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The Shops at wailea

THe shopping Dining Arts & culture magazine

spring/summer 2018


THE L ADY-DATEJUST The classically feminine Rolex, sized and styled to perfectly match its wearer since 1957. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

rolex

oyster perpetual and datejust are ÂŽ trademarks.


OYSTER PERPETUAL LADY-DATEJUST 28


center information to Maui’s premier shopping and dining destination. With more than 70 distinct boutiques, shops, restaurants and galleries, The Shops at Wailea offers an unparalleled leisure experience in the heart of the Wailea Resort. For a map of the center and a store directory, please see page 44. For a list of center events, please see page 8. WELCOME

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

PARKING

From within Wailea resort area Take Wailea Alanui Drive to the intersection of Wailea Ike Drive and look for our monument signs.

One hour free parking. Three additional hours free parking with validation. Or $3 per half hour, $40 per day maximum or lost ticket.

From Pi‘ilani Highway Take Wailea Ike Drive toward the ocean until you reach the traffic light at Wailea Alanui Drive. Turn either right or left onto Wailea Alanui Drive. Entrances to the center are located immediately following in either direction.

HOURS

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Monday-Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Select merchants and restaurants open earlier and remain open later. For more information, please call the management office at 808.891.6770.


The Shops

at wailea magazine

the shops at wailea

3750 Wailea Alanui Drive, Wailea-Makena, HI 96753 (808) 891-6770 www.theshopsatwailea.com General Manager Brian K. Yano (S) The Festival Companies Director of Marketing Denise Hart The Festival Companies

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O‘AHU Sales

Group Publisher William A. Moore III Account Executive Debbie De Mello Hawaii Sales Director Leianne Pedro Marketing and Circulation Manager Sherry Mae Ravago Customer Service Representative Melanie Lee WAILEA Editorial

Senior Editor Simplicio Paragas Assistant Editor Jasmine Hu CREATIVE

Chief Creative Officer Haines Wilkerson Editorial Director Margaret Martin Director of Photography Isaac Arjonilla Art Director Teri Samuels Retouching Jerry Hartman

Publication Services Director Karen Fralick Director of Manufacturing Donald Horton EXECUTIVE

President Donna W. Kessler Vice President of Operations Angela E. Allen Head of Digital Richard H. Brashear II Regional Vice President of Sales Courtney Fuhrmann Morris CoMMuniCations

Chairman William S. Morris III President & CEO William S. Morris IV where|HaWaii

Official publisher for The Shops at Wailea


The shops at Wailea

Events 8 / Concerts at the shops / market / LEI MAKING

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FASHION

20 ACCESSORIES

DINING

Spring into summer with looks that are casual, yet glamorous.

Spruce up your outfit or home with some of these fashionable finds.

The Shops offers everything from quick gourmet bites to tempting Pau Hana specials.

GIVING BACK

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HAWAIIAN CULTURE

The Shops helps support different local nonprofits each month.

Learn about the history and tradition of Hawaiian heirloom jewelry.

map 42 / Directory 44 on the cover Model Hannah Werner descends the staircase at the Fairmont Kea Lani in a dress and ring

from Enchantress Gallery by Bootzie, and sandals from Keliki. The Fairmont Kea Lani is Maui’s only all-suite and villa luxury oceanfront resort, providing award-winning amenities and exquisite accommodations. fairmont.com/kea-lani-maui

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(COVER) ©SEBASTIAN SAYEGH. (THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©SEBASTIAN SAYEGH; ©STEVE CZERNIAK; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA

contents


Events Art, music, dance, crafts

MUSIC MAN Henry Kapono performs on April 18.

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COncerts at the shops Henry Kapono

April 18, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Kapono has been blending rock ‘n’ roll vibes into traditional Hawaian sounds since the 1970s. He has since racked up 14 Nä Hökü Hanohano Awards as well as a Grammy nomination. Paula Fuga

May 16, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Fuga got her start in poetry, which transitioned naturally into songwriting after she picked up the ukulele. Her debut album earned her the Nä Hökü Hanohano Award for Most Promising Artist, and she’s been gracing the world with her talent ever since.

island wood carving Every Wednesday, 10:30 am – 1 pm; and every Friday, 12:30 – 3:30 pm Bone and wood carving is an important tradition in Tongan culture. At Tasini Tiki Gallery, learn about the culture and history behind this practice, and see examples of carving artistry from owner Taani Tasini Lavaka, who was raised in Tonga.

Kahulanui

May 30, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This Grammy-nominated Hawaiian swing band is composed of Patrick Eskildsen, Duke Tatom, Tim Taylor and Lena Naipo, whose individual talents lend themselves to a strong ensemble.

(OPPOSITE PAGE AND THIS PAGE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (3)

Hapa

June 20, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. This duo burst out of paradise’s gates with their debut album in 1993, which remains the number one selling recording by a group or duo in the history of recorded Hawaiian music.

coconut husking Every Tuesday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm As one of the most versatile plants on the planet, every part of the coconut is useful, from root to fruit. Discover its various sections and how Hawaiians have used them differently, from food and eating utensils to crafts, jewelry and furniture. This weekly demonstration also shows the traditional and modern methods used to husk a coconut.

Makana

July 18, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Renowned the world over for his extraordinary talents as a guitarist, singer, composer and activist, Makana has been a TEDx talk presenter, featured on three Grammy-nominated albums and invited to perform at the White House. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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events

polynesian Dance shows

at the shops Every first Wednesday of the month, 5:30 – 7 pm Become further immersed in Maui’s relaxing environment with Jazz at The Shops. Let award-winning musicians enchant you with their soulful island jazz performances under the stars. The series features talented musicians every month, each exhibiting his or her mastery of a variety of instruments, ranging from saxophones to guitars.

DANCING QUEEN A performer dances with a ‘ulï ‘ulï (gourd rattle).

UKULELE LESSONS Every Monday, 5:30 – 6:30 pm; and every Friday, 3:00 – 4:00 pm One of the most important instruments in Hawaiian culture, the ukulele is synonymous with Hawaiian music. And with its diminutive shape and the sweet, relaxing sounds it produces, it is perhaps one of the least intimidating instruments to learn. Whether you’re a beginner or a ukulele virtuoso, this event is for you. STRUMMING Learn to play basic ukulele during lessons held on Mondays and Fridays.

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(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) ©FURTSEFF/SHUTTERSTOCK; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2).

jazz

Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:30 – 6:30 pm Every Pacific Island nation has its own unique style of dance, many of which are showcased during The Shops’ weekly Polynesian dance shows. Let the performers transport you to another world with different dance styles like the Hawaiian hula and Tahitian.


Hand Carved Wood ision, My Chi V r sel u o Y

Tasini Tiki Gallery The Shops at Wailea 3750 Wailea Ala Nui Drive Open Daily 9:30am – 9pm

www.TasiniTikiGallery.com Custom Orders – Free Shipping


events

MARKET at the shops Second and fourth Wednesday of the month, 4 – 6 pm What could be more enticing than fresh pineapples, avocados, garlic, specialty foods and artisanal goods? You’ll find all these and more at the Market at The Shops, a fun grocery shopping venue. It provides a place for both residents and visitors alike to purchase farm-fresh and sustainably grown produce, all while supporting local growers, producers and artisans. Not only will you get the freshest ingredients, but you can also talk with the vendors and learn about the food and products they sell. FRESH OFF THE FARM Just a sampling of the abundant fresh produce available at the Market at The Shops.

Every Monday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm; and every Wednesday, 1:30 – 2:30 pm The lei has a long and storied past in Hawaiian history, and plays a crucial role in cultivating the aloha spirit. Welcoming visitors, graduations, ceremonies—the lei is used on every momentous occasion. Craft your very own lei-bor of love while learning about the many heartfelt Hawaiian mana‘o (ideas, intentions) behind harvesting, creating, wearing and gifting handmade lei. All the tools and materials are provided. LEI OF LOVE A basket of materials to make a lei.

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©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

lei po‘o making


tropical allure catch the next wave of fashion

photographed at the fairmont kea lani


GO WITH THE FLOW (Opposite page) Romper and clutch, Mahina; ring, Enchantress Gallery by Bootzie; earrings, Mahina; bracelet, Na Hoku.

PATTERN PARADISE (This page, left) Shirt, Billabong; pants, Banana Republic.

CHIC TO CHIC (This page, right) Top and skirt, Quiksilver; hat, Banana Republic; bracelet, Na Hoku.

This season is all about light, airy styles in eye-catching prints and patterns.


Bright pops of color and stripes add zest and vibrancy to daily, casual looks.

FLORAL FUN (This page, left) Dress, Imrie; purse, Bottega Veneta; shoes, Banana Republic; earrings, Mahina; chain necklace, Banana Republic; tassel necklace, Enchantress Gallery by Bootzie; ring and bracelet, Na Hoku.

LUXE LOOK (This page, right) Hat, Keliki; coverup and swimsuit, Canyon Beachwear; bracelet, Mahina.


OUT OF THE BLUE (This page) Swimsuit, Canyon Beachwear; earrings, Mahina.


The fairmont kea lani

Our fashion shoot took place on the grounds of the beautiful Fairmont Kea Lani in Wailea. As Maui’s only all-suite and villa luxury oceanfront resort, it provides award-winning amenities and exquisite accommodations. Visit fairmont.com/kea-lani-maui for more information.

BEACHY BLISS (Opposite page and this page, left) Hat, Canyon Beachwear; swimsuit, Billabong; sunglasses, Sunglass Hut.

MODERN MINIMALIST (This page, right) Hat, top and pants, Keliki; clutch and shoes, Mahina; bracelets (left) Banana Republic; (right) Mahina. Photography: Sebastian Sayegh Fashion Styling: Kyle Kagamida Models: Hannah Werner and Chris Harris, Renew Artists Hair/Make-up: Ry-n Shimabuku


beachside style No man’s island wardrobe is complete without marine motifs and casual-cool accessories.

BANANA REPUBLIC

Embrace island style with a straw fedora.

sunglass hut

Shade your eyes with these cool aviator specs.

tommy bahama

There are plenty of fish in the sea— and on this camp shirt.

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banana republic

bottega veneta

Step out on the sand in these stylish suede sneakers.

This briefcase epitomizes “business casual.”

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quiksilver

Stay hydrated with this sleek, silver tumbler.

tommy bahama

Say “cheers” to the catch of the day with this corkscrew.

TOMMY BAHAMA

Keep island time with this sport watch.

Sunglasses, Sunglass Hut; shirt and boardshorts, Quiksilver. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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island Beauty Black accents take your vacation look from casual to glamorous. Accessorizing with shiny baubles will make you the belle of the beach.

lambros fine Jewelers

Wear these diamond hoops on the beach—or on the red carpet.

aloha hat company

Stay stylish with this wide-brimmed hat.

maui clothing company

Hit the beach in this pretty dark-floral bikini.

greenleaf diamonds

enchantress gallery by bootzie

The plumeria flower on this rose-gold and diamond ring will never fade.

These floral perfumes were made on Maui.

keliki

Swap out your beach tote for this on-trend round straw bag. quiksilver

Buckle up for a stroll along the beach in these sandals. 22

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Sunglasses, Sunglass Hut; jumper, Billabong; purse, Bottega Veneta; shoes, Banana Republic; necklace, Tiffany & Co.

baron & leeds

Complete your look with a glint of gold.

aloha hat company

These glam sunglasses have style in shades.

ki‘i gallery

This sculpted silver bangle will shimmer in the sun. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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Home Is Where the Art Is Take a piece of Maui home with you. These artful objects and tropical touches will transform your abode into an island oasis.

enchantress gallery by bootzie

This amethyst geode is a dazzling addition to any room.

gottling home store

Display pretty blooms in this one-of-a-kind ceramic vase.

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soha living

Add some tropical sweetness to your decor with this bright pineapple sculpture.


tommy bahama

Fill your home with relaxing island scents, thanks to this sleek diffuser.

cariloha

Cozy up with this bamboo blanket— perfect for both home and travel.

tommy bahama

Bring a slice of paradise home with you with this “Maui Mango” scented candle. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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SIP AND SAVOR Pau Hana specials at The Shops By Simplicio Paragas

Photo credit

Photography by STEVE CZERNIAK

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STIR IT. MIX IT. Shake it. It must be Pau

Hana, otherwise commonly known as Happy Hour, a time when special drinks and menu items are available at discounted prices. So after you’ve soaked up as much sun as you can handle and shopped to your heart’s content, it’s time to relax with an ice-cold drink and tasty tidbits from The Shops at Wailea’s restaurants. At 3 p.m., crowds are already starting to file in at Longhi’s. Most belly up to the bar due to the inclement weather, but the steady rain doesn’t dampen the mood. There’s a lot to like about Happy Hour here, which runs daily from 3 to 6 p.m. For healthy fare, order the Greek flatbread ($10), which is topped with romaine, cucumbers, tomatoes, Kalamata olives, red onions and feta cheese. Everyone, though, should try the fish and chips ($13), consisting of panko-battered fresh monchong and hand-cut fries.

“We always use fresh fish,” says Michael Rose, Longhi’s longtime general manager and sommelier. “And you’ve got to try our Molokini Sunset-tini.” Other select martinis, including the Coconut-tini and Very Berry Passion Tini, are priced at $7.50. White and red wines start at $5.50, as do well drinks. Draft beers cost $4.50. Across the hall, a group of men huddle around the bar at Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room, noshing on a mound of nachos covered in a jalapeñopepper-and-cheese sauce, sour cream and pico de gallo. Manager Christopher McKinney paces back and forth from the bar to the kitchen, carrying trays of coconut shrimp ($9), crispy calamari ($9), teriyaki-coated edamame ($6.75) and baskets of large onion rings ($6.75). “We’re consistently busy during 2 to 5 p.m.,” says McKinney while en route to deliver

SMALL BITES (Opposite) Longhi’s fish and chips are made with fresh monchong and hand-cut fries. (This page, from left) The Piña Colada at Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room is prepared with an original recipe, which is made daily from scratch. Stuffed mushrooms and veal ravioli are two favorites at Ruth’s Chris. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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sip and savor

“Our roasted pork belly sliders are definitely one of our best sellers during Island Time.” specials feature margaritas, daily wine by the glass, and Ruth’s featured martini and cocktail of the day. As the lunch crowd thins out, The Pint & Cork’s staff members get a temporary reprieve before the next blitz of fans rush in during Happy Hour, between 2 and 5 p.m. Local craft beers flow at $5 and well drinks cost $6. Gastropub-quality appetizers include deviled eggs Rockefeller ($7), composed of farmed-raised eggs topped with smoked bacon, spinach, Parmesan and a velvety Béarnaise sauce. A bowl of mac and cheese offers a gooey mélange of

a plate of coconut shrimp, one of the signature appetizers. “And on a day like this when it’s raining, we see even more people.” Well drinks and Waikīkī Brewing Company draft beers cost $5.50. The made-from-scratch Piña Colada and Maui Mai Tai are priced at $6 each. Upstairs at Ruth’s Chris, executive chef Daniel Bader prepares for dinner service, starting with Happy Hour, which goes from 5 to 7 p.m. in the bar and lounge area. “We’re hoping to expand this area,” says Bader, pointing his finger to the two- and four-top tables in the lounge. “You’ve got to come early because the six bar stools and those two tables fill up quickly, especially on days like today.” Bader’s Happy Hour menu includes oysters Rockefeller, barbecued shrimp with mashed potatoes, sashimi or seared ahi, crispy calamari, stuffed mushrooms and, a personal favorite, veal osso buco ravioli. Drink 28

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CREATIVE CUISINE (Top) Tommy Bahama’s crispy roasted pork belly sliders are tucked in a sriracha-and-mayo-slathered mini brioche and garnished with pickled vegetables. (Above) The Pint and Cork’s iteration of oysters Rockefeller features creamy eggs instead. Pair it with a craft beer or Paloma cocktail.


Gruyère, white cheddar, Parmesan and mozzarella, all topped with a rich béchamel sauce. “Everything is made to order,” says assistant general manager Ashley Rivers. “We run the same program during our Pau Hana service from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.” Always a crowd-pleaser, hand-cut fries are topped with a good dose of garlic and Parmesan ($6). Add an order of sliders ($3.95 for two), choosing from pork adobo, kalua pork or cheeseburger. Happy Hour morphs into “Island Time” at Tommy Bahama, a theme that befits the restaurant’s persona. Kick back and enjoy special wines ($7-8), mai tais and mojitos ($8), and Coconut Cloud and grapefruit basil martinis ($10) at the bar. Small plates ($10 each) include ahi poke Napoleon, cheeseburger sliders, macadamia crusted goat cheese, duo of dips, blackened fish tacos and pork belly sliders. “Our ahi tacos are flavored with sesame, ginger, capers, soy sauce and a wasabi-lime-and-avocado vinaigrette,” explains executive sous chef John Pali. “It’s definite-

ly one of our best sellers.” Equally as popular are the pork belly sliders, slow-roasted, crispy-skinned pork belly tucked in a mini brioche then garnished with pickled vegetables and a slightly spicy sriracha aioli.

shortlist Cheeseburger grille & tap room

Tommy Bahama

808.874.8990

tommybahama.com /restaurants/wailea

cheeseburgernation.com /locations/cheeseburger -grille-and-tap-roomwailea

808.875.9983

Longhi’s

808.891.8883 longhis.com

Ruth’s Chris Steak House 808.874.8880 ruthschris.com /restaurant-locations /wailea-maui

The Pint & Cork

808.727.2038 thepintandcork.com

A Beach Boutique The Shops at Wailea

keliki.com t @keliki_hawaii

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GRAB AND GO Quick gourmet bites for a casual picnic on the beach By Simplicio Paragas Photography by STEVE CZERpNIA photography By steve czerniak

IT’S 8:30 A.M. and the fragrant smell of suntan lotion wafts in the air at the Island Gourmet Markets. “Emi … island breakfast deluxe,” Alma Amarillo shouts from behind the counter. “Steve … egg breakfast sandwich.” And orders continue to fire in as I try to decide what to eat. I’m assured, though, that whatever I order will take only 10 minutes. Looking up at the extensive board, I see multiple categories: Breakfast, Build Your Own Sandwich or Wrap, Create a Salad, Pizza, Fried Chicken, Kid’s Menu, Local Favorites, Daily Specials and Sides. I opt for the French dip sandwich ($11.99), a soft hoagie roll that’s sturdy enough to hold paper-thin slices of roast beef topped with Provolone and served with a side of savory au jus. “Everything is made fresh daily,” says Amarillo, Island Gourmet Markets’ deli manager. “All the dishes with a ‘shaka’ next to it means those are our best sellers and staff picks.” When on vacation, mornings tend to be relaxed, and deciding where and what to eat shouldn’t be a challenge. Breakfast should be a leisurely affair, sipping on coffee, reading the local paper and enjoying a stack of buttermilk pancakes ($6.99), an avocadoand-BLT omelet ($9.99) or Island Deluxe ($8.99), consisting of two eggs any way with a choice of ham, bacon, Spam, pork link sausage or Portuguese sausage, and served with rice or breakfast potatoes. Visiting from Oregon, Emi and her family said they’ve already eaten a few times at the Markets. “We even bought sandwiches for the beach from

here,” said the 15-year-old. “They have a lot of choices and it’s quick.” Wailea visitors aren’t the only ones who appreciate this quick-service deli. Locals, too, come here either before work for a morning meal and/or for a plate lunch or take-home dinner. The “Famous Wailea” burger ($10.49) gets the shaka of approval for its thick Angus beef patty. Add a couple of bacon slices and the burger earns another waving “Hang 10” symbol. The list of “Local Favorites” includes grilled New York steak, teriyaki chicken ($6.49 for a mini and $8.59 for a regular), grilled mahimahi ($10.99/$13.99), Cajun shrimp plate ($11.99) and, of course, loco moco supreme ($5.99/$7.99). At Whalers General Store, options abound as well. Sandwiches, salads and hot entrees are among the offerings. But where the Store truly shines is at the poke counter, where an assortment of cubed ahi is mixed with a variety of ingredients, from shoyu and seaweed to oyster sauce and wasabi. So do what locals do: pick up a tub of poke, some chopsticks and head to the beach.

shortlist island gourmet markets

Whalers General store

808.874.5055

808.891.2039

islandgourmet hawaii.com/wailea/

theshopsatwailea.com /shops/whalersgeneral-store

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GIVING BACK The Shops at Wailea builds platforms for Maui philanthropy By jasmine HU

with a passion for local programs that are By Anu Yagi

truly making a difference, The Shops at Wailea is giving back in a big way by partnering with 12 Mauibased nonprofits—one each month—using its special events as an avenue of philanthropy. So each time you attend Concerts at The Shops, Jazz at The Shops or any other event, you’re aiding a good cause. ONWARD AND UPWARD

April’s partnership is with Imua Family Services. Imua means “to move forward,” which is what they are committed to helping children do. Since 1947, they’ve been operating with the mission of “empowering families and their children to reach their full potential.” They do so by providing family-centered therapeutic services for infants, toddlers and preschool children who are facing disabilities and/or challenges in their development and behavior. According to executive director Dean Wong, Imua Family Services aims to cultivate “a better understanding of the extent of the problems that not only children with a crippling disease or disability have, but also those who are born premature, or have a developmental concern or delay. [They] do this SAFE HAVEN Habitat for Humanity Maui sells homes to low-income families on a no-interest, no-profit basis.

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RANGE OF HEARTS (This page) Hospice Maui cares for patients who are spending their final days or weeks of life, as well as provides support to their loved ones. (Opposite page, from left) IMUA Family Services empowers kids who are facing disabilities to reach their full potential. Maui Food Bank delivers and distributes food with programs like the Senior Mobile Pantry.

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through direct therapy with children, parent coaching, training and education to families and care providers.” COMFORT AND CARE

May’s organization is Hospice Maui. For over 35 years, they have been serving the Maui community with quality hospice care. Besides carrying out the required services provided by all hospices, Hospice Maui goes above and beyond by providing a warm and comfortable environment for patients and their family or caregivers. That level of service can only come from a deep understanding of Maui’s diverse community. In December 2016, they opened the Hospice Maui Hale, offering an

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additional service: 24-hour hospice care, seven days a week. By doing so, they’re providing a beautiful, safe and welcoming place for their patients to spend their last days or weeks of life when they can’t be at home. NOURISH AND NURTURE

June aims to combat hunger, as The Shops pairs up with Maui Food Bank (MFB). MFB has been serving the hungry for over 20 years. They team up with more than 100 agencies and programs to run an efficient, cost-effective, community-wide food distribution program, helping feed more than 10,000 people a month. They collect food daily, mostly through donations, but

(PREVIOUS PAGE) COURTESY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY; (THIS PAGE) COURTESY HOSPICE MAUI

giving Back


LEARN MORE, GIVE MORE imua family services

imuafamilyservices.org 808.244.7467 161 S. Wakea Ave.

(FROM LEFT) COURTESY IMUA FAMILY SERVICES; COURTESY MAUI FOOD BANK

Kahului, HI 96732

sometimes purchasing them at wholesale prices or less. To ensure quality and safety, they inspect every product that comes in before sanitizing, inventorying and storing them until distribution. Their programs include Aloha Backpack Buddies, which equips elementary schoolchildren who are on the free and reduced meal program with pre-filled backpacks on Fridays that contain six meals for the weekend. With nine schools currently involved, they plan on distributing 12,120 backpacks totaling 72,720 meals this school year. They also arrange Ohana Food Drops and the Senior Mobile Pantry, delivering and distributing mass quantities of food to 10 underserved areas on Maui once a month. PROTECT AND SHELTER

July’s foundation focuses on establishing a foundation—literally. An official

affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, Habitat for Humanity Maui (HHM) sells homes to low-income families, who earn between 25 percent and 80 percent of the median income, on a no-interest and no-profit basis. HHM seeks to provide not only shortterm solutions, but long-term as well. Families who are part of this program are required to attend homeowner education classes, budget counseling and credit counseling. HHM also has a Brush With Kindness program, which helps families in need with critical repairs, renovations and retrofits, including building grab bars or ramps to allow disabled or elderly residents to stay in the comfort of their own home. Its vision is a world where everyone has a decent place to live, as HHM believes that through shelter, it can build strength and stability for families and the community.

Habitat for Humanity Maui

habitat-maui.org 808-242-1140 970 Lower Main St. Wailuku, HI 96793 Hospice Maui

hospicemaui.org 808-244-5555 400 Mahalani St. Wailuku, HI 96793 Maui Food Bank

mauifoodbank.org 808-243-9500 760 Kolu St. Wailuku, HI 96793

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ADORNED WITH LOVE Heirloom jewelry dates back to the 13th century, and is a Hawaiian tradition that's rooted in sentiment. By kristen nemoto jay photography by isaac arjonilla

IF THE UNITED STATES is known as the “melting pot” of the world, then the state of Hawai‘i should be called a vibrant “fruit salad.” Different—yet the same—is the theme of the Islands, as Hawai‘i prides itself on distinguishing and celebrating each other’s differences and similarities, as well as remembering and respecting each other’s heritage. A particularly special tradition of honoring the past, and those who’ve come before us, is one that can be attributed to Hawaiian and British monarchies. Although evolved over time, this tradition is the giving of Hawaiian heirloom jewelry, and like many local customs, this practice has connections from abroad. In his book, “Hawaiian Heirloom Jewelry: A Lasting Remembrance,” Philip Rickard, owner of 36

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the eponymous Hawaiian heirloom jewelry manufacturing company, wrote that the origin of heirloom jewelry dates back to 13th-century England. Early works of gold rings and bracelets were some of the first pieces known to incorporate words of poetry or sentiment, which eventually led to the portmanteau of “posy.” According to London’s Victoria & Albert Museum, during medieval times when religion was a part of everyday life, it was common for text to appear on the outside of posy jewelry pieces as a way to express friendship or devotion to one’s faith, functioning as both a religious talisman and a gift of love. During the mid to late 1800s, Queen Lili‘uokalani was evidently fond of heirloom jewelry, since she can be seen wearing bracelets in several photographs.


Hawaiian heirloom jewelry features intricate details and can be traced back to Queen Lili‘uokalani, who helped popularize the bracelets. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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adorned with love

Hawaiian heirloom jewelry is unlike any other jewelry in the world.

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FROM ENGRAVING to polishing, Na Hoku is committed to maintaining tradition, being one of the few Hawaiian heirloom jewelry manufacturers that continues to make each of its pieces by hand.

(TOP) ©STEVE CZERNIAK

During this same epoch, enameled jewelry became popular and was worn primarily by English royalty. It would later be called “mourning jewelry.” Gold bracelets and rings were engraved with black enamel as a way to mourn the sudden death of Queen Victoria’s beloved husband, Prince Albert. For nearly three years, the Queen allowed only the mourning jewelry in her court. The fashionable trend soon made its way to Hawai‘i, as local merchants sold pieces to members of England’s upper class who were either vacationing or living in the Hawaiian Islands. Marques Marzan, the cultural advisor for the Bishop Museum, says it was during this time that Queen Lili‘uokalani commissioned her own personal enameled bracelets, thus starting a trend that would lead to modern Hawaiian heirloom jewelry. “[Lili‘uokalani] had some [bracelets] made to bring back as gifts to family members here in Hawai‘i,” says Marzan, as he points to the Bishop Museum’s current heirloom jewelry piece on display in the Kähili Room. Engraved with “Aloha ‘Oe” (Farewell to Thee) in black lettering, one of the

gold bracelets was a gift from Lili‘uokalani to Zoe Atkinson, the headmistress at Pohukaina Girls School and event coordinator for the queen. Coincidentally, the “Aloha ‘Oe” inscription proved to be prophetic: Just days after giving Atkinson the bracelet, a U.S. military-backed coup deposed Queen Lili‘uokalani and formed a provisional government; Hawai‘i was declared a republic in 1894. “The tradition became popular because Hawai‘i had its own unique design that made our heirloom jewelry one of a kind,” Marzan explains. “While the Victorian era was still represented in the black enameling of the letters, designs that represented Hawai‘i were embellished on the jewelry to show our appreciation and association to the land. That’s what you see in Hawaiian heirloom jewelry today, with various designs of the maile lei or plumeria flowers.” Paul Sato, vice president of Na Hoku, says Hawaiian heirloom jewelry is unlike any other jewelry in the world. “It’s representative of Hawai‘i and is available nowhere else [but here],” Sato asserts. “It’s a


adorned with love

combination of handcraftsmanship, personalization and history that really doesn’t occur anywhere else.” Today, Hawaiian heirloom jewelry is given and received as a way to honor Hawai‘i’s deep connection to its ancestral past. For birthdays and graduations, it’s common for family members to purchase a Hawaiian heirloom piece as a way to commemorate the special occasion. In recent years, engagement rings and wedding bands have grown in popularity. The styles of Hawaiian heirloom jewelry have also evolved with its customers. Sterling silver and rose gold are now incorporated into designs, and engraved lettering has expanded to include color or raised options. Whatever a person’s preference, the significance will continue on to the next generation. “That’s one of the reasons why ‘heirloom,’ in the titling of the jewelry, is so significant, because that’s what truly happens,” says Sato. “History moves with the person who wears it and that makes it so special.”

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T he sho ps at Wa ilea

shortlist Na hoku

greenleaf diamonds

808.891.8040

808.874.1118

nahoku.com

greenleafdiamonds.com lambros fine Jewelry

808.891.2100 lambrosgoldsmith.com

maui clothing company

808.891.8561 mauiclothingcompany.com


area map To Kihei d

oa

aR

n ha

To Kahului Via Piilani Hwy 31

o

Kil

W a

i l e a Al a

S. Kihe

31

PIILAN

nui Dr .

i Road

Y. I HW

Wailea Ekahi

Andaz Resort

Wailea Elua

Wailea Blue Golf Course

Wailea Marriott Resort

Wailea Ekolu

aa St.

i Dr

Wailea Point

Residence Inn Wa i l Maui Wailea ea Ik e Dr ive

Kalai W

nu

Four Seasons Resort

Wa i l ea Al a

Wailea Beach Villas Grand Wailea

Grand Champions Villas

. Hotel Wailea

Fairmont Kea Lani

The s ho ps at Wa ilea

i Dr.

42

Makena Al an u

To Makena Surf

Gold and Emerald Courses


&ODIBOUSFTT (BMMFSZ CZ#PPU[JF

5IF4IPQTBU8BJMFB&ODIBOUSFTTHBMMFSZDPN


directory See Maps Next Spread

LUXURY FASHION & LIFESTYLE

lululemon

EW18

Mahina

A35

Malibu Shirts

B21

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Maui Waterwear

B2

Moonbow Tropics

A26

Quiksilver

B50

Rip Curl

B4

Sunglass Hut

B36

Tina Stephens

EW14

T-Shirt Factory

B32

Tommy Bahama Store

A33

Tori Richard

B3

Truffoire

B6

Volcom (Coming Soon)

B7

Baron & Leeds

EW6

Bottega Veneta

EW3

Cos Bar

EW19

Gucci

EW9

Baron & Leeds

EW6

Louis Vuitton

EW1

Greenleaf Diamonds

B26a

Prada

EW24

Ki‘i Gallery

A17

Tiffany & Co.

EW2

Lambros Fine Jewelers

EW17

Na Hoku

A21

Swarovski Crystal

A15

Tiffany & Co.

EW2

FASHION & LIFESTYLE

JEWELRY

Aloha Hat Company

A38

Banana Republic

A47

Billabong

B41

Blue Ginger

B38

ABC Stores

A53

Canyon Beachwear

EW16

Elephant Walk

A36

Cariloha

B20

Martin & MacArthur

B17

Crazy Shirts

A49

Maui Dive Shop

B29

Dames & Gentlemen

A16

Mele Ukulele

A30

Gap/babyGap

B39

Sand People

B26

GOTTLING Home Store

EW23

SoHa Living

B45

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Swarovski Crystal

A15

Imrie

EW10

Whalers General Store

B12

Keliki

B5

44

T he s ho ps at Wa ilea

SPECIALTIES & GIFTS


DINING

Billabong

B41

Bottega Veneta

EW3

Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room

B25

Dames & Gentlemen

A16

Lineage (Coming Soon)

OP2

Elephant Walk

A36

Longhi’s

B22

Gap/babyGap

B39

The Pint & Cork

EW4

Gucci

EW9

Ruth’s Chris Steak House

A34

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar

A33

Island Gourmet Markets

OP1

Keliki

B5

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Maui Dive Shop

B29

Maui Waterwear

B2

Rip Curl

B4

Tommy Bahama Store

A33

MARKET & SPECIALTY FOODS ABC Stores The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf Honolulu Coffee Company

A53 B30 EW25

Honolulu Cookie Company

B27

Island Gourmet Markets

OP1

Lappert’s Hawai‘i

B33

Surfing Monkey Shave Ice

T07

Whalers General Store

B12

GALLERIES Enchantress Gallery by Bootzie

A19

Ki‘i Gallery

A17

Lahaina Galleries

A23

National Geographic | Fine Art Galleries Tasini Tiki Gallery

EW11 A43

REAL ESTATE SERVICES Coldwell Banker Island Properties

A37/B35

Fidelity Title

EW22

The Wailea Group

EW5

Wailea Realty

B16

shoes ABC Stores

A53

Banana Republic

A47

The Walking Company

B43

Whalers General Store

B12

children ABC Stores

A53

Billabong

B41

Blue Ginger

B38

Crazy Shirts

A49

Elephant Walk

A36

Gap/babyGap

B39

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Island Gourmet Markets

OP1

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Maui Dive Shop

B29

Maui Waterwear

B2

Quiksilver

B50

Rip Curl

B4

SoHa Living

B45

T-Shirt Factory

B32

Whalers General Store

B12

T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

45


UPPER LEVEL

bottega veneta

Prada

The pint & cork

tiffany & co.

Louis VuitTon

lululemon

gucci

abc stores

banana republic

Tommy bahama

ruth’s chris

LEGEND EW East Wing Upper Level A Upper Level B Lower Level OP Out Parcel

RESTROOMS

ELEVATOR

ESCALATOR

STAIRS

b51

MANAGEMENT OFFICE

P ATM

HOTEL SHUTTLES

USPS MAILBOX

PARKING PAY STATION

SECURITY OFFICE

PARKING OFFICE

Open Daily . 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive . 808.891.6770 . theshopsatwailea.com . Managed by The Festival Companies

46

The sho ps at Wa ilea


lower LEVEL

quiksilver

T07

gap / baby gap

whalers general store

B29

longhi’s

cheeseburger

The

Shops at Wailea

T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

47


A HUI HOU AKU

the koi pond at the Fairmont Kea Lani in Wailea is an oasis of relaxation and tranquility. It is a scenic stop between the hotel and the beach beyond.

48

The s ho ps at Wa ilea

©SEBASTIAN SAYEGH. DRESS, RIP CURL; SHOES, MAHINA; HAT, QUIKSILVER; NECKLACE, ENCHANTRESS GALLERY BY BOOTZIE

(Until we meet again)


First Place Award Winning Designer Lambros Magiafas

The Shops at Wailea • 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive, Suite EW17 Wailea Hawaii 96753 • 808-891-2100


Shops at Wailea Maui Apr 2018  
Shops at Wailea Maui Apr 2018