close range was such that several of the victims’ bodies were reportedly cut nearly in half. The success of the Thompson in outlaw hands led many law-enforcement agencies, including the FBI, to purchase the weapon themselves; the Thompson would be part of the “G-Men’s” arsenal for decades. Most local police forces, however, remained armed solely with revolvers

and shotguns, and so were at a distinct disadvantage when gangsters came to town.

Another weapons development of the 1920s was the widespread adoption of “pocket pistols” by criminals. These were small automatic pistols, usually in .22 or .25 caliber, which, as the name implies, could be easily concealed in a coat pocket, an ankle holster, or tucked behind the belt in the small of the back. They were handy weapons in case a bootlegging deal went bad, or in last-ditch struggles to escape the police.

BROwNING AUTOMATIC RIfLE The gas-operated, .30 Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) was introduced in 1918 and did limited duty in World War I. It was used by the FBI against gangsters in the 1920s as well as by the criminals themselves, sometimes in cut-down form.

Trigger guard

Al Capone, June 23, 1926

THOMPSON The Thompson submachine used a delayedblowback operation developed by U.S. Navy officer John Blish. It fired the same .45 ACP cartridge as the Colt M1911 pistol and fed either from a 50-round drum magazine or a 20 (later 30)round box magazine. Hollywood forever linked the “Tommy Gun” with U.S. gang wars of the 1920s in the public mind, but the weapon also first saw military service during the decade.

Leather holster

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PisTols in PockeTs

PeRSian MaUSeR An 8mm Persian (later Iranian) Army Mauser with bayonet. Many of these were manufactured at the Brno Arms Works in Czechoslovakia.

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aRgenTine MaUSeR In 1891, Argentina’s army replaced its antiquated .43 Remington rolling-block action rifle with the 7.55mm Mauser shown here, together with its bayonet and scabbard.

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Wooden buttstock

Box magazine

Six-shot cylinder

Additional front grip

COLT POLICE POSITIVE By the 1920s many U.S. policemen and private armed guards carried .32 or .38 Colt “Police Positive” revolvers. The name came from a new safety feature, introduced in 1905, which separated the hammer from the firing pin, thus preventing accidental discharge.

LILIPUT PISTOL The Liliput series of automatic pistols made by Waffenfabrik August Menz in Germany was aptly named—this one measures 3½ inches long and was made in 1927. To keep the weapon as small as possible, Menz chambered it for the rare 4.25mm round. (Other, slightly larger Liliput models used a 6.35mm round.)

SWediSH MaUSeR Sweden adopted the Mauser in 1893—although chambered for 6.65mm, a small round by the standards of military rifles of the era. The Swedes also insisted that while made in Germany, their Mausers be manufactured using Swedish steel.

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Handgrip

GAS BILLY CLUB Federal Laboratories Inc. of Pittsburgh produced this combination billy club/teargas launcher for police use in the mid-1920s.

Diminuitive pistol

Lever trigger

Cylinder takes 24 rounds

Long barrel

MITRAILLEUSE This defensive weapon was fitted to a window or barricade, and the firer pulled a string attached to the lever to fire and advance each of the 24 bullets. Al Capone’s gang are said to have mounted it on boats used to bring in illegal booze from Canada in case they encountered U.S. Customs patrols.

Repeating Weapons

Repeating weapons timeline Soldiers armed with single-shot firearms were particularly vulnerable while reloading their weapons. Repeating firearms greatly reduced the risk of facing the enemy “unarmed.”

1836 Pin-fire cartridge 1835 First Colt revolver

1851 Robert Adams double-action revolver 1837 Ethan Allen pepperbox pistol

1873 Winchester rifle 1860 Spencer repeating carbine

1869 Center-fire cartridge

1879 Lee box magazine

1892 Schönberger-Laumann semi-automatic pistol

Naval Warfare Until the sixteenth century, sea warfare in the Western world was often simply an extension of land fighting. Sea battles were fought close to shore by oar-propelled galleys. The object was to ram the enemy with the galley’s fortified bow or to get close enough to grapple with the enemy vessel. Then soldiers armed with infantry weapons—spears, swords, and bows—would board the opposing galley to fight on deck. In the

THE BROADSIDE

fourteenth century heavy guns were mounted on European ships, but they were put in “castles” on the main decks, which limited their number and usefulness. By the mid-seventeenth century, however, ships were stable enough to carry heavy cannon on their lower decks. This transformed naval battles, which now consisted of lines (columns) of warships battering each other with cannon at ranges of 300 feet or less.

“Something must be left to chance; nothing is certain in a sea fight”

BROADSIDE

Firing all the guns on one side of a ship was called a broadside. Being first to fire a broadside in a battle gave a ship an immediate advantage but to be successful the ship had to sail very close to its opponent.

It was during the reign of King Henry VIII (from 1509 to 1547) that English warships began mounting cannon on lower decks, firing through gunports that could be closed when not in action. This eventually led to the massive “ships of the line” of the Napoleonic Wars (see pages 00–00)—vessels that carried as many as 136 guns on two to four decks. These guns were muzzle-loading with brass or iron barrels.They were rated by the weight of the shot they fired, with 24- and 32-pounders being the most common sizes. Round shot made of iron was the usual DIRK Midshipmen (officers-in-training) traditionally carried a dirk (see pages 62–63) like the one shown here, which dates from the reign of King George III (r. 1760–1801). They typically had a blade of up to 24 inches in length and were worn on the belt.

projectile, but specialized ammunition such as chain shot (two small round shot joined by a length of chain, intended to tear the enemy’s sails and rigging) were also used. In addition to these “long guns,” warships carried carronades, or “smashers”—shorter guns that fired the same weight of shot, for use at close range. The weight of a broadside (the combined weight of shot fired by all the guns on one side of a ship in a single volley) was devastating. The broadside weight of the Royal Navy’s HMS Victory (flagship of Admiral Horatio Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805) was 1150 pounds.

BOARDERS AWAY!

Warships usually also had a contingent of marines; in battle, these “sea soldiers” would take to the fighting tops (platforms on the masts) to fire at enemy sailors with muskets and—if the range was close enough—to throw grenades onto the enemy vessel’s deck. If the ship came alongside its opponent, both marines and sailors would make up a boarding party, armed with a wide variety of weapons that could include pikes (see pages 00–00), cutlasses, pistols, blunderbusses (see pages 000–00), and musketoons (shortbarreled muskets).

Flintlock mechanism

Simple ivory handle

Admiral Horatio Nelson 22 June 1801

Flintlock mechanism

GRENADE LAUNCHER An eighteenth-century British naval weapon, this “hand mortar” was used to fire a kind of incendiary grenade. A wooden projectile with one end soaked in pitch (an inflammable resin) and topped with a burning rag was inserted into the barrel: The weapon was then fired, lofting the projectile onto the deck of an enemy ship.

The period from the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 to the outbreak of World War I saw rapid advances in weapons technology. By the mid-nineteenth century, the old smoothbore musket had given way to the rifle, a weapon of much greater range and accuracy. The flintlock firing mechanism was replaced, first by the percussion cap system, and later by weapons firing fully enclosed metallic cartridges. Such cartridges made repeating weapons— which could fire multiple shots without reloading—a practical proposition, and by the end of the nineteenth century, most armies would be equipped with bolt-action, magazine-fed rifles. The revolver, popularized by Samuel Colt at midcentury, gave individuals a potent pistol, and inventors had developed automatic pistols by the end of the 1800s. With firearms now dominating the battlefield, edged weapons like swords came to be increasingly relegated to purely ceremonial roles.

CUTLASS A short, broad-bladed slashing sword, the cutlass was a mainstay of boarding parties. Its compact size made it easily maneuverable in chaotic hand-to-hand fighting on a ship’s deck. Most cutlasses—like this British one—had a sturdy guard to protect the user’s hand and for clubbing an opponent.

BELGIAN PISTOL A .74 Belgian naval pistol, manufactured around 1810, according to the proof marks on the barrel.

Spike for boarding vessel

Curved blade

Pistol barrel

ROYAL NAVAL BOARDING AX AND GUN COMBINATION Dating from the late eighteenth century, this British weapon combines an ax and a percussion pistol. The handle contains the gun mechanism and the bullet is fired through the top of the ax head. The ax would be used to cut ropes and destroy masts.

Percussion mechanism Razor-sharp ax blade

RAIL GUN A rare rail gun from an Austrian warship. The weapon consisted of a 66-inch section of ship’s rail with ten pistol barrels mounted vertically (three barrels are missing). Each barrel was loaded individually, with priming powder for all distributed in a channel inside the rail. The idea was to ignite the charge and fire all the barrels at the moment an enemy boarding party tried to board.

PIC CAPTION HEADING The story of weapons begins with creation of the the first crude stone implements by early hominids, perhaps as long as 5 million years ago.

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The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Small Arms: From Hand Cannons to Automatic Weapons 9” x 12” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover October 2014 $49.95 US Retail

COMI N AUTU G MN 2014

From 17th-century wheel lock pistols to modern-day machine guns, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Small Arms chronicles the remarkable changes that have occurred in the design, manufacture, and technicality of small arms throughout history. From handguns such as the Colt .44 Magnum and Beretta 93R to classic rifles such as the M16 and AK47, this book profiles hundreds of small arms from the seventeenth century to the present day, including handguns, submachine guns, rifles, and support weapons. Each weapon is presented in a specially commissioned full-color photograph, fully annotated and concisely described. Rights Sold: English (North America) eArly MoDern WArfAre

hAnD-helD GunpoWDer WeApons

Wheel Lock Pistols tHe WHeel loCk

the flintlock

Early Flintlocks the adoption of the flintlock firing mechanism led to a proliferation of pistols. Despite their considerable drawbacks—ineffectiveness at any but close ranges, slow loading by the muzzle, vulnerability to inclement weather—these guns Coat, Holster, and Belt Pistols Generally, pistols of the flintlock era fall into three types: the first were coat pistols, also known as traveler’s pistols. As the name implies, these were personal-defense weapons compact

the wheel lock, the next major advance after the matchlock, combined a springloaded, serrated metal wheel and a dog, or cock—a pair of metal jaws that held a piece of iron pyrite. the wheel was wound up (usually with a key) to put tension on the spring. When the trigger was pulled, the cock struck against the rotating wheel, striking sparks to fire the weapon. the wheel lock gun was likely inspired by the handheld tinder-lighters in use at the time. the introduction of the wheel lock spurred the development of the pistol. (the term “pistol” may derive from the armsproducing city of pistoia in italy, although there are other theories; early pistols were often called dags, which probably derives from an old french word for “dagger.”) pistols put firepower into the hands of mounted troops; as concealable weapons, criminals and assassins also quickly adopted them. in 1584, a wheel lock pistol was employed to murder the Dutch leader William the silent in the world’s first political assassination by pistol.

gERMAN WhEEL LOCk PISTOLS This rare and magnificent pair of wheel lock pistols was made in Saxony, Germany, around 1590. They are shown with a matching box designed to carry five cartridges—which at the time consisted of powder and ball wrapped in paper or leather—and the key required to wind the wheel lock mechanism.

WhEEL LOCk PISTOL This sixteenth-century wheel lock pistol was made in Britain. It has two triggers, which are fired by two separate mechanisms, giving the pistol its unusual appearance.

tHe FlintloCk

the wheel lock’s heyday was brief. By the mid- to late sixteenth century, northern europe saw the development of the snaphance, or snaphaunce, lock. (the term came from a Dutch word for

CANNON IgNITER Flintlock mechanisms were not only used on handheld guns but were also fitted to artillery, particularly naval guns. Shown here is a British flintlock cannon igniter from the early nineteenth century. The

lock, the miquelet, appeared around the same time in southern europe. technical refinements to both eventually led to the introduction of the true flintlock early in the seventeenth century.

22-inch weapon’s lock was placed against the touch-hole of a cannon; pulling the trigger pulled back an external link that fired it and ignited the powder charge .

RAMPART gUN A wheel lock European rampart gun from about 1600. Rampart guns were mounted on the walls of castles and fortifications (and, at sea, on ship’s rails) for defense; this .76 model was designed so that it could be fired by “remote control” by means of a string.

gave individuals a potent weapon for self-defense, which was no small thing in an era without the benefit of any organized police forces, and in which robbers lurked after dark on the streets of towns and cities and highwaymen haunted rural roads.

enough to be carried in the pockets of the overcoats worn by men of the time; very shortbarreled versions could also be carried in a waistcoat pocket or elsewhere on one’s person. the second type were holster, or horse pistols—weapons with relatively long barrels

“pecking bird.”) in the snaphance, the cock held a piece of flint, which sprang forward on the trigger-pull to strike a piece of steel (the frizzen), sending sparks into the priming pan. A similar type of

Elongated trigger

DUBLIN CASTLE PISTOL This walnut-stocked, brass-finished .65 pistol was made in Dublin, Ireland, and bears the royal cipher of King George III (1738–1820). Ireland was a British colony at the time, and the armory at Dublin Castle was—together with the armories at Birmingham and at the Tower of London in England—a principal supplier of arms to the British Army and Navy.

that were intended to be worn in a holster attached to a horse’s saddle. the third type were belt pistols. of an intermediate size and caliber between coat and holster pistols, they were usually fitted with a hook, which could be attached to the belt.

fLINTLOCk CANNON LIghTER Made in Britain in the late eighteenth century, this tool worked on the same principle as a gun flintlock mechanism, but was used to ignite the gunpowder inside the cannon. gERMAN WhEEL LOCk RIfLE This German wheel lock rifle was probably made in Nuremberg in 1597. The stock is inlaid with ivory carvings of deer and fowl. Wheel lock muskets and rifles were expensive, so they enjoyed much popularity as hunting weapons for the aristocracy and the rich.

Square-shaped bullet

CLERMONT PISTOL A very finely made .48 pistol, probably French in origin

PERSIAN PISTOL In this beautiful Persian flintlock pistol of the eighteenth century. Instead of being inlaid or engraved, the beautiful gold decoration is overlaid.

SQUARE BARREL This early nineteenth century British pistol is unusual in having a square barrel designed to fire matching bullets. The bullets produced more ragged—and thus more fatal—entry and exit wounds.

gERMAN WhEEL LOCk MUSkET Another finely made example of a wheel lock weapon.

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fLINTLOCk TRAP gUN The stock on this gun has a rectangular hole in it, which suggests it would be mounted on a support or rest. A string or wire would have been tied to the trigger mechanism and then to a door. When the door was opened, it pulled the trigger, firing the gun—hence the name “trap.” It was made by Heinrich Kappell, one of the most famous Danish gunsmiths during the period of 1674–1718. He was based in Copenhagen.

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WeApons of espionAGe

Concealed Spy Guns

COAT PISTOL A short-barreled coat pistol, probably made in France around the turn of the nineteenth century

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BELT-BUCkLE PISTOL Made for a Nazi soldier during World War II, this belt buckle conceals a miniature 22-caliber pistol. Another variation comprised two 7.65mm barrels with lockwork hidden behind a Nazi Party belt buckle. The barrels were two inches long and such tiny weapons meant the wearer needed to get very close to the victim to have any hope of success..

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LOzENgE-CASE gUN An agent of Italy’s Fascist government reportedly used this pistol, disguised as a tin of throat lozenges, to assassinate an American intelligence operative in Switzerland during World War II. (As a neutral nation, Switzerland was a hotbed of espionage and intrigue throughout the conflict.) To fire the weapon, the assassin opened the lid and pressed on one of the “lozenges,” which served as a trigger.

Lozenge strip disguising trigger

Concealed barrel

WAr, Defense, AnD A chAnGinG WorlD

.22 round discharged from here

colt’s revolvers

Samuel Colt Born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1814, Samuel L. Colt was—like most of the great gunmakers—something of a mechanical prodigy. As a boy, he liked to disassemble and reassemble clocks, firearms, and other devices. Bored with working in his father’s textile mill, he went to sea at age fifteen as an apprentice seaman. It was on this voyage that he conceived his initial design. The origin of Colt’s inspiration is shrouded in legend, variously attributed to his observation of the ship’s wheel; or the capstan used to raise the anchor; or a steamboat’s paddlewheel—or, more prosaically, he may have seen Collier flintlock revolvers in India, where they were used by British troops. In any event, by the time he returned to the United States, he had carved a working model out of wood. To get his gun built, Colt needed money. Billing himself as “Dr. S. Coult,” he became a traveling “lecturer” whose specialty was demonstrating the effects of nitrous oxide—

Factory in Hartford, Connecticut The original Colt Armory was built in 1855 in the district of Hartford known as Coltsville. It was destroyed by fire in 1864, and rebuilt with its most dramatic feature of the original structure, the blue onion dome with gold stars, topped by a gold orb and a rampant colt, the original symbol of the Colt Manufacturing Company.

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laughing gas—on curious locals. With the proceeds of this work, he had two gunsmiths, Anton Chase and John Pearson, make experimental models. After receiving his U.S. Patent in 1836, Colt set up the Patent Arms Manufacturing Company in Paterson, New Jersey, to make the new weapon. The three “Paterson” revolver models that appeared that year, however, found few takers. In 1842, Colt went bankrupt. That experience—and the years of litigation that followed—might have driven a lesser personality into despairing retirement. As determined as he was ambitious, Colt made an astonishing comeback a few years later. Some early Colts had found their way into the hands of soldiers and frontiersmen, including Captain Samuel Walker of the Texas Rangers. In 1844, Walker and fifteen rangers, armed with Colts, fought off a war party of about eighty Comanche Native Americans. When the Mexican-American War broke out in 1846, Walker (now an army officer) and Colt collaborated on a design for a new revolver. The result was the huge (4.9pound), powerful (.41), “Walker Colt.” A government order for a thousand put Colt back in business; because he no longer had his own plant, Colt contracted with Eli Whitney Jr. (son of the famous cotton gin inventor) to make them in Whitneyville, Connecticut. The success of Colt revolvers in the Mexican-American War greatly raised the

Trigger and cocking mechanism

DEADLY TOOLS The tire gauge and screwdriver shown here are replicas of actual weapons produced for Allied operatives in World War II. Each is a single-shot .22 pistol. Brass screw trigger

NEW NAVY NEW NAVY Introduced Introduced in 1892 in and 1892 produced and produced throughthrough 1908, the 1908, double-action the double-action Colt “New Colt Navy” “Newrevolver Navy” revolver was typical was of typical the revolvers of the revolvers made bymade Colt by Colt from thefrom late the 1880s latethrough 1880s through the 1910s. the(These 1910s. guns, (Theseunlike guns,the unlike the earlier “Navy earlierColts, “Navy ” were Colts, actually ” were actually bought bought by the U.S. by the Navy U.S. and Navy were and were the standard the standard side-armside-arm during the during Spanish-American the Spanish-American War.) Colt War.) Colt revolversrevolvers of this era of this wereera available were available in several in different several different barrel lengths barrel lengths and chambered and chambered for a range for aofrange calibers. of calibers. The NewThe Navy New series Navywas series was made inmade .38 and in .38 .41—the and .41—the latter version latter version is shownis here. shown here.

weapons’ profile. They began to attract international orders when Colt exhibited his guns at the Great Exhibition in London in 1851, and also when they proved their worth in the Crimean War (1854–55). By 1855, Colt was so successful that he was able to build a huge and highly advanced factory in Hartford, Connecticut—soon to become the world’s largest nongovernment armory. Colt died in 1862, eleven years before his company’s most successful revolver—the single-action Army Model, and its civilian variants—came into being. Made in several calibers (including 44. and .45), this was the legendary “Peacemaker” and “Six-Shooter” of the American West.

DEADLY MUSIC Made in 1965, this fully functional silver flute was adapted to fire a .22 round. A brass screw on one of the keys functions as a trigger.

ThE LIBERATOR Although not produced especially for the OSS, the “Liberator” pistol has—rightly or wrongly—long been associated with that organization. The Liberator was simplicity itself: A single-shot pistol firing a .45 ACP round through a smoothbore barrel. Made of 23 pieces of stamped metal, it came in a cardboard box with ten cartridges (five of which could be stored in a compartment in the grip), a wooden rod for ejecting spent cartridges, and a wordless, comic strip-style sheet with assembly instructions. About a million of these guns were made by the Guide Lamp Division of the General Motors Corporation in 1942. The weapon was nicknamed “the Woolworth gun” after the discount store where all items sold for five or ten cents. (The actual unit cost was about U.S. $2.00.) With an effective range of about six feet, the Liberator was really a weapon designed to allow the user (if he or she were brave and lucky) to obtain better weapons. This gun was apparently intended for mass distribution to resistance fighters in Axis-

Lanyard ring Lanyard ring

Recessed Recessed hammer spur hammer spur

fAMOUS COLT COLT CUSTOMER fAMOUS CUSTOMER Billy the Kidthe (1859–81) was a was a Billy Kid (1859–81) notorious gunfighter who started notorious gunfighter who started rustling horseshorses and cattle at a very rustling and cattle at a very youngyoung age. His realHis name was Henry age. real name was Henry McCarty but after a manainman in McCarty butshooting after shooting an argument in 1873, changed an argument in he 1873, he changed his name to William Bonney. He He his name to William Bonney. joinedjoined a group of gunmen fighting a group of gunmen fighting a frontier feud infeud Lincoln County, a frontier in Lincoln County, killing killing yet more a yet men, more including men, including a sheriff.sheriff. His gun choice was the Hisofgun of choice was the Colt Single ActionAction Army revolver Colt Single Army revolver and the double-action Colt Colt and the double-action Thunderer. The feud but Billy, Thunderer. Theended feud ended but Billy, unlike unlike his fellow gunmen, was not his fellow gunmen, was not offeredoffered a pardon. In 1880 a pardon. Inlocal 1880 local ranchers elected Pat Garrett sherriffsherriff ranchers elected Pat Garrett to stoptohis continued cattle cattle rustling. stop his continued rustling. GarretGarret trapped and shot trapped andhim shotdead him dead in 1881, which time Bill hadBill had in by 1881, by which time killed at leastat21 men. killed least 21 men.

occupied Europe and Asia, the idea being that they would be used on stragglers and sentries, whose weapons would then be captured and added to the guerrilla group’s arsenal. In keeping with its clandestine nature, the gun had no manufacturer’s stampings or other telltale markings and it weighed about one pound. While they may have been originally intended mainly for distribution in Nazi-occupied Europe, there is not much evidence many were actually used there, but guerrillas fighting Japanese forces in the Philippines apparently used some Liberators to good effect. In the early 1960s, the CIA revived the idea of a no-frills, single-shot pistol in the form of the so-called “deer gun,” or “zip gun,” a successor to the Liberator and a 9mm weapon the U.S. distributed to anticommunist guerillas in Southeast Asia.

Hollow butt can store ten rounds

Sliding sheet metal cover prevents rounds falling out

Trigger guard Trigger guard

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NEW DOUBLE-ACTION NEW DOUBLE-ACTION REVOLVER REVOLVER In the mid-1870s In the mid-1870s Colt finally Coltbegan finallyto began maketodouble-action make double-action pistols, pistols, startingstarting with thewith “Lightning” the “Lightning” model. The model. pistol Theshown pistol here—which shown here—which makes use makes of ause slide-rod of a slide-rod ejector to ejector pushto spent pushcartridges spent cartridges from thefrom the cylindercylinder chambers—is chambers—is a modela.38 model made .38for made export forto export Britain. to Britain.

183 129

www.moseleyroad.com

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frontlist The Atlas of Military History: An Around-the-World Survey of Warfare Through the Ages 11” x 14” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $49.95 US Retail

The Atlas of Military History offers a fascinating look at the many wars that have been fought over land, independence, and other factors all over the globe. Organized into sections based on location and then in chronological order, this compendium covers everything from the Punic Wars in Carthage that began in 247 BCE, to the conquest of Constantinople in 1453, to World War II, to the recent Arab Spring. Full-color photos and maps, as well as highlighted sections on legendary leaders, battles, and weapons, are included.

T h e aT l a s of

MiliTary hisTory

an around-the-World survey of Warfare through the ages

a AFRICA

AAron rALby

In 1877, Britain annexed the small, insular state of the South African Republic, better known as the Transvaal, as part of a series of land grabs in southern Africa following the discovery of diamonds and in accordance with Britain’s unapologetic imperialism, which sought, in the words of Cecil Rhodes, diamond magnate and prime minister of Cape Colony (1890–96), to establish a swath of British dominance “from the Cape to Cairo.” The Boers—the Dutch-speaking descendants of settlers who had lived in Africa since the seventeenth century—revolted, and despite the fact that they were farmers while the British fielded a professional army, they won victories at Laing’s Nek, Ingogo, and finally ending the First Boer War, at the Battle of Majuba Hill (February 27, 1881). The Transvaal recovered its independence, but the British maintained a very vaguely defined “suzerainty” over it. The matter might have rested there, but in 1886 gold was found in the Transvaal.

Cetshwayo kaMpande(1826–1884) was the King of the Zulus from 1872 to 1879 and their leader during the Anglo Zulu war of 1879.

Left: Mani organized his followers into three groups.The first, the Elect lived ascetically devoting themselves to living as purely as possible, living ascetically, and by fasting on Sundays and Mondays. They ate mainly fruit and drank fruit juice. In the pursuit of redemption, the Elect was forbidden to eat or to uproot plants, to cut down any tree or kill any animal, and was obliged to follow complete sexual abstinence.

THE BATTLE OF ULUNDI

THE SLAVE TRADE IN THE KONGO

Despite the early victory, the Zulus were badly outmatched, and had been dismayed by the toll Isandlwana had taken on their forces (some 1,000 men). Over the next six months the Zulus and British forces clashed in many battles, most of them losses for the Zulu. Finally, on July 4, 1879, they engaged in one final all-out fight at Ulundi, Cetshwayo’s capital. The result was devastating. Unable to withstand the disciplined firing of British soldiers, nor outrun the British cavalry, the Zulu army of 20,000 lost some 1,500 men. The rest fled to their homes, where they resumed a nonmartial life. The British lost twelve men. The war had ended, and with it the Zulu nation: King Cetshwayo was captured on August 28 and sent into exile.

The Portuguese hardly introduced slavery to the Kongo: there as elsewhere in Africa, slaves formed one part of a functioning society. Slavery was an offshoot of war: the word for “slave” in Kikongo (the Kongo language) also meant “war captive.” Yet certain Kongo laws protected these slaves (from, among other things, being sold to Europeans), and slaves could become full members of society through social procedures. With the arrival of the Portuguese, however, slavery became a major economic factor, as slaves quickly became the Kongo’s most valuable export. Soon the Kongo nobility waged war solely to gain slaves to sell to the insatiable Portuguese, and the breaking of Kongo’s own laws to sell protected Kongo slaves led to social destabilization. The Portuguese indirectly caused political destabilization as well. Naturally the slave trade—and other commerce— occurred on the coast, with the result that coastal province of Soyo became wealthy and powerful enough to begin trading directly with the Portuguese, circumventing the power of the manikongo. Despite the fact that the manikongo was Catholic—the first to convert was João I in 1491—the Portuguese government paid no heed to the Kongo’s pleas that they conduct themselves equitably and legally.

Major Engagements Battle

DISSOLUTION The most powerful manikongo in Kongo’s history was probably Alfonso I (r. 1506 or 1509–1542), João I’s son. Fluent and literate in Portuguese as well as Kikongo, Alfonso tried manfully to manage an unbalanced relationship with Portugal, with some success, even as he rebuilt the capital, expanded his borders, and converted his country to Catholicism. After Alfonso’s death, however, competing factions for the kingdom engaged in years of civil war and political maneuvering, enabling another people, the Jaga, to invade and briefly seize the capital in 1568. One manikongo contender, Álvaro I Nimi a Lukeni (1568–87), enlisted Portuguese aid against this new threat and in securing the throne, in return allowing them to create a colony (Angola) in a former Kongo province, Luanda. The age of colonialism had now truly begun, and the Portuguese had no intention of remaining the submissive partner in a relationship with the Kongo. By 1622 the first Kongo-Angola war had broken out, but by then the Portuguese had firmly rooted themselves, utterly disrupted the Kongo economy, and considered the whole region their own. The matter was decided at the Battle of Mbwila on October 29, 1665, in which the last manikongo was killed. Although Portugal did not fully take control until 1857, the power of the Kongo had been broken, and what was left of the country descended into social and economic stagnation punctuated by decades of civil war.

Above: A map of the Kongo (Congo) in 1617, Petrus Bertius. Left: The King of Congo.

Above: Portrait of King John I of Portugal (1357–1433) He was called John the Good (sometimes John the Great) or John of Happy Memory.

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Date (1879)

Victor

Isandlwana

January 22

Zulu

Rorke’s Drift

January 22–23

British

Hlobane

March 28

Zulu

Khambula

March 29

British

Gingindlovu

April 2

British

Siege of Eshowe

February 11–April 3

British

Ulundi

July 4

British

Above: British colonial administrator Sir Henry Bartle Frere, 1st Baronet (1815–1884).

HORSES AND CHARIOTS Compared to the dog, whose domestication may go back 15,000 years, or even the sheep and goat, which were domesticated by the eighth millennium bc, the domestication of the horse is of relatively recent origin, and probably took place no earlier than 4000 bc. Horses were not used in warfare until some time after that and were not ridden to war until the first millennium bc. Overwhelmingly their earliest appearances on the battlefield were as chariotpullers. As soon as they were ridden to war, however, they made an immediate and lasting difference.

AFRICA

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Above: Bust of a woman with a rectangular face, from South Arabia. It may have been produced in a Sabaean workshop. The rings on the front of the neck--the socalled rings of Venus–show it is a woman.

OVER BY CHRISTMAS The Defense of Rorke’s Drift

Top left: The Battle of Isandlwana in January 1879 was the first major encounter in the Ango-Zulu War and an embarrassing defeat for the British Empire. Top: The Battle of Ulundi in July 1879 was the last major conflict of the AngloZulu War. The British defeated the main Zulu army and then burned the capital of Zululand, the royal kraal of Ulundi.

Even as the British army suffered its embarrassing defeat at Isandlwana, a garrison of no more than 150 men—some of them ill—began one of the most incredible survival stories in military history. Left to defend the supply depot of Rorke’s Drift (left), the garrison soldiers faced a Zulu army of as many as 4,000 warriors. All through the afternoon and night of January 22–23 the Zulus attacked, nearly managing to overrun the defense, but again and again the British garrison repelled them. Reinforcements arrived the next morning, relieving the exhausted garrison and soundly defeating the Zulus. By the end of the battle somewhere between 370 and 600 Zulus had been killed. Only seventeen British soldiers had died—although nearly every survivor was wounded.

The resulting gold rush spawned the town of Johannesburg and drew settlers from all over the world. Called uitlanders (outlanders), these new inhabitants were decidedly unwelcome, and the Transvaal government taxed them heavily while denying them voting rights. Cecil Rhodes conspired to overthrow the Transvaal government. The attempt, known as the Jameson Raid, failed spectacularly and sparked a war. Joined by its fellow Boer nation, the Orange Free State, the Transvaal invaded the British-held Cape and Natal on October 11, 1899. The British felt complacent, with many predicting the war would end before Christmas. Once again they were surprised. By January 1900 the Boers had won five battles and besieged three towns, but the war was far from over. In February British reinforcements arrived and began to recover ground. On March 13 the Boer city of Bloemfontein fell; on June 5 the capital, Pretoria, followed. Yet still the war did not end. The business turned ugly; the Boers fought a desperate guerrilla war while Britain instigated a “scorched-earth” policy, burning farmland, razing homes, and slaughtering livestock. By one British estimate, at least 30,000 houses were ruined; in the Orange Free State alone more than 5,000 farms burned. For the first time in history, the British placed tens of thousands of civilians in concentration camps, where many died from malnutrition and poor conditions. Finally, on May 31, 1902, the last fighting Boers surrendered and the war came to a close. The British had fielded 450,000 soldiers (against 60,000–87,000 Boers) and lost 22,000. Boer casualties numbered about seven or eight thousand—but Boer civilian deaths ranged between eighteen and twenty-five thousand, while African deaths numbered around 12,000. Britain had won—but the Boers retained the right to selfgovernance and to manage “native affairs,” which had enormous consequences for the future of South Africa.

In the words of British poet and author Rudyard Kipling, Queen Victoria’s realm had received “no end of a lesson” at the hands of the determined Boer resistance fighters. Kipling’s words were truer than perhaps even he realized, for the Second Boer War inaugurated many of the weapons, policies, and tactics that would later dominate warfare of the twentieth century. By the end of the Boer War, gone were the red-uniformed, organized units of the former British army; gone was the officer, mounted and bedecked, rallying his men to charge from the front line. Instead of the traditional sword, officers carried handguns; insignia and bright clothing vanished under the pressures of guerrilla warfare and excellent Boer marksmanship. New on the battlefield were telephones and searchlights, barbed wire and trench warfare; off the battlefield concentration camps made their ignominious debut. It was the last war of the Victorian era, and introduced warfare to the modern age.

Top: Map of South Africa after the Kaffir and Boer Wars showing the political position in 1899 and the territory embraced in the Union of South Africa 1910 (outlined in pink). Above left: The British had learned a hard lesson in the First Boer War and returned in 1899 with improved firepower. New artillery included twelve powerful Howitzer guns. Left: King Street, Toronto: the British Empire celebrates victory in 1902.

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THE IMPACT OF CHARIOTS

HORSES AND CHARIOTS

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power from the fourth through sixth centuries ad, the extent of Aksum’s direct control is debatable: during the interminable wars of South Arabia, the Himyar people conquered Saba in the fifth century and although the Aksum emperors continued to call themselves kings “of Aksum and of Saba and of Himyar,” for some time it was the Himyar who exercised real control over the peninsula, at least until Aksum sent another conquering army in 525. By then, however, less than seventy-five years remained before Persia invaded Arabia, and in the seventh and eighth centuries Aksum’s power vanished for good in the face of the Arabian invasions (previously, the aggression had been the other way around—an Aksumite army attacked Mecca itself in 570). These invaders carried Islam across the whole of Northern Africa and established deep cultural ties there with the Muslim Middle East; but in the former kingdom of Aksum, Christianity—in the Egyptian form called Coptic—retained its followers, and indeed still does.

HORSES AND CHARIOTS

TRADING POINTS

a AFRICA

Above: The first mention of Aksum can be found in the writings of Claudius Ptolemy, the Greek-Roman mathematician and geographer.

The second-century reference to Aksum mentions Adulis, a port on the Red Sea, and the primary source of the kingdom’s wealth. Through it flowed the goods of Africa, Arabia, and even India, linking these places with the classical civilizations of the Mediterranean and Persia. Yet this coveted commercial role was not without competition: for centuries it had been played by the Sabaeans, a Semitic people whose kingdom of Saba (the Biblical Sheba) operated on the tip of the Arabian peninsula. Mani’s assessment of Aksum as a mighty empire corresponds with Aksum’s third-century conquest of Saba, followed in the fourth century by Emperor Ezana’s western conquests of a people called the Noba and the kingdom of Meröe, the successor state of ancient Kush. To control these distant regions, the Aksumite emperors established tributary kingdoms, collecting tribute and demanding submission from their leaders, and settled their most warlike loyal tribes among the border regions. Such precautions did not always produce the necessary results, however; each new emperor might have to spend some time reestablishing his control over his fractious subjects. Even at the height of Aksum’s

KONGO

THE EMPIRE OF THE RED SEA

Using rather contemptible methods, Frere provoked a war, intending to finish it quickly before the British government even knew about it. Frere’s South African army numbered 20,000 (including African allies and reinforcements, sent after the war began) to Cetshwayo’s 40,000, but the British infantrymen were professional soldiers, armed with the latest weaponry, while the Zulus—although fierce warriors—fought mostly with spears and some antiquated guns, and were primarily farmers and herders. On January 22, the main Zulu force of about 20,000 men surprised a force of about 1,700 British soldiers at Isandlwana. The surprise and the numerical advantage won the day; the Zulus decimated the British, confiscating their guns and artillery, and shocking the Empire. They had brought knives to a gunfight—and won. Unfortunately, news of the Zulu victory required immediate and overwhelming military action to salvage British pride.

a

The Kingdom of the Kongo, located in parts of what are now Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, formed in the fourteenth century and gradually expanded to include six major principalities, each governed by a chief who owed tribute, taxes, and military assistance to the king (manikongo). The capital city, Mbanza Kongo, impressed the first Portuguese explorers in the late fifteenth century with its order and size: larger than any of the surrounding villages and towns, the concentration of manpower and wealth enabled the kingdom to maintain centralized authority, at least for some of the time. A complicated social structure, which invested men with leadership positions like the kingship but reckoned status, inheritance, and kinship through the mother (a matrilineal system), plus a tradition of electing a king rather than monarchy being a straightforward inheritance, meant that power transitions from one king to the next rarely passed without trouble. In the end, this system failed when stressed by economic, social, and political destabilizing factors stemming from Portuguese interference, and one of Africa’s most powerful precolonial kingdoms crumbled.

AKSUM

KONGO

Mani, the third-century Persian founder of the Manichaean religion, listed the four empires of the world as he knew it: Sileos (China?), Rome, Persia, and Aksum. Based at its capital city of the same name, Aksum had emerged from obscurity (the first mention of Aksum can be found in Claudius Ptolemy’s work) to empire in barely a century. In the fourth century Aksum’s most famous emperor, Ezana (303–350), would expand the empire’s borders and influence even farther through a series of conquests, made in the name of his new religion: Christianity. Aksum was thus one of the first two nations to convert, after Rome.

Anglo-Boer War program sold at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, Missouri “No End of a Lesson”

THE BATTLE OF ISANDLWANA

AKSUM

BOER WARS

With

BOER WARS

On January 6, 1879, British troops crossed into Zulu territory carrying an intolerable ultimatum for King Cetshwayo. Five days later, the ultimatum expired, and the last war fought by the Zulu nation began. At its height under King Shaka (r. 1817–1828), the Zulu kingdom covered about 11,500 square miles, but gradually lost territory to internal dissension and especially external encroachment, in particular from Dutch settlers—known as Boers—and British colonists. By 1877, the former Dutch colonies of Natal and Transvaal had passed to British hands, leaving the Zulus surrounded by British imperialism, unable to play the two European powers off of each other as they had in the past. Britain’s High Commissioner of African colonies, Sir Henry Frere, aimed to conquer the Zulus, part of a grand economic, imperialist, and racist scheme for the region.

a

AmAndA LomAzov

ZULU WARS

ZULU WARS

SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA

Rights Sold: English (North America), Russian

The chariot, a wheeled vehicle designed to carry two or—far more rarely and at a later date—three warriors, was a major military innovation. Its speed, mobility, and height offered great advantages to its drivers, and allowed the archers (chariots were in essence mobile firing platforms for archers) to fire from a vantage point of relative safety. The chariot first appeared around 2000 bc in the ancient Near East and Anatolia and introduced a new subtlety to warfare. Early chariots were too light to be used in frontal charges; instead, they harassed enemy infantry, breaking momentum and formations, carried men rapidly to and from the battlefield, and swooped down on exhausted infantrymen after the main battle had ended. Over open, fairly flat terrain chariots were weapons par excellence: it is not hard to imagine the terror they must have inflicted, speeding toward men who knew they could not hope to escape on foot. It was not long before every major culture in the ancient world fielded chariots; the chariot’s advantages were obvious and the innovation spread rapidly. By 1200 bc, the chariot had reached as far as China. Chariots were also used off the battlefield as transportation vehicles, racing vehicles, and as important status symbols; the appearance of the horse and chariot in ancient Eurasia marks an important step in the formation of large empires and complex social hierarchies.

Ancient Assyrian wall relief of a lion hunt made from a chariot.

PROTESTERS SPARK CHANGE

In January 2011, popular protests in Tunisia forced the dictatorial and corrupt president, Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, to resign from office and flee the country after several violent clashes between protesters and government forces. The uprising sparked a wave of similar protests throughout North African and Middle Eastern dictatorships in a farflung movement known as the Arab Spring.

AFRICA

a

THE ARAB SPRING

Horses in War

PROTESTERS SPARK CHANGE

SPRING COMES TO LIBYA

TRANSITION

Above: Hand-held rocket and grenade launchers are typical of the weapons employed by rebels in the Arab uprisings. The President of Yemen was wounded in a rocket attack in June 2011.

Libya, a predominantly Sunni Muslim country of more than 6.5 million people in 2010, had won its independence from Italy in 1951. Only sixteen years later a young army colonel named Muammar al-Qaddafi orchestrated a military coup, seizing control of the country while the pro-Western king, Idris I, was in Turkey. Thus began his dictatorial reign of forty-two years, ending with his death at the hands of revolutionaries.

Below: Map of North Africa and Middle East where the Arab Spring was first manifest in Tunisia and Egypt, with protests and rebellions quickly spreading to other countries, including Libya, Yemen, and Syria.

FROM PROTEST TO REVOLUTION

By the end of March, revolutionaries controlled most eastern cities, including Benghazi, Ajdabiya, and al-Brega, and were winning the fights for Ras Lanuf and Bin Jawad. Heavy fighting continued in the west and central parts of the country, particularly in and around Tripoli, where Qaddafi concentrated his forces. The UN imposed a no-fly zone and authorized foreign intervention to protect civilians on March 17; two days later, now supported by foreign air power, the rebels launched a major offensive. Although Qaddafi’s army had the advantages of training, equipment, and resources, high-level defections from Qaddafi’s inner circle highlighted the regime’s vulnerability. The military situation, with foreign operations now under the aegis of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), stalled. Finally, on August 22 rebel forces succeeded in seizing portions of Tripoli and surrounding areas; on August 23 they scored a major victory by taking control of Qaddafi’s headquarters, Bab al-Aziziyyah. But Qaddafi himself had fled. Not until October 20, 2011, did Qaddafi suffer an ignominious death at the hands of a violent revolutionary mob. One month before, on September 15, the UN formally recognized the opposition government, the Transitional National Council (TNC), as Libya’s representative authority.

A RISING TIDE LIFTS ALL BOATS Protests had started in Egypt in December 2010 but intensified dramatically after Tunisia’s success; by mid-February President Hosni Mubarak had been forced out. Similar protests soon began elsewhere in the Arab world, including Libya, Yemen, and Syria. The movement left no Arab country untouched; leaders of some nearby nations tried to preempt the protesters by offering reforms before the “Arab Spring” could overtake them, but unrest still simmers in some of these places, most notably Algeria. Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Kuwait, and others, however, may have successfully navigated the troubled waters.

YEMEN AND SYRIA Not all protests yielded the encouraging results of Egypt or Libya. In Yemen, President Ali Saleh declared a state of emergency in March 2011; despite making some concessions to the protesters, he had broken previous promises not to seek reelection (he had been in office since 1978) and increasingly

used deadly force against protesters. As the protesters began to form an armed rebellion, violence escalated until the president was wounded in a rocket attack in June 2011; his return to Yemen on September 23 promised more violence to follow. The Arab Spring movement reached Syria, under the control of President Bashar al-Assad, in March 2011. Syria, widely condemned in the international community for human rights violations and the severity of the Assad regime, responded to the demonstrators almost immediately by deploying tanks, troops, and artillery intent on crushing the protest. As with the Arab Spring movement in general, popular modern technology enabled Syrian citizens to broadcast videos and information to a world hungry for news after foreign journalists were expelled from the country. The same technology enabled many of the protests in the first place, because participants could communicate with their fellows in real-time.

Libya joined the Arab Spring on February 15, 2011. The precipitating spark was the arrest of Fethi Tarbel, a human rights lawyer representing the families of the thousand-plus political prisoners massacred in 1996 at the Abu Salim prison in Tripoli, Libya’s capital. Protesters took to the streets of Benghazi, the secondlargest city after Tripoli, demanding that Qaddafi step down. Soon people started protesting in Tripoli as well. The regime responded harshly, attacking the protesters with guns, tanks, and even warplanes; Qaddafi also shut down Internet access and telephone services, attempting to prevent communication among the malcontents. These punitive tactics drew the condemning eye of the international community; the protesters, who began to attract defectors from the army, asked the United Nations to impose a no-fly zone over Libya and began to engage pro-Qaddafi troops in armed rebellion.

Above left: The protests in Tunisia were sparked by the self-immolation of Mohamed Bouazizi in December 2010 and led to the ousting of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali a month later. Above right: Protests began in Yemen in January 2011. Demonstrators protested against unemployment, economic conditions, and political corruption. Below: Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, where tens of thousands of protesters gathered to demand immediate governmental reforms.

Above left: A silver Hunnish coin from the 5th century ad, depicting a horse and rider. Above: A relief of a mounted archer—the Assyrian king Ashurbanipal—hunting. The relief is from the walls of the Royal Palace in Nineveh. Right: Boadicea, or Boudica, leader of the Queen of the British Iceni tribe, and leader of the uprising against the Roman occupiers. She stands in her war chariot—note the spiked wheels that would chop down men and horses. Far right: A hand-colored woodcut of King Henry VII of England on horseback.

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As soon as horseback riding became common among warriors, the mounted soldier became a crucial part of every army. The use of the horse for war may have reached its apogee in the Late Middle Ages, when knights dressed themselves and their steeds in heavy, expensive armor and clashed on the fields of Europe. For a knight, a horse was not an accessory but a necessary implement of war. Other cultures also made use of the horse to devastating effect: most famously, perhaps, were the Huns, whose mounted archers decimated resistance and sped away before they could be engaged. The Huns invented the stirrup, a crucial tool for precise control of a horse. Spanish horses deserve at least as much credit as their human conquistadors for conquering the peoples of South and Central America; centuries earlier the Normans had conquered Ireland with ease thanks in large part to their cavalry. Today, the long history of the horse in war has largely come to an end, but as late as World War I opposing armies fielded horse-mounted cavalrymen.

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frontlist

17

46 The Norman Kings

william ii

KINGS & QUEENS

KINGS & QUEENS OF GREAT BRITAIN E V E RY Q U E S T ION

OF ENGLAND & SCOTLAND

ANSWERED

DAVID SO U D

THE FASCINATING BIOGRAPHIES OF THE BRITISH MONARCHS FROM THE HOUSE OF WESSEX TO THE HOUSE OF WINDSOR

House Normandy Born c. 1056 Died 1100 Reigned 1087–1100 Consort None Children None Successor Henry I

Kings & Queens of Great Britain: Every Question Answered 7-1/2˝ x 9-3/4˝ 400pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $35.00 US Retail

Odo of Bayeux, as depicted on the tapestry he probably commissioned to commemorate the Norman Conquest. The ambitious, aggressive Odo waves a club, possibly because, as a clergyman, he was forbidden to wield a sword

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Dissolute Warrior

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he relatively brief but fascinating reign of William II foreshadowed the virtues and flaws that would characterize British monarchs for centuries. A gifted military leader, William ruled with a firm grip but earned the enmity of the Church. Many regarded his court as a den of royal decadence. William, the second surviving son of William the Conqueror, had always enjoyed his father’s favor. Called Rufus, perhaps because he had a red beard or ruddy complexion, he was a stout man of about 30 when, having been given his father’s crown, scepter, and sword, he arrived in England to assume his duties. He carried with him sealed instructions from his father to Archbishop Lanfranc of Canterbury, a trusted advisor. On September 26, 1087, William was anointed and crowned at Westminster, after which he released his father’s prisoners and arranged for the distribution of his father’s deathbed bequests throughout the kingdom. It was a seamless transition—at first.. The Rebellion of 1088 Among the more questionable deathbed decisions of William the Conqueror was his order to liberate his half-brother Odo, Bishop of Bayeux and former Earl of Kent, whom he had imprisoned seemingly for scheming to advance his own position on the continent without consulting William. Odo returned to Kent and wasted no time networking with his other halfbrother, Robert of Mortain, and a number of Norman nobles in England. In fact, the death of the Conqueror had placed quite a few Norman barons in a difficult spot. Normandy was in the hands of Robert Curthose, and William Rufus ruled England. There was no love lost between the two brothers, and barons who held lands in both Normandy

and England feared that allegiance to one lord might cost them their holdings in the other’s realm. William II also drew his barons’ ire by exerting the same imperious control his father had used to keep his vassals in check. In Normandy, the impulsive and freewheeling Robert had let central authority devolve, and his vassals were beginning to enjoy room to expand their own ambitions. Given the choice, many of the Anglo-Norman barons would rather have a weaker king. Odo, a man of extraordinary personal wealth and ambition, became the ringleader of a plot to overthrow William and turn the English throne over to Robert. In concert, Odo and his AngloNorman allies fortified their castles, ravaged royal lands, and raised armies. Then they waited for reinforcements from Normandy. But the Norman forces proved unable to cross the Channel, and William seized the upper hand.

william Rufus had a Red face…astonishing stRength, though not veRy tall, and his belly RatheR pRojecting... William of malmesbury

1087

1088

????

William takes the English throne on his father’s death.

The University of Bologna is founded, the first institution of its kind in Europe..

EmEndipsae quo omnis quid que cuptusandios dolut re ventisc ilignamus quo dolupicition namus ex exeresequi dolum aut

Was Richard III really a villain, or just a victim of Tudor propaganda? Which king lost a wrestling match with the king of France? Why did George V change the name of the royal family? With a timeline of historical world events that occurred during the reign of each monarch, this fact-filled book presents a history of a nation through the stories of its rulers.

Opposite Portrait of William II . need more info in this caption??????Fill Fill Fill Fill

The House of Tudor After the Wars of the Roses had effectively culled the nobility of England, Henry Tudor was there to pick up the pieces, and he founded the dynasty that brought England into the modern era. Though it only lasted a little over a century, the Tudor dynasty transformed England completely. Henry VIII, brilliant as he was brash, made England a Protestant nation; his daughter Elizabeth I would keep it so, however ruthlessly, and in the process guide the nation through several dangerous decades to secure its place as a major European power. Under the Tudors, British culture blossomed spectacularly. It was the age of William Shakespeare and Francis Bacon. Here was Britain’s Renaissance.

166 The House of Tudor

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DAVID SOUD

160 The House of Tudor

Mary I House Tudor Born February 18, 1516 Died November 17, 1558 Reigned 1553–1558 Consort Philip II of Spain Children None Successor Elizabeth I

Birth of British Naval Power

161

Birth of British Naval Power

B

“ritannia rule the waves,” goes the classic tune, and it touches on one of the great glories of British history. The Royal Navy is the most storied of all maritime forces, and the rise of the British Empire is inseparable from Britain’s domination of the seas. Though first formally named the Royal Navy in 1661, the British Navy has roots going back to Anglo-Saxon times—but it was under Henry VIII that it began to take shape as a prime expression of growing English power and reach. It was Alfred the Great who first launched an English navy of any note. The Viking raiders had the advantage of swift, shallow-keeled, and Alfred eventually commissioned ships of his own, built to his specifications, as a counterweight. In 896, he launched a small fleet of perhaps a dozen vessels, much larger than Viking longships. Although too cumbersome to run down the Viking ships, they did serve as something of a deterrent. Though other kings, most notably Edward the Confessor and Richard I, took steps to establish a system of naval readiness, it was not until the Hundred Years’ War that the first major naval engagement took place: the Battle of Sluys in 1340, in which Edward III personally led a fleet of some 200 ships against a like number of French and Genoese vessels intended for an invasion of England. The French fleet was defeated and England had control of the Channel. Later in the war, Henry V would use well over a thousand ships and boats to ferry his army to France before Agincourt. The Tudor FoundaTion Only with Henry VII did the idea of a powerprojection navy take root. Henry was keenly aware of the economic and military importance of

Philip II of Spain. Mary’s choice of husband provoked a furious backlash in Protestant England.

controlling the Channel, and began assembling a modest standing fleet, which was called the Navy Royal. In the process, he built the first dry dock on the Thames, in 1495. By the time of his death, he managed to have seven warships built. It was Henry VIII who took that slender foundation and built it into something altogether new. Not only did he more than triple the number of warships in the first few years of his reign; in 1514, he launched the Henry Grace à Dieu, the largest warship on earth and the first to carry guns as its primary armament. Though its guns were not sufficiently heavy to sink a ship— their primary purpose was to kill sailors and soldiers on the enemy deck—the fact that Henry Grace à Dieu could inflict significant damage without ever coming into grappling range permanently changed naval warfare. Boarding would gradually give way to cannon fire, which would become more devastating as sturdier ships were built to accommodate heavy guns. Henry issued a Royal Charter establishing Trinity House, which built and maintained navigational aids and coastal signals, from lighthouses to beacons. He also established the Naval Board to manage the growing fleet, and built the first of the naval yards at Portsmouth.

THE POPES

THE POPES E V E RY Q U E S T ION ANSWERED

RUPERT MATTHEWS

FROM SAINT PETER TO P OP E F R A NC I S : T H E FASCINATING BIOGRAP H I E S OF A L L 2 6 6 P OP E S

RUPERT M AT T H E W S

FEATURING POPE FRANCIS

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The Failed Reactionary

K

nown to history as “Bloody Mary,” Mary Tudor attempted singlehandedly to wrest England back into the arms of the Roman Catholic Church. She was not without support in that effort, but she so mismanaged it that, by the end of her brief and tumultuous reign, England was ready to accept the moderately Protestant, if ruthlessly enforced, settlement advanced by her half-sister and successor, the illustrious Elizabeth I. Mary Tudor was Henry VIII’s daughter by his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, and she remained very much her mother’s daughter. Growing up amid the intrigues and sudden realignments of her father’s court, Mary endured disconcerting reversals of fortune which led her to cling all the more devoutly to her Roman Catholic faith. In her youth, Mary was by all accounts an attractive, fresh-faced girl who excelled at her studies, gaining fluency in Latin, Greek, French, Italian, and Spanish. Her chief tutor, Juan Luis Vives, also encouraged her more ascetic tendencies, teaching her to resist the urges of the flesh and beware of the company of men. Under his guidance and her mother’s, Mary also gained the fierce sense of Spanish dignity. King Henry was proud of her, having called her from a young age “the pearl of the realm,” and had her raised in Ludlow Castle as Princess of Wales. But Henry’s favor did not last. When Catherine proved unable to produce a male heir, Henry’s attention turned to the captivating and imperious Anne Boleyn. When, in a momentous change for

I know thIs queen, so good, so easIly Influenced, Inexpert In worldly affaIrs and a novIce all round

According to contemporary documents, by Henry’s death the standing navy consisted of between 40 and 60 ships of various sizes and armaments—a significant fleet, though it was still supplemented by merchant vessels in wartime. Though it was Henry’s vision that would ultimately make possible the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588, his daughter Elizabeth 1555 also saw the strategic value of a strong standing

Sir Francis Drake, the most accomplished of Elizabeth I’s “Sea Dogs.” He not only raided Spanish ports and shipping but also circumnavigated the globe and served as second-in-command in the fight against the Spanish Armada in 1588.

Simon RenaRd, ambaSSadoR of empeRoR ChaRleS V

The Peace of Augsburg allows each navy. She supported such “Sea Dogs” as Francis prince within the Holy Roman Empire Drake and John Hawkins in their lucrative raids on Spanish shipping, and under herto decide for himself and his realm between Catholicism and Lutheranism. watch the shipyards at Portsmouth introduced

The Mary rose The Mary Rose, launched in 1511, was one of the most impressive ships in Henry’s navy. In 1545, in a minor action against the French, it suddenly heeled over, taking on water and sinking. Of nearly 700 crew, only about 30 survived. It may be that extensive retooling and expanding of the ship over time had made it unseaworthy, but the cause of the wreck remains unclear. In 1971, the wreckage was found, and in 1982 a massive salvage operation brought it to the surface. It was a goldmine of archeological evidence. The hull of the Mary Rose, along with many other artifacts, is preserved at Portsmouth, where a new museum opened in 2013.

1555

1555

The Sultanate of Adal which has dominated the Horn of Africa for nearly two centuries suddenly collapses into chaos.

After an exhausting siege, the Republic of Siena surrenders to the combined armies of Florence and the Holy Roman Empire— effectively Spain. The Spanish cede Siena to the Grand Duchy of Tuscany.”

a range of innovations, from fully rigged ships to dreadnoughts that carried massive cannon capable of firing devastating broadsides, though that tactic is not known to have been used before the 17th century. The development of new technology for ships in the 15th and 16th centuries also made possible the voyages of exploration that launched the British Empire. Innovations in merchant and military shipbuilding benefited both endeavors, and British seamanship gradually became the gold standard of sail. To this day, the Royal Navy remains one of the most formidable fighting forces in the world.

The Popes: Every Question Answered 7-1/2˝ x 9-3/4˝” 400pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $35.00 US Retail Popes, Every Question Answered explores the lives and legacies of all 266 popes from St. Peter, the “Rock on which Christ built His Church,” to Pope Benedict, the first pope in centuries to abdicate the papal throne, and his successor Pope Francis. It charts the Church’s changing fortunes over two millennia from the persecution of Christians under the ruthless Roman emperors Nero and Diocletian to the “miraculous” conversion of Emperor Constantine and Christianity’s subsequent elevation to State Church of the Roman Empire. It explains how the Church survived the Fall of the Rome and descent into the Dark Ages as the murderous Italian aristocrats wrested papal authority from the clergy. Popes, Every Question Answered tells how, in a golden age for Rome, the Church attracted the world’s greatest minds to serve the papacy. It introduces the warrior popes who ordered the Crusades, and those popes who allowed the disreputable practices that sparked the Protestant Reformation. Finally, it charts the revival in Catholic fortunes as the great reforming popes steered the papacy onto its modern course, and it looks at the life of the current pope, Francis, the first non-European pope for centuries and the first ever pope from the Americas, who, once again, seems set on reforming the Church from within.

After St. Peter, who was the first pope to suffer martyrdom during the early persecution of Christians? Which pope hired a gang of gladiators to slaughter his opponents in the papal election? What is an antipope, and who was Pope Joan? The Popes: Every Question Answered is the only illustrated book that features all 266 popes, from St. Peter to Pope Frances I.

England, Henry broke with Rome so he could have his marriage to Catherine annulled and wed Anne, Mary found herself cast aside along with her mother. At the age of 17, she went from being Henry’s darling daughter to being the lonely, disinherited vestige of a forsaken marriage. When Anne gave birth to a daughter, Elizabeth in 1533, the newborn became a princess, and Mary simply Lady Mary. It was a humiliating, devastating reversal. For years, Mary lived in what she regarded as mortal peril, racked with period illnesses and subject to elimination at any time by her capricious father or his ruthless ministers. In fact, she was in no real danger, for the simple reason that her status as cousin, through her mother, of the powerful Holy Roman Emperor Charles V protected her. When Anne Boleyn went to the block in May 1536, Mary’s fortunes rose and Elizabeth’s fell. Such were the vagaries of Henry’s rule. But only with Henry’s final marriage, to Catherine Parr, did Mary recover her onetime status as heir to the throne. By that time, Henry had secured his male heir, the young Prince Edward, and Catherine Parr was able to reconcile the king to both his estranged daughters. In 1544, Mary and Elizabeth, in that order, were established behind Edward in line for the throne. Edward’s six-year rule proved dismaying to Mary. Though she was a devout Catholic, she had reconciled herself to her father’s moderate form

Opposite Mary I, who utterly lacked the political skills to advance her ambitious agenda of bringing England back into the Roman Catholic fold.

16 The late Roman Empire – 1st to 4th centuries

St peter Born Bethsaida, Palestine; c.1 Parents Father, Jonah; Mother, unknown Died Rome, Italy; probably 13 October, 64

Ruins of the fishing village of Bethsaida on the northern shores of the Sea of Galilee in modern-day Israel.

upon thiS roCk i will build my ChurCh and the GateS of hell will not prevail aGainSt it Matthew 16

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The 1st Pope c.33–c.64

S

t Peter was both a personal disciple of Jesus Christ and the first person to organize a community of Christians in Rome. Together with the unique mission entrusted to him by Jesus, these facts mean that Peter is today recognized as having been the first pope. This was not always the case – the early Christians in Rome reserved the title of “pope” for St Peter’s successors.

Peter was born as Simon in Bethsaida on the shores of the Sea of Galilee. Together with his brother Andrew, he became a fisherman and moved to Capernaum where he married a local girl. Peter spent some time with John the Baptist but, when Jesus began his ministry, he became one of the very first disciples to give up his home to follow Christ. From the start, Peter was recognized as a leader among the disciples and seems to have been present with Jesus at every important event in His life. Peter was there to hear most of Jesus’s sermons and parables and witnessed the raising of Jairus’s daughter, the Transfiguration, the Last Supper, and the Agony in the Garden. Leader of the discipLes The particular favour with which Jesus viewed Peter is illustrated several times in the New Testament. When Jesus asked the disciples who they thought He was, it was Peter who stated that they took Him to be the Messiah, the Son of the living God. Jesus then told Peter that he was blessed because of his insight and gave him the name or title of Cephas, the Aramaic word for “rock”. This name was later rendered into Greek as “Peter”, the name by which the fisherman born as Simon is today best known. Of crucial importance to the papacy, Jesus then went on to tell the disciples that “upon this rock (ie Peter) I will build my church and the

gates of hell will not prevail against it”. Jesus continued, speaking directly to Peter, “I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven”. These passages, found in the Gospel of Matthew, are taken to mean that Jesus entrusted the care of His followers to St Peter, a duty that Peter then passed on to his successors. It was largely on this basis that later popes established their claim to supremacy over other bishops. Exactly what Jesus intended in this incident has been disputed, particularly by Protestant theologians, but there can be no doubt at all that He intended Peter to have a special role of some kind. Throughout the Gospels, Peter comes across as being generous and warm-hearted but somewhat hot-tempered. This latter trait was shown most clearly when Jesus was arrested in the Garden of Gethsemane. Jesus had gone to the garden to pray, taking with Him three disciples of which Peter was one. Just as Jesus finished praying another disciple, Judas, arrived at the head of a group of men, some of whom were armed. Judas kissed Jesus, a pre-arranged signal to the servants of the high priest who Judas had brought with him. Those men surged forward to seize Jesus and Peter leapt to His defence. In the struggle that ensued, Peter cut

c.33

37

Jesus Christ is crucified along with two thieves at “the Place of the Skull”. He is charged with claiming to be “King of the Jews”.

Following the death of Rome’s Emperor Tiberius, aged 78, his nephew Gaius Caesar, known as Caligula, takes charge of the empire. His brief reign is notorious for its cruel excesses.

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Opposite This statue of St Peter stands in front of St Peter’s Basilica in the Vatican. He is holding the key to the kingdom of heaven and a scroll containing the names of those fit to enter.

The late Roman Empire 1st to 4th centuries

Chapter one The very earliest popes were leaders of the small Christian community in pagan Rome. The nature and form of the office they held is unclear, but by the year 300 the bishop of Rome had emerged as a powerful, spiritual force within Christianity and the Roman Empire. What had begun as a religion of foreigners, the impoverished, and slaves – that met with mistrust and, at times, terrible persecution – had become the mainstream faith of Rome. Wealth and lands flowed in to the hands of the Church so the bishop of Rome took on the roles of caring for the poor, building churches, and managing finances. But, just as the papacy was finding its feet, disaster struck with the Fall of Rome.


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WORKOUTS

WORKOUTS  Barbell Power Clean and Jerk, page 38

 Dips, page 48

Rights Sold: English (World), Italian

 Burpees, page 96

 Alternating Renegade Row, page 64

 Mountain Climbers, page 104

 Star Jumps, page 106

 Skier, page 110

deltoideus medialis deltoideus anterior

pectoralis minor

 Reverse Close-Grip Front Chin, page 52

 Plyo Kettlebell Push-Up, page 70

 Medicine Ball Pike-Up, page 118

156

157

BENCH PRESS • STRENGTH EXERCISES

BENCH PRESS quadratus lumborum triceps brachii biceps brachii pectoralis major rectus abdominis transversus abdominis obliquus externus

deltoideus anterior

trapezius supraspinatus*

MODIFICATIONS Easier: Use a very light bar or your own body weight.

pectoralis major

teres minor

pectoralis minor*

infraspinatus*

More difficult: Vary your grip width. A closer grip (below) makes the exercise more difďŹ cult, requiring greater effort.

obliquus externus

teres major

rectus abdominis

triceps brachii

obliquus internus*

latissimus dorsi

transversus abdominis*

ANNOTATION KEY  Lying on a bench, take an overhand shoulderwidth grip on a barbell, and unrack it.

DO IT RIGHT • Be sure to thrust your chest outward to complete the movement.

Hollis Lance Liebman

Bold text indicates target muscles Grey text indicates other working muscles * indicates deep muscles

 Lower the bar through a slow, controlled movement to your nipple line, inhaling as you do so.

AVOID • Bouncing the weight off your chest.

pectoralis minor* deltoideus anterior

pectoralis major biceps brachii transversus abdominis*

rectus abdominis triceps brachii

BEST FOR • pectoralis major • pectoralis minor • deltoideus anterior

 Exhale as you push the bar to arms’ length. Perform 6–8 repetitions.

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anatomy of

functional training An Exercise Programme for Real Life Activities

35

Anatomy of Functional Training: An Exericise Programme for Real Life Activities 7 5/8� x 10� 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback April 2013 $22.95 US Retail

Back care sequence

tension Buster When you sense stress or stiffness in your body, turn to this stretching, releasing workout for relief.

Your back supports the majority of your functional activities, whether you are swinging a tennis racket or sitting in a driver’s seat. Treat it well with these movements, and remember: if an activity causes strain, back off.

3 Squat and Row, page 104

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1 Full-Body Roll, page 60

2 Diagonal Reach, page 22

4 Piriformis Bridge, page 54

5 Chin-Up with Hanging Leg Raise, page 58

6 Swimming, page 52

8 Latissimus Roll, page 137

9 Cobra Stretch, page 130

1 Quadriceps Roll, page 134

2 Hamstrings Roll, page 135

3 Gluteal Roll, page 136

4 Latissimus Roll, page 137

5 Tensor Fasciae Latae Roll, page 138

7 Neck Flexion, page 123

6 Back Roll, page 140

7 Thread the Needle, page 142

î Š Back Roll, page 140

8 Neck Flexion, page 122

9 Neck Side Bend, page 123

152

warm-Up obstacle coUrse rectus femoris gracilis*

Katerina Spilio

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This is for the insatiable diehard who wishes to maximise strength, conditioning, stabilisation, agility and athleticism.

BENEFITS • Increases power and mass in the chest

brary over easoned ound ollege and nhattan.

s and s she vidual onnection, n r ew York.

KAMIKAZE WORKOUT

TARGETS • Pectorals • Anterior deltoids • Triceps • Abdominals • Upper back

Striano ANAtomy of fuNctioNAl trAiNiNg

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Increase Your Power, Tone Your Body

Hollis Lance Liebman

9

Strength & Conditioning

7 5/8� x 10� 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback October 2013 $22.95 US Retail

Workouts

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Workouts

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anatomy

Anatomy of Strength & Conditioning: Increase Your Power, Tone Your Body

STRENGTH EXERCISES

es

fitness

biceps femoris adductor magnus gluteus maximus iliopsoas* rectus abdominis

serratus anterior

Katerina Spilio and Erica Gordon-Mallin

latissimus dorsi

body-weight exercises

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Striano ANAtomy of streNgth & coNditioNiNg

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1 Set up seven small objects on the floor, as shown below, to form a triangle and a square.

Benefits • Warms up muscles • Improves agility Performance Boost • Tennis • All field sports

153

warm-Up obstacle coUrse • body-weight exercises multifidus spinae* rectus abdominis gluteus medius* gluteus minimus*

tensor fasciae latae

semimembranosus

avoiD • Stopping at any point. • Moving too quickly throughout the course.

vastus intermedius*

vastus lateralis semitendinosus

rectus femoris

biceps femoris vastus medialis

gastrocnemius

rectus abdominis 2 Taking small, quick steps, step around all of the objects in the triangle.

gluteus medius* vastus intermedius*

3 Stand in front of the square and jump forward to land in the middle of the square. Complete a jumping jack. 4 Jump forward to land outside the square. Jog back to the beginning of the course and repeat.

tensor fasciae latae rectus femoris Do it right • Keep a steady pace as you move through the course. • Take small steps, focusing on coordination. • Stand upright. • Keep your abdominal muscles pulled in and engaged.

vastus medialis

Bold text indicates target muscles Grey text indicates other working muscles * indicates deep muscles

20

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biceps femoris

gastrocnemius

annotation KeY

î Š Iliotibial Band Stretch, page 124

best for • rectus femoris • vastus lateralis • vastus intermedius* • vastus medialis • biceps femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus • gluteus medius* • gluteus minimus* • tensor fasciae latae • rectus abdominis

21


A Guide to Running Right

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swiss ball looP exTension • TargeT: Primary muscles

Primary muscles

swiss ball looP exTension 1 With a resistance band tied around your ankles, lie prone on a Swiss ball, with your hips over the centre of the ball as you support your weight on your arms. Your hands should be directly below your shoulders.

do iT righT • Keep your hips in line with your shoulders and ankles to achieve optimal weight distribution. • Keep your neck elongated and relaxed. • Keep your core tight and your back flat.

besT for

adductor magnus

ModificaTion advanced: With a resistance loop or a resistance band tied around your ankles, prop your forearms on a Swiss ball, and then follow steps 1 through 4.

• gluteus maximus • biceps femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus • pectoralis major • serratus anterior • deltoideus posterior • rectus abdominis • transversus abdominis • gastrocnemius

semitendinosus

biceps femoris

semimembranosus

2 Keeping your abs tight, exhale, and squeeze your gluteal muscles to raise your right leg, lengthening your body as your weight transfers from your arms to your left foot, stretching through your heel.

rectus abdominis transversus abdominis* annoTaTion Key

3 Return your right foot to the floor.

vastus intermedius*

Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

Repeat 10 leg extensions on that side, holding a straight plank position throughout the exercise.

adductor longus

* indicates deep muscles

rectus femoris serratus anterior

deltoideus posterior

vastus lateralis

trapezius

vastus medialis gluteus medius* gastrocnemius

TargeTs • Hip extensors • Abdominal muscles • Hamstrings LeveL • Intermediate

deltoideus anterior

anconeus

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4 Switch legs, and repeat

pectoralis major

10 times on the other side.

BenefiTs • Strengthens abs • Strengthens hips and hamstrings biceps brachii

noT advisaBLe if you have . . . • Shoulder issues

triceps brachii gluteus maximus

avoid • Allowing your shoulders to sink.

obliquus externus obliquus internus*

78

79

obliquus externus HiP exTension anD flexion • TargeT: Primary muscles

Primary muscles

HiP exTension anD flexion vastus intermedius

sartorius

gastrocnemius tibialis anterior

2 Keeping your head up, shoulders back, place your hands on your hips, slowly extend your leg backwards.

1 Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, with a resistance loop or a resistance band tied around your ankles. Tuck your pelvis slightly forwards, lift your chest and press your shoulders downwards and back.

iliopsoas*

4 Keeping your back and knee straight, slowly extend your leg forwards.

3 Perform three sets of 10 repetitions, and return to the starting position. rectus femoris

besT for

avoid • Bending your knee. • Allowing your hips to shift out of line.

• rectus femoris • iliopsoas • gluteus maximus • biceps femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus

soleus

Philip Striano, DC

5 Perform three sets of 10 repetitions, return to the starting position and repeat entire sequence on the opposite side.

ModificaTion easier: Complete steps 1 through 5, holding onto a support such as a mop handle or chair back.

TargeTs • Hip extensors • Hip flexors

HiP flexion

LeveL • Beginner gluteus maximus

BenefiTs • Strengthens hips

annoTaTion Key Black text indicates target muscles * indicates deep muscles

HiP exTension

noT advisaBLe if you have . . . • Balance issues

semitendinosus do iT righT • Tighten your glutes as you move your leg backwards during the extension phase of the exercise • Tighten the muscles at the front of your thigh and hip as you move your leg forwards during the flexion phase of the exercise.

biceps femoris

semimembranosus

68

CYCLING of

A Cyclist’s Guide to Strength, Flexibility and Conditioning

brachialis gluteus maximus rectus femoris vastus laterius

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side-Lying knee Bend Legs & Arms

aNatom Y

69

Anatomy of Cycling: A Cyclist’s Guide to Strength, Flexibility and Conditioning

side-Lying knee Bend • Legs & Arms Best for

avoid • Leaning back onto your gluteal muscles.

1 Lie on your left side, with your legs extended together in line with your body. Extend your left arm, and rest your head on your upper arm.

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• rectus femoris • vastus lateralis • vastus intermedius • vastus medialis

vastus intermedius*

2 Bend your right knee and grasp the ankle with your right hand.

3 Pull your ankle in toward your buttocks as you stretch.

4 Return to the

biceps femoris

starting position, and repeat on the other side.

TargeTs • Quadriceps

rectus femoris

BenefiTs • Stretches quadriceps

gastrocnemius

noT advisaBle if You Have • Hip discomfort. If it feels uncomfortable to rest directly on the floor, place a towel under your bottom hip.

brachioradialis tibialis anterior peroneus

vastus lateralis

Jennifer Laurita

looK for • Your knees to stay together, one on top of the other. • Your pelvis to be tucked slightly forwards. • Your chest to stay lifted, to engage and stretch your core. • The foot of your bottom leg to stay pointed and parallel with your leg.

trochles tali

forwArds Lunge

forwArds Lunge • Legs & Arms 62

Legs & Arms

r

RUNNING

biceps femoris

ANAtomy of CyCLI NG

G

of

Anatomy of Running: A Guide to Running Right

19

gluteus maximus

Striano

Y

aNatom y

Philip Striano, DC

c ic

ANAtomy of Ru NN iNg

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Striano

y

fitness

1 Stand with your feet together and your arms hanging at your sides.

looK for • Proper position of your shoulders and your whole upper body, to help lengthen your spine.

avoid • Dropping your back-extended knee to the floor.

Jennifer Laurita

ModificaTion More difficult: Follow steps 1 through 3, using your right leg as the forwards leg. Then position the palm of your left hand on the floor. Place your right hand behind your head, and slowly try to touch your elbow to the inside of your right ankle. Return to the starting position, and then repeat on the other side.

3 Slowly slide your right foot farther back while bending your left knee, stacking it directly above your ankle.

4 Position your palms or fingers on the floor on either side of your left leg, and slowly press your palms or fingers against the floor to enhance the placement of your upper body and your head.

gluteus maximus

tractus iliotibialis

2

adductor magnus

semitendinosus biceps femoris

semimembranosus annoTaTion KeY

Best for • biceps femoris • adductor longus • adductor magnus • gastrocnemius • tibialis posterior • iliopsoas • rectus femoris

Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

plantaris

* indicates deep muscles

pectineus* iliopsoas*

tensor fasciae latae

vastus lateralis

TargeTs • Quadriceps • Hamstrings • Calves

gastrocnemius

BenefiTs • Strengthens legs and arms • Stretches groins

5 Lift your head and gaze straight forwards while leaning your upper

noT advisaBle if You Have • Arm injury • Shoulder injury • Hip injury • High or low blood pressure

6 Press the ball of your right foot gradually

body forwards and carefully rolling your shoulders down and backwards.

trapezius soleus

on the floor, contract your thigh muscles, and press up to maintain your left leg in a straight position. adductor longus

vastus intermedius*

7 Hold for 5 seconds. Slowly return to the starting position, and then repeat on the other side.

tibialis posterior*

rectus femoris

60

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Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles * indicates deep muscles

63 gluteus medius*

1

2 Exhale, and carefully step back with your right leg, keeping it in line with your hips as you step back. The ball of your left foot should be in contact with the floor as you do the motion.

annoTaTion KeY

vastus medialis

61


static exercises

swiss baLL sit to bridge 1 Sit upright on the Swiss ball, with your feet flat on the floor and your hands resting on your knees or thighs.

dO iT RighT Lean back slowly and with control, and exhale while contracting.

avOid

rectus abdominis

erector spinae*

Allowing the ball to shift laterally.

quadratus lumborum*

obliquus internus*

gluteus minimus* transversus abdominis*

gluteus medius*

2 Extend your arms in front of you, and slowly step forward while leaning back on the ball, allowing it to roll up your spine.

iliopsoas*

quadratus femoris* gluteus maximus

vastus intermedius*

semitendinosus rectus femoris

biceps femoris semimembranosus

vastus medialis

target areas Primary emphasis is on the entire core.

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annOTaTiOn KeY Bold text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

latissimus dorsi

obliquus externus

* indicates deep muscles

LeveL • Intermediate

3 Walk your feet forward, so that the ball continues to roll up your spine, simultaneously extending your arms back and over your head.

Time • 30-second completion time BenefiTs • Increases spinal extension, and stretches upper back and abs

serratus anterior

tensor fasciae latae vastus lateralis

pectoralis major

pectoralis minor*

ResTRiCTiOns • Those with lowerback problems should avoid this exercise.

4 Roll back until your hands are on the floor, with your arms slightly bent, and the back of your head rests against the ball. Hold this bridged position for 5 seconds, ending in an exhale.

deltoideus

5 To release the stretch, lift your head from the ball, and then slowly walk backward to the starting position.

rectus femoris

flexor carpi radialis

deltoideus medialis

triceps brachii

tibialis anterior

obliquus internus*

static exercises

biceps brachii

55

froNt PLaNK

vastus lateralis

soleus

obliquus externus tensor fasciae latae

dO iT RighT

1 Sit with your legs extended i n f ro n t o f y o u a n d y o u r a r m s d i re c t l y b e h i n d y o u , w i t h y o u r fingers pointing straight ahead.

Keep your pelvis elevated for the duration of the exercise.

deltoideus anterior

target areas

gluteus maximus

avOid

Primary emphasis is on the glutes, hamstrings, quadriceps, deltoids, biceps, triceps, abdominals, and erectors.

Letting your shoulders slouch backward. semitendinosus biceps femoris

vastus intermedius* rectus femoris vastus lateralis

2 P u s h t h ro u g h y o u r p a l m s and raise your hips and g l u t e s o ff t h e g ro u n d u n t i l your body forms a straight l i n e f ro m t h e s h o u l d e r s d o w n .

annOTaTiOn KeY Bold text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

semimembranosus

* indicates deep muscles

vastus medialis

transversus abdominis*

LeveL • Intermediate

tensor fasciae latae

rectus abdominis

adductor longus

Time • 1-minute completion time

obliquus externus

adductor magnus rectus femoris

BenefiTs • Increases the ability to support your own body weight ResTRiCTiOns • Those with lowerback problems should avoid this exercise.

biceps brachii

3 Raise one leg and hold for 30 seconds, then switch legs. tibialis anterior

obliquus internus*

peroneus biceps femoris

triceps brachii

gluteus medius* gluteus maximus

44

Lisa Purcell

16.99

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static exercises

ch w ith a f or

Core Stability

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Hollis Lance Liebman

45

Anatomy of Exercise for Women: Every Woman’s Guide to Getting Fit and Strong 7 5/8” x 10” 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback November 2012 $22.95 US Retail

WomEn EvEry womEn’s GuidE to GEttinG Fit and stronG

piriFormis stretch

trapezius

latissimus dorsi

infraspinatus

sartorius

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hip stretch

1 Lie on your back with your knees bent.

best For

2 Bring your left ankle over your right knee, resting it on your thigh. Place both hands around your right thigh.

• adductor longus • iliopsoas • rhomboideus • sternocleidomastoideus • latissimus dorsi • obliquus internus • obliquus externus

3 Gently pull your right thigh toward your chest until you feel the stretch in your buttocks. Hold for 15 seconds and switch sides. Repeat sequence on your left leg.

• quadratus lumborum • erector spinae • multifidus spinae • tractus iliotibialis • gluteus maximus • gluteus medius • piriformis

1 Sit with your left leg extended straight in front of you, and bend your right knee. Cross your bent knee over the straight leg, and keep your foot flat on the floor. 2 Wrap your left arm around the bent knee so that you are able to apply pressure to your leg to rotate your torso. Place your right hand on the floor for stability. 3 Keeping your hips aligned, rotate your upper spine as you pull your chest in toward your knee.

do iT righT • Keep your neck and shoulders relaxed. • Apply even pressure to your leg with your active hand. • Keep torso upright as you pull your knee and torso together.

best For

TargeTs • Gluteal muscles

• piriformis • gluteus maximus • gluteus medius • gluteus minimus

LeveL • Beginner BenefiTs • Stretches the glutes

biceps femoris

avoid • Rounding your torso. • Lifting the foot of your bent leg off the floor. • Straining your neck as you rotate.

4 Hold for 30 seconds. Slowly release, and repeat five times on each side.

iliopsoas*

gluteus medius*

erector spinae* quadratus lumborum* multifidus spinae*

trapezius gluteus medius* gluteus minimus*

deltoideus anterior

deltoideus medialis avoid • Pulling your leg inward too quickly. • Twisting your lower body—instead keep your hips square

deltoideus posterior rhomboideus*

adductor longus sternocleidomastoideus

do iT righT • Relax your hips so that you can go deeper into the stretch. • Perform the stretch slowly • Keep your head and shoulders on the floor

noT advisaBLe if you have . . . • Hip dysfunction

piriformis*

piriformis* gluteus maximus

rectus abdominis

annoTaTion Key

* indicates deep muscles

edited by

Lisa Purcell

LeveL • Intermediate BenefiTs • Stretches hip extensors and flexors • Stretches obliques noT advisaBLe if you have . . . • Hip dysfunction • Severe lowerback pain

* indicates deep muscles

obliquus externus

annoTaTion Key Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

TargeTs • Hips • Gluteal muscles • Spine • Obliques

Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles

latissimus dorsi gluteus maximus

tibialis anterior

Flexibility

anatomy

of ExErcisE for

Flexibility

A NAto m y o f E X E R C ISE fo R Wom EN

ise al f

of

54

Hollis Lance Liebman

our s

anatomy

Anatomy of Core Stability: Develop a Strong Core

adductor magnus

obliquus internus*

tractus iliotibialis

gastrocnemius

Do it Right • Keep your body firm throughout the exercise. • Relax your shoulders and neck. • Form a 90-degree angle with your hips and knees to receive maximum benefit from the exercise.

waLL SitS • Lower Body

28

waLL SitS Lower Body

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fitness

static exercises

e ix re.

o f co re stAbil ity

ty

Striano A N Ato m y

y

20

1 Stand with your back to a wall. Lean against the wall, and walk your feet out from under your body until your lower back rests comfortably against it.

AvoiD • Sitting below 90 degrees. • Pushing your back into the wall to hold yourself up. • Shifting from side to side as you begin to fatigue.

iliopsoas*

BeSt for

gluteus medius*

sartorius adductor longus

• vastus medialis • vastus lateralis • vastus intermedius • rectus femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus • biceps femoris • gluteus maximus

adductor magnus

rectus femoris gracilis*

biceps femoris

vastus medialis semitendinosus 2 Slide your torso down the wall, until your hips and knees form 90-degree angles, your thighs parallel to the floor.

semimembranosus AnnotAtion Key Black text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles * indicates deep muscles

tARgets • Quadriceps • Gluteal muscles LeveL • Beginner

rectus abdominis 3 Raise your arms straight in front of you so that they are parallel to your thighs, and relax the upper torso. Hold for 1 minute, and repeat five times.

obliquus externus

Benefits • Strengthens quadriceps and gluteal muscles • Trains the body to place weight evenly between the legs

transversus abdominis*

vastus intermedius*

not ADvisABLe if you hAve . . . • Knee pain

vastus lateralis gluteus maximus tensor fasciae latae tibialis posterior* gastrocnemius extensor digitorum longus tibialis anterior

138

extensor hallucis

www.moseleyroad.com

139

adductor magnus

29


s,

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A TrAiner's Guide To sTAyinG FiT over FiFTy

Rights Sold: Czech, English (World), Finnish, French (Canada), French (Europe), German, Italian, Russian MEdICINE BAll OvER-ThE-ShOuldER ThROW • CORE STRENGThENING

vastus lateralis

rectus abdominis biceps fermoris

obliquus externus

gluteus maximus

CORE STRENGThENING

MEdICINE BAll OvER-ThE-ShOuldER ThROW transversus abdominis

BEST FOR

1 Stand upright with your feet slightly more than hip-distance apart, holding a medicine ball at one side of your body. Your arms should be extended, your core rotated, and the ball held low.

 b

ANNOTATION KEY

dO • Think of the motion as a “swing,” and keep the motion smooth. • Follow the ball with your gaze. • Engage your core.

• obliquus externus • obliquus internus • serratus anterior • intercostales interni • intercostales externi

Bold text indicates target muscles Gray text indicates other working muscles * indicates deep muscles

intercostales externi

 d

intercostales interni*

c 

serratus anterior

TArgETs • Chest • Obliques

Hollis Lance Liebman

rectus abdominis

LEvEL • Beginner BENEfITs • Improves core rotation • Strengthens and stabilizes core

obliquus internus*

AvOId If YOu HAvE . . . • Lower-back issues

BICYClE CRuNCh • CORE STRENGThENING

BICYClE CRuNCh

3 Continue to raise the ball, and then release

CORE STRENGThENING

it as you throw it to your exercise partner. transversus abdominis* Lower your arms and repeat on the other 1 Lie on your back with your fingers at your ears, side, working up to three sets ofyour 15elbows throws. flared outward, and your legs bent at

a 

dON’T • Move too quickly. • Bend your arms.

2 Keeping your arms extended, bring the ball in front of your body, and then continue to smoothly raise it upward to the other side as you rotate your core.

114

BEST FOR

a 90-degree angle.

MOdIfIcATION Easier: Begin with one foot on the floor and place the outside of your other foot on top of your thigh near your knee. As you crunch, bring your opposite elbow

• rectus abdominis • obliquus internus • obliquus externus

toward that top knee. Complete 5 reps on one side, then switch sides and repeat.

c 

 b

a 

dO

obliquus externus• Use your core to drive the movement. • Keep your elbows flared. • Keep both hips stable on the floor. • Keep your neck elongated.

tensor fasciae latae

iliopsoas* sartorius

a 

rectus femoris

115

2 Roll up with your torso, reaching one elbow

intercostales interni*

diagonally toward the opposite knee. At the same time, extend the other leg forward.

tibialis anterior intercostales externi

TArgETs • Obliques • Upper abs LEvEL • Intermediate BENEfITs • Stabilizes core • Strengthens and tones obliques and upper abdominals AvOId If YOu HAvE . . . • Lower-back issues • Neck issues

 b

3 Release, and repeat on the other side.

rectus abdominis

Continue to alternate, completing 30 crunches in both directions.

of

Stretching A Guide to increAsinG Your FlexibilitY

Anatomy of Stretching: A Guide to Increasing Your Flexibility

ED CLUD

IN

Craig ramsay with a foreword by Jerry mitChell

7 5/8” x 10” 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback $22.95 US Retail

TargeTs • Feet • Calves • Arch of the foot Do • During the slopedown phase, push forcefully with your palms—their downward force must be stronger then the upward force of your pulling fingers. • During the slopeup phase, push forcefully with your fingers—their upward force must be stronger then the downward force of your pushing palms.

3 Pull back on your toes until you feel a stretch in your arch.

exPeRT’S TiP Don’t ignore your feet! They are the foundation for all standing movements. These stretches will strengthen your ankles and improve range of movement in the foot and calf for cardiovascular activities.

avoiD • Allowing your foot to shift—firmly stabilize your ankle and heel.

flexor hallucis brevis* flexor digitorum brevis lumbricales flexor digiti minimi brevis

109

Forward Bend hip shiFt

douBle-leg hinge

1 Sit upright on a chair, with your legs widely separated and your feet planted firmly on the floor.

erector spinae*

gluteus medius*

erector spinae*

gluteus maximus

1 Stand behind a chair with your legs and feet parallel and generously outside of shoulder width. Bend your knees very slightly, and tuck your pelvis slightly forward, lift your chest, and press your shoulders downward and back.

biceps femoris

2 Keeping your knees bent, bring your chest toward your thighs to rest your hands on floor.

semitendinosus

3 Hold the downward position, and then return to the starting position, and repeat.

semimembranosus

gastrocnemius

soleus

BeST FoR

TargeTs • Back • Inner thighs Do • Keep your buttocks planted in the chair as you lean forward. avoiD • Dropping your head too quickly; keep your movements slow and controlled.

• iliopsoas • iliacus • pectineus • sartorius • erector spinae

annotation key Bold text = stretching muscles * indicates deep muscle

pectoralis minor*

annotation key Bold text = stretching muscles * indicates deep muscle

2 Bend forward from the hips, keeping your back flat, to grab the back of the chair. Your arms should form a 90-degree angle with your legs. 3 Try to bring your upper body closer to the floor while maintaining the position of your hands.

pectoralis major

4 Relax, and repeat.

Modification advanced: Continue from step 2, and straighten your leg, resting your flexed feet on your heels.

iliopsoas*

iliacus*

pectineus*

BeST FoR • pectoralis major • pectoralis minor • gluteus maximus • gluteus medius • biceps femoris

• semitendinosus • semimembranosus • erector spinae • gastrocnemius • soleus

TargeTs • Chest • Hamstrings • Lower back • Gluteal area • Calves Do • Keep your chest elevated. • Exhale as you bend forward from the hips. avoiD • Tensing your neck or shoulders. • Holding unnecessary tension in the upper body—relax and breathe in and out naturally.

sartorius

134 the stretching session Assisted Foot stretches •

slope-down

1 Sit on a mat or chair, and cross your right leg over the left so that your ankle rests on top of your left thigh.

slope-up

2 Grasp your foot so that the palms of your hand lie across the top of your foot and your fingers are wrapped around the bottom. 3 Using your palms on the top outside of your foot, push down. At the same time, pull up the bottom of your foot with your fingers; this creates the “slope-down.”

Flexion

4 Switch legs, and repeat on the other side, before again crossing your right leg over the left so that your ankle rests on top of your thigh.

exPeRT’S TiP

5 Grasp your foot so that the palms of your hand lie across the top of your foot and your fingers are wrapped around the bottom.

Make sure that you don’t “sickle” your foot, which is when your ankle turns in so that your big toe points in toward the other foot.

6 Using your palms on the top outside of your foot, push down. At the same time, pull up the bottom of your foot with your fingers; this creates the “slope-up.” 7 Switch legs, and repeat on the other side.

tibialis anterior

BeST FoR plantar interosseous

abductor hallucis

annotation key Bold text = stretching muscles * indicates deep muscle

22

 Switch legs, and repeat on the other side.

dON’T • Arch your back or raise your lower back off the floor. • Pull your head upward with your hands.

c 

A stretching routine offers so many benefits—for both body and mind. By following a carefully crafted stretching regimen, you can: • Create elongated muscles • Improve muscle coordination • Increase flexibility • Build up cardio endurance • Alleviate lower-back pain • Burn calories • Combat the effects of aging • Boost energy • Relieve stress Anatomy of Stretching helps you attain a solid understanding of your musculature by presenting a glimpse beneath the skin, revealing those muscles you are working during each stretch, while taking you through the movements step-by-step. With tips to guide you on what to do—and what not to do—Anatomy of Stretching provides essential insights into your body and your exercise routine.

About the Author: Internationally recognized in the fitness industry for his extensive knowledge and diverse expertise, Craig Ramsay has more than 12 years of documented success transforming the health, bodies, and lives of his many clients. Craig’s own versatile physical assisted Foot stretChes abilities were honed through his work on 1 Sit on a mat or chair, and cross your right leg over the point Broadway and as a ballet dancer, hockey left so that your ankle rests on top of your left thigh. player, fitness model, TV and film actor, and 2 Brace your right ankle with your right hand and grasp trained contortionist. A native ofyourOntario, the front of right foot with your left hand. Press on the top of your foot, focusing the palm Canada, who relocated to down Los Angeles in of your hand on the knuckles of your toes so that they point inward. 2008, Craig quickly established himself as a fitness and dance expert, model, TVrepeat on the other side. 3 Switchand legs, and host. Successfully juggling his many careers, still seated, again cross Craig’s résumé has made him one of1 While the most your right leg over the left so that your ankle sought-after fitness experts in the business. He rests on top of your thigh. is well known for establishing a rapport with 2 Brace your right heel with every client—from Hollywood’s top celebrities your right hand, and grasp the bottom of your toes to professional athletes—and proudly accepts and ball of the foot his nickname of “World’s Nicest Trainer.”with your left hand.

obliquus externus

108

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Poster

obliquus internus*

MOdIfIcATION same level of difficulty: Keep both feet flexed throughout the exercise.

oFFiCe stretChes

anatomy

Craig Ramsay

£9.99

ExErcisE: 50+

7 5/8” x 10” 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback October 2012 $22.95 US Retail

oFFiCe stretChes

s se

of

21

Anatomy of Exercise: 50+ A Trainer’s Guide to Staying Fit Over Fifty

the stretChing session

g

anatomy

AN Atomy of St r E tC h IN g

y

fitness

• extensor digitorum longus • extensor digitorum brevis • tibialis anterior • extensor hallucis longus • extensor hallucis brevis • flexor digitorum brevis

• quadratus plantae • flexor digiti minimi brevis • flexor hallucis brevis • lumbricales • plantar interosseous • abductor hallucis • abductor digiti minimi

peroneus

extensor digitorum longus

extensor hallucis longus annotation key Bold text = stretching muscles

extensor hallucis brevis

quadratus plantae abductor digiti minimi

www.moseleyroad.com

extensor digitorum brevis

23

135


e most sought-

er, hockey player,

dway, TV, and film

internationally for

rience transforming

and lives. His clients

od’s top celebrities

s. Craig’s personal people willing and

ives. Craig, who

d the very prestigious

ner opposite Jackie

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Book

of

muscle building A TrAiner’s Guide To increAsinG Muscle MAss

trapezius

deltoideus anterior

7 5/8” x 10” 160pp 4-color throughout Paperback $22.95 US Retail

skull crushers

XX

biceps brachii

flexor carpi ulnaris

 d

flexor carpi radialis pectoralis major

4 Press the bar straight 3 With your elbows bent, bring the bar

upward until your arms are straight above your chest.

toward your chest.

triceps brachii

Look For • Your lower back and glutes to remain in contact with the bench during exercise. • Your elbows to point forward. avoid • Tensing your neck or jaw during exercise.

deltoideus posterior deltoideus anterior

5 While keeping your upper arms and elbows stationary,

c 

slowly lower the bar backward until the bar nearly touches your forehead.

muscles useD • triceps brachii • deltoideus anterior • pectoralis major • latissimus dorsi

6 Concentrate on engaging your triceps to lift the bar back to the starting position. Repeat.

• teres major • deltoideus posterior • flexor carpi radialis • flexor carpi ulnaris

Trainer’s Tips • Exhale as you lower the bar toward your forehead, and inhale as you lift it back to the starting position. • Slow the bar’s descent as it approaches your forehead. • When you are finished with this exercise, bend your elbows and lower the bar toward your chest, and lift your body back to the starting position, gently placing the bar back onto your thighs.

annoTaTion keY Black text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

e 

111

InclIne Bench Row • Back 3 Grasping the dumbbells with your palms facing each

straddle an incline bench, facing toward the back.

latissimus dorsi

teres major

a 

TargeT • Triceps

InclIne Bench Row 1 Holding a dumbbell in each hand,

body onto the bench.

 b

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a 

ModiFicaTion More difficult: Follow steps 1 through 5, and then continue to slowly lower the barbell until it is behind your head.

2 Carefully begin to lower your

bench with either a straight bar or an E-Z curl bar on your lap, grasping the bar using a pronated, or palms facing down, grip, about shoulder width apart.

110

deltoideus medialis

skull crushers • Arms

1 Sit on the edge of a flat

 b

carefully place the dumbbells on the bench.

ModiFication Similar difficulty: Follow instructions for the Incline Bench Row, but hold the dumbbells with your hands facing behind you in.

trapezius

other in hammer-grip position, roll the dumbbells off the bench as you carefully lower your body until your chest rests against the bench.

infraspinatus*

2 Lean forward and 4 Keeping your elbows close to the sides of your body, lift them toward the ceiling to draw the dumbbells upward.

teres minor

annotation keY Black text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

rhomboideus* teres major latissimus dorsi

Craig ramsay

deltoideus posterior a 

brachialis

taRget • Back

triceps brachii

5 Lower the dumbbells to starting position, and repeat.

Look FoR • Your chest to remain elevated throughout the exercise. • Your feet to remain firmly planted on the floor.

tRaineR’S tipS

pectoralis major

• Use caution and care when executing this exercise. • When getting into the starting position, place your pelvis on the bench first, then your stomach, and then your chest upon the dumbbells. Be sure to replace the dumbbells with your chest in a controlled manner. • To protect your back and shoulders, carefully drop the dumbbells when you have finished the exercise.

avoid • Rushing this exercise. • Using momentum to lift the dumbbells. • Holding onto neck and jaw tension. • Sliding down the bench during exercise.

 b

biceps brachii

Muscles used brachioradialis

• trapezius • rhomboideus • latissimus dorsi • teres major • deltoideus posterior • infraspinatus • teres minor • brachialis • brachioradialis • pectoralis major • biceps brachii • triceps brachii

c 

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146 • HealtHy Back anatomy

Lower-Body exercises • 147

Hip stretcH low e r B ody

s of experience,

ness. A trained

anatomy

Anatomy of Muscle Building: A Trainer’s Guide to Increasing Muscle Mass

Back

Muscle Building xercises for ted with clear ical illustrations you are working on what do look r your goals. ng a glossary of ology, Anatomy ial insights into

ANATOMY Of Muscle BuildiNg

ng

Craig ramsay

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fitness

Arms

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1 in a seated position, extend your left leg straight in front of you, and bend your right knee. cross your bent knee over the straight leg, and keep your foot flat on the ground.

iliopsoas*

rhomboideus*

QuIck guIDe

adductor longus

deltoideus posterior

tARget • Hips • Gluteal muscles • Spine • Obliques

Do It RIght Do • Your neck and shoulders to remain relaxed. • Your active hand to apply even pressure to your leg. • Your torso to remain upright as you pull your knee and torso together.

2 wrap your left arm around the bent knee so that you are able to apply pressure to your leg to rotate your torso.

latissimus dorsi quadratus lumborum* erector spinae*

AvoID • Rounding your torso. • Lifting the foot of your bent leg off the floor. • Straining your neck as you rotate.

multifidus spinae* gluteus medius* piriformis* tractus iliotibialis

3 keeping your hips aligned, rotate your upper spine as you pull your chest in toward your knee.

Best foR • adductor longus • iliopsoas • rhomboideus • sternocleidomastoideus • latissimus dorsi • obliquus internus • obliquus externus • quadratus lumborum • erector spinae • multifidus spinae • tractus iliotibialis • gluteus maximus • gluteus medius • piriformis

4 Hold for thirty seconds. slowly release, and repeat three times on each side.

sternocleidomastoideus

core

annotation key Bold text indicates active muscles * indicates deep muscles

philip striAno d.C. CCiC

gastrocnemius

tARget • Abdominals • Gluteal muscles • Inner hip muscles type • Stability/Balance LeveL • Beginner Benefits • Stabilizes core • Improves balance

soleus

nOt ADvisABLe if yOu hAve • Vestibular deficits

Best fOR • rectus abdominis • transversus abdominis • erector spinae • multifidus spinae • pectoralis major • pectoralis minor

annotation key

pectoralis major erector spinae* pectoralis minor*

transversus abdominis*

2 close your eyes as you try to maintain your balance on the block.

iliopsoas*

Quick guiDe

3 open your eyes, and repeat, balancing on the right leg.

tARget • Abdominals • Lower back

iliacus*

Best fOR DO it Right DO • Open your eyes if you feel yourself tipping over. • Keep your raised knee parallel to the floor. AvOiD • Sloping your shoulders—your arms should form a straight line from shoulder to fingertips.

annotation key Bold text indicates active muscles * indicates deep muscles

DO it Right DO • Keep your abdominals activated. AvOiD • Hunching your shoulders.

2 arch backward as far as you can comfortably go.

rectus abdominis

transversus abdominis*

rectus abdominis

multifidus spinae*

1 stand straight with your weight equally distributed between your feet. Place your hands on your hips.

• rectus abdominis • transversus abdominis • gluteus medius • iliopsoas • iliacus • gastrocnemius • soleus

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type • Stability LeveL • Beginner Benefits • Stabilizes core • Strengthens lower back nOt ADvisABLe if yOu hAve • Neck issues • Lower-back pain

trapezius

deltoideus medialis

obliquus externus

stanDing extension

Quick guiDe

not ADvIsABLe If you hAve • Severe lower-back pain

rectus abdominis

Core exerCises • 69

gluteus medius*

BenefIts • Stretches hip extensors and flexors • Stretches obliques

deltoideus anterior

obliquus internus*

1 stand on a foam block, balancing on your left leg with your right knee bent. extend both arms out to the side, parallel to the floor.

LeveL • Intermediate

gluteus maximus

68 • HealtHy Back anatomy

stanDing staBility

type • Flexibility

3 return to starting position, and repeat ten times.

adductor magnus

Bold text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles


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78 • Core training anatomy

core strength • 79

Crossover CrunCh Cor e str e ngth

anatomy

1 Bring your hands behind your head, lifting you legs off the floor into a tabletop position.

Modification Easier: Begin with both feet on the floor. Place the outside of one foot on top of your thigh near your

2 roll up with your torso, reaching your right elbow to your left knee and extending the right leg in front of you. imagine pulling your shoulder blades off the floor and twisting from your ribs and oblique muscles.

annotation key Bold text indicates active muscles gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

rectus femoris

3 alternate sides. repeat sequence six times.

biceps femoris vastus lateralis

deltoideus

BenefiTs • Stabilizes core • Strengthens abdominals

adductor magnus

BesT for • rectus abdominis • transversus abdominis • obliquus externus • obliquus internus

gluteus maximus

• rectus femoris • vastus medialis • sartorius • tensor fasciae latae

tensor fasciae latae iliopsoas* rectus abdominis

Foam RolleR Challenge • 129

Foam roller

BesT for

Quick Guide

3 lift one leg off the roller and hold it steady, making sure not to drop your hips.

TarGeT • Triceps • Shoulder stabilizers • Abdominals • Hamstrings

• rectus abdominis • transversus abdominis

• triceps brachii • serratus anterior • deltoideus

• biceps femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus

4 Keep the leg lifted, and press your opposite leg into the roller, drawing your hips back toward your hands.

BenefiTs • Improves core, pelvic and shoulder stability noT advisaBle if You Have • Wrist pain • Shoulder pain • Discomfort in the back of the knee or knee swelling

5 return to the starting position, rolling your calf muscle along the roller and keeping your lifted leg straight in the air. repeat fifteen times on each leg.

annotation key Bold text indicates active muscles gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

do iT riGHT

deltoideus

adductor magnus sartorius vastus medialis

pectoralis minor*

semitendinosus

latissimus dorsi

gastrocnemius

obliquus internus*

plantaris

obliquus externus rectus abdominis

semimembranosus

transversus abdominis*

biceps femoris rectus femoris vastus intermedius*

biceps brachii brachialis triceps brachii brachioradialis

tibialis posterior*

extensor digitorum gluteus medius* palmaris longus

An InsIder's GuIde to ImprovInG Your poses trapezius

adductor magnus obliquus externus semitendinosus

triceps brachii

sartorius

avoid • Allowing your shoulders to lift toward your ears. • Bending your knees. • Bending your elbows.

of

avoid • Pulling with your hands, bringing your chin toward your chest, or arching your back. • Moving the active elbow faster than your shoulder.

gracilis*

look for • Your lifted leg to from a long, straight line. • Your hips to remain elevated throughout the exercise.

anatomy yoga

look for • Your neck to remain long and your chin to remain away from your chest. • Both hips to remain stable on the floor.

biceps brachii

TarGeT • Torso stability • Abdominals

Single-leg CalF preSS

2 press into the floor to lift your hips, keeping your legs firm.

do iT riGHT

Quick Guide

128 • Core training anatomy

1 Sit on floor with your legs outstretched in front of you, with the foam roller placed under your knees. place your hands on the floor to support your torso, your fingers pointing toward your buttocks.

knee. reach your opposite elbow toward the knee of your raised leg. after six repetitions, repeat on the other side.

transversus abdominis*

noT advisaBle if You Have • Neck issues • Lower-back pain

Dr. Abigail Ellsworth

23

gluteus maximus

iliopsoas* iliacus* tensor fasciae latae*

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transversus abdominis semimembranosus rectus femoris vastus intermedius

Dr. AbigAil Ellsworth

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vastus lateralis

serratus anterior

latissimus dorsi


24

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rhomboid latissimus dorsi

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obliquus externus rectus abdominis transversus abdominis

dr. Abby ellsworth

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25

Anatomy of Strength Training: The 5 Essential Exercises

ANATOMY of

STRENGTH TRAINING The 5 Essential Exercises Pat Manocchia

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Starting Position: With the kettlebell on the ground and your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, toes and knees pointed outward at 45-degree angles, grasp the bell with palms facing toward you. Your knees are bent so that your  toes are directly over your feet. Keep your spine in a neutral position, positioned at a 45-degree angle to perpendicular. Your hips are dropped and retracted so that your upper legs are parallel to the ground (or as close to parallel as your flexibility will allow). Position your shoulder joints directly over the bell. Make sure that your feet are flat and your weight is evenly distributed. Pull your chest, head, and rib cage up and your abdominal muscles up and in. Inhale at the bottom of the position.

LOOK FOR • The angle of your spine to never drop below 45 degrees during the movement • A slight arch in your back throughout the movement • All of your joints to move at the same time and at the same rate AVOID • Straightening your knees prior to extending your back and hips • Rounding your back • Elevating your shoulders or lowering your head • Allowing your knees to migrate either inward or outward

SUMO WITH KETTLEBELL • DEAD LIFT STABILIZE BY • Keeping your rib cage high and your head up • Pushing your shoulders down and back, with your shoulder blades flat on your rib cage • Keeping your knees directly over your feet

 MODIFICATIONS More Difficult: Holding the kettlebell directly in front of you, with arms extended, straddle boxes or blocks in the movement, going as deeply as you can while still maintaining spinal position.

obliquus externus pectoralis major

quadratus lumborum*

medial deltoid

gluteus medius*

biceps brachii

piriformis*

brachialis

superior gemellus*

flexor digitorum

Action: Exhale and drive your torso up and backward and your hips up and forward. Push your feet into the ground, extending your knees so that they move in a scissorlike action inward, and pull backward on the kettlebell with your upper back and shoulders until you arrive at a vertical position.

gluteus maximus

obliquus externus obliquus internus*

adductor longus adductor magnus

tensor fasciae latae adductor longus

rectus femoris sartorius

ANNOTATION KEY Black text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

gracilis* biceps femoris

soleus

semimembranosus

tibialis posterior

gastrocnemius semitendinosus

MUSCLES USED • quadratus lumborum • rectus femoris • soleus • biceps femoris • semitendinosus • semimembranosus • gastrocnemius • adductor magnus • adductor longus • gracilis • adductor brevis • gluteus maximus • rectus abdominis • obliquus internus • obliquus externus • trapezius • levator scapulae • vastus lateralis • vastus medialis • vastus intermedius

Movement Path: Your hips move upward and forward, while your spine and torso move upward and backward, your knees extend and move inward, and your entire body moves upward and way from the floor.

tibialis anterior

More Difficult: With two kettlebells on the ground and your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, toes and knees pointed outward at 45-degree angles, grasp the pair of kettlebells. Follow same action and movement path as with single kettlebell.

PNF RAISE WITH MEDICINE BALL

DEAD LIFT

DEAD LIFT

SUMO WITH KETTLEBELL

PNF RAISE WITH MEDICINE BALL • DEAD LIFT

infraspinatus*

trapezius

Over 250, 000 in print !

quadratus lumborum*

pectorialis major

brachioradialis

anterior deltoid

piriformis* gluteus maximus medial deltoid

19 LOOK FOR • Your knee and hip to extend and rise at the same time • The ball to remain equidistant from your torso throughout the movement • Your elbows to remain extended

teres minor teres major latissimus dorsi

posterior deltoid

18

erector spinae*

subscapularis*

STABILIZE BY • Pulling your abdomen up and in • Distributing your weight evenly across your foot • Using all muscles and joints in a coordinated, relaxed manner

biceps brachii

adductor magnus

coracobrachialis* triceps brachii

obliquus internus*

Starting Position: Stand on one foot, bending the raised knee, and grasp a medicine ball just below and to the outside

rectus abdominis vastus intermedius*

obliquus externus

transversus abdominis* pectineus* adductor longus gracilis* semitendinosus biceps femoris

of the knee on the standing leg. tibialis posterior

flexor digitorum

gluteus medius*

flexor hallucis* Action: Stand, extending your leg, while bringing the ball across your body to above and outside the opposite shoulder.

AVOID • Excessive flexion of your torso and spine • Bringing the ball close to your body or lifting any part of your foot from the floor

extensor digitorum

vastus lateralis

gastrocnemii

tibialis anterior soleus

rectus femoris

extensor hallucis

sartorius Movement Path: Your upper body rotates as your center of mass

MUSCLES USED • biceps femoris • erector spinae • extensor hallucis • flexor hallucis • gluteus maximus • gluteus medius

shifts upward. The ball moves in an arc across your body.

• infraspinatus • piriformis • quadratus lumborum • rectus femoris • semimembranosus

• semitendinosus • soleus • tibialis anterior • tibialis posterior • vastus lateralis • vastus medialis

vastus medialis

peroneus

semimembranosus

ANNOTATION KEY Black text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

26

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LEGS AND HIPS

BARBELL SQUAT • LEGS AND HIPS

AMB_32-67.qxd

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2:10 PM



Starting Position: Place one foot on a block in front of you, preferably with the raised knee at close to a 90 degree angle. Make sure your body is vertical, your chest is up, and your knee is directly over your foot. Your raised knee should not exceed the toe line and your foot should be flat on the surface of the step. Grasp the dumbbells by the side of each hip.

LOOK FOR • The barbell to drop down in a vertical line, directly above the mid-foot to heel • All joints to move at the same time • Balance throughout the movement

gluteus maximus

posterior deltoid triceps brachii extensor carpi radialis

44

extensor digitorum 36



tensor fascia latae peroneals tibialis anterior

biceps femoris soleus

• biceps femoris • gluteus maximus • gluteus medius • rectus femoris • vastus intermedius • vastus lateralis • vastus medialis

rectus femoris sartorius gracilis* gastrucnemus

tibialis posterior*

ANNOTATION KEY Black text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

37

piriformis* adductor longus

semitendinosus

gluteus maximus vastus lateralis

brachioradialis

adductor magnus soleus

gastrocnemius

BEST FOR • Keeping your spine in a neutral position and your shoulder blades pinched downanterior and back deltoid • Keeping your abdominal muscles taut and your hands on the bar, with some tension in your brachii grip biceps

flexor digitorum

biceps femoris

gluteus medius*

vastus intermedius

rectus femoris

flexor carpi radialis gluteus medius*

Movement Path: The movement is slightly forwards and directly upwards. Your head should begin behind the elevated foot and end directly over it. Allow your arms to simply stabilize the weight and hang as pendulums, following the body’s natural path. Descend in the same fashion.

obliquus externus



semimembranosus

• Keeping your upper back muscles and shoulders down and back • Not allowing your momentum to bring forward either the weights or your torso • Keeping your hip, shoulder, and ankle in a line from the bottom weight

erector spinae*

iliopsoas*

vastus medialis

trapezius medial deltoid

semitendinosus

STABILIZE BY

quadratus lumborum*

transversus abdominis*



BEST FOR AVOID • Sliding your knees for• biceps femoris • semimembranosus ward, beyond your toes • Rounding your back • gastrucnemii • semitendinosus • Allowing the bar to roll up • gluteus maximus • soleus on your neck, towards • sartorius • vastus medialis your head Movement Path: • Letting your knees slide Your hips and spine until they are either wider slide down and backor narrower than your feet wards while your knees slide forwards until the bottom of the movement; then your knees, hips, and back move straight up simultaneously.





pectineus*

Action: Begin by slightly leaning forward. Allow the weights to swing forward so that they are close to the plane of your ankle. Keeping your back leg straight, push through your top leg, extending your knee and hips simultaneously to drive your body up and over the step. Do not allow your back leg to push off the floor.

trapezius

posterior deltoid

infraspinatus*

STEP-UP • LEGS AND HIPS

LOOK FOR • A slight forward translation and directly upwards movement of your spine

w w w. m o s e leyroad.com

Action: Retract your hips, pulling them backwards. Bend your knees, keeping your spine in a neutral position, allowing your body to hinge at the hip and knee joints, until your upper legs are parallel with the floor and your spine is at a 45 degree angle to the floor. Your knees should extend slightly forwards, with your chest and head up. Your knees should be directly over the front of your feet.

STABILIZE BY

AVOID • Bending or extending your back knee • Allowing your front knee to slip forwards beyond the toe line or any part of your front foot to lift off the step • Moving your knee either laterally or medially; keep it directly over the stepping foot



Starting Position: Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder width, resting a barbell across the top of your shoulder blades. Your hands should be wider than your hip width. Keep your chest up and your spine in a neutral position. Keep your eyes looking up, 20 degrees above horizontal. Your weight should be evenly across throughout your feet.

Page 44

STEP-UP LEGS AND HIPS



tibialis anterior

ANNOTATION KEY Black text indicates active muscles Gray text indicates stabilizing muscles * indicates deep muscles

45


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The Solar System THE SUN

Closest star to Earth (92.96 million miles); largest object in our solar system (radius of 864,400 miles), 109 times larger than Earth; sphere of gases, mostly hydrogen and helium; temperature ranges from 27,000,000°F at its core to 10,000°F on its surface.

SpacE URANUS

MARS

EARTH

Third (92.95 million miles) from the sun; only planet with liquid water; unique atmosphere of mostly nitrogen and oxygen protects planet from the sun’s dangerous rays and meteors; fifth largest planet, radius of about 3,963 miles; one day is 23 hours, 56 minutes; one year is 365 days, 6 hours, and 16 minutes.

Fourth (141.63 million miles) from the sun; reddishbrown dust on its surface gives it its nickname “Red Planet”; thin atmosphere of carbon dioxide; arid, rocky; evidence of ice, but no signs of life in polar ice caps; about half the size of Earth, radius of about 2,111 miles; one day equal to 24 hours, 37 minutes; one year equal to about 687 Earth days.

Seventh (1,783 million miles) from the sun; a “gas” planet, comprised mostly of hydrogen and helium; four times larger than Earth, radius of 15,882 miles; methane in atmosphere cause its bluegreen color; tilts so much that it rotates on its side; coldest planet; temperature hovers at about –355°F; one year equal to 84 Earth years; one day just over 17 hours.

SATURN

Jupiter

MERCURY

First (35.98 million miles) from the sun; not the hottest planet; daytime temperatures can reach 800°F; thin atmosphere cannot retain the sun’s heat, so nighttime temperatures plunge to –279°F; rocky, cratered terrain; radius of 1,516 miles, about a third the size of Earth; one day equal to 58.65 Earth days; one year is around 88 Earth days.

12

Venus

second (67.23 million miles) from the sun; brightest object in the night sky; about the same size as earth, radius of 3,760 miles; mountainous terrain with plains and craters; thick atmosphere of carbon dioxide and sulfuric acid traps the sun’s heat, making it the hottest planet; temperatures reach 880°F; rotates from east to west on its axis; sun rises in the west and sets in the east; Venusian day (243 earth days) is longer than its year (225 earth days).

Fifth (483.68 million miles) from the sun; radius of 44,423 miles; largest planet in solar system, 11 times larger than earth; a “gas” planet, composed almost entirely of hydrogen and helium; planet’s stripes caused by strong east–west winds in upper atmosphere; “Great red Spot” is a giant spinning storm; average temperature is –234°F; one day is 10 hours; one year equal to 4,331 earth days.

Sixth (885.90 million miles) from the sun; a “gas” planet, composed primarily of hydrogen and helium; nearly nine times larger than Earth, radius of 37,449 miles; dust, rock, and ice make up rings; some of the pieces are small and dustlike, others are up to a half mile across; one year on Saturn is equal to 29.5 Earth years; one day lasts for 10.5 hours.

O

ur solar system is made up of the eight planets as well as the hundreds of moons and thousands of other objects, including asteroids, comets, and meteoroids, that travel around our sun. Ours is not the only solar system in the Milky Way. Scientists have detected about 70 others, but there may be even more. What’s What in the Solar System Our solar system is home to asteroids, meteoroids, meteors, WhaT and meteorites. What’s the aBOuT PLuTO? difference among them? Asteroids are large rocks. In 2006, pluto was “demoted” from a Some are just a few feet NEPTUNE planet to a dwarf planet by the International in size, but other asteroids Eighth (2,795 million miles) astronomical Union. Why? Because unlike from the sun; “gas” planet are several hundred composed of hydrogen, helium, other planets, pluto does not “clear the miles across. Most of and methane—which gives it neighborhood around its orbit.” In other its blue color; radius of 15,388 the asteroids in our solar miles four times larger than words, pluto shares its orbit with system are found circling Earth; Great Dark Spot is an other objects in space. the sun in an area between the enormous storm; solar system’s strongest winds found here; orbits of Mars and Jupiter called one year is equal to 165 Earth the “asteroid belt.” years; one day is just over 16 hours. Rocks and other space debris that are smaller than .62 miles are called meteoroids. When a meteoroid enters our atmosphere and burns up, it creates a flash of light called a shooting star, or a meteor. PLaneTary MOveMenTS If a meteoroid does not burn up in our atmosphere but instead lands on Earth, a planet Moves in two ways. it revolves around the it’s called a meteorite. Most meteorites sun in an oval path called an orbit and at the same are tiny, but some have weighed as time it rotates around an imaginary line running from much as 220 pounds. its north to south pole. that line is called the axis. Comets are asteroids that are covered a year on any planet is the amount of time it takes with dust and ice. When the comet gets to revolve once around the sun; earth revolves around close to the sun in its orbit, some of the the sun every 365.25 days. a day is the amount of ice melts and winds push the melted ice time it takes to make one full rotation on its axis. For earth, that is around 24 hours. away from the comet, forming its tail.

Creatures Great and small

13

“A

Heavy Horses Draft breeds, the “heavy horses” whose ancestors carried knights in the Middle Ages, are cold-blooded. Big and strong, these horses have easygoing temperaments—they keep their cool in most situations. That sure is a good thing, because a 2,000-pound, highstrung horse would be a disaster, hurting itself and the people around it if it spooked.

Hot-Blooded Some horses are called “hot-blooded." That doesn’t mean that their blood is literally warmer than that of other horses. The term hot-blooded describes horses that are most famous for their speed and high-spirited temperaments. Hot-bloods include the Arabian and its descendants, especially the Thoroughbred.

not Too Hot, not Too Cold If you mix hot and cold, what do you get? Warm! That’s exactly where warm-blooded horses, the other saddle horse breeds, come from. European cavalry soldiers needed horses with the speed of an Arabian or a Thoroughbred, but with gentler natures that could tolerate excitement and noise on the battlefield. By breeding these two horse types, they developed the warm-blooded breeds, such as the Irish hunter, the Hanoverian, the Trakehner, and the Selle Français (the French saddle horse). Originally from Europe, warmbloods are finding enthusiastic homes and riders in the United States, too.

average Horse sIzes

12

Horses

horse is a horse, of course, of course . . . " Or so the old song says. But there is no typical horse. They can be big, small, and everything in between, and have all sorts of personalities. Since it’s important to know what kind of horse you’re dealing with, people use many different terms to describe different types of horses.

Heavy horse 72 inches 18 hh

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warm- or Hot-blooded horse 60 inches 15 hh

sMAller THAn A Horse WHat’s a cob? a cob is larger than a pony but short for a horse (you’ll read more about ponies later in this book). cobs are powerfully built and short-legged. they look like smaller versions of their draft horse cousins. even smaller than cobs are miniature horses. although small, they aren’t ponies. in fact, these little guys are tiny for ponies! some miniature foals stand just 1 foot tall—about the same as a house cat—and fully-grown miniature horses stand 34 inches tall, at the most. What’s the point in having such a little horse? owners of mini horses say their little steeds are fun pets. Minis can also pull carts, jump fences, and do pretty much everything larger horses can do—except they can’t be ridden by anyone who weighs more than 70 pounds. Minis are also working more and more often for disabled people. in fact, there are actually seeing-eye horses for blind people. Mares and geldings make good companions (stallions are often cranky with short fuses, but that’s stallions for you). so from the tiny miniature to the giant shire, there’s a horse of every size, for every need.

Cob 58 inches 14.2 hh

DID you Know? What does “high-strung” or “highspirited” mean? a horse’s temperament (how it relates to people, other horses, and its surroundings) is incredibly important. a horse that reacts violently or unexpectedly to small things, like a piece of paper fluttering in the breeze, requires an experienced horse person. if you watch the Kentucky derby on television, you’ll see examples of highspirited behavior when the handlers load the horses into the gate before the race!

Pony 44 inches 11 hh

Miniature horse 34 inches 8.2 hh

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gift

27

Wisdom of Animals series

PUPPIES 

4-7/8” x 6-3/8” 128pp 4-color throughout “Life is either a daring adventure or Hardcover it is nothing.” —Helen Keller $12.95 US Retail People have long had a soft spot in their hearts for the irresistible puppy. Here is an inspiring compendium of the wise words of wits throughout the ages coupled with charming images of adorable puppies. In Wisdom of Puppies, the combination of words and photographs are bound to turn even the grumpiest frown upside down. Wisdom of Puppies makes the perfect present for a forlorn friend or cheerful acquaintance, a low loved one or even yourself—no matter what your mood. Make somebody smile today with the wonderful Wisdom of Puppies.

of

Pairing some of the most adorable and striking photos carefully selected to complement each accompanying inspiring quote by famous figures from around the world, the Wisdom of… series is perfect for a thoughtful gift.

PUPPIES

Rights Sold: Italian (Frogs), Japanese (Frogs, Penguins), Russian (all titles)

wisdom of

wisdom of

WOLVES

MEERKATS 

Ward Calhoun

Compiled by Ward Calhoun

wisdom

wisdom of

Compiled by Rachael Lanicci Compiled by Rachael Lanicci

“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.” —Henry David Thoreau

“One of the best ways to persuade others is with your ears—by listening to them.” —Dean Rusk

Never bear more t h trouble at a time. an one Some people bea r th - all they have ree kinds h all they have now ad, , and all they expec t to ha ve . —Edward Everett Hale

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gift Cat Cuties

5” x 7” 128pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $12.95 US Retail The perfect gift for any cat lover, Cat Cuties showcases 60 photographs of cats and kittens at their most playful and irresistible. Pure-breeds and cross-breeds alike are caught romping, stretching, and acting adorably. Each shot is paired with a famous (or not-so-famous) quotation about our favorite furry friends that complements the photograph purrfectly, and describes cats in a way that all feline aficionados will be able to appreciate. Rights sold: Russian

Mutt Mugs

5” x 7” 128pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $12.95 US Retail There is something about a mutt that evokes fierce loyalty from dog lovers, and this book showcases 60 of the scruffiest, puffiest, scrawniest, and feistiest mutts (and pure-bred dogs) anywhere! A collection of famous (and not-so-famous) quotes about Man’s Best Friend is interspersed with precious photographs of a range of different cross-breeds. The result is a precious book that is perfect on a coffee table or as a gift. Rights Sold: Russian

I Love You, Mom 5” x 6” 64pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $9.99 US Retail

In this book, the unique relationship between mother and child is brought to life through adorable full-color photographs of animal mothers and their young, accompanied by insightful quotations. From the hilarious to the profound, I Love You, Mom showcases the full range of love between mother and child and makes for the perfect heartfelt gift title. Rights Sold: Japanese, Russian

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The Llama Sutra: Getting Wild in the Wild Kingdom

9/13/07

10:33 AM

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Page 12

I don’t mind telling you, this foot fetish of yours is a little weird.

5” x 6” 64pp 4-color throughout Hardcover November 2006 $9.95 US Retail

In The Llama Sutra, author Ward Calhoun offers a comedic look at the love lives of creatures big and small. Each color photo is accompanied by preposterous pillow talk – which just goes to show, when it comes to sex, there’s not much that separates man from beast 12

Rights Sold: English (UK & Commonwealth), French (World), Greek, Italian, Russian

The Mutt Book: Decoding Your Dog’s Heritage 8-1/2” x 10-1/2” 192pp 4-color throughout Paperback with flaps $24.95 US Retail

With this book, the reader learns how to identify physical traits that can be used to decode a mutt’s ancestry. The book features extensive descriptions of the different characteristics of pure breed dogs, which are used to help to unravel the puzzle that is a mutt’s heritage. Featuring more than sixty wonderful dogs with gloriously mixed backgrounds, The Mutt Book helps readers get to know their mutts like never before. World Rights Available

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30

gift

gift and humor Brick Book series: Nature 7” x 5” 544pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $19.95 US Retail

Our super-chunky Brick Books are here with nine timeless subjects. Each thick-like-a-brick title features subjects of persistent fascination through dramatic images, poignant quotes, and interesting facts about them. These gift books are perfect for any coffee table. Rights Sold: English (UK and Commonwealth only), Russian

Although males and females look alike, males usually have larger bodies and bills.

“There, in the center of the web, neatly woven in block letters, was a message. It said: SOME PIG!” —E. B. White

9

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popular culture Brick Book series: Celebrities 7” x 5” 544pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $19.95 US Retail

Our super-chunky Celebrity Brick Books celebrate popular figures of the entertainment industry with dramatic images, poignant quotes, and interesting facts. Rights Sold: Japanese: Audrey Hepburn, Johnny Depp, Marilyn Monroe, Michael Jackson, Leonardo DiCaprio; Polish: Audrey Hepburn, Brigitte Bardot, Elvis Presley, Grace Kelly, Heath Ledger, Jack Nicholson, Johnny Depp, Katharine Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Robert DeNiro, Sophia Loren, Woody Allen; Russian: Audrey Hepburn, Brigitte Bardot, Grace Kelly, Katharine Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe, Sophia Loren

Marilyn Monroe

Leonardo DiCaprio

Leonardo DiCaprio

“When I was young, I used to have this thing where I wanted to see everything. I used to think, how can I die without seeing every inch of this world?”

“I am not interested in money. I just want to be wonderful.” —Marilyn Monroe

BRICK

BOOKS BRICK

BOOKS

BOOKS

Johnny Depp

BRICK

A Photographic Celebration

BRICK

A Photographic Celebration

BOOKS

BRICK

Mari lyn Monroe

Johnny Depp A Photographic Celebration

BRICK

BOOKS

BOOKS

Heath Ledger

“He brought to the role of Ennis more than any of us could have imagined—a thirst for life, for love and for truth, and a vulnerability that made everyone who knew him love him. His death is heartbreaking.” —Ang Lee, director of BrokeBack Mountain

Heath Ledger A Photographic Celebration

BRICK

BOOKS

BRICK

BOOKS

Michael Jackson BRICK

BOOKS

“True cool never dies and Steve McQueen was cool for one simple reason: he was the real deal.” —GQ magazine

Clint Eastwood

Steve

A Photographic Celebration

Steve

BRICK

[Cute horse quote here]

BOOKS

McQueen

Michael Jackson’s Thriller is the best selling album of all time selling over 100 million copies and staying in Billboard’s Top 10 for over 80 weeks.

Michael Jackson

[Cute horse quote here]

McQueen BRICK

BOOKS

BRICK

BOOKS

A Photographic Celebration

BRICK

BRICK

BRICK

BOOKS

BOOKS

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BOOKS BRICK

BOOKS

A Photographic Celebration

31


popular culture Must-See Movies: An Essential Guide

1939

The Wizard of Oz Overview Genre: Musical/Fantasy Duration: 101 min Color: Black and White (Sepiatone), Color (Technicolor) Country: USA MPAA Rating: G Studio: MetroGoldwyn-Mayer (MGM)

5-3/4” x 7” 512pp 4-color throughout Flexibound $19.95 US Retail

A

n eye-popping fantasy movie, with musical numbers too! Judy Garland stars as Dorothy Gale, a girl who longs to leave her drab Kansas home for greener pastures. A sudden tornado grants her wish, as she, her dog Toto, and their house are blown into the sky and transported to the magical land of Oz. In this strange and beautiful place Dorothy encounters munchkins, witches, flying monkeys and even manages to make three friends along the way in the forms of a scarecrow, a tin man, and a cowardly lion. As she and her friends seek out the elusive Wizard, Dorothy comes to realize that home wasn’t such a bad place after all. A great film for kids and adults alike.

Sometimes a movie has such a strong pull that, after viewing it, you want everybody you know – and even strangers – to see it. From dramas to comedies, international classics to Hollywood musicals, Must-See Movies offers a delightful array of films for cinematic enjoyment.

Cast

Behind the Scenes

Judy Garland: Dorothy Gale Ray Bolger: Hunk/Scarecrow Bert Lahr: Zeke/Cowardly Lion Jack Haley: Hickory/Tin Man Billie Burke: Glinda Margaret Hamilton: Elmira Gulch/Wicked Witch of the West

Director: Victor Fleming Writers: L. Frank Baum (novel), Noel Langley, Florence Ryerson, and Edgar Allan Woolf (screenplay) Producer: Mervyn LeRoy Film Editor: Blanche Sewell Cinematographer: Harold Rosson

Awards

Trivia

Oscar Winners: Best Music—Original Song Oscar Nominations: Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography, Best Effects—Special Effects, Best Picture

• The horses of the Emerald City were coated with Jell-O crystals. Their scenes were filmed quickly, before the horses started licking their sugary coating.

500

Rights Sold: English (UK & Commonwealth)

Guitar Heroes: From Blues to Rock and Beyond 10-3/8” x 11” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover

Jimi henDrix

32

J

essential albums with the Jimi hendrix exPerience 1967 Are You Experienced 1967 Axis: Bold as Love 1968 Electric Ladyland live

1970 1970

Band of Gypsys The Jimi Hendrix Experience/ Otis Redding at Monterey

Posthumous releAses 1971 The Cry of Love 1971 Rainbow Bridge 1972 War Heroes 1974 Loose Ends

imi Hendrix (born November 27, 1942, in Seattle, Washington; died September 18, 1970, in London, England) was a feverishly innovative guitarist, known for his experimental, unmistakable sound and his tragically short career. Considered a genius and one of the best guitarists of all time, his mark on modern music is incalculable. As a child in an unstable household, Hendrix (born Johnny Allen Hendrix) spent his early years shuffling between the United States and Vancouver, Canada, where his grandmother lived. His shyness led him to practice the guitar nonstop, first with a used model he acquired at 15, and then with a Supro Ozark he purchased with his father’s assistance. Inspired by Chuck Berry and Elvis Presley and the records of B.B. King and Muddy Waters, Hendrix dropped out of high school to hone his wild playing skills in several bands. After a lackluster stint in the U.S. Army, Hendrix moved to the southern United States and embedded himself in the influential Chitlin’ Circuit, a breeding ground and network of concert venues that showcased black performers and R&B and blues-based music. The year 1964 saw a move to New York City’s Harlem for Hendrix, where he gained exposure at the Apollo Theater and landed a recording deal with the Isley Brothers. Hendrix spent the next few years bouncing from gig to gig, contributing to some early recordings that would only gain attention after his ascent to fame.

A series of serendipitous meetings beginning in 1966 led Hendrix to London. There he changed the spelling of his first name and formed the Jimi Hendrix Experience with bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell, following the “power trio” model set by Cream. Hendrix also jammed with Eric Clapton and Pete Townshend, cementing his extreme popularity in Europe. Recording contracts and records followed, with the first album Are You Experienced (1967) nearly overtaking the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’s No. 1 chart position. American success would follow after Hendrix met Frank Zappa in the summer of 1967. Fascinated by Zappa’s new wah-wah peddle, Hendrix quickly incorporated it into his repertoire and pushed its possibilities to the limit. The Jimi Hendrix Experience would record two more albums and continue to expand its presence worldwide, giving Hendrix the opportunity to indulge his eccentric perfectionism, as well as explore the boundaries of his art. The Experience disbanded in 1969, playing a dramatic last concert to a rioting crowd in Denver. After the Experience, Hendrix played with a hired group he dubbed Gypsy Sun and Rainbows. Together they played Woodstock and made a number of highly visible TV appearances. Hendrix also released a live record, Band of Gypsys. In the midst of a grueling tour, Hendrix was found dead in his basement suite at a London hotel in September 1970.

From the pioneers of blues to today’s arena rock stars and cutting-edge indie talents, Guitar Heroes explores the lives, career highs (and lows), and common links among a diverse selection of the world’s greatest guitarists. With a special emphasis on playing style and technique—as well as on some of history’s truly legendary guitars—each hero’s mark on music is captured alongside brilliant shots of a guitar virtuoso in action.

Left and above: Hendrix performing at the Newport Jazz Festival, 1969

70 | Guitar Heroes

Guitar Heroes | 71

Rights Sold: Russian

A Field Guide to Monsters 5-1/2” x 8-1/4” 192pp 4-color throughout Paperback $14.95 US Retail

136 • A FIELD GUIDE TO MONSTERS

SUPERNATURAL MONSTERS • 137

Length: 6 feet 4 inches

Family: Vampire Aristocracy

Weight: 180 pounds

Origin: Transylvania, Romania

Romanian Prince Vlad Dracula became a fierce warrior exacting revenge on those that murdered his father. After a fierce and bloody rein, which included impaling his enemies on large wooden stakes by the thousands, he was murdered, damned by the church and rose from the dead after making a deal with Satan. His goal is to repopulate the Earth with legions and followers of not quite living, but Grateful, Dead. So far he has been quite successful in his mission—just look at Willem Dafoe, Calista Flockhart, Lara Flynn Boyle and Marc Anthony. They must be on this earth to do Dracula’s bidding…how else can you explain their uber-emaciated bodies? BEHAVIOR: The originator of the “night shift” sleeps all day and seeks to increase his following by stalking victims in villages and cities where beautiful women and influential men like to be kissed on the neck.

This fabulously illustrated book is filled with fun monster facts, including how big monsters can grow, where they live, and what they feed on. You can quickly flip through A Field Guide to Monsters and read up on their size, their place of origins, and, most importantly, how to protect yourself against them – or, in extreme circumstances, kill them! Great for film buffs or serious monster hunters. Containing hundreds of dramatic photographs of the world’s scariest monsters, this is a spoof on field guides that takes Movie Monsters very seriously. Rights Sold: Chinese (Simplified)

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Habitat: Castles, old abbeys, decaying mansions. Intelligence:BB BBBBBBBBBBBB

COUNT VLAD DRACULA LETHALITY: Like a lawyer he sucks you dry and then expects you to thank him. His bites cause death, then undeath and, infrequently, your own sequel film. WEAKNESSES: Casts no shadow or reflection. Hates crosses, daylight and Christian religious symbols, holy water, bottled water, garlic in any form and wooden stakes and silver bullets and daggers. Likes to match wits

with vampire hunters. Must sleep all day in coffin with native soil. When starved for blood he begins to show his age, something he can do at will if necessary. POWERS: Can morph into a wolf, bat or cloud of mist. Has hypnotic stare. Has the ability to change his features, but this can take years to do, but does explain the difference of appearance over time.

First Appearance: Draculas (1931)

Endorsements: Red Cross

Relatives: Three wives, one son, one daughter are known, mother (Lilith, rumored)

Description: White hair, red lips, black hair.

wouldn’t be caught dead in casual wear


33

Presidents: Every Question Answered 7 1/2” x 9 3/4” 400pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $29.95 US Retail

FI FTY STATES

FIFTY STATES

50 States: Every Question Answered

E V E RY

7 1/2” x 9 3/4” 400pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $29.95 US Retail

QUESTION

EVERY QUESTION ANSWERED

ANSWERED EDITED BY WARD CALHOUN

World Rights Available Page 1

The Illustrated

Illustrated History of WEAPONRY

WEAPONRY From Flint Axes to Automatic Weapons

Goering’s Baton AK 47

The Illustrated Life of Jesus 8-1/8” x 10-1/2” 304pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $29.95 US Retail

Rights Sold: Dutch, English (World), German, Polish, Romanian, Spanish (Latin America)

Spanish Main Guache Persian Scimitar

The Illustrated History of Weaponry

Chinese Battle Axe

Gatling Gun

Apache Combination Pistol

Chuck Wills

In Association with the Berman Museum

T

EAST ASIA

The Eastward Journey of Buddhism MONGOLIA

Black Sea

CAUCASUS MOUNTAINS

ar

L. Ysyk

ya

uD Am

THE SILK ROAD

Gaochang

cities Silk Road

TIAN SHAN

ar ya

Anxi

xu (O

TURKEY

s)

Asia Minor

rD

Dunhuang

Kashgar

Ti gr Antioch

Cyprus Mediterranean Sea

The major branches of Buddhism were disseminated eastward along different routes, traveling primarily along preexisting trade routes. Foremost of these was the overland Silk Road, which stretched some 4,000 miles (6,400 km) across most of Asia.

Yellow River

Caspian Sea

L.Van is

CHINA

L.Urmia

Eu ph ra tes

HIMALAYAS HINDU KUSH

TIBET Chang’an

ZAGROS MOUNTAINS

PERSIA

ARABIA

First built in 652 CE in Chang’an (modern Xi’an), the Big Wild Goose Pagado was rebuilt in 704 and indicates the importance of Buddhism by this time in this eastern city along the Silk Road.

The arrival of Buddhism was the most significant dominant religion in most of Southeast Asia. Mahayana Buddhism, the other main branch of the religious development in East and Southeast Asia religion, took a different route east, largely carried during the millennium that spans the dawn of the on the Silk Road through Central Asia into China, Common Era. Along with Hinduism, Buddhism is one of the few religions to have spread so widely through largely r ve Ri peaceful means, unattached to w KOREA JAPAN llo Ye warfare, invasion, forcible conversion, or colonization. By 500 ce, roughly a millentze nium after the birth of the Buddha ng Ga TIBET Ya ng CHINA (c. 563 bce), the tradition that he es tra Brahmapu founded in India had spread as far TAIWAN east as the Pacific Ocean. Each of MYANMAR the cultures that received Buddhist INDIA PACIFIC teachings absorbed some elements OCEAN VIETNAM of the dharma, or doctrine. These Bay Of Bengal CAMBODIA principles of Buddhism were often commingled with the extant reliSPREAD OF BUDDHISM IN SOUTHEAST gious traditions, so that during this ASIA, C. 500 BCE–500 CE Anuradhapura Sri Lanka period Buddhism not only gained cities in geographic spread, but in variTheravada Buddhism ety of worship and practice as well. Mahayana Buddhism INDONESIA Indian Ocean Buddhism traveled east from India over two principal routes, generally carrying the two main branches of the religion to different regions. The Theravada school, one of the original eighteen schools of Buddhism that Vietnam, and Korea. Eventually, Mahayana Buddhism reached Japan, though not until it had been well flourished under Indian emperor Ashoka (268–232 established in mainland East Asia. Another important bce), was carried east from the island of Sri Lanka, an early Buddhist center established by Ashoka’s son, branch of Buddhism was later established in Tibet, in the seventh century ce. Mahinda. This branch of Buddhism is still the g on Mek

WORLD RELIGIONS

11” x 14” 400pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $60.00 US Retail

Rights Sold: Chinese (Simplified), Czech, Dutch, English (UK and Commonwealth), Finnish, German, Polish, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish

Sy

THE ATLAS OF

The Atlas of World Religions: A Visual History of Our Great Faiths

8-1/4” x 10-7/8” 240pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $29.95 US Retail

s

THE

History of

Indu

11:23 AM

Salween

3/2/06

Ind us

DUMMY.qxd

history and religion

THE NORTHERN ROUTE 

Silk production in China, according to legend, began in 3000 bce with the mythical Yellow Emperor, whose wife was said to have initiated the craft. While other products from China were exported in trade, it was silk that was the

THE ANCIENT SPLENDOR OF ANURADHAPURA 

In Sri Lanka’s north-central region, the city of Anuradhapura once rose high above the dense jungle. One of the ancient world’s largest and most splendid cities, Anuradhapura covered over 250 square miles. Archaeological finds have been supported by descriptions of the city found in the early Sri Lankan Pali text the Mahavamsa. During the fourth century BCE, when Buddhism arrived on the island, a succession of kings built enormous temples and stupas, which housed relics of the Buddha. Many are still standing today. The largest of these is the Jetavanaramaya stupa, the tallest brick structure ever built and the highest structure in the ancient world after the pyramids of Giza. Other magnificent buildings here include the Maha Vihara, a Theravadin temple, and the Abhayagiri Vihara, a Mahayana temple. Several important large monasteries surrounding the city have recently been excavated. Anuradhapura was said to be the home of the legendary king Ravana, according to the Hindu text the Ramayana.

most prized. Hence the name the “Silk Road,” which describes the ancient trade routes that have long connected China to points east (Korea and Japan), west (India, western Asia, and Europe), and southwest (the east coast of Africa). Along these routes China imported several important products, including jade and gold. Buddhism, especially Mahayana Buddhism, which was centered in northern India, traveled along these roads as well. Monks, merchants, and pilgrims traveled the dusty and sometimes treacherous route from India to China. Along the way, Buddhist centers were established in Central Asia, often coexisting with the many other cultural and religious traditions that were found along these roads, primarily Turkish and Persian. The earliest documented pilgrim to come from China to India seeking Buddhist teachings was Fa Xian (338–422 ce), who traveled as far west as Lumbini, Buddha’s birthplace in northern India, before returning to China by way of Southeast Asia.

EAST BY SOUTHEAST 

Indian religion. Buddhism in Southeast Asia remains a syncretic religion, fusing elements of Hinduism, Buddhism, and indigenous spirit worship and shamanism. Myanmar (Burma) was an early adopter of Buddhism, beginning in the time of Emperor Ashoka. The Mon ethnic group was dominant here in the early centuries of the Common Era; at its height in the twelfth century, the Mon kingdom incorporated much of present–day Thailand and Laos. It is believed that Theravada Buddhism spread from the southern region of Myanmar to Thailand and Cambodia, both countries where Theravada Buddhism is still widely practiced. Buddhism in Indonesia took a different route, arriving later (in the seventh century), thriving through the Middle Ages, and then falling off with the arrival of Islam in the fifteenth century. Compared with other Southeast Asian countries, Vietnam had stronger trade and cultural links with China than with India, and Mahayana Buddhism became the dominant religion there.

With more than 200 maps and 300 photographs & illustrations, The Atlas of World Religions vividly chronicles the development of faith and worship from ancient times to the twenty-first century. Detailed explanations of religious events, biographies of leaders, a glossary of terms, and a helpful 20-page chronology of religious history make this unique title the key to unlocking thousands of years of fascinating history. 112  ATLAS OF WORLD RELIGIONS

A Visual History of Our Great Faiths

Rights Sold: Slovenian

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Sri Lanka was one of the earliest Buddhist centers outside mainland India. The Theravada school was the dominant form here for centuries, beginning with the arrival of some 250 monks brought by Mahinda around 250 bce. Already a major trade hub, with marine routes linking the island to Southeast Asia, Sri Lanka became a starting point for Buddhist missionaries. At the same time, both merchants and missionaries were carrying Buddhism eastward from mainland India as well. Indian culture and religion had already influenced many Southeast Asian countries, so Buddhism essentially became another layer of

Jetavanaramaya stupa in Sri Lanka rises more than 400 feet (122 m) high.


34

sex Sex 101: 101 Positions to Add Spice to Your Sex Life 4-7/8” x 6-3/8” 224pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $14.95 US Retail

The essential book on lovemaking positions, Sex 101 includes all the positions in the Kama Sutra, plus exciting variations on its many themes. Stunning photography combined with funny tongue-in-cheek position names make this a handy, entertaining must-have for every bed-side table. Rights Sold: Bulgarian, Chinese (Complex), Czech, English (ANZ, UK), French (World), German, Greek, Italian, Polish, Turkish

Advanced Sex: 99 Positions for the Sexually Adventurous 4-7/8” x 6-3/8” 224pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $14.95 US Retail

Advanced Sex picks up right where Sex 101 lets off, offering adventurous couples another assortment of unique, creative positions and advanced techniques. With beautiful photography and a handy checklist, Advanced Sex will help you increase your expertise in bed, and have the sex life you’ve always wanted. Rights Sold: Bulgarian, Chinese (Complex), English (ANZ, UK), German, Hungarian, Italian, Polish, Turkish

Sex Masters: The Ultimate Challenge

SEX MASTERS THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE FOXX

4-7/8” x 6-3/8” 224pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $14.95 US Retail $14.95 US /

SEX MASTERS THE ULTIMATE CHALLENGE

Higher in Canada

Limber couples seeking challenging sexual positions—and voyeurs of all persuasions—will regale in Sex Masters, the latest and greatest title in the popular Randi Foxx sex-positions trilogy. Picking up where she left off with Advanced Sex, Sex Masters showcases difficult, provocative, and exciting positions such as The Circle of Pleasure, Shucking the Oyster, and The Shrieking Monkey. Plus, warm up and get limber by revisiting some of your old favorites, as shown in the helpful illustrated checklist cataloguing the 200 positions from Randi’s first two books, Sex 101 and Advanced Sex.

The final book in the Randi Foxx trilogy of sex techniques, Sex Masters adds another one hundred outrageous positions to experiment with to spice up any love life. Photography and step-by-step instructions guide the reader through each move, and In the photographic tradition of the first two a checklist at the beginning and ending make sure the reader doesn’t miss a single books in the series, the photography in Sex Masters is both beautiful and stimulating. one! Sizzling with fantasy, fetish, and toys,

Sex Masters is a masterpiece of fiery abandon.

Rights Sold: Chinese (Complex), Polish, Turkish

RANDI FOXX ISBN: 1-59258-255-9 ISBN-13: 978-1-59258-255-6 www.hylaspublishing.com

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sex Fetish 101: Explore Your Fantasies 4-7/8” x 6-3/8” 224pp 4-color throughout Hardcover $14.95 US Retail

Compiled by the editor of Marquee Magazine, this tiny book contains a brief accounting of 101 different fetishes, each given a spread, with a photo and description. Unlike many fetish books, this title is done with style - if you’re looking for a classy companion that highlights the beauty of fetish, this is the book for you. Rights Sold: German

The New Kama Sutra: A Visual Guide to the Art of Making Love 8-1/2” x 10-7/8” 160pp 4-color throughout Hardcover

In The New Kama Sutra, sexual explorers will find a modern interpretation of the text from the original ancient Indian book of erotic love juxtaposed side-by-side with specially commissioned illustrations, modern color photographs, and detailed how-to instructions. The focus of the practice is on pleasing your partner as much as pleasing yourself. Rights Sold: French (World), German, Polish, Russian, Turkish

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35


Dogopedia!

COMI N AUTU G MN 2014

9” x 12” 320pp 4-color throughout Hardcover September 2014 $49.95 US Retail

This is the most comprehensive illustrated book about dogs ever published­—Dogopedia! features over 400 breeds from every corner of the globe. Packed with full-color annotated photographs of each breed, the book includes images of puppies for most breeds, and every breed’s coat colors and types. With information on temperament, trainability, history, size, health and exercise needs, this book is the ultimate resource for dog lovers. Rights Sold: English (North America), Russian

000 DESIGNER DOGS

000 SPITZ-TYPE DOGS

SPITZ-TYPE DOGS

FINNISH LAPPHUND

SIBERIAN HUSKY The Siberian Husky is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. Siberian Husky puppies dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud

AT-A-GLANCE Temperment: Calm Exercise: Little Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health: Good

STANDARDS Group - Non-Sporting (Giant / Standard / Miniature) / Toy (Toy / Teacup)

BACK The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail.

SHOULDERS Strong, smoothly muscled shoulders. The shoulder blade is well laid back.

BODY The correct poodle body should be exactly square.

STANDARDS Group - Spitz-Type Weight -70lbs Height- 24” Alternative Names - None Life Expectancy - 12 years Growth - Poodles under one year of age are considered puppies Gait - A straightforward trot with light springy action and strong hindquarters

TAIL Straight, set on high and carried up, docked of sufficient length to insure a balanced outline.

Weight - 45-70lbs Height (at highest point of shoulders) - Standard: over 15”, Miniature: between 10” and 15”, Toy: under 10”

CHEST Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

Alternative Names - None Life Expectancy - Toy-14 / Standard-12 / Giant10

FORELEGS Straight and parallel when viewed from the front.

Growth - Poodles under one year of age are considered puppies Gait - A straightforward trot with light springy action and strong hindquarters drive. Head and tail carried up. Sound effortless movement is essential. Training - Poodles are intelligent and responsive. They need discipline and may benefit from professional training

LOINS Short, broad and muscular. HIND LEGS Straight and parallel when viewed from the rear. Muscular with width in the region of the stifles which are well bent.

PAWS The feet are rather small, oval in shape with toes well arched and cushioned on thick firm pads.

HEALTH RISKS Progressive Retinal Atrophy (see Page 000) Corneal Dystrophy (see Page 000) Legg-Calve’-Perthes (see Page 000) Patella sub-luxation (see Page 000) Epilepsy (see Page 000) Hypothyroidism (see Page 000) Cryptorchidism (see Page 000) Mitral Valve Disease (see Page 000) Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (see Page 000)

Cushings Disease (see Page 000)

The Finnish Lapphund is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. The Poodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed.

BEHAVIORAL INFORMATION Abilities - Poodles are clever retrievers and swimmers. Temperament - Carrying himself proudly, very active, intelligent, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. Major fault: shyness or sharpness. Lifestyle needs - Poodles need attention, control, and exercise. Toy poodles are happy in apartments; the larger sizes need room to run

COAT COLORS

CHEST Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

HINDLEGS The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail. PAWS Straight and parallel when viewed from the front.

AT-A-GLANCE Temperment: Active Exercise: Needs a lot Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health Risks: Epilepsy, Hip Displacia Lifestyle Needs: needs to be able to run often Training: Easy Country of Origin: Finland COAT The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail. FORELEGS Straight and parallel when viewed from the front. PAWS Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

FINNISH SPITZ The Finnish Spitz is a very active, intelligent and elegantappearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. The Poodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly.

000

EARS Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

AT-A-GLANCE Temperment: Active Exercise: Needs a lot Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health Risks: Epilepsy, Hip Displacia Lifestyle Needs: needs to be able to run often Training: Easy Country of Origin: Finland

CHEST Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

DESIGNER DOGS 000

LABRADOODLE

COCKAPOO

The Labradoodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself.

The Cockapoo is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. The Poodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed.

AT-A-GLANCE Temperment: Calm Exercise: Little Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health: Good

BEHAVIORAL INFORMATION Abilities - Poodles are clever retrievers and swimmers. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed at nisi id ante tempus tincidunt. Nam tincidunt, sapien a rutrum gravida, quam erat sodales quam, sed eleifend velit ante ac purus Temperament - Carrying himself proudly, very active, intelligent, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. Major fault: shyness or sharpness. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed at nisi id ante tempus tincidunt. Nam tincidunt, sapien a rutrum gravida, quam erat sodales quam, sed eleifend velit ante ac purus Lifestyle needs - Poodles need attention, control, and exercise. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Sed at nisi id ante tempus tincidunt. Nam tincidunt, sapien a rutrum gravida, quam erat.

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EARS The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail.

MUZZLE The correct poodle body should be exactly square.

CHEST Straight, set on high and carried up, docked of sufficient length to insure a balanced outline.

BACK Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

LEGS Straight and parallel when viewed from the rear. Muscular with width in the region of the stifles which are well bent.

PAWS The feet are rather small, oval in shape with toes well arched and cushioned on thick firm pads.

ORIGINS: Labrador / Poodle

COAT COLORS

PUGGLE

AT-A-GLANCE EARS Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

The Puggle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. The Poodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly.

Temperment: Active Exercise: Needs a lot Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health Risks: Epilepsy, Hip Displacia Lifestyle Needs: needs to be able to run often Training: Easy Country of Origin: Finland

CHEST Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

HINDLEGS The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail.

ORIGINS: Pug / Beagle

PAWS Straight and parallel when viewed from the front.

Cushings Disease (see Page 000)

NON-SPORTING DOGS

NON-SPORTING DOGS 000

POODLE

AT-A-GLANCE Temperment: Calm Exercise: Little Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health: Good

The Poodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant-appearing dog, squarely built, well proportioned, moving soundly and carrying himself proudly. Properly clipped in the traditional fashion and carefully groomed, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. SHOULDERS Strong, smoothly muscled shoulders. The shoulder blade is well laid back and ap-

Poodle puppies dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco

HEALTH RISKS

Weight - 45-70lbs Height (at highest point of shoulders) - Standard: over 15”, Miniature: between 10” and 15”, Toy: under 10”

Life Expectancy - Toy-14 / Standard-12 / Giant10 Growth - Poodles under one year of age are considered puppies Gait - A straightforward trot with light springy action and strong hindquarters drive. Head and tail carried up. Sound effortless movement is essential. Training - Poodles are intelligent and responsive. They need discipline and may benefit from professional training

HIND LEGS Hind legs straight and parallel when viewed from the rear. Muscular with width in the region of the stifles which are well bent; femur and tibia are about equal in length; hock to heel short and perpendicular to the ground. When standing, the rear toes are only slightly behind the point of the rump.

CHEST Chest deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

FORELEGS Straight and parallel when viewed from the front. When viewed from the side the elbow is directly below the highest point of the shoulder. The pasterns are strong.

Authorities concede that the large, or Standard, Poodle is the oldest of the three varieties, and that the dog gained special fame as a water worker. So widely was it used as retriever that it was shorn of portions of its coat to further facilitate progress in swimming. Thence came the custom of clipping to pattern which so enhanced the style and general appearance that its sponsors, particularly in France, were captivated by it. All of the Poodle’s ancestors were acknowledged to be good swimmers, although one member of

Group - Non-Sporting (Giant / Standard / Miniature) / Toy (Toy / Teacup)

Alternative Names - None

Corded/Curly

TAIL Tail straight, set on high and carried up, docked of sufficient length to insure a balanced outline.

LOINS The loin is short, broad and muscular.

BODY The correct poodle body should be exactly square, breastbone to tail base equals withers to ground.

HISTORY

STANDARDS

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (see Page 000) Corneal Dystrophy (see Page 000) Legg-Calve’-Perthes (see Page 000) Patella sub-luxation (see Page 000) Epilepsy (see Page 000) Hypothyroidism (see Page 000) Cryptorchidism (see Page 000) Mitral Valve Disease (see Page 000) Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (see Page 000)

COAT TYPES: BACK The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail, with the exception of a slight hollow just behind the shoulder.

STANDARDS Group - Spitz-Type Weight -70lbs Height- 24” Alternative Names - None Life Expectancy - 12 years Growth - Poodles under one year of age are considered puppies Gait - A straightforward trot with light springy action and strong hindquarters

Temperment: Active Exercise: Needs a lot Child Friendly: Yes Grooming: Often Life Expectancy: 14 yrs Cost of Upkeep: $$$ Health Risks: Epilepsy, Hip Displacia Lifestyle Needs: needs to be able to run often Training: Easy Country of Origin: Finland

PAWS Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs.

000)

000

AT-A-GLANCE

COAT The topline is level, neither sloping nor roached, from the highest point of the shoulder blade to the base of the tail.

ORIGINS: Cocker Spaniel / Poodle

COAT Strong, smoothly muscled shoulders. The shoulder blade is well laid back.

HEALTH RISKS Progressive Retinal Atrophy (see Page 000) Corneal Dystrophy (see Page 000) Legg-Calve’-Perthes (see Page 000) Patella sub-luxation (see Page 000) Epilepsy (see Page 000) Hypothyroidism (see Page 000) Cryptorchidism (see Page 000) Mitral Valve Disease (see Page 000) Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (see Page

EARS Deep and moderately wide with well sprung ribs. MUZZLE Straight and parallel when viewed from the front.

PAWS The feet are rather small, oval in shape with toes well arched and cushioned on thick firm pads. Nails short but not exces-

BEHAVIORAL INFORMATION Abilities - Poodles are clever retrievers and swimmers. Temperament - Carrying himself proudly, very active, intelligent, the Poodle has about him an air of distinction and dignity peculiar to himself. Major fault: shyness or sharpness. Lifestyle needs - Poodles need attention, control, and exercise. Toy poodles are happy in apartments; the larger sizes need room to run around. Problem behaviors - Reserved around strangers; sometimes hyperactive.

For rights information on all titles, please contact Karen Prince kprince@moseleyroad.com

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididlaboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididlaboris nisi ut aliquip

COAT COLORS: Apricot / Black / Silver / Golden / White / Brown / Cafe-Au-Lait

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Spring 2014 Rights Catalog  

Moseley Road International Rights and Packaging

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