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Air & Water

Sept 09 2010 3rd edition

Top 3 Places with the best Quality air.

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outh Land, New Zealand The South Island of New Zealand has an advantageous location, receiving winds from that originate from relatively unpopulated areas. If you want your air to be even cleaner you’ll take advantage a plain ride around Mount Cook where, as you explore the snow-covered mountain peaks, you’ll have the chance to breathe some of the cleanest air available in the world.

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ahiti’s wildly unpopulated landscapes are the perfect breeding ground for clean air. Nearby Papeete, on the other hand, is one of the dirtiest air sources on earth,

made so by excessive use of old automobiles. Kiteboarders and surfers love Tahiti, specifically Bora Bora, because of the lack of large manufacturing companies and industrial buildings available to pollute the islands.

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he lakes of Patagonia, located at the southern tip of South America, usually register a whopping “zero” on the pollution monitors for the majority of the calendar year. The cleaner Southern Hemisphere combined with plenty of rain makes the air here very enjoyable. Grab your hiking boots and hit the trails. -Source Jennifer Gregory “Ratestogo. com”

Water Purness Though the drinking water supply across much of the U.S. meets the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Safe Drinking Water standards, contaminant concentrations do vary from city to city. Forbes.com found that the metropolitan statistical areas with some of the cleanest water on tap include Des Moines, Iowa; Austin, Texas; and Sioux Falls, S.D. Behind The Numbers To create our list, Forbes.com examined data from consumer confidence reports provided annually by community water systems and compiled by University of Cincinnati researchers in 2006 in its “United States Drinking Water Quality Study Report.” The report covers 77 metropolitan statistical areas--about 62% of the population in the contiguous U.S. Forbes.com’s rankings are based on levels of the cloudiness of water or turbidity, bacteria, haloacetic acids--a byproduct of drinking water disinfection--and lead. - Source Allison Van Dusen Forbes.com

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