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The Shops at wailea

THe shopping Dining Arts & THe shopping Dining Arts & culture magazine

fall/winter 2017-2018

culture magazine


THE COSMOGRAPH DAYTONA Rooted in the history of motor sports and watchmaking, the legendary chronograph that was born to race. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

rolex

oyster perpetual, cosmograph and daytona are ÂŽ trademarks.


OYSTER PERPETUAL COSMOGR APH DAY TONA


center information to Maui’s premier shopping and dining destination. With more than 70 distinct boutiques, shops, restaurants and galleries, The Shops at Wailea offers an unparalleled leisure experience in the heart of the Wailea Resort. For a map of the center and a store directory, please see page 44. For a list of center events, please see page 8. WELCOME

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

PARKING

From within Wailea resort area Take Wailea Alanui Drive to the intersection of Wailea Ike Drive and look for our monument signs.

One hour free parking. Three additional hours free parking with validation. Or $3 per half hour, $40 per day maximum or lost ticket.

From Pi‘ilani Highway Take Wailea Ike Drive toward the ocean until you reach the traffic light at Wailea Alanui Drive. Turn either right or left onto Wailea Alanui Drive. Entrances to the center are located immediately following in either direction.

HOURS

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Monday-Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Select merchants and restaurants open earlier and remain open later. For more information, please call the management office at 808.891.6770.


The Shops

at wailea magazine

the shops at wailea

3750 Wailea Alanui Drive, Wailea-Makena, HI 96753 (808) 891-6770 www.theshopsatwailea.com General Manager Brian K. Yano (S) The Festival Companies Director of Marketing Denise Hart The Festival Companies

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O‘AHU Sales

Group Publisher Buddy Moore Account Executive Debbie De Mello Circulation & Marketing Sidney Louie Customer Service Representative Jordan Sutton WAILEA Editorial

Senior Editor Simplicio Paragas Editor Kristen Nemoto Assistant Editor Jasmine Hu CREATIVE

Chief Creative Officer Haines Wilkerson Design Director Jane Frey Regional Editorial Director Margaret Martin Director of Photography Isaac Arjonilla Art Director Teri Samuels

Retouching Jerry Hartman Publication Services Director Kristine Miller Director of Manufacturing Donald Horton Technical Operations Manager Tony Thorne-Booth EXECUTIVE

President Donna W. Kessler Vice President of Operations Angela E. Allen Regional Vice President of Sales Courtney Fuhrmann Morris CoMMuniCations

Chairman William S. Morris III President & CEO William S. Morris IV where|HaWaii

Official publisher for The Shops at Wailea


The shops at Wailea

Events 8 / Concerts at the shops / market / Pau Hana

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FASHION

20 ACCESSORIES

DINING

Cool, breezy, chic looks that prove you can be both comfortable and fashionable.

Pick out the finishing touches for a stylish outfit and cozy home.

From casual to elegant, gastropubs to seafood, the Shops caters to a variety of tastes.

GIVING BACK

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HAWAIIAN CULTURE

The Shops partners with local organizations to promote good causes.

Learn about the history of hula, the traditional dance of the Islands.

map 42 / Directory 44 on the cover Model Haylee Kam chills by the pool at Hotel Wailea. Hat from Aloha Hat Company, cardigan from

Mahina, swimsuit from Maui Waterwear, sunglasses from Sunglass Hut, ring from Na Hoku. Hotel Wailea is Hawai‘i’s only Relais & Châteaux, offering 72 luxury one-bedroom suites with large, ocean-facing lanais. hotelwailea.com

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(COVER) ©SEBASTIAN SAYEGH. (THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©SEBASTIAN SAYEGH; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA(2). ON HAYLEE: DRESS, KELIKI; EARRINGS, RING AND BRACELET, TIFFANY; SHOES, BANANA REPUBLIC. ON JOEL: SHIRT, MAUI CLOTHING COMPANY; PANTS AND SHOES, TOMMY BAHAMA; WATCH, TIFFANY. MODELS; HAYLEE KAM, KATHY MULLER AGENCY; JOEL HEHN, PREMIER AGENCY

contents


Events Art, music, dance, crafts

ISLAND SONG Kalani Pe‘a performs on January 17.

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COncerts at the shops Napua Greig

December 20, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This distinguished recording artist has won many Na Hoku Hanohano Music awards for her albums “Pihana” and “Möhalu,” including Best Female Vocalist and Hawaiian Album of the Year. kalani pe’a

January 17, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This singer/songwriter made history when he became the first Hawaiian recording artist to win a Grammy Award for Best Regional Roots Music Album and a Na Hoku Hanohano Award for Contemporary Album of the Year with his debut album, “E Walea.”

polynesian Dance shows Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:30 – 6:30 pm Every Pacific Island nation has its unique style of dance, many of which you can enjoy at The Shops’ weekly Polynesian dance shows. Among the many talented performers is the troupe Manutea Nui E, who appear at The Shops on Thursdays.

(OPPOSITE PAGE) ADAM PALUMBO/VISION HORSE MEDIA©; (THIS PAGE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

Josh Tatofi

January 31, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Dubbed the “Luther Vandross of Hawai‘i,” this accomplished artist has been performing since the tender age of 13. Starting with a reggae sound, he found his voice in traditional Hawaiian music in 2014 and hasn’t looked back. Robert Cazimero

February 21, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Robert was half of one of Hawaiian music’s most successful acts, the Cazimero brothers. Since his brother’s passing in July 2017, Robert has continued to perform and spread their legacy for generations to come.

coconut frond weaving Every Thursday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm. Free. The coconut is one of the most versatile plants on the planet. From root to fruit, every part of this palm is useful. The fronds were used to make baskets, mats, jewelry and more. Join Hawaiian cultural expert Makahiwa Thompson for a journey into the art, lore and utility of coconuts and create your own souvenir.

John Cruz

March 21, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This talented artist has performed at all sorts of venues, from Bluesfest in Australia to headlining four galas during Barack Obama’s inauguration. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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events

jazz at the shops Every first Wednesday of the month, 5:30 – 7 pm Maui’s relaxing atmosphere goes hand-in-hand with The Shops’ latest offering—Jazz at The Shops. Let awardwinning musicians enchant you with their soulful jazz performances under the stars. The series features new musicians every month, each exhibiting his or her mastery of a variety of instruments, ranging from saxophones to guitars.

Every Friday, 4 - 6 pm Celebrate the end of the work week with some of Maui’s most beloved musicians and up-and-coming talents. From an ethereal harp in the upstairs Luxury Wing to Hawaiian-style guitar on the ground level near the surf shop, there’s no better way to relax. MUSIC MAN Singer/guitarist Randall Rospond performs a mix of folk, country and Americana music.

island wood carving Every Wednesday, 10:30 am – 1 pm; and every Friday, 12:30 – 3:30 pm The tradition of bone and wood carving is an important aspect of Tongan and Polynesian culture. At Tasini Tiki Gallery, learn about these cultures and see examples of carving artistry from owner Taani Tasini Lavaka, raised in Tonga. MASTERFUL WORKS Beautiful items in carved wood are found at Tasini Tiki Gallery.

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(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) ©POZNYAKOV/SHUTTERSTOCK; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2). (0PPOSITE PAGE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA

Pau Hana music


MOMENT OF ZEN

Pau Hana is such a civilized tradition. What better way to end the day than watching the sun set, cocktail in hand, as live music provides the soundtrack to this blissful moment.

PINEAPPLE YAZU MOJITO

KEY LIME MARTINI

HIBISCUS LIME COOLER

Cruzan citrus, muddled pineapple and mint, yuzu syrup, soda.

Van Gogh Blue, Licor 43, Këkë Beach Liqueur, lime, graham cracker.

Ketel One Vodka, Cointreau, lime juice, pineapple juice, hibiscus syrup. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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events

MARKET at the shops Second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 4 – 6 pm Fresh pineapple, mangos, avocados, garlic, specialty foods and artisanal goods. You’ll find all these and more at the Market at The Shops, a fun grocery shopping venue. The market provides a gathering place for residents and visitors alike and the chance to purchase farm-fresh and sustainably grown produce, while supporting local growers, producers and artisans. It’s a wonderful opportunity to talk with the vendors and learn about the food and products they sell. FRESH OFF THE FARM Just a sampling of the abundant fresh produce available at the new Market at The Shops.

Every Monday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm; and every Wednesday, 1:30 – 2:30 pm Flower crowns may be all the DIY rage right now—but Hawaiians have been rockin’ lei po‘o (head lei) since time immemorial. Craft your very own fresh floral headdress while learning about the many heartfelt Hawaiian mana‘o (ideas, intentions) behind harvesting, creating, wearing and gifting handmade lei. All the tools and materials needed to make a lei po‘o are provided. Held at the main fountain courtyard. All ages welcome. LOVELY LEI Create your own lei po‘o at one of The Shops’ twice-weekly classes.

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©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

lei po‘o making


Style of the Times Trendy looks from The Shops at Wailea Photography Sebastian Sayegh FASHION STYLING KYLE KAGAMIDA LOCATION hotel wailea


BEAUTIFULLY BREEZY (Opposite page) Dress, Mahina; earrings, bracelet, ring and shoes, Banana Republic; purse, Louis Vuitton. POLISHED TO PERFECTION (This page) Dress, Keliki; earrings, ring and bracelet, Tiffany.


POOLSIDE CHIC (Opposite page) Romper, Maui Clothing Company; earrings, ring and bracelet, Na Hoku. SOPHISTICATED SWIMMER (This page) Swimsuit and coverup, Canyon Beachwear; rings, Na Hoku.


SUITED AND BOOTED (This page) Jacket, pants and shoes, Banana Republic; purse, Louis Vuitton; necklace, Tiffany. DIVINE IN WINE (Opposite page) Top and skirt, Banana Republic; earrings, ring and bracelet, Na Hoku; clutch; Bottega Veneta; shoes, Mahina.


Model: Haylee KaM, KatHy Muller agency; WHere HaWaii coordinator: Kristen neMoto; Hair/MaKe-up: ry-n sHiMabuKu

The Amazing hotel wailea

Hotel Wailea is an intimate, romantic oasis that provides 180-degree, unobstructed ocean views of three Hawaiian Islands. With just 72 suites set on 15 acres, luxurious tranquility is a certainty. Visit hotelwailea.com for more information.


Pretty in pink With no winter on the island, you can dress like it’s spring/summer all year round. Stay cheery and bright with pink hues and gold jewelry.

sunglass hut

Stun the crowd with these cool, retro shades. aloha hat company

Shield yourself from the sun’s rays, even in the winter!

Baron & Leeds

mahina

Diamond-embellished earrings shine like a golden sun.

This golden bracelet is the perfect accessory for a chic, sleek look.

blue ginger

The only thing missing from this bag is the beach.

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quiksilver blue ginger

This dress will definitely make you feel like a true island girl.

These cute sandals are the perfect footwear for a stroll along the beach.


keliki

Tetra Drop Necklace in Neon Pink Chalcedony/14K Gold

cos bar

Go for the “no-makeup� makeup look with this neutral colored palette.

Island gourmet markets

Stay stylishly sustainable with this bright pink water bottle.

Sunglasses, Sunglass Hut; top, Mahina; jacket and shorts, Billabong. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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Cool sand look Bring the aloha spirit with trendy island wear that is bound to impress, both day and night.

sunglass hut

Keep them guessing with these cool sunblockers.

TOMMY BAHAMA

Enter full vacation mode with this fun fedora.

TOMMY BAHAMA

This classy, yet stylish watch is sure to stand out on your wrist.

TOMMY BAHAMA

Be the barbecue master with these handy tools. louis vuitton

This luxurious duffel bag is bound to turn heads wherever you go.

moonbow tropics

There’s nothing boring about a classic black shirt with a pop of pattern!

maui clothing company

Feel comfortably dapper in these sandy shoes.

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Shirt, Maui Clothing Company; pants, and shoes, Tommy Bahama; watch, Tiffany; bag, Bottega Veneta.

TOMMY BAHAMA

It’s all in the details—and this belt offers the perfect last touch to a sharp look.

billabong

Go from the beach straight to dinner in these effortless shorts.

quiksilver

Quench your thirst and rep the islands with this bottle. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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island living Find the perfect gifts for friends and family, or keep them for yourselves to spruce up your home and make it a private paradise.

soha living

With this pillow, you won’t even need to camp outside.

gottling home store

This beautiful Buddha statue gives off a sense of peace and serenity.

Island gourmet markets soha living

Everyone will be pining for this charming pineapplethemed decoration.

Keep the sand out of your belongings with this beachy pouch.

tommy bahama

Bring home the scent of the islands with these pineapple cilantro soaps and candles.

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cariloha

Wrap yourself in the warm comfort of these plush towels.

gottling home store

Nest your candles in these refined candle holders.

soha living

Defuse the tension and stress of the day with these diffusers. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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Child’s play Toys, books, clothes, totes—everything your child needs for his/her tropical adventure.

island gourmet markets

island gourmet markets

Let Limu teach your kids that the inside is what matters most.

This hydro football is perfect for the beaches and pools.

blue ginger

Dress your child in a shirt as colorful and bright as their personality. blue ginger

Lovely and dainty—fit for a princess.

quiksilver

These board shorts will definitely make a splash!

quiksilver

These slippers ensure a quick getaway for your keiki. 26

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whalers general store

Bring surfing Snoopy to the surf!

island gourmet markets

Kids are sure to have a whale of a time with this plush toy.


A Beach Boutique The Shops at Wailea

keliki.com t @keliki_hawaii


Photo credit

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HOOKED ON SEAFOOD Chefs lure in guests with fruits de mer By Simplicio Paragas Photography by STEVE CZERpNIA photography By isaac arjonilla

long gone are the

days when shoppers’ dining options were simply limited to burgers, tacos and slices of pizzas. Today, restaurants at The Shops at Wailea offer a gourmet experience, luring guests in with farm-to-table-inspired dishes and a sea change of gourmet appetizers and entrees. A favorite among locals and visitors alike since 1976, Longhi’s is well known for its iterations on Mediterranean coastal cuisine and supper-club elegance. The bestseller both day and night is the catch of the day, which is actually four different types of fresh fish prepared with delicacy and expertise. Diners in the mood for something light often look to appetizers, and many choose the famous Longhi’s artichoke, served with melted lemon-infused butter and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.

“We’re using the best, freshest, healthiest ingredients,” explains general manager Michael Rose. “It’s extra-virgin olive oil, it’s tomatoes, it’s whole grains, and stuff made from scratch so we know what’s going into it.” This season, the consummate dinner could start with a classic Caprese salad, composed of authentic Buffalo mozzarella, juicy red tomatoes and sweet basil, both local and organic. For the main course, opt for the Frenchinspired seared ahi au poivre, peppercorn-encrusted yellowfin tuna that’s seared and accompanied by Hawai‘i Island Ali‘i oyster mushrooms in a puddle of green-peppercorn-garlic-and-brandy sauce. Another option, the lobster Longhi is a titan: two one-pound Maine lobsters, clams and mussels, served over a bed of linguine with a spicy marinara sauce.

SUMPTUOUS SEAFOOD (From left) Longhi’s ahi au poivre is crusted with peppercorn, then quickly seared, and served with Ali‘i oyster mushrooms bathed in a brandy sauce. Ruth’s Chris’ seafood tower comes with Maine lobster, king crab legs and knuckles, colossal lump crab meat and jumbo cocktail shrimp. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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hooked on seafood

“What we provide is more than just a great meal but a great experience overall.” “In Hawai‘i, this fish is known as kale kale,” Pali explains. “It is mild in flavor, and its texture is moist and flaky when prepared right.” Another fruit-de-mer specialty here is the seared ahi katsu, which is wrapped in nori (seaweed) and then simply breaded with flour, egg and panko. Lightly fried to a medium-rare temperature, the ahi is then sliced and served with sushi rice, tsukemono (pickled vegetables), and drizzled with a homemade spicy mayo-and-soy glaze. “I want people to realize we take the food just as serious as [the designers] take the clothing line,” said Tommy Bahama culinary director Don Donley in an interview with FSR Magazine. “We make everything from scratch; we work hard at staying current with the trends … And, we’re really serious about what we do and who we are.” Executive chef Daniel Bader shares the same passion in the kitchen at Ruth’s Chris Steak House.

“Our menus are built on family-style dining,” Rose says. “We don’t have side plate or splitting charges … none of that stuff matters. We really encourage people to share! Bob [Longhi]’s philosophy is, why should we tell you when you’re hungry and what you should eat?” The same questions apply when dining at Tommy Bahama. The name itself evokes visions of the relaxed island lifestyle, which includes tropical flavors and fresh local fish. Executive sous chef John Pali explains that the menu is “coastal-inspired American cuisine with an emphasis on seafood.” The epitome of this concept can be seen with the crispy fried whole local snapper, which is heaped with stir-fried seasonal vegetables from local vendors, and topped with a sweet-and-spicy sesame soy glaze. 30

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OCEAN DELIGHTS (From left) Ruth’s Chris seafood tower offers an impressive amount of fruits de mer and is meant to be shared. Tommy Bahama’s Ko‘ala mahimahi is served on a bed of quinoa succotash and sprinkled with Meyer lemon vinaigrette.


A consummate professional, Bader goes to great lengths to ensure every steak that comes out of the 1,800-degree oven is done to perfection. “It has to be medium rare,” Bader says. “I think our service and the quality of our steaks sets us apart from other restaurants.” World renowned for its U.S.D.A. Prime beef and fine dining ambiance, Ruth’s Chris serves up a memorable experience for discerning tastes. Start with the seafood tower, a cornucopia of Maine lobster, king crab legs and knuckles, colossal lump crab meat and jumbo cocktail shrimp, all served with Sriracha-lime seafood sauce and classic cocktail sauce. Or, try the signature sizzlin’ blue crab cakes, served with a lip-puckering lemon-butter sauce. Aside from premium cuts of beef, other entree options include lamb chops, three chops cut extra thick and served with fresh mint; pan-roasted Chilean sea bass with citrus-coconut butter; stuffed chicken breast and a vegetarian plate. In the mood for a combo? It’s hard to beat the petite filet and

shrimp, two four-ounce medallions topped with succulent jumbo shrimp. “I encourage people to try us out,” Bader says. “What we provide is more than just a great meal but a great experience overall.”

shortlist Tommy Bahama

808.875.9983 tommybahama.com /restaurants/wailea SIGNATURE SEAFOOD:

World Famous Cocktail Shrimp, crispy fried whole snapper and seared ahi Longhi’s

808.891.8883

Ruth’s Chris Steak House 808.874.8880 ruthschris.com /restaurant-locations /wailea-maui SIGNATURE SEAFOOD:

Seafood tower, sizzlin’ blue crab cakes and New Orleans-style jumbo shrimp

longhis.com SIGNATURE SEAFOOD:

Seared ahi au poivre, lobster Longhi

the SHOPS at WAILEA

3750 Wailea Alanui Drive EW23 • Phone: 808•280•7979

Karl D. Gottling Designer

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HOPS AND GRINDS Crafting a new culinary movement By Simplicio Paragas

Photo credit

Photography by isaac arjonilla

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Like fashion, culinary trends come and go. Some endure, others are forgotten—remember “molecular gastronomy?” However, one trend seems to be enduring and even gaining momentum: the gastropub. It’s no coincidence that the sprout of the American gastropub mirrors the rise in America’s interest in craft breweries. Across the mainland, gastropubs have established themselves at such top dining destinations as New York, Chicago and Los Angeles. And now it’s come to Wailea. Just over a year old, The Pint & Cork has quickly established a reputation for its gastropub fare, offering such pub-defining dishes as homemade sausages, grilled octopus and a charcuterie board. “The restaurant has elements of fine dining, craft beers and craft cocktails,” explains The Pint & Cork’s managing partner Scott Pacer. “But we also air sports so I guess you could consider us a ‘sports’ gastropub.” Like most gastropub fare, the food here is hearty, comforting and meaty. The “Bib” burger, for example, is layered with white cheddar, bacon, charred onions, tomato, arugula and a fried egg for good measure. “Shared Plates” are meant for just that—sharing. Grilled lamb chops, deviled eggs Rockefeller and hand-cut fries sprinkled with Parmesan cheese are all intended for communal dining. “We’re four friends who wanted a perfect place that anyone would want to go to,” says Pacer, referring to the intent behind The Pint & Cork. “I think we’ve established that, given the number of regulars we now have.” While not a gastropub, Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room does meet certain criteria that are gastropubesque, especially in the Tap Room, where one can order a pint of Aloha Spirit Blond Ale, Hana Hou Hefe, 808 Pale Ale, English Brown Ale, Skinny Jeans IPA and the Jalapeño Mouth. “We’re not a gastropub, we’re a tap room,” asserts general manager Kris Galon. “And the handmade craft beer we get from Waikïkï Brewing Company is exclusive to Wailea.” HEARTY FARE (From left) The Pint & Cork’s version of squid lū‘au includes grilled octopus with lomi lomi salad. Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room’s “Five-Napkin” cheeseburger weighs a half pound and is stacked with tomatoes, onions, lettuce and cheese.

Also exclusive to the Cheeseburger brand is the signature “Five-Napkin” burger, billed as a “Cheeseburger with an attitude.” Prepared with 100 percent fresh Black Angus beef from Harris Ranch Meats, the juicy half-pound patty is slathered with Thousand Island dressing, lettuce, tomato and onions, all sandwiched between a salt-and-pepper bun and topped with a slice of Colby Jack. “You might even need more than five napkins,” Galon quips. “And, of course, you’ve got to have it with a pint of Blonde Ale.” It’s the perfect gastro pairing … even at a Tap Room.

shortlist Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room

808.727.2038

808.874.8990

thepintandcork.com

cheeseburgernation.com /locations/cheeseburger -grille-and-tap-roomwailea

Grilled octopus with lomi lomi salad, Bib burger and charcuterie board

The Pint & Cork

SIGNATURE DISHES:

SIGNATURE DISHES:

The five-napkin cheeseburger, kalua pork plate lunch and fish tacos T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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GIVING BACK The Shops at Wailea builds platforms for Maui philanthropy

with a passion for local programs that are

truly making a difference, The Shops at Wailea is giving back in a big way by partnering with 12 Mauibased nonprofits—one each month—using its special events as an avenue of philanthropy. So each time you By Anu Yagi attend Concerts at The Shops, Jazz at the Shops or other event, you’re aiding a good cause. Fair Beginnings

December sees a partnership with the Friends of the Children’s Justice Center (FCJC). Targeting the social welfare of children and families who have been

traumatized by abuse and severe neglect, their threepart mission is to provide assistance to abused and neglected children in Maui, promote prevention of child abuse and neglect, and support the Children’s Justice Center of Maui. As Executive Director Paul Tonnessen explains, “Our society tends to take punitive actions against children who are unable to process the effects of trauma in healthy ways. These children can easily become high-risk teens and adult offenders. We believe a holistic approach is more effective than a punitive one, especially when it comes to this fragile population.” With that in mind, the FCJC focuses on being proactive rather than reactive when it comes to child abuse and neglect. In the past year, they’ve provided funds for direct services to more than 900 children, distributed more then 2,500 children’s Christmas gifts, and reached 8,000 children and parents through community events. Together in Unity

FORWARD THINKING (This page) IMUA Family Services empowers kids who are facing disabilities to reach their full potential. (Opposite page) HCF helps fund charities by connecting donors and philanthropies.

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January’s featured organization is Maui United Way (MUW), which pairs people in need with agencies and programs to help with the various issues they face. Their programs range from emergency food and shelter to tools for school drives. As President Kari Nunokawa puts it, “In the last year, MUW partnered with 35 agencies to provide 36 nonprofit programs. These programs then provided a total of 62,319 nonprofit services to the people of the County of Maui. Over 400 Maui keiki received over 3,063

©LYLE KRANNICHFELD; (OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY HAWAII COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

By jasmine HU


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BACK ON TRACK (This page) Maui United Way partners with different agencies to provide a variety of nonprofit programs, including the Tools for School drive, which equips Maui keiki with school supplies. (Opposite page) Friends of the Children’s Justice Center offers support to kids who have been traumatized by abuse and severe neglect.

school supplies from our Tools for School drive and over 2,100 toys were collected for keiki in need during the holiday season.” MUW focuses their efforts on education, income and health, as research has shown that they are essential foundations to building a better life. A valuable education leads to a reliable career, which results in enough money to support oneself and one’s family through basic necessities, health and retirement. 36

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The Gift of Giving

If you’re feeling charitable but you don’t know where to start, February’s partner, Hawaii Community Foundation (HCF), is the place to turn to. The premier place to learn about nonprofit agencies, charitable giving and community issues, they are focused on educating, funding and strengthening various charities across six sectors: community and economy, health and welfare, arts and culture, natural environment, government and civics, and education.

(THIS PAGE) COURTESY MAUI UNITED WAY; (OPPOSITE PAGE) COURTESY FRIENDS OF THE CHILDREN’S JUSTICE CENTER OF MAUI

giving Back


LEARN MORE, GIVE MORE friends of the children’s justice center

mauicjc.org 808.986.8634 1773 Wili Pa Loop #A Wailuku, HI 96793 maui united way

mauiunitedway.org 808.244.8787 270 Ho‘okahi St. Ste. 301 Wailuku, HI 96793 hawaii community foundation

hawaiicommunityfoundation.org 808.242.6184 33 Lono Ave., Ste. 390 Kahului, HI 96732 imua family services

“Each year, we’re able to distribute more than $47 million in grants, including over $5 million in scholarships,” says Micah Käne, CEO and President of HCF. “With more than 100 years of service to our community, our family of philanthropic partners includes over 1,000 individuals, families, businesses and community leaders, who are working together to create a better Hawai‘i.” Marching On

March shines the spotlight on children with Imua Family Services. Imua means “to move forward,” which is what they are committed to helping children do. Since 1947, they’ve been operating with the mission

of “empowering families and their children to reach their full potential.” They do so by providing family-centered therapeutic services for infants, toddlers and preschool children who are facing disabilities and/or challenges in their development and behavior. According to executive director Dean Wong, they aim to cultivate “a better understanding of the extent of the problems that not only children with a crippling disease or disability have, but also those who are born premature, or have a developmental concern or delay. [They] do this through direct therapy with children, parent coaching, training and education to families and care providers.”

imuafamilyservices.org 808.244.7467 161 S. Wakea Ave. Kahului, HI 96732

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POETRY IN MOTION Hula dancers preserve an ancient art form By Simplicio Paragas

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centuries ago,

when gods and people shared these Islands, and time was measured by the waxing and waning of the moon, the hula was born. The first dances were linked to Pele, goddess of volcanic fires, who made the request to her younger sister, Hi‘iaka. The Pele cycle provided the hula with a repertoire that was both religious and entertaining. Rhythmic and poetic chants (mele) combined with disciplined motion to tell stories of love and passion, anger and revenge, and loyalty and betrayal, all part of Pele’s tempestuous nature.

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Hawai‘i’s history is in the oli, the chant; the mo‘olelo, stories; and in hula, dance.

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(PREVIOUS SPREAD) ©J.J. WILLIAMS/HAWAII STATE ARCHIVES; (THIS PAGE) ©VIRGIL BIGGS/HAWAII STATE ARCHIVE; (0PPOSITE PAGE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

poetry in motion


ONCE ENDANGERED, HULA now enjoys the support of thousands of dancers and halau from across Hawai‘i, and as far away as Japan and Germany.

While the hula was distinctively Hawaiian, it evolved from the rhythmic dances brought to Hawai‘i by settlers from the Tahitian islands. When contact between Tahiti and Hawai‘i was lost, the Hawaiian culture evolved in isolation. Hula was part of that evolution, with dancers inspired by poetic chants and paced by deep-throated, shark-skin-covered drums (pahu), gourd rattles (‘uli‘uli), slit-bamboo sticks (pu‘ili), tapping sticks (kala‘au), clapping stones (‘ili‘ili) and dogtooth anklets (kupe‘e niho‘ilio). Dancers were trained in movements that could be performed in a wide number of storytelling formats. Hands used sign language for ideas like love or anger, or objects like the moon, rain or a fragrant flower. While there were rituals attached to the dance, the hula differed island-to-island, each hālau (school) influenced by the style of its kumu (teacher). Oli (chants not danced to), mele and hula were treasured possessions, passed on, generation-to-generation.

Today, there are two types of hula practiced: kahiko, or ancient hula, and auana, modern hula set to music. Hula auana is lovely, most often danced by graceful ladies in long mu‘umu‘u, and you’ll enjoy watching it throughout your Hawaiian vacation. But it’s in kahiko that the real story lies … literally. In ancient Hawai‘i, everything was always taught through chanting and storytelling, detailing and cataloging the lineage of a people and all of the events in their personal—and collective—history. Prior to 1820, both men and women danced hula, sometimes together and sometimes apart. Shortly after the missionaries arrived, however, neither performed it in their disapproving presence. Missing the spiritual message and mistaking the sensual for sin, the missionaries sought to repress it, nearly eliminating its practice in the process. King Kalākaua is credited with having rescued the hula from oblivion, sponsoring performances at his coronation (1883) and birthday jubilee (1886), encouraging its practice and expanding the repertoire with new chants and dances. Today, hundreds of hālau and thousands of dancers, including many far from Hawaiian shores, dance hula, learning not only the rhythmic and graceful movements but also its significant, spiritual and aesthetic message. A cultural treasure on the verge of being lost is now no longer endangered.

polynesian dance show See a live Polynesian Show Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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area map To Kihei d

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To Kahului Via Piilani Hwy 31

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W a

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S. Kihe

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PIILAN

nui Dr .

i Road

Y. I HW

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aa St.

i Dr

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A HUI HOU AKU

the treehouse at Hotel Wailea is the perfect setting for that special dining experience, complete with stunning ocean views, a seven-course private dinner and sunset Champagne toast.

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ŠSEBASTIAN SAYEGH

(Until we meet again)


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Shops at Wailea Maui Dec 2017  
Shops at Wailea Maui Dec 2017