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The Shops at wailea

THe shopping Dining Arts & culture magazine

spring/summer 2017


THE SUBMARINER The quintessential divers’ watch has embodied the historic ties between Rolex and the underwater world since 1953. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

rolex

oyster perpetual and submariner are ® trademarks.


OYSTER PERPETUAL SUBMARINER DATE


center information to Maui’s premier shopping and dining destination. With more than 70 distinct boutiques, shops, restaurants and galleries, The Shops at Wailea offers an unparalleled leisure experience in the heart of the Wailea Resort. For a map of the center and a store directory, please see page 44. For a list of center events, please see page 8. WELCOME

DRIVING DIRECTIONS

PARKING

From within Wailea resort area Take Wailea Alanui Drive to the intersection of Wailea Ike Drive and look for our monument signs.

One hour free parking. Three additional hours free parking with validation. Or $3 per half hour, $40 per day maximum or lost ticket.

From Pi‘ilani Highway Take Wailea Ike Drive toward the ocean until you reach the traffic light at Wailea Alanui Drive. Turn either right or left onto Wailea Alanui Drive. Entrances to the center are located immediately following in either direction.

HOURS

Monday-Sunday, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Select merchants and restaurants open earlier and remain open later. For more information, please call the management office at 808.891.6770.

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West Maui

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Lahaina

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MAUI

Maalaea

Hana

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Kihei Haleakala

wailea resort Molokini

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Makena


"TRUFFLE I N F U S E D S K I N C A R E "

Come in for a

COMPLIMENTARY FACIAL Truffoire at The Shops At Wailea 808-875-6717 Hawaii@Truffoire.com

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The Shops

at wailea magazine

the shops at wailea

3750 Wailea Alanui Drive, Wailea-Makena, HI 96753 (808) 891-6770 www.theshopsatwailea.com General Manager Brian K. Yano (S) The Festival Companies

O‘AHU Sales

Hawai‘i Director Buddy Moore Account Executive Debbie De Mello Circulation & Marketing Sidney Louie WAILEA Editorial

Wailea Editor Anu Yagi Senior Editor Simplicio Paragas Contributing Editors Gillian Glover, Jasmine Hu CREATIVE

Chief Creative Officer Haines Wilkerson Design Director Jane Frey Regional Editorial Director Margaret Martin Art Director Teri Samuels Retouching Jerry Hartman

Publication Services Director Kristine Miller Director of Manufacturing Donald Horton Technical Operations Manager Tony Thorne-Booth EXECUTIVE

President Donna W. Kessler Vice President of Operations Angela E. Allen Regional Vice President of Sales Courtney Fuhrmann Morris CoMMuniCations

Chairman William S. Morris III President & CEO William S. Morris IV where|HaWaii

Official publisher for The Shops at Wailea

Ultimate Wood Watches

www.MartinandMacArthur.com The Shops at Wailea MnM_TSAW_HP_NB_11032016.indd 1 4 Th e sho ps at Wa ilea

808-891-8844 11/3/16 3:50 PM


The shops at Wailea

Events 8 / Concerts at the shops / Artwalk / Pau Hana

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FASHION

ACCESSORIES

DINING

Breeze through spring and summer in these casual yet chic island looks.

Charming gifts for friends, the perfect accessory for you. A win-win!

Farm-to-table is the inspiration behind Maui menu items at the Shops’ restaurants.

GIVING BACK

HAWAIIAN CULTURE

The Shops partners with local organizations to promote good causes.

Discover traditional and modern uses of the versatile coconut.

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map 42 / Directory 44 / on the cover Wetsuit, Billabong; sunglasses, Sunglass Hut.

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(ON THE COVER) PHOTOGRAPH ©JENNIFER WHALEN; SURFBOARD COURTESY GREIG MOERS. (THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA; ©JENNIFER WHALEN; ©STEVE CZERNIAK. ON HER: RING, NA HOKU; BRACELETS, KI‘I GALLERIES; DRESS, MOONBOW TROPICS. ON HIM: LINEN SHIRT AND PANTS, TOMMY BAHAMA; RING, NA HOKU.

contents


Events

MUSIC MAN Makana performs on April 19.

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Photo credit

Art, music, dance, crafts


COncerts at the shops

island wood carving Every Wednesday and Friday, 12:30 – 3:30 pm The time-honored tradition of Polynesian wood carving is a sight to behold. Using techniques handed down from generation to generation, artisans chisel masterpieces ranging in size from mini to massive. See a master-in-action downstairs near the fountain courtyard.

Makana

April 19, 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Internationally acclaimed guitarist, singer and composer Makana has been instrumental in providing the musical backdrop for social change. He has been featured on three Grammynominated albums, including the soundtrack of the Oscar-winning film “The Descendants.” Paula fuga

May 17 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Paula Fuga has performed for the President at the White House, recorded with Ziggy Marley, sung with Jack Johnson at Madison Square Garden and headlined Brazil’s Alma Surf Festival. Her individuality in song composition and stirring vocals strike a chord in listeners’ hearts.

(OPPOSITE PAGE) DANA EDMUNDS; (THIS PAGE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA

hoku zuttermeister

June 14 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. With 10 Na Hoku Hanohano Award nominations and six wins under his belt for his debut album, “Aina Kupuna,” there is no doubt that Hoku has a gift. Crediting many Hawaiian music greats as his influence, Hoku has taken what he’s learned and translated it into his own style of Hawaiian music.

polynesian Dance shows Every Tuesday and Thursday, 5:30 – 6:30 pm Every Pacific Island nation has its unique style of dance, many of which you can enjoy at The Shops’ weekly Polynesian dance shows. On Tuesdays, delight in ‘Aumakua Productions’ keiki performances by talented youngsters (pictured); on Thursdays, be wowed by the professional polish of the troupe Manutea Nui E.

JOHN CRUZ

July 19 5:30 – 7 pm. Free. Renowned singer-songwriter John Cruz produced his popular debut album, “Acoustic Soul,” himself. He has won several Na Hoku Hanohano Awards and a Grammy. Fans of his soulful vocals include former President Barack Obama and Jack Johnson. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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events

artwalk Every first Wednesday of the month, 6 – 8 pm The beauty of Maui has made the island a mecca for generations of artists. See the results during ARTwalk at The Shops, a free event showcasing the works of artists from Hawai‘i and around the world. Meet featured artists and chat with fellow art lovers as you stroll through six galleries – aFeinberg Gallery, Ki‘i Gallery, Lahaina Galleries, Mouche Gallery, National Geographic Fine Art Galleries and Tasini Tiki Gallery.

Every Friday, 4 - 6 pm Celebrate the end of the work week with some of Maui’s most beloved local musicians and up-and-coming talents. From an ethereal harp in the upstairs Luxury Wing to Hawaiianstyle guitar on the ground level near the surf shop, there’s no better way to relax. FINE TUNE Maui vocalist and guitarist Gibran Vicente presents hip interpretations of classic songs.

coconut frond weaving Every Thursday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm. Free. The coconut is one of the most versatile plants on the planet. From root to fruit, every part of this palm is useful. Join Hawaiian cultural expert Makahiwa Thompson for a journey into the art, lore and utility of coconuts. (To learn more, see page 37.) TRY YOUR HAND Weaving workshops are held on Thursdays; husking on Tuesdays.

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(CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) ©RACHEL OLSSON; ©STEVE CZERNIAK; ©ISAAC ARJONILLA. (OPPOSITE) ©ISAAC ARJONILLA.

Pau Hana music


lei po‘o making Every Monday, 2:30 – 3:30 pm Flower crowns may be all the DIY rage right now—but Hawaiians have been rockin’ lei po‘o (head lei) since time immemorial. Craft your very own fresh floral headdress while learning about the many heartfelt Hawaiian mana‘o (ideas, intentions) behind harvesting, creating, wearing and gifting handmade lei. All the tools and materials needed to make a lei po‘o are provided. Classes are free and are held at the main fountain courtyard. All ages are welcome. lovely lei The making and offering of a lei is a way to express aloha.

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LEISURE & LACE Hat, Tommy Bahama; lace body suit, BCBG Max Azria; crop shorts, Billabong; hoop earrings, Tiffany & Co.; Tiffany T bracelet, Tiffany & Co. LIGHT ON YOUR FEET Sunglasses, Aloha Hat Company; earrings and necklace, Na Hoku; bracelet and ring, Lambros Galleries; tank, Mahina; pants, Moonbow Tropics; Palm Springs Backpack, Louis Vuitton.


Lorem ipsu wailea dreaming SHenducit reprovi temolore vol

paradise at every step


A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME Earrings, Na Hoku; necklace, Banana Republic; ring, Mahina; bracelet, Na Hoku; blouse, BCBG Max Azria; skirt, Mahina. EDGE OF INFINITY Bikini, Maui Waterwear; swim cover, Canyon Beachwear; necklace, Na Hoku.


Photographer: Jennifer Whalen; Models: Rose Marie O’Leary and Kahi Kapololu, Kathy Muller Talent & Modeling Agency; Stylist: Kyle Kagamida; Hair/Make-up: Kymberly Marr, Makeup & Talent Hawaii, and Cos Bar, The Shops at Wailea; Production Assistants: Justin Collier and Kalapana Kollars

TIP YOUR HAT TO GOOD STYLE Hat, Aloha Hat Company; sunglasses, Sunglass Hut; watch, Na Hoku; shirt and pants, Tommy Bahama; District PM messenger bag, Louis Vuitton.

NO HOLDING BACK Earrings, Swarovski; jumpsuit, BGBG Max Azria; bracelet, Swarovski; Lockme Backpack, Louis Vuitton.


luxe looks This spring, metallic accents make sultry looks shine. Shop our picks for a night out or a day at the beach.

greenleaf diamonds

Diamonds—and gold, rose gold and silver—are a girl’s best friend.

baron & leeds

Complete your look with a glint of gold.

MARTIN & MACARTHUR

Patent leather and gold studs make this purse pop.

baNANA REPUBLIC

Stand tall with these stunning suede sandals. 18

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banana republic

Go from dinner to dancing in this standout LBD.

TIFFANY & CO.

Slip these 18-karat-gold bangles on for instant glamour.


sunglass hut

Shield your eyes from the sun’s rays in style.

maui waterwear

Stand out by blending in with this tropical one-piece.

maui waterwear

This roomy beach bag is casual but with a sophisticated edge. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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RELAX, MAX Keep it casual in laid-back coastal styles. Wood, metal and leather add rugged touches.

MAUI clothing company

BANANA REPUBLIC

Channel aloha vibes in this printed shirt.

Don this fiery pullover on cool Hawaiian nights.

MARTIN & MACARTHUR

Knock on wood with these organic, lightweight shades.

MARTIN & MACARTHUR

Tote your essentials in this rugged calfskin-leather bag. THE WALKING COMPANY

Explore the island in OluKai’s Nohea mesh slip-ons.

TOMMY BAHAMA

Crack open a cold one with the catch of the day. 20

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NA HOKU

This bold boar-tusk pendant is inlaid with Hawaii’s own koa wood.

BILLABONG

Catch a wave in this submersible ocean-blue hat.

KI‘I GALLERY

This pyramid-patterned ring is a piece of art in itself.

TOMMY BAHAMA

The island outfitter’s striped leather belt is both fun and functional. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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making waves With the right accessories, your day at the shore will be easy, breezy and delightful.

SUNGLASS HUT ALOHA HAT COMPANY

Stay stylish while shielding yourself from UV rays.

Stay fly with this pair of cool aviators.

enchantress gallery by bootzie

Enchant the world with this luxurious blend of essential and perfume oils. CANYON BEACHWEAR

Go beyond the fringe in this charming cover-up.

ISLAND GOURMET MARKETS

Burnt after a day in the sun? Soothe your skin with this organic ointment.

THE WALKING COMPANY

truffoire

Don’t expect any fashion slip-ups with these slippahs!

White truffle extract is the magic ingredient in this facial mask.

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MOONBOW TROPICS

Find your own “heart of the ocean” to treasure forever.

MAUI clothing company

Tote all your beach-day essentials in this ample bag.

QUIKSILVER

Stay hydrated all day long with this 40-ounce hydro flask. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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KEIKI BY THE OCEAN You’ve brought the kids to this paradise of a playground; now give them something to remember their visit by.

ABC STORES

Your little one is a ray of sunshine in this onesie.

QUIKSILVER

Keep your wild child warm and stylish in this sweater.

MAUI CLOTHING COMPANY

With the flowers of the islands, this dress is a garden of delights.

Whalers general store

BILLABONG

All aboard for skateboarding fun.

This hula dancer cookie is almost too cute to eat. BLUE GINGER

BLUE GINGER

Get in the swim with this plush stuffed moray eel.

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This mermaid is bound to make a splash with your kids.


MAUI WATERWEAR

Suit up for the waves in this spring suit by Rip Curl.

HONOLULU COOKIE COMPANY

Be the pineapple of your family’s eye with a gift of these delicious cookies.

BILLABONG

Your keiki will be walking pretty in these bright-hued sandals. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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TASTE MAKERS Chefs’ appreciation of Maui ingredients

Photo credit

By Simplicio Paragas Photography by STEVE CZERNIAK and isaac arjonilla

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FARM FRESH (Clockwise, from top left) Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room’s executive chef Seville Jackson uses fresh parsley to garnish his grilled salmon; The Pint & Cork’s ‘Bib Burger’ is topped with bacon and a fried egg; The Pint & Cork’s culinary team is led by Maka Kwon, second from left. (Opposite page) Longhi’s grilled filet mignon.

farm-to-fork is already a given, and

sustainability is an unquestioned universal goal. In 1991, when a dozen celebrated chefs decided to promote Hawai‘i produce and seafood through a burgeoning movement known as Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine (HRC), it was seen as a monumental shift in the local culinary paradigm. Although such terms as sustainability and food security had not yet become part of the daily lexicon, these forward-thinking leaders of the restaurant industry were already cham-

pioning the mantra of “Fresh First. Local Always.” “In the ’90s, everyone wanted Mediterranean food,” says Malcom “Maka” Kwon, executive chef at The Pint & Cork. “In the 2000s, it was all about Pacific Rim. And now, it’s all about casual food prepared with local ingredients whenever possible.” A case in point is the aromatic mushroom salad, which is prepared with a duet of sautéed baby shiitake and Hamakua King Ali‘i mushrooms, and presented atop a verdant bed of baby greens. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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TASTE MAKERS

CHEF’S TALK (Clockwise, from top left). Tommy Bahama’s lilikoi dessert, as prepared by chef Jason LaMotte; steaks and lobster are chef Daniel Bader’s mainstays at Ruth’s Chris. (Opposite page) Ruth’s Chris’ Kumato salad.

“One of my favorite ingredients is the Haiku tomato,” Kwon says. “The tomatoes are picked just at the right time, and the farm is just right up the street from us so it doesn’t get any better than that.” For Seville Jackson, locally grown avocados and watermelons opened his palate to new flavors. The Las Vegas transplant—who relocated to Maui two years ago—uses both ingredients when preparing his watermelon salad, adding a dollop of goat cheese for an additional local touch. 28

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“When I first tried the Maui avocado, I said ‘Wow, this is how this is supposed to taste.’ It was just the creamiest avocado I’ve ever had in my life,” says Jackson, executive chef at Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room. “Everything is just harvested so quickly that ingredients are literally coming directly from the farm and straight to the table.” Since opening his first eponymous restaurant in Lähainä in 1976, the late Bob Longhi insisted on using the best of Maui ingredients, which was


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TASTE MAKERS

SWEET SENSATION Longhi’s signature tiramisu offers layers of homemade lady fingers and mascarpone.

especially challenging at the time since the island’s agriculture industry was at a nadir. Today, Longhi’s executive chef Paul Gonsalez incorporates as many Maui ingredients that he can into his salads, including Triple N Farms baby romaine, Waipoli Farms watercress, and Kula greens and baby kale. “Longhi’s was ahead of the farm-to-table movement,” says general manager and sommelier Michael Rose. “We’ve always sourced the best ingredients possible, whether it’s for our food program or our 30

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cocktail menu. We let the essence of ingredients speak for themselves.” An advocate for farmers, Jason LaMotte’s philosophy is to utilize local first and organic whenever possible. It’s a stance that he has held his entire culinary career. Since assuming the top-toque position at Tommy Bahama two years ago, the New Orleans-raised chef has forged close relationships with local farmers who supply him with such bounty as golden beets, goat cheese, arugula, lilikoi, berries and micro mint.


“I think it’s imperative, as a chef, that we support our farmers,” asserts LaMotte, who uses the ingredients above to create his Evonuk Farms roasted golden beet salad and liliko’i cheesecake. “When I have all this great fresh produce available to me, why wouldn’t I want to use it?” Ruth’s Chris’ executive chef Daniel Bader asks the same rhetorical question and, as expected, he arrives at the same answer as LaMotte. Of course, he’ll use local ingredients whenever he can. In fact, one of his signature dishes is a Caprese-inspired salad composed of locally sourced Kumato tomatoes, which are topped with fresh mozzarella then drizzled with an aged balsamic glaze. “The tomatoes are fresh and they don’t taste like cardboard,” Bader says. “And they haven’t traveled thousands of miles to get here.” With increased collaboration between farmers and chefs, diners can expect an authentic taste of Maui, adding another memorable—and delicious— moment to their island vacation.

shortlist Tommy Bahama

SIGNATURE DISHES:

808.875.9983

Prime rib cheeseburger, huli huli chicken and marinated salmon

tommybahama.com /restaurants/wailea SIGNATURE DISHES: World

Famous Cocktail Shrimp, crusted rack of lamb

The Pint & Cork

808.727.2038 thepintandcork.com

Longhi’s

SIGNATURE DISHES:

808.891.8883

Mushroom salad, The Bib burger and Parmesan fries

longhis.com SIGNATURE DISHES:

Lobster and Filet Longhi and homemade tiramisu

Ruth’s Chris Steak House 808.874.8880

Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room

808.874.8990

ruthschris.com /restaurant-locations /wailea-maui

cheeseburgernation.com /locations/cheeseburger -grille-and-tap-roomwailea

Filet and lobster tail, crab stack and Kumato tomato salad

the SHOPS at WAILEA

3750 Wailea Alanui Drive EW23 • Phone: 808•280•7979

SIGNATURE DISHES:

Karl D. Gottling Designer

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GIVING BACK The Shops at Wailea builds platforms for Maui philanthropy By jasmine HU By Anu Yagi

with a passion for local programs that are

truly making a difference, The Shops at Wailea is giving back in a big way by partnering with 12 Mauibased nonprofits—one each month—using its special events as an avenue of philanthropy. So each time you attend an ARTWalk, Concerts at The Shops, or other event, you’re aiding a good cause. Nourishing the Body and the Soul

April’s featured nonprofit is Maui Food Bank (MFB), established in 1994 “to help the hungry in Maui County by collecting and distributing food through community partnerships.” MFB provides food to 10,000 people a month through distributions and partnerships, collecting food donations from retail stores, wholesalers, food distributors, restaurants, farmers and farmer’s markets, individuals and through food drives. The beneficiaries include the homeless, working poor, children and youth, seniors and anyone who FRIENDLY FACES Maui Food Bank (above) distributes food to 10,000 people a month. Habitat for Humanity Maui (right) helps underprivileged people with home repairs, renovations and retrofitting.

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giving Back

LEARN MORE, GIVE MORE Boys & Girls ClubS of Maui

THE GIFT OF GIVING Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui (above) offers enriching opportunities to children. Hospice Maui (left) provides compassionate end-of-life care.

808-242-4363 100 Kanaloa Ave. Kahului, HI 96732

is at risk of going hungry. All the food goes through a strict inspection process, before being sanitized, inventoried and stored for distribution.

Habitat for Humanity Maui

habitat-maui.org 808-242-1140 970 Lower Main St. Wailuku, HI 96793 Hospice Maui

hospicemaui.org 808-244-5555 400 Mahalani St. Wailuku, HI 96793 Maui Food Bank

mauifoodbank.org 808-243-9500 760 Kolu St. Wailuku, HI 96793

Compassionate Companions

May highlights the benevolence of the ‘ohana at Hospice Maui. For the past 35 years, Hospice Maui has provided the highest level of professional, ethical, culturally appropriate and deeply compassionate hospice care to the diverse Maui community. Hospice Maui believes that we all are entitled to care that relieves pain and symptoms and to be cared for by those who understand the emotional and spiritual needs of the dying. Care is provided at the patient’s home or at the Hospice Maui Hale, a new five-bedroom facility. They also offer assistance and bereavement support to loved ones. Shaping the Future

June showcases the Boys & Girls Clubs of Maui. With the motto “great futures start here,” the Boys & Girls Clubs of 34

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Maui understands the importance of establishing a strong foundation for our youths to ensure their success in the future. Their programs provide services in five different fields—Education and Career Development; Character and Leadership Development; Sports, Fitness and Recreation; the Arts; and Health and Life Skills—to offer various enriching opportunities for the children of Maui. Home Is Where the Heart Is

July’s featured nonprofit is Habitat for Humanity Maui (HHM). An official affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International since 1997, HHM builds single-family and multifamily housing for those in need. With their “A Brush With Kindness” program, HHM also helps underprivileged families with critical repairs, renovations and retrofitting to their home to ensure that it’s safe and comfortable to reside in. Whether it’s fixing a leaky roof or installing ramps to accommodate a disabled or elderly resident, HHM envisions a world where everyone has a decent place to live.

(THIS PAGE, FROM TOP) COURTESY HOSPICE MAUI; COURTESY BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF MAUI. (PREVIOUS SPREAD, FROM LEFT) COURTESY MAUI FOOD BANK; COURTESY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY MAUI.

bgcmaui.org


BRAVE NIU WORLD

More than tropical treat, cracking open a coconut is a portal to understanding Polynesia. By Anu Yagi Photography by isaac arjonilla

FLOATING ON THE SEA of our celluloid imagination, the lonely coconut washes up on a desert isle. Maybe in our mind’s eye we see a time-lapse scene, of the coconut sprouting through sun and storm. Or maybe we envision a montage of a marooned seaman, quenching his famine and carving a face in a coconut, as he waits to be rescued.

Droll as this imagery might be, it’s a rather sad heresy that the coconut was crowned with a cocktail parasol and called the king of tropical kitsch. In truth, coconut is one of the most versatile plants on the planet. From root to fruit, every part of this palm is crucially useful, and therefore deeply respected by Polynesian cultures. T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

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brave niu world

BEAR THE PALM Hawaiian cultural expert Makahiwa Thompson shares the versatile qualities of coconut.

turn over a niu leaf

“Have you ever tried to pick up a coconut off the ground, but couldn’t?” asks Makahiwa Thompson, a big man with a gentle voice, as he mimes straining to lift a tiny object. The crowd around him giggles. “It’s kind of funny watching someone try.” Makahiwa is a Hawaiian cultural expert who twice weekly teaches workshops at The Shops at Wailea. He explains how a coconut will shoot strong roots into the ground as it germinates—which, for the unwitting, makes it amusingly impossible to lift. Seated under a shade tent near The Shops’ coconut palm-filled courtyard, workshop attendees lean in close 38

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to listen to Makahiwa’s fluid narrative. One guest asks Makahiwa about the trees’ root systems, to which he receives a response befitting a university botany class. Visitors quickly discover that if you’ve got questions, Makahiwa has articulate answers. And not just about coconuts, but about Hawaiian culture at large. Known as niu in ÿölelo Hawaiÿi (Hawaiian language), the plant has myriad uses that provide insight into the Polynesian way of life. Used for food, medicine, household materials, personal care products, plus artwork— niu aids in effectively every aspect of traditional living. A professional educator, Makahiwa is happy to gratify visitors’ diverse questions. He’ll deftly discuss


brave niu world

FROM DRUPE TO NUTS Holding up a niu that’s ripe for husking, Makahiwa Thompson explains characteristics of the various stages of coconut maturity—and how to select drupes based on the desired product.

everything from indigenous sciences to oceanic voyaging to ways of the Hawaiian warrior. Meanwhile, his workshop materials include a bevy of visual examples, plus hands-on crafting or tasting opportunities. (Tuesday workshops focus on husking, whereas Thursdays showcase frond weaving.) “It’s amazing,” Makahiwa says after the class, “I’ve had many tourists tell me they’ve been visiting Maui for 20-plus years—and this is the first time they’ve been exposed to this kind of information.” WHAT’S NIU?

Globally, coconuts can be found almost everywhere between 26 degrees north and 26 degrees south (save for the interiors of Africa and South America), an equatorial region dubbed “the coconut belt.” 40

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Botanically, the fruit is actually a drupe, i.e., stone fruit—not a nut. The palms take a decade or two to reach peak production, and can continue to produce for upward of a century, with trees known to live much longer. More than the fruit’s electrolyte-rich water and “meat” (which can be made into “milk,”oil and flour), sap from the flowers yield sweet syrup that can be turned into vinegar and even wine. Oil can be used as fuel, in cooking, as ointments or rendered into luxurious natural shampoos and soaps. Thanks to the Internet-fueled foodie bonanza, the health benefits of coconut are now widely known. It is a gluten-free source of fiber, amino acids, vitamins and minerals—especially calcium, magnesium and potassium.


Shells from the niu were made into cups, bowls, utensils and containers, among other ornamental items. Fronds were woven into hats, mats, brooms and toys; and wood was used for everything from house building to drum making. Perhaps one of the most fascinating uses of husk fiber is for making rope. Not only did this cordage lash together homes in thousands of villages without metal nails, but niu rope was essential for canoe building. Niu fiber is resilient to the rigors of salt water and made possible the ancient, epic voyages of Polynesians. Their ability to deliberately migrate here to Hawaiÿi— the most isolated archipelago on the planet—is a feat that in the context of its time is oft equated to men landing on the moon. Further, niu is one of the several dozen “canoe crops” brought by early Polynesians to Hawai‘i—along with the likes of kalo (taro), ulu (breadfruit), kukui (candlenut) and ÿuala (sweet potato). These plants add to the evidence that Polynesians migrated with vision and purpose. Plus, it speaks to the fact that—although coconuts do indeed float and propagate themselves across short ocean distances—the sheer isolation of Hawai‘i makes this a very rare occurrence in these isles; therefore the vast majority of Hawaiian niu is of ancient human introduction. GOOD AS NIU

Makahiwa shows visitors a coconut that he’s freshly husked on a clever wooden spike. He points out the “face” in the shell—three dots that resemble eyes and a mouth (that are actually micropyle germination points). He highlights one of the core lines going between the two eyes, and with ninja nimbleness and a sharp whap, cracks the shell so that it gushes fresh coconut water into a wooden bowl. The crowd “oohs” and “aahs,” then “mmms” as Makahiwa passes around tasting cups. He then cracks the coconut open to reveal the thick, delicious meat within. It glistens in the sun like an inverted pearl; an intriguing portal into understanding Polynesia.

“In truth, coconut is one of the most versatile plants on the planet. From root to fruit, every part of this palm is crucially useful, and therefore deeply respected by Polynesian cultures.” steps to nutty goodness Getting to the meat of the coconut 4 Find the nut within

1 Straight from the tree

5 “Face” time

2 Spike it

6 The big reveal

3 Husk it

7 Enjoy

coconut workshops Every Tuesday (husking) and Thursday (weaving), 2:30 – 3:30 pm. For more information about The Shops’ free cultural classes and events, see pages 8-11.

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area map To Kihei d

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To Kahului Via Piilani Hwy 31

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PIILAN

nui Dr .

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Y. I HW

Wailea Ekahi

Andaz Resort

Wailea Elua

Wailea Blue Golf Course

Wailea Marriott Resort

Wailea Ekolu

aa St.

i Dr

Wailea Point

Residence Inn Wa i l Maui Wailea ea Ik e Dr ive

Kalai W

nu

Four Seasons Resort

Wa i l ea Al a

Wailea Beach Villas Grand Wailea

Grand Champions Villas

. Hotel Wailea

Fairmont Kea Lani

The s ho ps at Wa ilea

i Dr.

42

Makena Al an u

To Makena Surf

Gold and Emerald Courses


directory See Maps Next Spread

LUXURY FASHION & LIFESTYLE Baron & Leeds

EW6

BCBGMAXAZRIA

EW18

Bottega Veneta

EW3

Cos Bar

EW19

Gucci

EW9

Louis Vuitton

EW1

Prada

EW24

Tiffany & Co.

EW2

44

The s ho ps at Wa ilea

Aloha Hat Company

A38

Banana Republic

A47

Billabong

B41

Blue Ginger

B38

Canyon Beachwear

EW16

Cariloha

B20

Crazy Shirts

A49

Enchantress Gallery by Bootzie

A19

Gap/babyGap

B39

Honolua Surf Co.

B47

Keoni’s HotLava DanceFit Studio

EW15

L‘Occitane En Provence

B9

Mahina

A35

Malibu Shirts

B21

Maui Clothing Company

B1

Maui Waterwear

B2

Moonbow Tropics

B5

Quiksilver

B50

Rip Curl

B4

Smooch Boutique

EW14

Sunglass Hut

B36

T-Shirt Factory

B32

Tommy Bahama’s Store

A33

Tori Richard

B3

©ISAAC ARJONILLA (2)

FASHION & LIFESTYLE


Truffoire

B6

Honolulu Coffee Company

EW25

The Walking Company

B43

Honolulu Cookie Company

B27

Island Gourmet Markets

OP

Lappert’s Hawai‘i

B33

Surfing Monkey Shave Ice

T07

Whalers General Store

B12

JEWELRY Baron & Leeds

EW6

Greenleaf Diamonds

B26a

Ki‘i Gallery

A17

Lambros Fine Jewelers

EW17

Na Hoku

A21

aFeinberg Gallery

A26

Swarovski Crystal

A15

Ki‘i Gallery

A17

Tiffany & Co.

EW2

Lahaina Galleries

A23

Mouche Gallery

A27

National Geographic | Fine Art Galleries

EW11

Tasini Tiki Gallery

A43

SPECIALTIES & GIFTS

GALLERIES

ABC Stores

A53

Elephant Walk

A36

GOTTLING Home Store

EW23

Martin & MacArthur

B17

Century 21 All Islands

A37

Maui Dive Shop

B29

Coldwell Banker Island Properties

B35

Mele Ukulele

A30

Island Sotheby’s Int’l. Realty

B34

Sand People

B26

Fidelity Title

EW22

SoHa Living

B45

Maui Luxury Real Estate

T12

Swarovski Crystal

A15

The Wailea Group

EW5

B12

Wailea Realty

B16

Whalers General Store

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

DINING Cheeseburger Grille & Tap Room

B25

Longhi’s

B22

The Pint & Cork

EW4

Ruth’s Chris Steak House

A34

Tommy Bahama Restaurant & Bar

A33

MARKET & SPECIALTY FOODS ABC Stores

A53

The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf

B30

T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

45


UPPER LEVEL

LEGEND EW East Wing Upper Level A Upper Level B Lower Level OP Out Parcel

RESTROOMS

ELEVATOR

ESCALATOR

STAIRS

b51

MANAGEMENT OFFICE

P ATM

HOTEL SHUTTLES

USPS MAILBOX

PARKING PAY STATION

SECURITY OFFICE

PARKING OFFICE

Open Daily . 3750 Wailea Alanui Drive . 808.891.6770 . theshopsatwailea.com . Managed by The Festival Companies

46

The s ho ps at Wa ilea


lower LEVEL

T07

T12 T13

T14 T15

The

Shops at Wailea

T he Sho p s at Wa il ea

47


A HUI HOU AKU

©ISAAC ARJONILLA

(Until we meet again)

48

The s ho ps at Wa ilea


Maui Shops at Wailea Spring-Summer 2017  

Magazine celebrating the beautiful, elegant, and cultural Shops at Wailea on the island of Maui.

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