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November 2020

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Ben Ross is riding the creative wave Specialising in mural and digital work, Ben Ross grew up surfing the Peninsula waves and is making a name for himself globally through his vibrant creations that radiate beach vibes. Kate Sears speaks to Ben about his career surge that’s taken him from the Royal Australian Navy to carpentry to now applying his love of surf, summer and weirdness into his striking drawings that capture the essence of summer.

In Conversation Fabulous chats with Peninsula people

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When did your passion for art emerge, and how did you reach the calibre you’re at now? My passion for art has always been there, from scribbling in almost every workbook in high school to sitting around the table and drawing with Mum. As a carpenter for 10 years I wasn’t passionate at all; I wanted to surf, travel and get paid to do it, so I started a surf/art brand with my brother Jake, yet that fizzled after three years as the love for the brand wasn’t there anymore. But the love for art always remained. Jake talked me into taking my art seriously and boom, here I am! I couldn’t thank him enough as this is the happiest I’ve ever been. I’m a massive believer in doing what you love and eventually you’ll get paid, so all I can say is work, work, work – even though it doesn’t feel like work – and the clients will come running. How did you develop your unique style? I was about to embark on a surf trip of a lifetime to Mexico with the boys, so I headed to America early but I blew through all my money – Vegas, hey? To continue the trip, I started some contract work and received a job from an England yoga studio. I just drew myself doing some yoga and the client hated it and didn’t pay me, but I absolutely loved it. From here my caricature Bennie grew. I feel the Mexico trip sculpted the caricatures and the summer style I have now. We see you’ve worked with prominent

brands like Nike, Rip Curl and Nixon. Could you tell us more? Nike has been a fun client for me, from collaborating on the Asian basketball to a show in California and now working with Boston Celtics. It’s been an epic ride and I was so pumped to get a hold of this client. This honestly came from a girl in San Francisco buying one of my prints and a Nike representative saw it. I’ve got my artwork into the United States, Mexico, Japan, China and of course Australia. I’ve also done an art show in San Francisco as a support artist, and I just had my first ever solo show in Tokyo – everything sold, so that was an unreal experience. I’ve just finished off a massive collection for Sideways Surf on the Gold Coast and in Sydney, which consists of surfboards, skateboards, threads and two massive window decals. Do you have any exciting upcoming projects that you could tell us about? Yeah, I have a few tasty works on at the moment featuring Coca-Cola, Vegemite and some massive murals around Melbourne and Geelong. But the biggest client would have to be the Chinese Winter Olympics. We’re still in talks and hopefully they don’t read this, but fingers crossed that the Olympics run, and secondly, hopefully a Peninsula boy will be making an appearance as an artist. Catch the beachy vibes of Ben’s artwork on Instagram @benross_art

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Money available for Men’s Sheds Men’s Sheds across the Mornington Peninsula have been invited to apply for funding as part of the latest round of the Federal Government’s National Men’s Shed Development Program. Round 21 of the program will specifically prioritise applications with a strong health, well-being or safety emphasis, in acknowledgement of the impact of COVID-19 and the needs of Men’s Sheds in the recovery period and beyond. Additionally, in light of COVID-19, IT equipment and training will be prioritised to increase connectivity among Men’s Shed members. Money is available for three categories: • Health, well-being and events – $8000 maximum; • Shed improvements – $8000 maximum; and, • Equipment – $5000 maximum. “Now more than ever, Men’s Sheds offer men a critical avenue for social support and engagement,” Flinders federal Liberal MP Greg Hunt said. “To stay healthy, we all need to do regular activities with the people around us, and our local Men’s Sheds have become a focal point for the Mornington Peninsula community. Men’s Sheds are vital in providing a safe space for men to talk and work on meaningful projects. This new funding round will provide financial support to assist in both setting up and maintaining Men’s Sheds across Australia.” Since 2013, the Government has provided $5.4 million to support Men’s Sheds across Australia. Applications for the current round close on Friday, November 27. For more information, visit www.mensshed.org

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

Welcome to Woodleigh, Natalie McLennan As Term 4 began, our new Head of Senior Campus started her time at Woodleigh School. A real ‘people person’, Nat (pictured) joined Woodleigh after 15 years at Mentone Grammar. I know she will take every opportunity to be available to staff and students during Term 4 and I’m equally sure she’ll be a regular at the crossing, welcoming students to School every morning. DAVID BAKER – Principal

Excited by Woodleigh

After 15 years at Mentone Grammar, I have stepped out of my comfort zone – it was time to move on. I am genuinely excited to be part of a community where Respect for Self, Respect for Others and Respect for The Environment underpin everything we stand for. Personalised learning, student agency, a focus on wellbeing and formative feedback, and the development of lifelong learning capabilities align with my personal educational philosophies. I’m also really enjoying being greeted by a family of ducks each morning, and the cockatoos who sing every lunchtime! I am passionate about education and excited by Woodleigh’s culture, where positive relationships and learning experiences are acknowledged as being central to the quality of our students’ education.  NATALIE McLENNAN – Deputy Principal – Head of Senior Campus

Go well, Year 12

It’s been one heck of a year. You’ve been faced with so many challenges, and you’ve each done a mighty job so far. So, as the end of your time at Woodleigh gets nearer, remember: study hard, but not so hard that everything else goes south. Remember to eat well and get good rest, hydrate and take those breaks when you need them. Go for a walk, hit the beach (if you can), or have a play with the dog and a chat with mum and/or dad. Seek help when you need it, offer help when you see others who are feeling the pinch. Take time to celebrate the things you have achieved already, with the understanding that there is still plenty to be done. And don’t forget: when you’re in front of that exam, and you’re ready and raring to go . . . Read the question. Read the question. Then, read the question again. Best wishes to all, and thanks for the memories. ADAM LIDDIARD – Director of Community Relations WOODLEIGH SCHOOL A: 485 Golf Links Rd, Langwarrin South T: 5971 6100 W: www.woodleigh.vic.edu.au FB: woodleighschoo1 INSTA: woodleighschool

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What started off as a private Instagram account by Jess Dakota has now become a stash of affordable fashion, budget home styling, and delish recipes. The Mornington Peninsula microinfluencer decided to begin sharing her love for fashion and styling when she discovered that she had more time on her hands, not only throughout her pregnancy but of course during the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions. Soon enough she was uploading daily, sharing her money-savvy styling tips for fashion, home décor and daily maternity fashion through her Outfits of the Day posts. With almost 4000 followers, down-to-earth Jess has created a community of followers who enjoy the glimpses she shares from her life, the items she simply adores, styling tips and of course discount codes to use at her favourite online stores.

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“I’ve always loved fashion and all things styling, and I wanted to share with everyone that you don’t need to spend hundreds to look puttogether and feel good,” said Jess. “It’s all about how you style the items and feeling confident. I bought the basics for my maternity fashion, a good pair of maternity jeans and some dresses and then everything else I bought in a bigger size or stretchy material so it stretched with my bump, and then I would style my outfits based off that. My biggest thing was always making sure I was comfortable. You can be comfy, put-together and stylish at the same time.” Jess believes fashion is like an extension of your personality and a way to express oneself. Like most women, she knows there is something special about finally finding that fabulous pair of shoes or the perfect pants. It’s true that they have a way of bringing out a confidence that you didn’t even know you had. Jess adores the beautiful people who engage with her on a daily basis. It feels like a little community where women are uplifting other women. Here she thrives on posting her newest home décor purchases and fresh fashion finds she’s discovered, and in turn her followers reach out to her showing their appreciation for her sharing her secrets. It doesn’t stop there, with her eye for styling continuing through to the home. Jess says her love of interior styling and organising has grown as a result of her love of fashion and styling outfits. “Since I can remember I’ve always enjoyed styling, decluttering and decorating. My motto would be ‘less is more’. Start with the main feature item and add decor around that. The one tip that makes me feel organised is having everything labelled. I have a slight labelling addiction and possibly go overboard.” We’re betting this organisation queen is grateful for her labelling obsession since baby Charlie James Campbell was welcomed into the world on September 7. When she’s not styling, she’s in her other happy place – the kitchen. Here she flourishes on trying new things, cooking anything and everything, creating new flavours and basically not following a recipe. “I’m always open for a chat, whether it be styling advice or anything else. I’d just like to continue helping women and sharing what I love.” Get inspired by Jess’s passion for fashion, knack for styling on a budget and follow her motherhood journey on Instagram @jess.dakota KATE SEARS www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Musical theatre creates

cultural connectivity

Sutton and Wesley Taylor and Ellie and Freya Ford get in some tree-decorating practice ahead of Christmas.

COVID-safe Scout Christmas trees This year Christmas is going to be a little different for everyone. At this stage, who knows what it will look like exactly? Social bubbles and champagne bubbles, masks on big bushy beards, socially distanced carols by candlelight and lots and lots of handwashing are just a few new things we will have to consider besides when to make the Christmas pudding and who’s picking up Aunt Mavis. Well, the Scouts are working towards making at least one thing easy this year – the COVID-safe click and collect of your fresh Christmas tree. This year they are selling their trees each weekend in December from two locations: the hall on the corner of Baden Powell Drive and Humphries Rd, and from Frankston Bunnings. To make it a COVID-safe experience, you can pre-order and pay for your tree online at www.bpp.org.au, and your tree will be patiently waiting for you to pick it up. For a totally hassle-free time of it, the Scouts will also organise the delivery of your tree if you live in South Frankston or Mount Eliza and will even take it away when the festive season’s over. Head to www.bpp.org.au for details. Then it will be over to you to go a little ‘Christmas tree whisperer’ and create a special theme in your home.

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Mark Featherby annoys the crap out of his wife Georgie. While singing in the shower, that is. Warbling takes centre stage in this family’s life, where theatre, law and midwifery merge energetically to form a serendipitous flow of performance. Laughter plays a starring role too. Moving to Red Hill in the early ‘80s and now settled in Mount Eliza, Mark makes time for things that he loves even when there is none. Lunging across lawyering commitments, not-for-profit theatre interests and family obligations, this 66-year-old has no intentions of slowing down. You can tell he enjoys a challenge as his voice charges down the phone: “I have a law firm in Rosebud with my business partner Greg Russo and it’s been good to me. I mainly handle commercial concerns and work across different areas. I wasn’t a wonderful student. My father was a great sportsman and I was mad for it too. I played cricket with the Melbourne Cricket Club and was offered my articles after graduation with a firm in Hastings – as long as I agreed to captain the Hastings cricket team. My son Harry is becoming a lawyer too.” This Altona-born and raised boy with three children began singing lessons when his two young daughters, Jessica and Madeleine, began theirs at eight and five respectively. Mark continues: “Georgie and I were at a local production in Frankston in 1999 and there was an ad about auditioning for Les Misérables with PLOS – Peninsula Light Operatic Society. I told her I was going to start singing lessons too and we – both the girls and I – were going to be in Les Misérables. Georgie, who is a midwife, thought that was hilarious as she is a classically trained singer, but we all got in. I established not-for-profit Stella Entertainment in 2003 and produced Paris – A Rock Odyssey with the help of Jon English at the National Theatre in St Kilda. We revived that show in 2017 at the Melbourne Recital Centre and Madeleine played Helen of Troy. There’s been multiple musicals produced in between, including The Mapmaker’s Opera, which premiered off-Broadway at the New York Musical Theatre Festival in 2014. I’ve always been a supporter of theatre and am dedicated to promoting Australian work and talent. I now work with Jonathan Madgwick and a great team under the title of Music Theatre Melbourne.”

Whether Mark’s walking the streets of Mount Eliza with an audio book or hitting a round of golf, this admirer of The Book of Mormon and Come from Away musicals is always thinking on his feet. Music Theatre Melbourne has recently been running a writers’ competition under the banner of COVID: THE MUSICAL and it’s down to three. Could be just what the doctor ordered. Ha! Judged by an Australian panel plus mega musical theatre composer and lyricist Stephen Schwartz, of Wicked, Godspell and Pippin fame, the winner will have their work produced and staged. Exciting. Mark wraps it up: “The brief for the competition was completely non-prescriptive,” he laughs. “The performing arts were already facing huge difficulties before COVID-19. There has to be new ways of doing things coming out of this. Perhaps combining performance with technology or more smaller productions. Who knows?” Not me. But the show simply must go on. Livelihoods and cultural connectivity are at stake. LIZ ROGERS

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OUR COVER

Left: Local micro-influencer Jess Dakota shares her budget fashion and home styling tips on page 11. Top Row: Award-winning craftmanship at Anny’s Manufacturing Jewellers pages 16 & 72; Frankston’s destination cafe One Pear Tree is excited to re-open, page 60. Bottom Row: Coastal inspired living with Oz Design Furniture pages 31 & 86; Don’t forget to wear a poppy this Remembrance Day, see page 38

News & Interviews H Choose Local this Christmas Arts & Events The Business Health Beauty Fashion & Stars Food & Wine, Produce Property Home Decor incl Trades

3-54 55-63 64-67 68-71 72-77 78-82 83-100

Book by Nov 17 for our next edition, out December 1 PUBLISHER, EDITOR Lisa Walton lisa@mpmag.com.au EDITORIAL CO-ORDINATOR Geoff Scott geoff@mpmag.com.au CUSTOMER RELATIONS & SALES Molly 0407 225 261 molly@mpmag.com.au Anna 0401 598 613 anna@mpmag.com.au Chendelle - on leave - chendelle@mpmag.com.au JOURNALISTS & FEATURE WRITERS Kate Sears, Liz Rogers, Lisa Walton, Drew Cooper, Stephanie Johnson, Maurie Hutchinson, Nerida Langcake SOCIAL MEDIA Molly Mitchell & Jasmine Forecast DISTRIBUTION Archie and his band of helpers DESIGN Lisa Walton, Jasmine Forecast Note some staff on reduced hours during Covid-19

WE’VE GOT THE PENINSULA COVERED Distribution increasing due to COVID-19 restrictions lifting Look for our baskets across the Peninsula, greater Frankston and Melbourne -

Mornington Peninsula Magazine

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www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au READERS AND ADVERTISERS look for our baskets to pick up your print copy and connect with us on social media and online for daily updates from all your favourites.

In Print, Online & on Social Media @MornPenMag @MtElizaVillageMag @eatdrinkMornPen

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Ros credits family support for her 45 years of council service Rhiannon Petris contacted us and dobbed in her mum, Ros Humphrey, who has chalked up 45 years of service for the Mornington Peninsula Shire Council. We hear she’s even set the record for the longest-serving council employee. Way to go, Ros! It all began in 1975 when she and her husband bought their first house in Dromana and Ros starting work at the Shire of Mornington. Her first role was a computer operator, and because the council was so small, the staff assisted across most business units. Throughout the 1980s, Ros worked modified hours with three small children and her very supportive husband. Ros found moving through changes in technology exciting. Then in December 1994 the shires

of Mornington and Flinders amalgamated, after which Ros moved to the Rosebud office of the former Shire of Flinders and into the roles of rate collector and then revenue management. Ros says she’s thoroughly enjoyed working in the constantly changing environment and considers herself fortunate to have served the community for so long, crediting the support of her husband and three daughters for her impressive achievement. “I thrive in a changing environment of people, services and technology and am not yet looking to slow down,” Ros says. “I am fortunate that I have been able to work for a local employer which has given me a work/ life balance close to home. I think the highlight of my journey has been the friendships that I have made along the way.” KATE SEARS

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Please welcome Kelly Deluxe on to the stage By day, Kelly-Maree Newling is a graphic designer, and at night she puts on her amateur seamstress hat and cosplay outfit to become Kelly Deluxe. Since 2008, Peninsula-based Kelly has been engulfed by the world that cosplay – a hybrid of ‘costume’ and ‘play’ – has opened up to her, diving headfirst into the community in 2018 and organising her first shoot in 2019. From here she’s combined her passion for fashion, cosplay and performance to create her stage name, Kelly Deluxe. “Kelly Deluxe encompasses both alternative fashion and cosplay, as I’m drawn to vintage and gothic styles,” said Kelly. “Fashion is just as theatrical, playful and intricate. My favourite thing about cosplay is that it combines so

Photo by Simon’s Loveable Photos Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

many skillsets: character acting, sewing, prop making, wig styling and make-up to name a few. You can focus on whatever you like.” Having performed in dance concerts from a young age and participated in musical theatre later on, these hobbies add another layer of sparkle to her performances. Holding singing close to her heart, and favouring street Latin, jive and ballroom dancing, she hasn’t performed in a while but keeps that spirit alive through cosplay. “Cosplay for me is a performance; you embody a character through their dress and mannerisms. Style is completely open to interpretation. You can aim for an accurate, movie-realistic look or create a Pokémoninspired Rococo outfit. I love portraying strong female characters from Japanese animation and video games.” Shoots require a lot of attention from Kelly. Not only do the photoshoot days require extensive organisation via the use of spreadsheets for the models, photographers, make-up and hair stylists, but they also demand time for the costumes that consist of handmade items, artist commissions and purchased items. It was later in 2018 that Kelly undertook weekly sewing lessons for over a year at Sew This Pattern. In the same year, Kelly successfully organised 10 shoots, while she participated in 19. “My favourite cosplay moment was at Animaga 2015, where my partner and I dressed as Sailor Moon and Tuxedo Mask. We watched Toru Furuya’s panel – the original Tuxedo Mask voice actor – and we were excited to meet him later on at his photo session. Instead, he came over to us and asked us for a photo. We got to have an in-depth chat after the session, which was quite special.” With events off the cards for now due to COVID-19, Kelly’s focused on developing future collaborations and shoots. So she’s keeping her skills tip-top by giving her cosplay outfits some TLC, upgrades and creating a ‘50s-style dress to sharpen her sewing skills. When she isn’t portraying someone else, Kelly’s consumed in her calligraphy, playing retro games, travelling with her partner, or spending time with her noisy budgie, Pippin. Kelly’s also a self-confessed pinball witch and plays competitively in three clubs. Kelly encourages anyone considering entering the cosplay world to give it a go. Join the Melbourne Cosplay Community group on Facebook or attend the Tech Games Fest at Frankston Chisholm run by Andrew Owen, where Kelly has volunteered since 2015. And remember that your first costume doesn’t have to be perfect. Kelly will hopefully see you at the next con, or you can say ‘Hi’ now on Instagram and Facebook @misskellydeluxe  KATE SEARS

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Canoeing champion continues to paddle on the Peninsula There’s a couple living on the back slopes of Mount Martha overlooking the moorings in the marina below. Unusual for these parts, no? But what is unusual is that one of them has had a 65-year canoeing career that has seen them paddling across the globe. Thirty-eight Australian championships, 81 Victorian titles, 25 Masters golds and several World Masters titles later, Jonathan Mayne is happily hunkered down on the hill gardening, hanging out at the Men’s Shed in Dromana and going to church on Sundays with his OAM-awarded wife Jenny. Not bad for a

Preston-born boy who developed Perthes disease when he was just two years old. Jonathan chats: “Perthes is a rare childhood bone disease that affects hip joints. The other boys in the rehab unit of The Children’s Orthopaedic Hospital in Jacksons Rd, Mount Eliza, were nine to 13 years old. I was two. My dad Roy had a motorbike and parents were only allowed to visit once a month for an hour at a time. This I learnt years later from a lady I met by chance in Israel who had nursed me in that very ward. I was there for 12 months, then had a couple of years in splints and I suspect that’s why I’ve never kicked a footy or hit a cricket ball in my life. My mother Emily must have asked people to be gentle with me.” The Maynes brought up their daughters Melissa and Samantha in Doncaster

Jonathan Mayne’s father, Roy, aboard Lazy Days about 1954.

before moving to the Peninsula in 1996. Jonathan won his last open canoeing championship two years ago when he was 80. He continues: “I can still do 30 pushups and a few with one arm with ease. I started canoeing when I was 14. My sister Wendy was going out with a fellow my father didn’t like the look of so I was sent along as chaperone. Our first stop was always the Fairfield Canoe Club and when we got there this bloke rolled out a canoe, gave me a paddle and told me to piss off. I’ve been a member of that club since 1954.” Jonathan continues: “I tried out for the Olympics four times and missed out by a few points of a second each time, but I never gave up. I did go to the Melbourne and Moscow Olympics as a spectator, the Los Angeles Olympics as the canoeing commentator for Network 10, the Sydney Olympics together with Jenny as officials and we worked as journalists for the Christian Mission at the London Olympics.”

Jonathan’s life has been jam-packed with all things canoeing, including being the race commentator for Australian Canoeing for more than 40 years. He’s just finished renovating two Peterborough canoes too. His father bought one of them in 1954 for £60. He concludes: “The one Dad bought was made in 1900 from spruce and would have been imported by the Chipperfield Boatshed that was on the Yarra at Kew. The other one would have been built 15 years later. Peterborough canoes were the Rolls-Royce of canoes and were built for a gentleman to take a lady paddling quietly on a lake. Roy often fell out of his because the stern seat was set too far aft. He would lean back and the prow would lift and out he would go. I just need to relocate that back seat and that grand old canoe will be ready to live again.” Just paddling magic. LIZ ROGERS

2021 EDITION FINAL CALL HURRY bookings close November 16 Dedicated to all things delicious on the Mornington Peninsula and Frankston

Available from December 15 at bookstores, newsagents, produce stores & 100’s of outlets from Ivanhoe to Crib Point.

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Steamer Mined Off Australian Coast This was the dramatic headline in the Melbourne Age on Saturday, November 9, 80 years ago. The s.s. Cambridge, while on passage from Melbourne to Sydney, had struck a mine off Wilsons Promontory at 11pm the previous Thursday, sinking in 45 minutes with the loss of one life. In response to a distress call, the survivors were picked up the next morning. They had spent nine hours in the lifeboats in wild wet weather before being taken to Port Welshpool, where the residents kindly made room for them in their homes and ensured that they were warm and well fed. Departing from Port Pirie, the City of Rayville was heading eastward through

Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

Bass Strait when at 7.47pm on November 8 she also struck a mine. The ship sank in just over half an hour, taking the life of one crew member. The lighthouse keeper at Cape Otway witnessed the explosion and called fishing boats at Apollo Bay to go to the aid of the survivors. The ship’s lifeboats were towed to Apollo Bay. The loss of two ships in less than 24 hours prompted the prime minister, Robert

Menzies, to state: “(This) brings the war nearer home.” Previously, all of the action had been on the other side of the world. The Cambridge was a British-owned steamer, but the City of Rayville was American-owned. The US was neutral at the time of her sinking, not entering World War II until December 1941. The City of Rayville was the first US-owned ship to be sunk in World War II, and

The s.s. Cambridge, weighing 10,846 tons and measuring 160m, was launched in 1919 as the Vogtland. She was built in Germany and surrendered to Britain after World War I as part of war reparations. Photo by Allan C Green (1878-1954), courtesy State Library of Victoria (H91.108/1761).

the crewman who died was the first US seaman to die in that war. Both ships were victims of the Passat, formerly a tanker named Storstad that had been captured by the German raider Pinguin, converted into a minelayer and, with a German prize crew aboard, laid minefields in Bass Strait in early November. The Pinguin was a cargo vessel, fitted with weapons and manned by the German navy, which sank 28 ships with another four sunk by her mines before meeting her end. After the loss of the two ships, Bass Strait was closed to shipping until all of the remaining mines were swept by HMAS Orara and Durraween. BY MAURIE HUTCHINSON President, Peninsula Ship Society T: Maurie Hutchinson 9787 5780 E: mauriehutch@gmail.com The Peninsula Ship Society will not be meeting until further notice.

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It’s back to school with balloons and banners Dromana Primary School is known for delivering A-plus education and care. October 12 marked the first day back in the classroom for foundation to Year 6 students after months of remote learning, and principal Andrew Haley and education support Lauren Christie wanted to make sure the students felt welcomed and supported.

Lauren explains: “At first we wanted to have a huge event to celebrate finally being back on site, but of course we couldn’t due to COVID-19 restrictions, so we went for the next best option. It was really all about saying thank you to our community, who have rallied together during lockdown. We are pretty lucky living where we do. Everyone within the school community has been patient and understanding and the students have responded well

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to the challenge of remote learning. “We knew that some children might feel overwhelmed being back at school after so much time at home, while others would be excited. That’s one of the reasons we staggered the arrival of the students. Foundation to Grade 3 students arrived at 9am, while the rest of the school began at 9.30. All students and their families were welcomed by a huge ‘Welcome Back’ banner, and the gated area was completely covered in balloons kindly donated by local Lynda Coombs. “One of the things we were particularly conscious of was the fact that all parents had to leave their children at the front gate. They aren’t allowed on school grounds at the moment, so students were taken to their classrooms by their teachers or other staff members just to make sure they felt safe.” It must be a very strange world for our little ones at the moment, although children are often the most

adept at adaption and going with the flow. That doesn’t mean it’s not tricky. Just imagine little heads bubbling over with rules and regulations like social distancing, constant handwashing and sanitisation, and seeing their teachers wandering around the yard with face masks on. COVID-19 normal. Lauren concludes: “We were focused on making the transition back to the classroom as easy as possible for all students. This little celebration was just a small way of letting our community know how proud we are of them. They have coped really well throughout the pandemic. Dromana Primary School staff want them to know that we support them in moving forward and that we have all the safeguards in place – including a new system for contact tracing – to do so.” Welcome back, everyone. It’s business as usual – almost! LIZ ROGERS

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5975 9644

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• Family owned and operated body repair shop in Mornington, specialising in prestige body repairs and refinishing for over 30 years. • Our qualified, professional and friendly staff can assist you with handling all claims. • All repairs are fully guaranteed and are to the highest industry standards. • Hire and loan cars are available to all customers. • All insurance companies** • Insurance and private work – all makes, all models

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Easy Breakfast hosts Jon Vertigan and Julie Strini.

Future’s looking ACE for Easy Music 3MP Radio station 1377 3MP is rich in history, becoming Melbourne’s seventh commercial radio station in July 1976. Originally broadcasting from the top level of Frankston’s Bayside Shopping Centre, 3MP found its success playing ‘easy music’ and targeting a 50-plus audience. However, over its 40-year-plus history the station has taken on a variety of music, talk and sports formats. After several ownership changes, regional radio broadcaster ACE Radio purchased the licence in July and has brought back the much-loved Easy Music 3MP brand.

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ACE Radio prides itself on being a proactive corporate citizen backing a significant number of community groups and locally based initiatives. Easy Music 3MP will be no different. Already a member of the Committee for Greater Frankston, 3MP is also a sponsor of the Frankston Football Club and the Mornington Peninsula Regional Tourism Board. There is a variety of ways to listen to 3MP: on the traditional 1377AM, DAB+, on your smartphone through RadioApp or iHeart Radio app, Google Home devices or online at www.3mp.com.au Across Melbourne and the Mornington Peninsula, Easy Music 3MP is back to stay.

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Ed Moon has been busy since we spoke in September 2019. He began his Bachelor of Applied Music and Performance at Box Hill Institute, released his debut single Pass the Blame in early 2020 and has just released his second single, Moon. Looks like isolation hasn’t slowed this Mornington-based musician down. Ed chats: “I’ve been busier than ever. Lockdown has given me the opportunity to concentrate on writing and fine-tuning my musical skills. I’ve been live streaming like lots of other artists and opportunities having been springing up everywhere.” He’s excited! We reckon many musos have been pining for their live performance fix, but the streaming scene has allowed creatives to reach audiences they

otherwise wouldn’t. Ed continues: “I supported Jack Jones and collaborated with Mornington Peninsula band Johnny Bipolar last year. Live performance is great, but digital connection allows expansion of audience. Releasing my music on Facebook, Instagram, Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

Soundcloud, Spotify, TikTok and YouTube means so many other people get to hear it.” It also means you get offered gigs like the Victoria Together and Mushroom Group series The State of Music – Introducing,

which Ed did on September 18. Introduced by one of his favourite artists, Matt Corby, Ed crooned his way through original and covered songs and the result has been, let’s say, amazing. He continues: “I couldn’t believe it when I was approached to do this. It was a real honour to be introduced by Matt Corby, who I love. Becoming linked in with a group like Mushroom is amazing, and who knows what will happen from here. I was also featured on AIME Mentoring’s Imagination TV program, which gives young adults at home the chance to be mentored and supported. I also appeared in a live stream for the Minus18 Pride Party.” Anyone who has heard Ed’s music may describe it as acoustic with a splash of blues-infused soul. There’s also a touch of chill-out Hawaiian groove. His lyrics are often penned with a poetic hand that oozes over you like his namesake’s cool blue hue. Effortless. Concerned with current geographical, political and emotional issues, his songs connect young people from persons of colour, LGBTQIA and climate activism groups while telling stories that touch all of us no matter where we come from. His song Pass the Blame was written in response to the devasting bushfires at the beginning of the year, while Moon offers hope in a world where chaos often reigns. He concludes: “I wrote, recorded and produced Moon during Melbourne’s Stage 4 lockdown. I’m in a very lucky position. I have everything I need at home to continue writing and recording, so I’ve deferred my music course for a year to concentrate solely on my music career. My mum is a great photographer and helps me out with publicity too.” Stay tuned to www.edmoonmusic.com to see where this young man’s musical vision may lead. To the moon and back and everywhere in between? LIZ ROGERS www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Peninsula creator launches into a Spring Clean Mornington Peninsula actor, director and producer Brigitte Jarvis launched Spring Clean online in late October. The four-part dramedy is centred around Rowena, a perimenopausal woman on the verge of a breakdown. With the launch a success, Brigitte’s set her hopes on Season 2 reaching our television screens – and hopefully a smoother post-production process after COVID-19 restrictions left her with a fully shot series but with no means to finish the production and teaser videos shot within her own house. Kate Sears speaks to Brigitte about creating the world of Rowena and the brains behind her – Brigitte herself. What’s Spring Clean all about? Racing to win promotion and find love, daily chaos follows lonely 40-something Rowena. Her messy endeavours are disrupted by a new shiny cleaner. But is this love or friendship? And who is the man behind the binoculars? Could you please provide our readers with some insight into the inspiration behind creating the lonely 40-something Rowena for the two previous plays and this addition? The plays with RAWcollective were about – among other things – women, the impossible struggle for unattainable ‘perfection’ and the shame, despair and loneliness that can hide behind that. I was at a time in my life where I, and many other women in my life, were mums, frazzled, too busy, and trying to please everyone, but completely disconnected from ourselves. So I wanted to create something very relatable, which allowed us to laugh at ourselves as well as take a good hard look in the mirror and say, ‘Well this is a bit crap, isn’t it?’ So Rowena was born. What’s your industry experience consist of, and what’s next? I’ve been in the industry for some 20 years, with my most recent screen performances in Welfare, the comedy series made down in Rosebud, which has gone on to win an award at the recent Melbourne Web Festival. I’ve just completed The Party Bus, a gritty feature film about the LA Party Bus drug

scene, where I played the lead female role. These days, through my experience writing for stage and film, I am enjoying creating my own stories. Under the umbrella of my production company Wild Sage Pictures, my first work was a short film, Madre, which was selected for the Peninsula Short Film Festival and picked up awards for Best Female Actor and Best Short Film at the LA Shorts Awards. We created an online character for a little series during lockdown called Nestle Into My Nook and I have just completed the post-production for the short film The Endless Hourglass, all shot on iPhone and edited by myself. This was my first solo project and a great challenge to learn new skills due to the isolation laws, and therefore needing to do everything alone. How has the response to the release been thus far? The response has been incredible. It seems to have completely hit the tone I was after, with the relatable comedy and pathos. The general response is that it’s hilarious, clever, relatable and they really felt a sadness for Rowena and that they wanted to see her find love. The general consensus was they wanted to see more, more, more! We had so much fun filming this and I think you feel that when you watch it. Stop by Spring Clean on Facebook, Instagram and our YouTube channel to watch it for yourself.

LAST DAYS TO BOOK YOUR SPOT OUT DECEMBER 2020

Do you have a hospitality business on the Peninsula or Frankston? Join over 120 foodie hot spots within Eat.Drink Mornington Peninsula’s third edition. Rise above the rest and be featured in this stunning book Wineries, Breweries, Farm Gates, Cafes and Produce Professionals.

Visit www.eatdrinkmorningtonpeninsula.com.au or call 9708 8222 for details

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Welcome to Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron’s playground Tackers might well be something for the kids to enjoy, but the Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron’s playground is for everyone. So these summer holidays when your child begins a Tackers course – an introductory fun, games-based sailing program – why not come and join the squadron too. You might like to enjoy a coffee from the BYS clubhouse and watch the action from the deck, or you too might want to dip your toes in the water and join a sailing program. BYS offers opportunities for both adults and youths to discover sailing through hands-on learn-to-sail experiences. BYS is an inclusive club and is proud to have been named the Australian Sailing Victorian Inclusive Club of the Year 2020. BYS aims to offer a sailing experience for everyone, which includes programs for women and for people with a disability. Safety and enjoyment are the squadron’s priorities both on and off the water in a COVID-safe environment. As BYS looks forward to a fabulous summer enjoying its playground, you are welcome to come and join in the fun.  BLAIRGOWRIE YACHT SQUADRON A: 2900 Point Nepean Rd, Blairgowrie W: www.bys.asn.au FB: blairgowrieys INSTA: blairgowrieyachtsquadron Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

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Metropolitan madness

How a bizarre geographical classification and a once-in-a-generation pandemic created the perfect storm that’s battering the Peninsula When Melissa Goffin walked into Red Gum BBQ, the restaurant she and husband Martin own on the Mornington Peninsula, her chef broke the news she’d been dreading: “Did you hear? Victorian restaurants are required to close to diners. As of tomorrow at midday.” As Melissa tried keep a brave face for her staff, a customer approached her and assured her: “We’ll be back. Soon. When this is all over. I promise.” Melissa locked eyes with a colleague and they embraced, momentarily forgetting to social distance as they hugged and cried together. Then they put on hand sanitiser and prepared to close. Not just for the weekend, but the foreseeable future. This is a year no one will ever forget. COVID-19 became a global pandemic, countries all around the world went into lockdown and by March it had reached Australian shores. The borders were closed and the entire country went into Stage 3 lockdown for almost 50 days. “It was intense,” says Melissa. “Everybody

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BY JANE FLYNN situated in picturesque Red Hill? A had those similar feelings of panic and popular tourist destination, the Peninsula fear and trauma at what was happening.” is 70km from the CBD, with a population Of the 45 staff employed at Red Gum of 165,800. Considering this, it may come BBQ, Melissa was only able to keep as a surprise to learn that the Peninsula 20, utilising the Federal Government’s is classified as part of metropolitan JobKeeper scheme. “The pressure of Melbourne. Melissa was forced to close making the right decisions to ensure we the doors on Red Gum BBQ once more. would come out of it and be alive and And an issue that had been bubbling away thriving on the other side was really in the background for many years boiled enormous.” over and started a debate that will likely By June, there was light at the end of continue long after COVID-19: why is the the tunnel. COVID-19 case numbers Peninsula considered part of metropolitan had dropped to single figures and the Melbourne and not part of regional country slowly began to open up. Red Victoria? Gum BBQ opened its doors again, albeit This is a debate that Shannon Smit, with limited numbers and strict COVID-19 president of the Committee for safety measures. Little did Melissa and Mornington Peninsula, has been Martin know that the worst was yet to attempting to have for the past two come. Cases slowly began to rise again in Victoria, escalating to the hundreds by the years. One of the organisation’s key policy pillars is ‘securing regional designation start of July. and access to commensurate support’. On July 7, Victorian Premier Daniel Shannon believes the Peninsula is Andrews announced that metropolitan economically disadvantaged by being Melbourne and Mitchell Shire would be classified as metropolitan. “We don’t have re-entering Stage 3 lockdown. Still the the funding regional (areas) get but we case numbers kept increasing. By August, don’t have the infrastructure metro has,” restrictions were further tightened and Shannon contends. “We are in no man’s metropolitan Melbourne was placed in land.” Stage 4 lockdown. An 8pm-5am curfew The CfMP has put together a proposal for was imposed and no one was allowed to a study to be done on the regionalisation travel outside the 5km radius from their of the Peninsula. The proposal outlines residence unless they held a permit as an some of the benefits of being classified as essential worker. regional: What did this mean for Red Gum BBQ,

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•R  educed payroll taxes paid by employers; • L ower rates of state land tax, metropolitan planning levies and some property charges; • Increased support for post-secondary education students; • Improved funding for training, education, arts and cultural services; •H  igher subsidies for NDIS support and some medical services; and, •M  ore appropriate and ‘fit for purpose’ regulatory arrangements. Shannon acknowledges that one concern over being reclassified as regional is losing the Peninsula’s green wedge. Green wedges are the non-urban areas of metropolitan Melbourne that lie outside the urban growth boundary. However, she points out that the Government has the ability to classify the Peninsula as regional but add planning restrictions that protect the green wedge. “We have no intention of changing that green wedge element,” she says. Shannon and the CfMP had been working steadily on the regionalisation study long before the COVID-19 outbreak, including making a presentation to the Shadow Cabinet in July 2019. However, the pandemic and associated restrictions have brought the issue front and centre continues over page

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Metropolitan madness continued from previous page

as residents and businesses struggle to understand why they have been included in the lockdown. According to the Covid Live website, on July 7 when metropolitan Melbourne was placed under Stage 3 restrictions, the Peninsula had one active case and a total of 64 cases, while Greater Geelong had two active cases and a total of 70 cases. By August 2, Greater Geelong had a whopping 98 active cases while the Peninsula had only 17. Yet the Peninsula was moved into Stage 4 restrictions along with the rest of metropolitan Melbourne. It just doesn’t make sense to Shannon. When she reached out to Nepean state Labor MP Chris Brayne, his response was simply that the Peninsula was included in the lockdown due to the health risk. “I know that the local member of the Andrews Government says he is working around the clock on these issues, but we are not seeing that representation,” says Shannon in frustration. The CfMP took matters into its own hands, sending many correspondences to Mr Andrews and Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton. When she received a

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response from Professor Sutton, Shannon was disappointed: the reason the Peninsula was included in the lockdown was because of an outbreak at Frankston Hospital. “Well, those cases were in the last week, not in the month or so ago (he) made that decision,” Shannon says. The outbreak was in fact the week of August 24, three weeks after the Peninsula was included in Stage 4 restrictions. “It was such a pathetic response.” It was a response repeated in an emailed statement from Mr Brayne when he was asked for comment: “We have been close to clusters of cases in Casey and Frankston, including when Frankston Hospital had an outbreak resulting in hundreds of staff having to be sent home, many of whom live on the Peninsula.” Mr Brayne believes this push for regionalisation is simply a response to the restrictions. “If, for instance, metropolitan Melbourne wasn’t in lockdown and regional Victoria was in lockdown, people would likely be fine with us being part of metropolitan Melbourne. What people

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aren’t fine with is being part of lockdown. I get that.” This is a view that Mornington Peninsula Magazine publisher Lisa Walton strongly disagrees with. “It’s not anything to do with lockdown. It’s to do with local groups, community groups, festivals, everyone out in the community not even knowing if they can apply for regional or metro grants.” It’s a frustration Lisa knows only too well. In 2018, she applied for the Regional and Small Publishers Innovation grant. Unfortunately, she missed out due to some clerical issues but was set to go the following year for round two. But then she was told she was not eligible because her postcode was not regional – even though it was the same postcode as she’d submitted for the previous year. This year Lisa applied for a metropolitan grant, but with a much smaller pool of money available and pitted against big city publications, her independent magazines didn’t stand a chance. “It’s not a fair playing field,” Lisa says. “In the arts community it’s particularly difficult – local theatre groups putting on shows at Rosebud theatre are up against someone doing something at the Atheneum in Melbourne. It’s like we are not seen to be in either (metropolitan or regional category).” Back at Red Gum BBQ, Melissa was surprised to discover when she registered her business that despite Red Hill being almost 100km from the CBD, it was classified as metropolitan. This means Melissa has to pay almost double the payroll tax compared with a regional business. It also means she misses out on funding that is offered to regional businesses to help them attract and retain staff.

The distance from the city, the shortage of public transport and lack of training institutions are all issues the Peninsula shares with regional Victoria. It can take months for Melissa to fill a senior hospitality position. Even junior staff and apprentices can be hard to come by, with many young people moving away from the Peninsula once they graduate. “Every business owner on the Peninsula knows that it’s one of the difficulties – hiring staff. Everyone is pretty unanimous in saying the current classification is not for us.” For now, the Peninsula remains in lockdown along with metropolitan Melbourne. Red Gum BBQ has been able to stay minimally operational by offering a takeaway and delivery service and expanding into retail, but not all businesses have had that option. “Every restaurant is having their own experience,” Melissa acknowledges. “Some (experiences are) really awful, and I think many won’t reopen.” For most hospitality businesses on the Peninsula, summer is the busiest and most profitable time of year, with tourists flocking here in droves. With so much uncertainty around when metropolitan Melbourne will be able to start moving out of restrictions, Melissa admits: “My fears are for the future and what will happen over the next six months.” The Federal Government last month announced a $250 million regional Australia package with $150 million specifically for tourism and infrastructure projects, none of which Melissa or other Peninsula traders are eligible for. The Mornington Peninsula remains a no man’s land, leaving its residents and businesses high and dry. Jane Flynn is a second-year journalism student at Deakin University

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Mount Eliza hairdresser launches game-changing product Melissa Niblock-Bell’s Mount Eliza hair salon Mayko may have been dormant since mid-July due to COVID-19 restrictions, but the determined business owner took the situation handed to her and turned it into a positive. The idea to add to her luxury organic and vegan hair care range Locou had been in the works since January, yet when working remotely became the norm, it was time to act. So entrepreneur Melissa designed a new product using her experience as a master colourist after placing in the top 10 in 2018 for Australia and New Zealand Goldwell Global Creative Colourist. “The hair industry hasn’t seen this product designed in this manner – it will change the game for hair care,” said Melissa. “I’m gearing up the brand for the new release of the secret unique product.” Locou is an ethical hair care range that is organic, vegan, cruelty-free and Australianmade. There’s even a reclaimed timber refill bar at her Mayko salon. Melissa designed Locou for her clients. It’s centred around providing her clients with a compatible hair care solution to use at home that is as natural as possible while also being luxurious.

“As a female business owner, I want to inspire other females considering taking the plunge into either pivoting their business due to COVID-19 or launching their own business to do so. I started Mayko during the global recession in 2008. My belief is that I’d rather swing the bat than not try. I’m so proud of what I’ve achieved, and it goes without saying that I’ve worked so hard for it.” Melissa, who was a Victorian finalist in the Young Businesswomen category at the 2016 Telstra Business Awards, has worked alongside a formulation scientist to create this fresh product. Locou takes its name from her son Logan, and ‘co’ is from ‘collaboration’, which to Melissa covers the way hair, science, colour and nature create a harmony together. Plus you’ve got to love your hair and be kind to the earth. “I genuinely love what I do. I love creating beautiful hair,” said Melissa. “My point of view is that hairdressing is a reflection of the science being created. This innovative home care product is going to be next level.” What Melissa did spill is that this hush-hush product has got all of your hair solutions in just one bottle. We’re intrigued. KATE SEARS MAYKO HAIR A: Shop 3/70 Mountain View Rd, Mount Eliza T: 9787 3489 W: www.maykohair.com.au FB: maykohairmounteliza INSTA: locou_haircare INSTA: maykohair

Website: www.maykohair.com.au

Shop 3/70 Mountain View Rd Mount Eliza Victoria 3930 Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

Website: www.locou.com.au Contact email: info@locou.com.au Sales: sales@locou.com.au follow us@locou_haircare Facebook LoCou Haircare www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Businesses are back.. .


...and can’t wait to see you!


Give your business some extra bite Out of a mutual love of all things delicious, Bite Local has formed a partnership with Mornington Peninsula Magazine’s sister publication, Eat.Drink. It’s a win-win for users of the new Bite Local app because they will receive a complimentary copy of Eat.Drink 2020 when they place a takeaway or delivery order through the app. This offer is limited, so download the app now. Frankston resident and Bizz Apps founder Dave Wilton has created the Bite Local app to help our local restaurants and cafes go mobile and engage with a broader customer base with lower costs. “We now have 35 local restaurants on board and almost 3000 app downloads,” said Dave. “These are locals who want to support local eateries by buying their takeaway or delivery direct.” Best of all, 100 per cent of the money from your order goes to the eatery because Bite Local takes no commission. Bite Local and Eat.Drink puts Mornington Peninsula and Frankston restaurants and beverage creators online, on the app and in print, presenting all their options for dining, delivery and takeaway for your convenience.

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Bite Local is free to download from the Apple App Store or Google Play Store, while the new Eat.Drink 2021 will be out in mid-December and can be purchased from stockists across Frankston, the Mornington Peninsula and Melbourne, ordered via the website or purchased as a digital version. Book now to be featured in the 2021 book as bookings close on November 16. Order your next takeaway or delivery meal through the app to receive the current Eat.Drink 2020 as our gift while stocks last. Food and beverage outlets that want to be featured on the Bite Local app or included in the next edition of Eat. Drink should contact Dave at Bite Local or Molly at Eat. Drink. Special rates will apply to be on both platforms. EAT.DRINK MORNINGTON PENINSULA T: 9708 8222 W: www.eatdrinkmorningtonpeninsula.com.au FB: EatDrinkMornPen INSTA: eatdrinkmornpen BITE LOCAL T: 0413 335 382 W: www.bitelocal.com.au FB: bitelocal INSTA: bite.local

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Get your head in the clouds There is a lot to see in the southern skies this month with just the naked eye. Start off by looking for the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) west of the constellation Pictor, and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in Tucana. These are both irregular galaxies close to the Milky Way. The globular cluster 47 Tucanae can be seen with the naked eye as a hazy star very close to the SMC. A large-aperture telescope shows its countless stars packed together in a dense ball. In the east you can locate Canis Major, which is hard to miss because it is home to the blazing star Sirius. In Canis Major, the open clusters NGC 2362 and M41 make for good small-telescope targets. Also coming into view in the east are Orion and Taurus. It is easy to identify Orion because its brightest stars are blue-white Rigel (Beta Orionis) and red Betelgeuse (Alpha Orionis). The constellation Eridanus is located above Orion and is one of the largest constellations in the sky. There

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you will find the interesting multiple star system Omicron-2 Eridani, with three components, and the double star Theta Eridani. Both are visible with small telescopes. Deep-sky observers with dark skies will be able to spot the barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300, located approximately 69 million light-years from Earth, in the same constellation using large telescopes. The Leonid meteor shower is annually active each November, and this year the Leonids will peak on the night of November 17-18. The shower is called Leonids because its radiant – the point in the sky where the meteors seem to emerge from – lies in the constellation Leo. The Leonids occur when the Earth passes through the debris left by Comet Tempel-Tuttle. The comet takes about 33 years to make one orbit around the sun. For further information about the Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society, such as public stargazing nights, event bookings and membership, please visit the society’s Facebook page, or website at www.mpas.asn.au NERIDA LANGCAKE, Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society

NGC 6744 (aka Caldwell 101) is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Pavo. It is considered a Milky Way mimic, displaying flocculent (fluffy) arms and an elongated core. It also has at least one distorted companion galaxy – NGC 6744A – superficially similar to one of the Magellanic Clouds. Photo by MPAS member Steven Mohr

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Mount Eliza actor hits the global virtual stage At just 17 years old, Mount Eliza resident Ellie Stafford is representing Australia at the World Monologue Games. She’s placed first at the regionals in the Youth (Main + Sprint) category for Australia and New Zealand in Judge’s Choice, and third in Audience Choice. With theatres and film sets forced to close during the pandemic, more than 3000 actors signed up for the event in its inaugural year – with almost 200 reaching the regional live stream finals and fewer than 70 from 20 countries progressing to the global finals. This means that Ellie has performed the best monologue by a youth in Australia. “I flew off the couch when I saw my name come up on the TV, I was so happy and thrilled,” said Ellie. “I’m so honoured to be up against the best actors from all around the world. It’s truly amazing.” The event is judged by senior industry experts from across the globe, comprising successful performers, filmmakers and heads of international acting schools. With 100,000 viewers participating in the qualifiers and regional live streams, event founder Pete Malicki is overjoyed with how the games have been received. “I have loved to act ever since I was little,” said Ellie. “It has been my dream to become an actress, so any opportunity I get to perform I take. When I saw this opportunity to be shown around the globe, I was super excited. I found the whole experience really incredible. Watching my piece of

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

acting that I had written make it all the way to the global finals was super rewarding and it has instilled a lot of confidence within myself as an actress.” Ellie admitted to us that she’d always taken centre stage at kindergarten concerts, where she’d sing her little heart out and dance like crazy. Yet she didn’t properly begin acting until she was in Year 5. From there she joined acting classes at Helen O’Grady before moving on to Broadway Academy and taking lead roles in school plays and productions. After realising her passion was for TV and film acting, Ellie moved to Austin Acting Studios, which saw her land roles in three short films, including a lead in the horror short film NYMPH. “I love that when I act I get to be someone else,” said Ellie. “In this whole different world I get to create in my mind away from reality. My role models would have to be Emma Watson or Millie Bobby Brown as they are both such incredible women and actresses who stand for what they believe in.” The Youth (Main + Sprint) finals were scheduled to be held on Saturday, October 24, at 9.30pm, with the winners announced on Wednesday, October 28 at 7.30pm. Mornington Peninsula Magazine went to print before the finals, but you can check how Ellie went at https://youtu.be/ ycZ-oGolGc8, and make sure you catch her raw and chilling monologue on her Instagram page @elliejstafford KATE SEARS

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Think, spend, recommend local

The Mornington Peninsula Shire knows businesses are doing it tough. Through its Support Local campaign, the Shire is urging all of us to support local business as we come out of restrictions and do our part in stimulating the local economy. The Shire is asking everyone – community members, organisations and businesses – to consider how you spend, recommend and utilise local services. Whether it’s shopping in new ways locally, engaging local tradespeople or exploring your own backyard with new eyes, you can make a difference. With many Mornington Peninsula dining businesses ready and eager to reopen and welcome customers back safely, this is your opportunity to experience the culinary delights of the region by eating outdoors. You can also buy great seasonal produce at local farm gates and find the perfect gift from local retailers as you prepare for Christmas. Our local businesses are crucial to ensuring the Mornington Peninsula thrives. So many businesses have impressively adapted through the challenge of COVID-19. The Shire congratulates this innovation and excellence. As a community member, you can show your support for local business with the Shire’s Support Local sticker. And if you’re a local business, displaying the sticker lets your customers know you are open for business. Visit mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal to order your free sticker, explore more handy hints on supporting local and use the Mornington Peninsula business directory. Together we can keep our community thriving, create local jobs and sustain local business and services.

Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Intergenerational connection through Deadly Kids Peter Aldenhoven had no idea Deadly Kids would be so successful. As the executive officer of Men’s Business at Willum Warrain Aboriginal Association in Hastings, he knew there was a need for it but was uncertain how far and wide that need would span. Peter explains: “We thought there may be a handful of kids interested in the program, but we had up to 20 participants right from the start, and their families were coming too. It’s gone gang-busters.” Willum Warrain offers five cultural programs for Indigenous people across the Peninsula. The Deadly Kids program, which runs on Thursdays from 4-5.30pm, offers a safe culture-based landing place for Indigenous kids from all backgrounds. The program has been operating bi-monthly via Zoom during the pandemic. Peter continues: “The focus on Deadly Kids is exclusively cultural. The three rules of the group are: Respect for Country, Respect for Elders, and Respect for Each Other. We acknowledge the Bunurong/Boon Wurrung peoples at the start of every session and recite the rules every week too. Activities like boomerang-throwing, spear, clapstick and hut-making and possum skin armbandmaking are practised. The kids also learn about totems, bush tucker, traditional storytelling and smoking ceremony. The real highlight of term one this year, before we had to close down due to the pandemic, was harvesting myrnong, or yam daisy. The kids had planted them last spring and cooked them in the traditional way – pounded pancake-style on heated rocks. It was probably the first time local Aboriginal kids had planted, harvested and eaten yam daisies since colonisation.” Willum Warrain acts as a gathering place for Aboriginal

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

people to build a shared identity. Deadly Kids is a program that teaches traditional values to eight to 14-year-olds, although siblings, parents and carers often participate in the sessions because “it is the Aboriginal way to include kin”, says Peter. “We teach how everything is shared, how everyone has rights and responsibilities to the group, and how caring for Country means Country will care for you.” Lessons that could well be learnt by all of us. Each week, one of the program’s workers drives a bus from Frankston through Mornington, Mount Martha and Hastings picking up participants. Once the kids arrive at Willum Warrain, they eat before getting down to Deadly Kids business. Parents and carers alike have expressed how important the program is because they say their kids receive little or no Aboriginal curriculum content at school. Peter concludes: “Cultural pride is critical for navigating adolescence into young adulthood. A number of our Aboriginal mob living on the Mornington Peninsula are amongst the most socially-disadvantaged cohorts locally. Willum Warrain provides charitable support for families experiencing difficulties and Aboriginal kids living in out-of-home care. It can be hard growing up Aboriginal in mainstream settings. Some kids experience racism, lose cultural connection living ‘off country’ away from kin and culture or are impacted by the Stolen Generation. We have big dreams for our young ones. They are our emerging leaders and our future.” Responsibility, respect and care. Leadership qualities? What else is there? LIZ ROGERS

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This year more than ever, we will remember them

Every year at 11am on November 11 – the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month – we stop what we’re doing and observe a minute’s silence for those who have died in conflicts, especially soldiers from as far back as World War I. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. At the time, the world welcomed peace as thousands returned home to their loved ones amid much fanfare. There were unfortunately thousands more who never made the journey home. While this year may be a little different due to COVID-19 restrictions, we can all show our appreciation by wearing a poppy, listening to Last Post, and observing a minute’s silence. Even though we’re unable to mark this year’s Remembrance Day by gathering at the Shrine of Remembrance or memorials across the Peninsula, you’re welcome to honour the memory of homecoming, reunion and sacrifice and join the live streamed broadcast at 10.45am on Wednesday, November 11, through the Shrine’s Facebook and YouTube channels. Visit www.shrine.org.au/remembrance-day-2020 to find out more. You can also download a template to make your own Remembrance Day messenger bird with the children at home – perhaps adding a special message for someone you miss. Birds have been used for centuries to carry messages to people separated by distance, especially during wartime when they would carry information across enemy lines. Wherever you are and whatever you’re doing on November 11 this year, take a minute to pause, remember and give thanks for the thousands of men and women who paid the ultimate price so that we could enjoy the peace and freedoms we often take for granted. Lest we forget. KATE SEARS

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

Taking a leaf out of Thanksgiving’s values Canadian-born Courtney Persson has introduced a beautiful element of Thanksgiving into Retirement Communities Australia’s Beleura Village Mornington. A tree of gratitude was set up in the main foyer to coincide with Canada’s Thanksgiving on October 12. “It’s made us all stop and think what do we have to be grateful for this year, and it’s forced everyone to focus on a positive,” said Courtney. “We’ve had residents read all of the leaves on the tree, which has provided insight into their neighbours’ lives and how they can continue to support each other.” Putting residents on the spot to think of something to be grateful for and write it on a paper leaf has ignited positive conversations as well as provided much-needed social interactions during COVID-19 restrictions.

“It’s beautiful to see our residents embracing the tree,” said Courtney. “We’re a very social village here so our residents are struggling a little without the bus trips and coffee clubs. We’ve also begun tech classes to teach our residents how to use social media and start a video call to connect with loved ones.” KATE SEARS RCA VILLAGES – BELEURA VILLAGE MORNINGTON A: 107 Bungower Rd, Mornington T: 1800 445 666 W: www.beleuravillage.com.au

Pictured: Beleura Village Mornington residents Daphne O’Gelsby, Sylvester Lien and Gabriele Wert, with Active Living co-ordinator Courtney Persson, put the finishing touches to the gratitude tree.

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It’s Macey’s way Macey is the mini bull terrier who looks like butter wouldn’t melt in her mouth. Yet when she was attending puppy school, she was the first in her class to be put in the naughty corner. Her crime? Playing too much. She’s turning two this month and her humans, Steve Velardi and Alex Colesworthy, from Frankston, have had a bundle of laughs ever since she joined their family.

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“After a lot of convincing for a dog, Steve finally said ‘Yes’,” said Alex. “Steve had a bull terrier as his first ever dog and always liked them. We went to a couple of dog shows and we decided to get a mini. She is such a funny dog, unlike any that we have experienced, and definitely one of the cheekiest breeds.” Bull terriers are often known to be stubborn dogs with a lazy bone or two, and despite being a mini version, it appears Macey has the full dose. She often dawdles during her walks and makes her parents wait like the queen she is. You see, Macey deems it necessary to lay down and have a rest even if they’re only five minutes into the walk, so

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or the highway there is zero chance that she’s exhausted already. It’s short-lived, but only if she happens to spy a fellow furry friend, a potential for pats from a stranger walking by or if her human parents throw an attractive-looking stick. Then she’s up and acting like it never happened. However, if Steve and Alex are taking their sweet time getting ready for a morning walk, Macey will let out a big “Awwoooo” to not only tell them off for their disgraceful behaviour but to make them hurry up. Did someone say ‘diva’? Recently she’s taken up an interest in attempting to – let’s say – juggle. Macey adores her toys and often ventures to her toy box and proceeds to grab all her goodies out of the box and run around the backyard like a crazy puppy, throwing them all up in the air. As for food, she’s an avid seafood-lover, especially in the morning when she gets sardines for breakfast. The smelly food must be eaten outside, yet Macey refuses to set foot outside until Steve and Alex have shown her the tin. After dinner,

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there’s no after-dinner mints in sight; instead she prefers dental treats. In fact, she runs straight inside to her bed and sits waiting for it – somewhat patiently. If her owners don’t tend to her fast enough, she sighs and sets out to see what is taking so long. “She’s the funniest dog,” said Alex. “She’s so full of energy.” It was her first visit to the beach as a puppy that provided her new mum and dad with the scariest moment. Alex had carried her out in the water a little past where the waves were breaking so she could try paddling. But as Alex put her down, a little wave came and swept her up and carried her to the shore. At first the pair were quite shocked and worried, but she’d enjoyed her effortless swim and ran straight to Steve looking very pleased with herself, and perhaps happy to be out of the water. Catch more of this cheeky lass on Instagram via @ minibullmacey KATE SEARS

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Greenways: the time is now With spring upon us, the mood is positive. Things are opening up. People are eager to return to everyday life. And the pent-up demand for retirement living has never been higher. Now more than ever is a great time to join the Greenways Retirement Village community.

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

The recent challenges have highlighted the benefits of Greenways’ retirement living: the sanctity and security of this private oasis; beautifully appointed and spacious homes within a supportive community; home-cooked meals from the village chef; a stocked kiosk onsite; incredible and caring staff looking out for residents’ every need; and the comradery, connection and engagement of friends. Greenways’ residents certainly agree. “How glad am I that I moved to Greenways!” (Merle, resident of eight years). “You make us safe in ways we would not have thought of” (Anne, a new resident). “To our incredible staff, your happy, selfless, dedicated and professional support for residents is second to none” (Brian, president of the Residents’ Association). “You are heroes. All of you … Thank you” (Ian, resident since 2011). As restrictions ease, Greenways looks forward to reinvigorating its village activities and functions. Whether it be planning a Melbourne Cup event or upcoming Christmas festivities, or just getting ready for residents to enjoy activities and socialising in the Club Centre again soon, the village is working hard to end the year on a high! Private inspections are now permitted so call today. Greenways looks forward to welcoming you. GREENWAYS VILLAGE A: 330 Frankston-Dandenong Rd, Seaford T: 9786 8679 M: Sandra, 0433 883 228 W: www.greenwaysvillage.com.au

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available to support you through COVID-19 restrictions to connect with family and friends, while services of up to 10 people are currently welcomed onsite. Mannings Funerals is committed to helping you through the journey of losing a loved one. The staff understand that grief and mourning look different for every one of us. It is this understanding that makes their dedicated service so special. They are also proud to offer afterfuneral advice too. For you. MANNINGS FUNERALS A: 3 Hastings Rd, Frankston A: 155 Sladen St, Cranbourne T: 8781 1400 W: www.manningsfunerals.com.au FB: Mannings-Funerals

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Outdoor dining permit helps spice up business Frankston’s Spice Club has received the first extended outdoor dining permit from Frankston City Council, allowing it to begin preparations for reopening now the COVID-19 restrictions are lifted. “The permit means The Spice Club, along with other hospitality businesses across Frankston City, can begin the process to create a safe and welcoming outdoor dining experience for their customers once COVID-19 restrictions lift,” the council said in a statement. “We will be working closely with owners Ashish and Rajamin in the coming weeks to make sure they are ready and raring to go. “The Spice Club’s application is one of the first to be processed as part of the $500,000 funding we received to support local eateries to get back to business as we move towards a COVID normal. Council has fast-tracked our usual approval times for outdoor dining permit applicants and we were able to give them the happy news just three business days after receiving their application.” The Nepean Highway restaurant has also applied for a $5000 State Government enhanced outdoor dining grant to help furnish its planned outdoor space. For more information on the council’s extended outdoor dining program, go to www.frankston.vic.gov.au/Business/ Extended_Outdoor_Dining_Program

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Grants for projects to restore Peninsula fisheries Two fisheries projects on the Mornington Peninsula have been given money as part of the Federal Government’s fisheries habitat restoration program. The Port Phillip Community Shellfish Reef Project will receive $299,000 to work with recreational anglers on fish habitat restoration while Reel Big Fish has been given $305,000 for its restoration of mangroves throughout Western Port. Flinders federal Liberal MP Greg Hunt said the projects were among 28 across the country to share $8 million in grants under the program. “The Mornington Peninsula is blessed to be home to some of the most ecologically diverse coastline in Australia,” Mr Hunt said. “From the mangroves of Western Port to the reefs in Port Phillip Bay, the marine wildlife and coastal ecology of the Peninsula is a point of pride for all in our community. “This (money) builds on our current support for reef restoration in Port Phillip Bay, as well as our Government’s efforts to create a safe haven for birds, marsupials and endangered native animals on French Island.” The fisheries habitat restoration program is designed to restore the health and functionality of coastal and estuarine fisheries habitats.

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

A boutique, family-friendly, mewsstyle village and comfort-plus lifestyle – that’s what Peninsula Lifestyle Retirement Village in Baxter offers its residents. And with just 46 villas, it’s an intimate village. Every villa at Peninsula Lifestyle Village provides genuine luxury retirement living. The Flinders, Mornington, Somers and Bay villas have Caesarstone kitchen bench tops, built-in robes, airconditioning, double glazed windows, European appliances and high ceilings, while the Flinders has two bedrooms, a dualentrance ensuite, two toilets and an attached garage with internal access. There is something for everyone at Peninsula Lifestyle Village. Weekly social activities create a hive of activity, including fitness groups, shopping days and happy hour. Beautiful grounds surround the villages, which are built in a gated community complete with security for peace of mind, and live-in caretakers are always on hand. There’s an alfresco dining area that’s perfect for lunches outside, and the lavish cinema screens new and popular movies as well as all your favourite sports. Give

your circulation a boost at the wellequipped gym or relax in the community clubhouse. Alternatively, if ‘me’ time is what you’re after, stop by the library and business centre, explore the wide range of health practitioners, or visit the onsite hairdresser. These services combine to create an exciting list of activities at the wonderfully friendly village. Get social at The Lodge by enjoying a game of billiards with friends or simply relax. The community vegetable garden beds are raised and offer a chance for those green-thumbed residents to share their knowledge and bond with others over their mutual love of gardening. Another popular pastime is the potting shed. The vibrant and beautiful established gardens complement the stylish buildings as well as offering a scenic, relaxing stroll in the sun for residents and their guests. Visit Peninsula Lifestyle Retirement Village online to find out more or call now to begin your journey towards first-rate retirement living. PENINSULA LIFESTYLE RETIREMENT VILLAGE A: 46 Baxter-Tooradin Rd, Baxter W: www.peninsulalifestyleretirementvill age.com.au T: 1800 794 838

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Lifestyle Communities empowers bucket list dreams for residents As the sun sets on another day in lockdown, many ponder how their lives will look when we finally return to a semblance of normal: what they will do, who they will see, where will they go? For Lifestyle Communities residents, these thoughts were put to paper when they were invited to share an item they’d like ticked off their bucket list. The inaugural Jack and Jean Clark Grant attracted 116 entries from 15 Lifestyle Communities. The grant was named in honour of Jack and Jean Clark, two of the first Lifestyle Communities residents who moved into Lifestyle Brookfield in 2005. Sadly, Jack has since passed. Tim and Diane Williams, pictured, at Lifestyle Bittern, were chosen as the winners, with a grant of $1000 to enable them to realise their dream of making the journey to Cape York, and their joy was infectious as they were congratulated over Zoom by Jean Clark herself. Jean’s son Gavin said his late father would have been “over

the moon” for the winners. “Dad would have been wishing he could come too.” Winners were also selected from each of the 15 Lifestyle Communities and awarded $250 towards realising an item on their bucket list. Lifestyle Communities wellness co-ordinator Bridget Meehan said: “It was lovely to be able to help people fulfill their sometimes-lifelong dreams. There will often be obstacles to achieving these dreams, but these grants can go some way towards making them happen.” Lifestyle Communities managing director James Kelly said: “Our homeowners are central to everything we do. Empowering possibilities for them gives us a strong sense of pride.” The end of COVID-19 restrictions will give us all an opportunity to stop dreaming of our bucket lists and start living them. Homeowners at Lifestyle Communities are ready to embrace their bucket lists – are you? LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES T: 1300 505 560 W: lifestylebittern.com.au W: lifestylehastings.com.au FB: lifestylebittern FB: lifestylehastings

Spotlight on security When was the last time you changed your password? How much of your life do you share online? If your laptop happened to be stolen, would the thief have full access to all of your personal information? These questions will come to the forefront of everyone’s minds on Friday, November 30, thanks to International Computer Security Day. The day aims to raise awareness and remind the public about the importance of protecting both company and personal computer resources in order to prevent the misuse of financial and personal data, including identity theft. Today we use computers and technology to work, study and store precious

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memories – our very identity exists on computers. Social media is another breeding ground for identity thieves, viruses and computer fraud. Ensure that your passwords are regularly updated, not used across other platforms, and please don’t write them down. Also make sure that your systems are protected by installing an anti-virus and malware program and reduce how much personal information is accessible. Keep your programs up to date and back up regularly. It’s key to learn how to spot suspicious links and avoid falling for online scams such as phishing, identity theft, fraud and hoax emails. Why not then teach members of your family and co-workers how to spot these scams too. KATE SEARS

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Hastings cleans up at Tidy Towns awards Hastings has been crowned the winner of this year’s Sustainable Communities – Tidy Towns Awards during a remarkable night that saw the Mornington Peninsula win seven awards as well as receive high commendations for four projects. The awards, announced by Keep Victoria Beautiful during a virtual event at Beechworth last month, recognised grassroots initiatives and positive actions taken by individuals, community groups, educational institutions, businesses and councils across rural and regional Victoria. “Hastings took out the overall prize after impressing judges with the quality and calibre of its entries, which had judges speechless and only capable of uttering the words ‘wow’ during the assessment process,” Keep Victoria Beautiful said in a statement. The Hastings-based Dolphin Research Institute won the Environment Award for its I Sea I Care Marine Ambassadors behaviour change program, which is designed to empower students to become environmental leaders. The program has grown from 25 schools in 2011 to almost 100. Sixteen-year-old Harrison Hansen, from Hastings, landed the Young Legend Award for his consistent contribution to school and community activities during his four years at Western Port Secondary College. This included mentoring Year 3 and 4 students, running the Year 7 camp, and helping with RUOK Day. Mornington Peninsula Shire Municipal Emergency took home the Community Award for the effective co-ordination of agencies in Western Port during the Mallacoota bushfire evacuation in January. The Sea Is Our Best Friend, a marine environmental education program run by St Joseph’s Catholic Primary School in Crib Point, earned the school the Education Award. The program provides Year 3 and 4 students with greater appreciation

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of the marine environment and its connection with community and has also helped embed students’ knowledge of the area and the Boon Wurrung peoples by working alongside a specialist Indigenous teacher. The Litter Award went to Josephine Jones, of Rye, for the creation of a 2m x 2.3m sculpture of the map of Australia made entirely from litter. The work – a collaboration with Melbourne Zoo – was created from 16kg of waste, including 5500 cigarette butts. Conservationist Jacqueline Salter was awarded the Phyllis Frost Award for her contribution to Landcare and the environment over the past decade. Dr Salter has been a driving force behind a project that has seen landholders link their bushland across four catchments, and she has also inspired and educated children through her puppet shows, improved communication between authorities and community groups, and provided support to women working in conservation. The $1000 Gift Fund went to the Mount Martha Farmers Market for its Washed Up, Not Wasted initiative, which was developed to eliminate single-use plastic and landfill waste while demonstrating best practice for tackling waste at public events. Reusable cups, cutlery and crockery, which are cleaned and sanitised at the end of each event, are now used by all food stalls and market attendees. The market is looking to introduce this initiative at other events in the region. The four highly commended projects were: • Advance Team, a program by a group of VCAL students to tackle littering and illegal dumping in reserves and grounds in Hastings; • Mornington Peninsula Shire Youth Services in Hastings for its Rap4RAP project, dedicated to improving Indigenous reconciliation on Peninsula; • Rye Community House for its Zero Waste Festival; and, • Boomerang Bags in Mount Martha for sewing scrubs for medical staff at Rosebud and Frankston hospitals during the height of COVID-19.

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

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Standing in the shower . . . weeping The shower seems to be the go-to place for people to shed a tear, with 74 per cent of people saying they save their cries for the bathroom. It’s safe to say that we’ve all wanted a cry over the past few trying months, so with this in mind, Showerstoyou.co.uk was inspired to look deeper into what songs may have been the popular choice to accompany the sobbing and tearful moments. To complete this task, the website chose five synonyms for sad: emotional, heartbreak/break-up, crying, sad, and depressed. Next, the team exported the playlists that were chosen and filtered through to find the most popular songs and thus the most popular artists. From here the songs were cross-referenced. After surveying 57,000 people from 57 countries and trawling through 10,000 songs across Spotify playlists,

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the results are in. The artist that most people cry to in the shower is XXXTENTACION, with 130 citations across all playlists. Coming in second is the world’s favourite redheaded ballad writer, Ed Sheeran, followed by America’s grunge princess herself, Billie Eilish, then British singer Sam Smith, and of course singer-songwriter Adele. As for songs, the most popular choice to cry to is Jealous by Labrinth, which appeared 26 times across five playlists. The title of second-best tearjerker is shared by Say Something, by A Great Big World and Christina Aguilera, and Someone You Loved, by Lewis Capaldi. Fighting out a three-way tie for fourth place are Stay With Me, by Sam Smith; Say You Won’t Let Go, by James Arthur; and Dancing On My Own, by Calum Scott. Sam appeared in the top five songs and artists most featured. The least popular song to cry to in the shower is Harry Styles’s Falling, which was cited 17 times across all playlists. To view the complete results, visit www. showerstoyou.co.uk/ KATE SEARS

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Funding boost a win for TAFE students Chisholm Institute of TAFE students are set to enjoy redeveloped, stateof-the-art facilities thanks to a $6.8 million funding boost from the State Government. The funds will allow for a major refurbishment of several trades buildings at the TAFE’s Dandenong campus to create the Dandenong Trade Centre, due to be completed in the first half of next year. Training and Skills Minister Gayle Tierney said the project would “deliver better facilities for students and staff, and support jobs and local businesses through the pandemic”. Chisholm director and CEO Steve Varty said the redesign and refurbishment would align the training at Dandenong campus with the newly developed Frankston Trades Building, which was opened late last year. “We are one of the largest providers of apprenticeship training in Victoria, and the establishment of the Dandenong Trade Centre will enable us to continue our best-practice approach to deliver relevant industry-simulated training that aligns to industry needs and expectations,” Mr Varty said. Students will also benefit from a new student hub to be built at Dandenong, providing spaces for support services and a modern student lounge. Services to be included in the hub include student counselling, a careers hub, an Indigenous engagement unit, disability support, family violence prevention support spaces and apprentice support. Many courses offered at Chisholm are included in the

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

Government’s Free TAFE for Priority Courses program, which reduces the financial barrier for students who want to train in an area that’s in demand by Victorian employers. For those interested in learning about training options at TAFE in 2021, Chisholm is holding a series of live virtual information sessions for a selection of course areas. The sessions can help you to find out more about courses

and careers from experienced trade teachers. For details, visit www.chisholm.edu.au/open CHISHOLM INSTITUTE T: 1300 244 746 (all campuses) W www.chisholm.edu.au/open FB: ChisholmInstitute INSTA: Chisholm_institute

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Chase a career as a TAFE teacher Tired of chasing builders and clients for unpaid invoices, qualified carpenter Adam Laxton decided it was time for something new. With 15 years’ experience in the trade, including running his own business, Adam, pictured, decided to explore TAFE teaching. “I loved the trade but was fed up with chasing money and working the long hours,” Adam said. “A friend of mine said I should look into TAFE teaching. I’d trained my own apprentices but never seriously thought about

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teaching. I had an opportunity to have a go at teaching a few classes and really liked it.” After completing his Certificate IV in Training and Assessment – one of the requirements for TAFE teaching – Adam landed a full-time teaching role at Chisholm Institute of TAFE. He has progressed from teacher to program co-ordinator and is now Chisholm’s manager for building and construction. “Becoming a TAFE teacher offered me flexibility and the satisfaction of training and mentoring these upcoming tradesmen and women.” Adam’s journey is not so different to other tradiesturned-teachers. Some opt to change careers after suffering ongoing injuries, while others want to free up time to spend with their families. “It’s a requirement that our teachers keep their skills up to date, so some teachers still run their trades business on the weekends or after hours,” Adam said. “It’s more than just a job, it’s a career.”

If you’re a tradie, your skills and unique perspective could be invaluable for student learning. You can learn more about the requirements for TAFE teaching, salary expectations and job opportunities at Chisholm’s upcoming Tradie to Teacher virtual information sessions. Plumbers, mechanics, engineers, carpenters, cabinet makers, builders, electricians and hairdressers are all welcome. Registrations essential: chisholm.edu.au/ teacherVIS If you come from a non-trade background but also want to explore a career in teaching, you’re invite to attend a Training and Assessment virtual information session. Register at Chisholm.edu.au/open to learn more. CHISHOLM INSTITUTE T: 1300 244 746 (all campuses) W www.chisholm.edu.au/open FB: ChisholmInstitute INSTA: Chisholm_institute

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The saying goes: never judge a book by its cover. This 30-year-old long-haired devotee of Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Judas Priest and legendary guitarist Randy Rhoads – think Quiet Riot and Ozzy Osbourne – has been touring the world for the past five years, but you’d never know it. He’s currently living the quiet life walking the streets of Carrum with his fiancé Rachel and their chihuahuafox terrier cross Lunar and working at his dad Chris’s business in Frankston. There may be no gigs to play due to the pandemic, but there’s still plenty of head-banging music to be thumped out. Jarrod talks: “I’ve been busier than ever working with Dad, playing and writing, and maintaining the band’s label, Damaged Record Co. I’ve been pretty happy to stay at home on the weekends and just play guitar. Touring is fantastic but it’s physically and mentally demanding. Our performances are energetic and Stevie, our lead singer, runs all over the stage and climbs up amps. We also drive ourselves when we are playing festivals or doing club tours overseas. We set up and bump out. You’ve got to have the staying power.” Sure, it may be tough driving across the US or Europe in a van and playing gig after gig to adoring fans in Germany, Belgium and

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

Photos by Matt Walker

It’s guitar central in the Goon household in Carrum. Acoustic. Electric. Gibson. Martin. Seger. You name it, they’ve got it. Well, almost. Jarrod Goon is quietly spoken, easy-going and rather charming. He’s also the guitarist for world-touring hardcore punk band Clowns. Never heard of them? You have now.

the Netherlands but someone’s gotta do it. Jarrod remembers playing in Hamburg one night, jumping in the van and driving through the Netherlands, Belgium and France to catch the ferry from Calais to Dover, then driving to London to perform, all within 24 hours. Nuts. Rock band heaven or hell? He continues: “I wouldn’t want to do that all the time, but it’s a lot of fun too.” Guitar playing is in the Goon blood. Growing up in Beaumaris and moving to Carrum about seven years ago, Chris introduced his sons to this esteemed instrument and the Goon boys have been hooked ever since. Jarrod’s brothers Ryan and Kyle still play and his mum Sue, who passed seven years ago, also had a bit of a strum. After joining Clowns in 2015 and being booked to play his first festival in Chicago two days later, Jarrod is still thrilled about having the opportunity to play with a band he had been following for years before joining them on the road. “That was Riot Fest in Chicago. Motorhead, Iggy Pop and Billy Idol were playing and I was blown away. I’d been playing with local bands before joining Clowns but this was next level. We travelled through 29 states and did 30 shows over six weeks in America last year and are planning to be in Europe next year for summer. We’ve released multiple singles, four albums and are currently working on a new album.” Jarrod and Rachel will continue to dress Lunar in cute outfits while waiting for the next tour. And oh yeah, did I mention Clowns supported Foo Fighters at Etihad Stadium in 2018? Not bad for a Carrum boy. Yes? LIZ ROGERS

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We’ve heard on the ‘hollyvine’ that the big jolly man has implemented a strict hygiene regimen at the North Pole and has schooled the elves to socially distance. So why not pop on your sparkling Christmas earrings and your reindeer antlers because it’s official: Christmas is on! With a trying year somewhat behind us, we’ve got our sights set on the light at the end of the tunnel . . . oh wait, that’s the Christmas lights that our neighbours have put up early. And yes, Christmas may look a little different this year, but the gift of giving and thinking of each other stays the same. So without sounding like a broken record or like Mariah Carey’s version of All I Want For Christmas, which will no doubt start playing wherever we venture, we’re adamant that the lovin’ local train will continue to power along as we head into the silly season. In buying from a local shop or an eatery down the road, you’re not only supporting them, you’re creating a snowball effect: those precious dollars will continue to be spread – with contactless payments – throughout the community. Your community. Santa sees all and he has let us in on a little secret: for every sale a small business receives, the owner does a little dance. The jolly fellow has caught countless owners dancing enthusiastically to Chuck Berry’s Run Rudolph Run and of course Jingle Bell Rock by Bobby Helms. All we want for Christmas is a jolly community where Santa sacks are filled with locally made products, dining tables are overflowing with local produce, our nearest and dearest are delighted to receive gifts from nearby specialty stores, and everyone enjoys a rocking Christmas to help get our economy rolling again. We’ve been good, Santa, we promise. KATE SEARS

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Luxurious, affordable dining and bedding direct from importer Pearl’s Manchester imports some of the finest quality table linen for your home, as well as manufacturing superior down quilts and pillows and carrying a choice selection of bedding essentials suitable for aged care, hotels/motels, clubs and more. If you’re in the hospitality and wedding/events industries, Pearl’s Manchester also imports such essential items as napkins, glass cloths, tea towels, damask tablecloths and fabrics. And with Christmas around the corner, Pearl’s has a great selection of practical gift ideas. In 1975, Pearl’s Manchester began from humble beginnings as a mom and pop business in a small singlefronted brick home in Elwood. In those days, the master bedroom was the shop front, the second bedroom the workroom, the garage the storeroom, and from there goods were sold directly out of cartons. Over the years this Australian family-owned and operated

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company – now a third-generation enterprise – has built a reputation as a nationwide premium importer/ wholesaler sourcing globally, offering solutions that are perfect for you while understanding the need for innovation. Pearl’s ensures the product mix constantly

changes and regularly showcases its premium products at Australian trade fairs. PEARL’S MANCHESTER A: 48-52 Clifton St, Prahran T: 9529 2758 W: www.pearlsmanchester.com.au

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Elves working throughout lockdown While everyone’s been homebound, the Christmas elves have been tirelessly working away at Christmas on Main creating this year’s theme: Candy Canes. With tranquil pastels adorning cupcake-style train carriages and lollipops, sparkling metallic stars, rainbow sprinkle-covered baubles and vibrant candy canes, the lolly world will delight all Christmaslovers who will no doubt need a little drop of sweetness this year. Owner Susan Russo has been busier than Mrs Claus over lockdown. She’s even welcomed a new range by Mark Roberts

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as well as the arrival of nutcrackers and elves in a variety of colours, which are the epitome of collectors’ items. With so much stock to choose from to begin your festive designing, including splashes of silver and traditional reds, you can start creating this year’s Christmas memories by shopping online right now. If you’re within 25km, stop by the wonderland for local pick-up, or have it delivered – it’s like receiving a Christmas present to yourself. Stay on Santa’s ‘nice’ list by keeping an eye on Christmas on Main’s social pages for up-to-date opening information. CHRISTMAS ON MAIN A: 3 Bayport Court, Mornington T: 0439 955 778 FB: ChristmasOnMain INSTA: christmasonmain

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To delight and inspire‌ Ideas By The Bay is full of unique treasures and essential household items. Carrying staple kitchen utensils and products, as well as ecologically friendly essentials to help reduce harmful environmental impacts. We pride ourselves on carrying products of quality that will stand the test of time, without forfeiting aesthetic appeal and unique value. We have the biggest range of mugs for those looking for a quality piece and are building a following for the beautiful, UK-made Emma Bridgewater range. At Ideas we celebrate all things Australia,

which includes a variety of gorgeous Australian-made items. Perfect for visitors and locals alike, our Australian section is brimming with treasures for all. We have products to suit most occasions and ages making gift buying a cinch. Come visit us in store or visit our new website at ideasbythebay.com.au and shop from the comfort of your own home. Explore a world that celebrates creativity. Normal trading hours resume from November, Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm and Sunday 10.30am to 4pm. IDEAS BY THE BAY A: 34 Main St, Mornington T: 5977 0708 W: www.ideasbythebay.com.au FB: IdeasByTheBay INSTA: ideasbythebay

Obtainium Antiques & Vintage Wares

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Sea food and eat it Get ready for Christmas by ordering a deluxe seafood tasting platter from Cripps Family Fish Farm Seafood Market. Their famous seafood platters come in a range of sizes, and with more than 140 years of experience within the fishing industry, you’ll be delighted by their range of fresh prawns, oysters, flathead tails, Atlantic salmon, sashimi-grade tuna and so much more. See advert on page 55.

Marlene Miller Antiques

Specialising in antique and newly made jewellery by Melbourne’s top jewellers

128 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento t. 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e:marlenemiller3@bigpond.com

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The Peninsula’s finest all under one roof

The Mornington Peninsula is home to an incredibly diverse range of farmers, growers and makers whose goods extend from beauty products and gourmet food to sweet treats and unique gifts – and much, much more besides. But with so much variety, you’d think tracking it all down would be a nightmare, right? Well, no.

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Peninsula Gourmet Emporium is a treasure trove of the Peninsula’s finest artisan produce and products, a magical store filled with all things grown, made and produced on the Peninsula all stocked in the one location. Whether you’re a Peninsula resident or a visitor to our glorious part of the world, if you have limited time then this one-stop shop provides you with the perfect solution by allowing you to peruse and purchase a whole range of what the Peninsula has to offer.

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

Owners Kym and Ted Smirnoff stock an impressive and diverse range that includes an excellent selection of gluten-free and vegan products as well. The shelves are lined with wonderful cookbooks, local wines, beers, ciders, award-winning olive oils, cheeses, pates, jams and chutneys as well as handmade soaps and body products. With Christmas fast approaching, Peninsula Gourmet Emporium has you all sorted. You can purchase ready-made gift hampers or even create your own, filling

them with all the wonderful goodies that will add that special personalised touch. Your gift hampers can be delivered to Melbourne, interstate and overseas. Giftgiving has never been so easy. PENINSULA GOURMET EMPORIUM A: 240 Boundary Rd, Dromana T: 5981 9123 W: www.hamperyourself.com.au FB: HamperYourself INSTA: hamperyourself

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arts events leisure

arts events leisure Nine reasons to be cheerful If you’ve just about had enough of selfisolating or working from home – and who hasn’t – Miffy Pittaway has the answer: why not brighten up your home and your mood with one of her nine limited-edition seashell artworks at Mark and Cherie Poulter’s delightful Veraison Restaurant. This gorgeous shell-encrusted mirror frame is one of the artworks available, and like all Miffy’s work it has been created from shells she has collected over four

decades – all from dead sea creatures that are neither critically endangered, threatened nor exotic. Miffy’s art evokes memories of happier times spent at the beach enjoying the calming and restorative effect the ocean has on all of us. It’s exactly what we need during these trying times. SHE SHELL ART M: 0400 178 635 W: https:sheshellartbymiffy.com FB: Miffyshells INSTA: sheshellartbymiffy E: miffypittaway@live.com.au

Timeless Treasures Ship-Wheel Mirror

...beach, tide & coastal finds forming stunning art pieces... sheshellartbymiffy.godaddysites.com 0400 178 635

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Australia celebrates Indigenous culture with NAIDOC Week from November 8-15. Our First Nations Peoples have cared for this country and maintained their culture for about 80,000 years, and this has produced one of the world’s most distinct and unique artforms. Born from thousands of years of connection to Country and the ceremonies that were an integral part of their spirituality and the law, the first Australians have developed styles telling of their life, land and custodianship of their stories and Dreaming. For November, Nissarana Galleries presents its online catalogue of Aboriginal art in celebration of the remarkable achievements of Indigenous artists in creating a truly unique art movement and genre that has become a hallmark in collections not only in the national galleries of Australian but also in many major art institutions throughout the world. The catalogue contains a superb collection of paintings

from artists who have become primary names associated with the Aboriginal art movement of the Central Desert. It allows for easy viewing and with large imagery is perfect for those wishing to purchase premium artwork online without having to physically visit the gallery. Many of the artists have won numerous awards. The artists include Anna Price Petyarre, Gloria Petyarre, Karen Bird Ngale, Bronwyn Bancroft, Belinda Golder Kngwarreye, Bianca Gardiner-Dodd, Brennan Cox, Gracie Morton Pwerle, Margaret Scobie, Jeannie Petyarre, Jeannie Mills Pwerle, Jacinta Hayes, Patricia Kamara, Polly Ngale, Rosemary Egan Nampijinpa, and Lindsay Bird Mpetyane. View the catalogue online at www.nissaranagalleries. com.au NISSARANA GALLERIES A: 211 Main St, Mornington T: 5976 8877 M: 0474 496 222 E: info@ngmornington.com.au W: www.nissaranagalleries.com.au INSTA: nissaranagalleries

arts events leisure

Month-long celebration of Indigenous art

Polly Ngale’s Anwekety Dreaming

Brennan Cox’s Invisible Reef.

2 1 1 M a i n s t, M or n i n g to n www.nissaranagalleries.com.au

Ce l e brati ng 8 0 ,00 0 ye a r s o f Cul tu re Australia’s Acclaimed Indigenous Artists Margaret Scobie * Please note. There are no storytime sessions at Seaford Junior Library on the first Tuesday of the month.

visit library.frankston.vic.gov.au/whats_on or call 9784 1020

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Humour, intimacy and resourcefulness in the face of adversity and disadvantage

arts events leisure

Photo by Steve Brown

As an actor, theatre-maker and director, Carole Patullo has always been enthralled by the incredible stories seemingly ordinary people hold within them. Ms Patullo is excitedly looking forward to creating a solo theatre performance capturing and celebrating some of Frankston’s ‘ordinary champions’ thanks to an artist project grant of up to $4000 from Frankston City Council. “It’s a huge morale boost at this time when the arts has been so devastated. I’m extremely grateful and excited,” she said of receiving the grant. Ms Patullo drew motivation for her new show partly from a fascination with people. “It goes with the territory of being an actor. Most people are often remarkably resourceful and distinctly positive in the face of adversity and disadvantage. That inspires me.” The council has significantly expanded its community and business grants program this year to support up to

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

16 artists and creatives. This was a result of the $6.434 million relief and recovery package the council created to help Frankston recover from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. The arts grants are designed to help artists and those working in creative industries to pursue their passion while delivering culturally important work to the community. They included artist project grants each up to $4000 for eight artists to develop new works that can be presented online, on location or at a venue when restrictions allow. There were also a further eight creative industries professional development grants, each up to $2500, to support artists via further training, career development activities, mentorships and workshops. Arts grant recipients must complete their projects by next June. FRANKSTON ARTS CENTRE A: 27-37 Davey St, Frankston T: 9784 1060 W: www.thefac.com.au FB: FrankstonArtsCentre INSTA: the_fac

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arts events leisure

The shortlisted finalists from the 2020 Peninsula Film Festival.

Stars will Shine at Peninsula Film Festival The Peninsula Film Festival, with partner Shine Lawyers, will run from March 5-7. It will be launched on Friday, March 5, with a curated feature film at Rosebud Cinema. Tickets are $25 and include nibbles and drinks. The short film festival is on Saturday, March 6, at the Dromana Drive In, with tickets $40 per car, and will be followed on Sunday, March 7, with a filmmaking workshop at Rosebud Cinema. Tickets are $10. “Right now we’re all itching to get out and experience the arts but in a safe environment,” said festival director Steve Bastoni. “We’re taking over the entire Dromana Drive In and we’re going to deliver an amazing event in a COVID-safe manner.” Anyone with an idea and a camera is invited to enter the festival and vie for a share of $30,000 in cash and prizes. Up to 20 shortlisted films will be judged on the Saturday by industry professionals. The Woodleigh School Emerging Filmmaker Award is open to students under 18, the R U OK? category invites short films highlighting mental health conversations, and the My Local Hero Award, supported by the Rye, Rosebud and Dromana Community Bank branches of Bendigo Bank, is for two-minute films featuring people who have made an impact on the region. Enter at www.filmfreeway.com/PeninsulaFilmFestival or head to www.peninsulafilmfestival.com.au for details, programs and tickets. Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

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THE BUSINESS

the business

New office marks a new chapter in independent publishing When Lisa Walton and her daughter Yandell launched Mount Eliza Magazine in 2005, they could have hardly imagined that this humble kitchen table publication would spawn two more highly successful magazines and a parent company – Morn Pen Mag Pty Ltd – that champions and celebrates everything we love about the Mornington Peninsula.

Just two years later and with the support of extraordinary local businesses, loyal readers and partner Archie, Lisa opened Mornington Life and moved the operation from her Mount Eliza kitchen to an office in Mornington’s Main St, and then to Unit 11 at Mornington Industrial Park at 1140 Nepean Highway. Mornington Life eventually morphed into Mornington Peninsula Magazine, which has grown from strength to strength and this year celebrated its 100th issue. It’s a pretty significant milestone in these challenging times for independent media. Having established Mornington Peninsula Magazine as the Peninsula’s go-to glossy publication, Lisa and Archie launched another publication in 2018 called Eat.Drink Mornington Peninsula. This annual compendium of everything a foodie could desire has been a hit among residents and visitors alike, and it complements the endearing stories of community spirit, inspirational residents and exceptional businesses that its sister magazines highlight – albeit with a delicious vibe. It really is the perfect corporate gift. The 2021 edition will be out on December 15. Now, as Lisa heads into her 16th year of publishing on the Peninsula, she and her small but dedicated team found they’ve outgrown their MIP office and so have had to move again – but this time it’s just a few doors away to more spacious offices at Unit 14. Lisa and Archie, alongside a band of skilled tradespeople, have transformed the space into a bright working environment with fresh paint and carpets, a fully equipped kitchen, warehouse storage, a meeting area, and of course ample room for continued growth. “Archie and I found ourselves doing the majority of renos during lockdown,” said Lisa. In print, online, and rapidly expanding on social media, Mount Eliza Magazine, Mornington Peninsula Magazine and Eat.Drink have the Peninsula covered. Showcase your brand in our magazines and take up the option of full multi-media publicity when we promote and post your business on our website, Facebook and Instagram. And watch for our new website to be launched later this year. KATE SEARS

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THE BUSINESS

est. 1988

OUR NEW OFFICE, GARDEN’S YET TO BE FINISHED!

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THE BUSINESS

Signs point the way to reopening safely After the exciting news that Stage 4 restrictions have been eased for those in metropolitan Melbourne, there’s no better time than now to rejuvenate your business by reassuring your clients that your environment is safe, hygienic and following all of the Chief Health Officer’s directions. Digital Reprographics can assist you in completing your COVID-safe plan in line with DHHS recommendations by providing you with floor graphics, directional graphics, posters and counter signage. As a business owner himself, George Metallinos understands the need for businesses to get back on track as soon as possible and knows that the correct signage will leave your customers feeling safe, comforted and more likely to return. Therefore, Digital Reprographics is open from Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm with pick-up or delivery available. KATE SEARS DIGITAL REPROGRAPHICS A: Shop 2, 415-417 Nepean Highway, Frankston T: 9781 0073 W: www.digitalreprographics.com.au

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The limitations brought on by COVID-19 haven’t hampered KO Construction Law. Kelvin Oldridge and his team have embraced current technology allowing him to continue with his regular practice requirements of handling new and existing clients by running video conference meetings and court cases – all remotely. With this, Kelvin remains accessible to clients from far and wide, including the city, bayside and the Peninsula. With qualifications in building and law — B.Build (RMIT) and LL.B (Hons University of London) — Kelvin’s advice is complemented by his building experience and his understanding of the needs of clients from the building and construction industry. Kelvin regularly provides a legal and advisory service to construction and project management businesses, property developers, contractors and insurance companies, including drafting and amending contracts, standard forms of construction and development contracts in Australia and including the Australia Standards suite of contracts. He also provides commercial advice and support to clients in arbitration, litigation and the defence of insurance claims. KO CONSTRUCTION LAW T: 9598 6444 W: www.kolaw.com.au

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THE BUSINESS

Kelvin’s thoughtful approach to client accessibility


health beauty fashion

health, beauty, fashion Family-owned jewellers with award-winning craftmanship Anny’s Manufacturing Jewellers is an award-winning familyowned and run boutique jewellery store that provides the complete jewellery experience and has specialised in designing quality custom-made jewellery for 30 years in the heart of the Mornington Peninsula. They have many accolades and recently won the Jewellers Association of Australia’s People’s Choice Award. This win also allows owner and head jeweller Harry to represent Australia in the International Jewellery Design Excellence Award in Hong Kong next year. Anny’s has also taken things to a whole new level with a website that lets you view thousands of natural GIA-certified diamonds and certified lab-grown diamonds online from all over the world. Each has its own 360-degree video, so you can hand-pick the perfect diamond for your perfect ring. You start by choosing the shape you like, then the colour, carat, cut, price and clarity. Just like that, all the diamonds in Anny’s system that match your search criteria appear with their details and corresponding prices, and you can even zoom in on your choice for a 360-degree close-up view of the sparkling beauties. If you’re still not sure, simply speak to one

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

of Anny’s master jewellers, who will help you design a gorgeous quality piece that will last a lifetime and bring you endless joy, working with you every step of the way. Jewellery is very personal, which is why they stand by their promise ‘You Imagine — We Create’, and that’s exactly what these master jewellers do. “Jewellery is our profession and passion; it’s not just a job for us,” says Harry. “I have been making jewellery for a very long time; I always listen to what my customer wants and bring their imagination to life — my customer’s smile when they see their finished piece is always a very rewarding moment.” Anny’s can also repair, provide valuations, redesign or remodel your treasured piece. If you have old worn jewellery that needs a new lease on life, Anny’s can create something new and fresh using your loved jewellery. Check out Anny’s Facebook and Instagram pages to see before and after videos/photos of remodelled jewellery. Anny’s also stocks a range of brands, including Dora wedding bands, Peter W Beck, Thomas Sabo, Tesoro, Ikecho pearls, Sekonda watches and Classique Swiss watches. The finest diamonds, precious gems and most exquisite jewellery are all right on your doorstep. ANNY’S MANUFACTURING JEWELLERS A: 92 Young St, Frankston T: 1300 092 000 W: www.annys.com.au FB: Anny’sManufacturing Jewellers INSTA: annysjewellers E: annys@annys.com.au

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health beauty fashion

Keeping your health a priority It goes without saying that the past several months have been anything but ordinary. Lockdown may have forced you to slow down, giving you an opportunity to kick-start or speed up your exercise routine. Alternatively, you may be working from home at a ‘temporary’ office setup that has not been ideal for your posture. Or perhaps you’ve just happened to strain yourself through the ins and outs of everyday life that still must go on among this pandemic. Whatever your situation may be, your health and wellness should remain a top priority. If you’ve been experiencing pain of any kind, it is important to seek professional treatment before the injury worsens. Early intervention

is key to identifying the cause of the injury before symptoms start to further develop and become more debilitating. So if something doesn’t feel right and that persistent nagging pain or soreness is not going away, get in touch with The Sports Injury Clinic so you can get back to feeling 100 per cent. TSIC’s qualified physiotherapists will assess, treat and advise you on the best course of action to improve your pain and prevent it from happening in the future. TSIC is continuing to book in-clinic appointments following strict hygiene measures. Alternatively, TSIC is offering online video Telehealth consultations from the comfort of your home. Contact the team today to book an appointment. THE SPORTS INJURY CLINIC A: 365-367 Nepean Highway, Frankston T: 9783 9990 W: www.tsic.com.au FB: TSICPeninsula INSTA: tsic.com.au

It’s time to celebrate re-opening and support our local traders, but please stay safe. From the team at

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health beauty fashion

Transforming lives for 10 years Effective Hypnotherapy has been established for 10 years, and founder Eileen continues to strive to support people wanting to transform their lives. Whether your issues involve weight loss, sugar, nail biting, alcohol, smoking, sleep or anxiety, or you’re in need of counselling or mindset coaching, Eileen’s programs are supportive and tailored to suit everyone. They’ll help you to feel confident and empowered so you can finally let go of what’s holding you back. Eileen and her UK business coach, world-renowned hypnotherapist Sheila Granger, have now made it accessible for anyone who wants this dream career to study a full diploma under Eileen and gain full support of an incredible career and community. For more information, please contact Eileen on scotteileen3@gmail. com EFFECTIVE HYPNOTHERAPY M: 0401 558 297 W: www.effectivehypnotherapy.com.au FB: Effective Hypnotherapy

Eyewear as individual as you are...

MainStreet EyeCare

57 Main Street, Mornington (03) 5975-3235 ( 74

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It goes without saying that most of us have kept ourselves busy during the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions by spending our extra time tackling those long-avoided home projects or commencing new home improvement jobs. Tasks such as tiling or painting can demand a lot of physical effort and are therefore a good way to burn some calories indoors – and you kill two birds with one stone. Following this concept, MyJobQuote.co.uk decided to explore the idea further. To do this, it set out to determine which DIY jobs burn the most calories and what their level of intensity was. Three men and three women of average weight were asked to complete a variety of DIY tasks over 15 days while wearing a Fitbit tracker. Each task was performed for roughly 20 minutes and the results were multiplied by three to reach a standard measure of one hour for each DIY job. MyJobQuote.co.uk DIY expert Kane Hughes shared some of the highlights with us. Coming in at No.1 for the DIY job that burns the

most calories – and is thus deemed high-intensity – is sanding. The study showed that men burned 456 calories in one hour, while women burned 392 calories completing the task. Carpentry came in second. “Sanding is something most people can DIY,” said Kane. “If you’re sanding furniture such as tables and chairs, this can usually be done with sandpaper and can take half a day for a whole dining room set.” Gardening was the highest burner of calories within the moderate-intensity group, with men burning 337 calories and women burning 306. Think digging holes, planting seedlings, trimming hedges, raking and weeding. However, the DIY job that burned the least calories was wallpapering. Completing this task, men burned 217 calories an hour, whereas women burned 180 calories. This is generally a difficult task that requires more mental effort than physical because the wallpaper must be cut to the correct lengths and patterns need to be properly aligned. To find out more, visit https://www.myjobquote. co.uk/ KATE SEARS

PLAN YOUR SUMMER PROMOTION

ONLY A FEW WEEKS UNTIL CHRISTMAS

CALL

NOW out

DEC 1 SECURE YOUR SPOT - IN OUR SUMMER EDITIONS Book your Summer Campaign - Dec Jan & Feb to save up to 20%

IN PRINT + ON LINE + SOCIAL MEDIA Call 9708 8222 or email molly@mpmag.com.au or anna@mpmag.com.au Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

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health beauty fashion

OK, calories, sand up and be counted


health beauty fashion

Stephanie is an experienced Astrologer and regular contributor to

Mornington Peninsula Magazine.

For more info go to seeingwithstars.net or ph: 0411 2555 77

your november STARS by Stephanie Johnson

Aries: November is a month of reflecting on past actions with your ruling planet, Mars, Retrograde in your Zodiac Sign. In particular, the investment section of your Solar Chart is under scrutiny. You may be more aware of the cycles of economics, weather and even life than you have been in the past. Taurus: The focus is on your primary relationship. If you are single then you are likely to question your status, deciding to either remain happy in your solitary life or to start looking for a mate. If you are in a committed relationship, then it is time to nurture your connection. Gemini:

Your health and well-being are centre stage. It’s time to reassess your lifestyle, ensuring that you are living a healthy and balanced daily life. Your routine needs to be one that sustains your well-being. If not, then you need to make changes. Bad habits need to be replaced with good ones.

Cancer:

The focus is on your primary relationship. If you are single then someone may cross your path, prompting you to rethink your solitary status. If you are in a committed relationship then it’s time to bestow some affection on your nearest and dearest. The idea is to spark romance.

Leo:

Home and family are your primary concern this month. If you are settled then you are likely to enjoy home-oriented projects. However, if you are unsettled then you may be looking at making some changes. You may declutter, redecorate, renovate or just do some much-needed household management.

Virgo:

Communication is the name of the game. The start of the month is about listening and reflecting on your options, and then it is about taking action. Do you need new skills in speaking, teaching, advocating or some such related field? If so, what is it that you need to learn?

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Libra: Venus is in your Sign at the start of the month, heralding close contact with important women. However, Venus is also connecting with the Wounded Healer Chiron. This means that it’s time to heal wounded relationships from the past, or that a significant woman needs some tender loving care right now. Scorpio: It’s makeover time! Only if you want to. You can invent a new you. It’s time to be resourceful and brave and make changes that enhance your personal health and happiness. A partner – or potential partner, if you are single – may spark self-realisation and the resulting changes. Sagittarius: There are times for full speed ahead and then times to slow down. November is a time for you to relax. This is serious cave time. While you are in your cave you can assess the past year – and what a year it has been – and how to move forward. Capricorn:

In many ways 2020 has been your year. Some heavy planetary action in Capricorn has meant that others finally realise your worth. You have been living and learning Capricorn traits your entire life. November sees you connect with other likeminded souls. Groups, clubs, and friendships flourish, even if it is online.

Aquarius: Your time is coming. 2021 is the Aquarius Super Power year. And so the trick is to now decide on your direction. This is about your chosen profession or contribution to society. This could be your career, role as a parent or grandparent, or perhaps an office bearer’s role in a public group. Pisces: This is your month to live in sync with the lyrics of Joni Mitchell: “I felt unfettered and alive, there was nobody calling me up for favours, and no one’s future to decide.” In other words, it’s time to let go of any anxieties, take a breather if possible, and dream a little.

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Magazine


health beauty fashion

Please welcome Mornington Peninsula Magazine’s newest and cutest sales representative in the making. Weighing 3.4kg and measuring 49.5cm, Joshua Richard Kolasa was born to our sales representative Chendelle Kolasa and Corey Holman at 12.39pm on October 16 at Monash Hospital Clayton. This little bundle of joy is in perfect health and so is his mum, who’s elated at being able to eat sushi and sashimi again. Her heart is full of gratitude for this baby boy and Chendelle is overwhelmed with joy for this blessing. She believes that he is the cutest baby, and Joshua’s grandparents wholeheartedly agree. Chendelle’s English staffordshire terrier Xanny was pretty curious about this fur-less and noisy creature that seemed to be taking all the attention away from him, but he’s come to accept Joshua and is loving having a baby brother. The team at Mornington Peninsula Magazine congratulate the parents and can’t wait to meet wee Joshua. KATE SEARS

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

food wine produce

Global focus on diabetes

World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization in response to growing fears about the mounting health threat posed by the disease. It is marked every year on November 14 and is the world’s largest diabetes awareness campaign, reaching a global audience of more than 1 billion people in more than 160 countries. It focuses on creating awareness of diabetes, illustrating issues important to the diabetes world and keeping diabetes in the public and political spotlight. The theme for World Diabetes Day 2020 is The Nurse and Diabetes. Here the global event will raise awareness around the crucial role that nurses play in supporting people living with diabetes. As the number of

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

people with diabetes continues to rise all over the world, the role of nurses and other health professional support staff becomes ever so important in handling the effects of the disease. Why not undertake the online diabetes risk assessment test, which only takes a few minutes. It has been created by the IDF to predict an individual’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. The IDF estimates that as many as 212 million people, or half of all adults currently living with diabetes, are undiagnosed. Most of these have type 2 diabetes – so take the test by visiting www.idf.org/ type-2-diabetes-risk-assessment/ To find out how you can participate both in the build-up to World Diabetes Day and after the campaign, visit www. worlddiabetesday.org

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Taste the delights of Greater Dandenong

Discover the vibrancy and diversity of Greater Dandenong and enjoy the region’s rich array of culinary delights on one of the city’s acclaimed food tours. Join other food lovers for an authentic celebration of food and culture in one of Melbourne’s most celebrated and thriving food heartlands. A visit to the City of Greater Dandenong allows you to travel the world without the need for a passport. Now officially recognised as Australia’s most culturally diverse community, Greater Dandenong provides a rich tapestry of cultural experiences that will awaken the senses and leave you

wanting more. The perfect way to get your first taste of the city is on a Food Lovers or Cultural Tour. Explore Afghani culture in Dandenong’s Afghan Bazaar precinct or travel to South-East Asia in Springvale. Greater Dandenong’s celebrated twohour tours provide generous samplings of a rich array of cuisines and conclude with a delicious meal. Book one of the scheduled tours today or contact the City of Greater Dandenong to tailor one for a group of your closest family and friends. Go to greaterdandenong.com/tours or phone 8571 1666 and discover Greater Dandenong on a plate.

Greater Dandenong Tours

Have an authentic cultural experience without your passport!

Dumpli n a n d Dessert gs s

n a h g f A aar Baz

Be introduced to the wonderful Afghan business community learning how traditional Afghan bread is made, visiting a traditional homewares shop, supermarkets and finishing with an Afghan banquet. Guarantee you won’t walk away hungry!

Who doesn’t like dumplings and desserts and on this tour you can indulge in both. You will be treated to a variety of dumplings along the way and finish with fabulous desserts.

Do you have a group of friends or colleagues and can’t make one of the scheduled dates? Did you know that we can organise group bookings for 8–16 people available upon request. For more information and bookings visit greaterdandenong.com/tours 8571 1666 or phone 8571 1377


FOOD WINE PRODUCE

A CHAT WITH OUR FOOD, WINE AND DINING EXPERTS Head brewer David Golding — Red Hill Brewery, 88 Shoreham Rd, Red Hill South. Phone 5989 2959 Alongside your wife Karen, you established the brewery in 2005 and you’re now an award-winning independent craft brewery. How has the journey been? We started out with a love of good beer, a lot of passion and an idealism about what running a small business and hospitality venue entailed. We learnt fast, brewed great beer and have created something that people recognise as a unique, relaxed and local Mornington Peninsula experience. I am still blown away by people who have been introduced to what a beer experience can be, who have come once, tens or hundreds of times to the Red Hill Brewery. What is your philosophy when it comes to brewing craft beers? I make beer that Karen and I want to drink. We fell in love with classic European styles, and a lot of what we make is starting from that point. The concept is that you can drink a pint of Red Hill and want another pint of the same beer. That’s what we aim for with all of our beers. Your brewery is located amid its own hops garden. What else makes you unique? We are a family-owned brewery. Both Karen and I are hands-on in all aspects of the business, from brewing, marketing, food, café and events. The hops were planted here around 20 years ago and are part of the experience coming to the Red Hill Brewery. Our brewery has no mains water, no sewerage, so everything is designed to be self-sufficient. We were the first brewery on the Mornington Peninsula and we have remained committed to staying independent and brewing great beer. Could you tell our readers about your menu of beer-friendly food? We will be launching a new beer-friendly menu of modern burgers and snacks soon. Relaunching the food operations has been slightly on the backburner due to the unknown COVID regulations ever-changing, but we hope to have an exciting and fun food option. In the meantime, we will always have some beer-friendly snacks or food trucks in residence. Throughout the COVID-19 restrictions, what have you been offering your customers? Online sales have been the forefront of the focus. Getting beer out into people’s fridges by Friday afternoon has been key to keeping customers happy. Karen has put together some great packs allowing people to order a pack designed for a craft beer-lover, a person wanting to try the range, new beer packs, and to cover a range of budgets. The continued support from loyal customers is amazing. We’ve heard you kept yourselves busy with renovations. Tell us more! Firstly, we restyled our whole bar area – a sleek bar, fresh paint, new floors, new art – and we have tiled the whole bar in a nod to the classic tiled, iconic Aussie bars. With more focus on outdoor dining, we have also refurbished our deck and integrated some outdoor garden spaces around the bar to enable more of our guests to enjoy pints in the fresh Red Hill air. We have also been working hard outdoors so the gardens and grounds are looking beautiful too.  Finally, what’s your favourite beer that you’ve created? Imperial Stout would have to be the favourite, but I’m excited about what we are canning now – watch this space.

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

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FOOD WINE PRODUCE

We’re setting up for outdoor dining Following Premier Dan Andrew’s announcement on Monday, October 26 that from midnight Tuesday, October 27, retail and hospitality can re-open, the excitement among businesses and the public was through the roof. Both Mornington Peninsula Shire and Frankston City councils had previously announced their intent to help our local restaurants, cafes, taverns, bars, clubs, takeaway food venues and pubs extend their table service outside as well. With applications invited for free temporary extended outdoor dining permits, it’s sensational news for the region’s hospitality industry. Large umbrellas, outdoor furniture, screens and road closures will no doubt create a scene like no other as animated voices and aromas of delicious food waft down the lively streets. This initiative to create additional outdoor dining space is crucial for the community’s food businesses to remain profitable all the while following the social distancing measures and space restrictions. With three and six-month permits available, our streets will once again be hives of activity. Yes, they’ll look different, but it’s a brilliant alternative that we’re sure our ever so supportive community will jump on board with.

This concept will provide a long-awaited opportunity for people to come together again and socialise in a COVIDsafe manner to not only reconnect with each other, but also our townships and our local businesses. Just picture it: long summer days, sitting outside at your favourite restaurant, with tree branches catching the balmy breeze as you embrace the atmosphere and soak up those last rays as dusk falls. Please join us in creating a wonderful summer for all to enjoy. By everyone getting on board we’ll be able to rebuild our stunning shopping strips, bubbly atmosphere and foodie culture on the pristine Peninsula. With Stage 4 restrictions eased, it’s time for us to reap the rewards of our hard work, all the while maintaining our social distance practices, wearing of masks, sanitising our hands and supporting small businesses. While we’re on the local lovin’ train, don’t forget that takeaway is still a popular option, with many businesses introducing and perfecting the process throughout the lockdown stage. Why not explore one of our 35 townships that perhaps have been out of your radius, or pick up a copy of our sister publication, Eat.Drink 2021 – out mid-December – to discover a new eatery to fall in love with. We’ll be out and about, seeing what’s happening and admiring the changes to our dining culture. We’ll see you there! KATE SEARS

Natural Spring Water Peninsula Springs is a local, family owned and operated Natural Spring Water business, serving the Mornington Peninsula and Bayside Regions. We pride ourselves on providing great service and great tasting Natural Spring Water to our clients. Delivered Free to your door. Indulge in the taste of Peninsula Springs Natural Spring Water in 15 litre or 600ml size bottles.

For more information ring Peninsula Springs on 0413 996 317 or check the website at www.peninsulasprings.com.au

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Design for life We cannot wait to open our doors; the studio is feeling fresh and inviting. New stock has arrived including tiles, mosaics, handcrafted concrete basins, handmade lights and more to stimulate your creative senses!

Isolation imposed because of COVID-19 has shown us all the importance of a home – what it should be, how it feels and how it provides. It is our passionate belief that a home should reflect its owners, and bringing the owners’ personalities to the design is of paramount importance. Here at Lifestiles Design Studio, we bring thoughtfulness to your interiors.

Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

We design homes that mirror warmth, functionality, intimacy, and connectivity. With our worldly experienced team, we bring a knowledgeable and fresh perspective to modern living. Joining with skilled and experienced professionals, trades, and artisans, our team collaboratively works alongside clients and project teams. All stages of the design process are personal and unique. It is our ethos to create bespoke homes full of sophistication and authentic personality with exceptional quality. This year has shown that our homes are our sanctuary. It is now time to build houses with the most fundamental necessities every homeowner needs – tranquillity, comfort and individuality – while still incorporating a home with an

adventurous sense of being. DEBORAH QUILL LIFESTILES DESIGN STUDIO A: 4/5 Torca Tce, Mornington (just off Mornington-Tyabb Rd near Audi) P: 5976 3507

M: 0439 224 888 E: sales@lifestilesds.com.au W: lifestilesdesignstudio.com.au Open: Monday-Thursday 9am-4pm, Friday 9am-3pm, Saturday 10am-2pm or by appointment

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Property Home Garden

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A bright yellow nursery? Oh, for crying out loud Whether your impending bundle of joy is a carefully planned addition or a happy lockdown accident, you’ll no doubt be busy choosing names, picking out baby clothes and preparing pets and siblings for the new arrival. But have you given much thought to what colour you’ll be painting the nursery? If not, you should. According to psychologist and well-being consultant Lee Chambers, colour can affect a baby’s mood and behaviour. UK interior design specialist Homedit.com surveyed 3273 parents to find out what colours they chose for their children’s nurseries, then ran those choices past Mr Chambers.

Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

Here are the most popular colours and what he had to say about each: Yellow: “The wonderful colour of neutrality. A happy aura comes from a room the colour of the sun, and it can increase focus and motivation. The brighter the yellow, however, the more it stimulates frustration, and in research yellow made babies cry more than any other colour.” Pink: “A popular colour for a bedroom but not so often elsewhere, pink takes some of the benefits of red and takes the edge off the stimulation. It is calming initially and can increase compassion, but over time it can become irritating, leading to a disruptive child.” Purple: “A wise and regal colour, purple can be a great choice for something different. Combining the fire of the red with the relaxed nature of blue, it can

create a nice balance, or can be tailored towards more energy or more serenity by changing the shade. It does have an element of grown-up about it, which may take the childish edge off.” Blue: “A popular colour, blue creates a calming atmosphere that reduces stimulation and helps children to settle. It also invokes a sense of the body cooling, which helps when children fall asleep. It’s worth being mindful of the tone – too dark can become almost gloomy and uninspiring, but too pale reduces some of the benefits.” Green: “The symbolic colour of nature, and the colour we can see the most shades of. With its connotations to growth and the outdoors, it takes some of the happiness from yellow and some of the calming of blue. It promotes concentration and soothes the mind, but

it doesn’t motivate or inspire energy or communication.” Orange: “Another joyous colour not often used but very welcoming. It is the colour for inspiring communication if you want to promote chatter, but again is a colour that generates underlying anxiety that decreases children’s attention.” Red: “The highly emotive colour of energy and anger. Likely to lead to an excitable, confident child willing to push the limits. However, it is also likely to increase aggression, decrease concentration and overstimulate children.” Mr Chambers added: “Trust your intuition and you won’t go far wrong. You can bring out the value of colours by pairing darker colours with more vibrant neutral colours. With bold colours, consider utilising them through accessories and balance them with cooler colours.”

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Property Home Garden Classic coastal travellers, this one is for you. Troubled times have left us without the chance to travel to the gorgeous Mornington Peninsula or spend time by the beach on the Sunshine Coast. So bring this holiday seaside escape to your home with OZ Design Furniture Mornington’s quintessentially classic living look. It’s inspired by a relaxed lifestyle and offers a calming presence for those who live in it. The Bellamy daybed will

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leave you living the coastal dream from the comfort of your very own home. Introduce it into your reading nook, living room or bedroom and take time for yourself this new season. Adventure awaits. Live boundlessly this season with OZ Design Furniture Mornington.  OZ DESIGN FURNITURE MORNINGTON A: Showroom D4, Peninsula Home, 11281132 Nepean Highway, Mornington T: 8560 1137 W: www.ozdesignfurniture.com.au FB: OZDesignFurniture INSTA: ozdesignfurniture

Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

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Property Home Garden

Sweltering summer days and sticky nights are just around the corner, so get your hot little hands on your phone and call Southside Plumbing Heating and Cooling in Langwarrin to have your airconditioning sorted before the heat hits. This family-owned business takes pride in completing all work to the highest standard with owner Peter Dwyer at the helm. Peter’s got more than 30 years of plumbing experience, and he and his team complete repairs and maintenance on all heating and cooling appliances, including installing an airconditioner or maintaining an existing unit. The Southside Plumbing Heating and Cooling team are highly skilled at repairing and servicing all types of systems, from evaporative airconditioners to reverse-cycle airconditioners and ducted refrigerated systems. In addition, they expertly install and service hot water systems as well as undertaking ducted heating maintenance and carbon monoxide testing of gas appliances. “I insist that my team do the job right the first time, every time,” said Peter. Just one call to the friendly office staff and all of your heating and cooling needs will be sorted quickly and efficiently. KATE SEARS SOUTHSIDE PLUMBING HEATING AND COOLING T: 1300 669 555 W: www.southsidehc.com.au

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With these longer sunny days, we are seeing substantial growth in our edible gardens. And while it’s exciting to have another warm season upon us, keeping up with it all can be overwhelming for some. However, if you plan well and understand how the cycles work in your own garden, you can prepare and stay on top of the maintenance of your food crops. By now you will want to have most of your summer crops in and growing strong. Tomato, capsicum, eggplant, chilli, zucchini, cucumber, pumpkin, watermelon, potatoes, beans and corn will all be loving the recent mix of sunshine and rain. Keep up with subsequent plantings of your salad vegetables: lettuces, beetroot, carrot, radish, kale, etc. The early stone fruit will be picking soon too, with plums, peaches and nectarines all swelling beautifully. While enjoying the rewards from your garden, there are a few important things to keep in mind over this warmer period: maintaining soil moisture, watching out for pests

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Everything we love about the peninsula, fresh every month

and diseases, and consistently harvesting your crops. If your soil has been prepared adequately before summer planting with plenty of nutrient and organic matter, a lack of water is really the main issue that will impede strong growth and healthy crops during these warmer months. Consistent soil moisture is very important to deliver food and water to your plants. Giving your gardens a hose down every few days isn’t really sufficient, and you may find that your plants don’t thrive as they should. A well-functioning drip irrigation system covered with a thick layer of straw mulch is going to make maintaining moisture in your soil much easier. As well as attending to your soils, make sure you keep a regular eye on pests and diseases over the season. I would recommend casting an observant eye over your crops at least two to three times a week if possible to see if there are any little crawlers, nibblers or fungal issues. And you probably need to start now! The cabbage white butterfly is out and about, as are aphids, pear and cherry slugs, brown scale, caterpillars, earwigs, snails and slugs and so on. A few bugs in the garden are fine and a little damage is nothing to worry about, and as long as you catch them before any serious infestation takes hold you

will be right. In the event of an outbreak, consider using ‘organic certified’ sprays over the harsher chemical ones. You can also find recipes on the web to make your own chemical-free alternatives. Failure to keep up with harvesting your fruit and vegies can lead to all sorts of problems, so be sure to keep track of which plants are producing and when. This will help in subsequent seasons. Regular harvesting will encourage your plants to continue to produce in most cases, and prevent rotting vegies attracting flies and bugs. You may also end up with dry, split or oversized vegetables if you leave them too long. Nibble as you wander to check how they are going. The best way to stay on top of these things is to ramble through the garden a few times a week, sticking your fingers into the soil, checking for bites and bugs, and filling your harvest basket with goodies. It’s all part of enjoying an edible garden.

HAPPY GARDENING!

Drew Cooper, Edible Gardens www.ediblegardens.com.au

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Fresh linen is a breeze As we head into the warmer months, the majority of us will be counting down the days until we can have a much-deserved getaway. Speak to BayLinen Hire & Laundry Services about their reliable and professional linen hire service to make your holiday a breeze. Since 2010, BayLinen has been offering a door-to-door delivery service to ensure when you walk through the door of your holiday rental, the beds are already made with quality luxurious linen and towels. With a dedicated team, the local business takes the hassle out of your precious holiday time by taking care of your linen needs. Call now to ensure your downtime is complete relaxation. Sit back, relax and enjoy the sunshine. KATE SEARS BAYLINEN HIRE & LAUNDRY SERVICES T: 0458 231 232 W: www.baylinen.com.au Bay Linen Logo_CMYK.pdf

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Property Home Garden

There’s never been a better time to refresh your home with Dollar Curtains + Blinds’ eco-friendly SunSmart energy-saving fabrics. Innovation features just as highly as design throughout their fabric and product ranges, which include certifications from Greenguard Gold and Oeko-Tex Standard 100, as well as anti-bacteria and mouldresistance features. UV-resistant fabrics also protect your home and interiors from the harsh Australian sun. Dollar Curtains + Blinds’ smart home solutions allow you to more easily cover your windows in times of intense heat, creating a comfortable, shaded sanctuary. Just as easily, raising all the window coverings in a home to absorb as much sunlight as possible can significantly reduce the amount of internal heating needed during the cooler months. For every day in between, your window coverings can endlessly move at the click of a button to a height best suited to combat the ever-changing outside environment.

Refresh your

BATHROOM!! SERVICES INCLUDE: Leaking shower specialist

Indoor & outdoor tile cleaning & sealing Pre-sale makeovers Mouldy showers re-grouted Silicone seals replaced Damaged tiles replaced Cracked acrylic shower bases & Bathtubs repaired Find us on Facebook: Bayside-GROUT-Solutions

Jorg Melzer | Owner Operator 0424 843 358 | melzer1@bigpond.com

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Leaking the harsh truth You’ve excelled in your spring cleaning, including completing the dreaded deep shower clean, so we almost don’t want to tell you the next bit. The tough truth is that the chemicals you’ve used can actually cause damage. Often, the use of harsh chemicals on our showers can trigger more problems than they fix, so it’s much better to secure a professional, like owner/ operator Jorg from Bayside Grout Solutions. Jorg offers an all-inclusive repair and re-grouting service to stop your shower leaking. Jorg can also give it a

Dollar Curtains + Blinds has specialised in manufacturing custom window coverings for more than 50 years, ensuring factory-direct prices, no hidden costs and the highest Australian-made quality. Every product is designed and handcrafted specifically to fit your window, door or alcove dimensions for a high-quality, durable window covering that will last for many years to come. Contact the Mornington or Moorabbin Airport teams today for your free design measure and quote so you can get your window coverings installed for the summer months ahead. If you’re building a new home, then DC+B can also provide expert advice and free quotes off house plans. DOLLAR CURTAINS + BLINDS A: Shop C4, Peninsula Home, 1128-1132 Nepean Highway, Mornington T: 5975 3655 A: Store 15, Kingston Central Plaza, 288 Centre Dandenong Rd, Moorabbin Airport T: 9566 8200 FB: dollarcurtainsandblinds INSTA: dollarcurtainsandblinds Open Monday to Friday 9am-5.30pm, Saturdays 9am-5pm

BEFORE

AFTER

complete makeover while he’s there. Honestly, you won’t recognise your shower afterwards – and it’s ready to use within 48 hours. Jorg has always taken the utmost care when working in a customer’s home and adheres to strict COVID-19 hygiene practices. KATE SEARS BAYSIDE GROUT SOLUTIONS A: Somerville M: 0424 843 358

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All the tradies you need right at your fingertips Since June, we’ve been more dedicated than ever in supporting our talented local tradies across the Peninsula and Greater Frankston area. What started as a one-off Trades To You feature has grown into a regular trade directory that is here to stay. This directory has become and will continue to be a regular section in Mornington Peninsula Magazine as we emerge out of lockdown. It’s your guide to local tradespeople. This go-to guide’s success is thanks to the wonderful local lovin’ spirit and our devoted community coming together over the past few difficult months. We’ve seen this fresh feature received so well and we’ve got you all to thank. You could

Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

almost say we hit the nail on the head. As we shrug off our lockdown cocoons and the warm days creep in, it’s time to revisit those grand plans in and around the house that we put on hold because they involved trades that were under restrictions or required more brainstorming. If spring cleaning isn’t quite your style, perhaps it’s best to get some professionals in to take charge before spring’s over and we head into summer. If you’re like us, there’s a DIY project that was begun out of iso-boredom and unfortunately remains in an unfinished and defeated pile. Again, it’s time to call in an expert. And with indications that we may be able to have guests in our homes again soon with summer barbecues beckoning and Christmas on the horizon, let’s get our houses, gardens, cars and garages looking 11/10. Whether the job is big or small, whether it’s inside or outside the home, we’ve

TRADES TO YOU

trades to you

your guide to local tradespeople Ads from $100 per month

got the tradie for it. Just keep an eye out for our monthly Trades To You directory and together we’ll work to support small business and our precious Peninsula community. If you are a tradesperson looking to publicise your business to the Mornington Peninsula and Greater Frankston area, give us a call on 9708 8222. You will find we have great rates starting from $100 a month and editorial options for you to showcase what you do. KATE SEARS

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TRADES TO YOU

Huddo’s helps you keep your cool Focused on finding the best solutions for all your electrical requirements, Peter Hudson’s team of professional electricians at Huddo’s Electrical Services love lending a helping hand when you’re in need of a sparky who knows what they’re doing. “No job is too big or too small for us,” said Peter. “Whether your new or existing property needs wiring or you’re dissatisfied with your existing electrical work, we can help.” Known in the trade for delivering exceptional service, Huddo’s Electrical Services is on call, and because the person who picks up the phone is the person who carries out the work, there’s no more talking to multiple operators. Huddo’s Electrical Services is the go-to for all things cool this summer, so why not call an electrician who is fast, friendly and can help you with all your residential and commercial cooling needs. Huddo’s will make sure all your ceiling sweep fans are in great working order to beat the heat, and Huddo’s can perform switchboard upgrades, replace lights at home and work with LED fittings, and install new lighting and power points. Look no further, Huddo’s is here. HUDDO’S ELECTRICAL SERVICES M: 0411 316 180 FB: huddos electrical services

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TRADES TO YOU

Fire Pits & Chimineas by SLOT ME IN

• Fire Pits

• Cookware & Accessories

• Chimineas

• Lifestyle Products

• Fireplaces

• Garden & Outdoors

0408 105 510 Issue 108, NOVEMBER 2020

www.slotmein.com.au

Create a stunning outdoor entertaining area centred around an ambient & warm fire pit by SLOT ME IN or have us design and construct your very own unique “INFIREDSCAPE ”

Factory inspections by appointment at 1+2 / 14 Jennings Crt, Rosebud www.morningtonpeninsulamagazine.com.au

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Promoting a clean, green peninsula

Planet Ark focuses on the waste hierarchy National Recycling Week is celebrated from November 9-15, and for more than two decades Planet Ark has been inspiring and promoting positive behavioural change through this highly regarded program. This event focuses on making all of us better at recycling and managing our rubbish, highlighting the importance of reducing our waste at home, school and work, and making sure that we recycle correctly. National Recycling Week helps create a better understanding of what happens to our rubbish and recyclables after they leave our bins. Its message is all about how to improve our environmental footprint by supplying ideas and tips. By following the waste hierarchy – reduce, reuse and recycle – Planet Ark concentrates on motivating households, schools, workplaces and councils to rethink their rubbish.

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Planet Ark understands that recycling can be confusing, particularly after China’s ban on accepting our recyclables and the media’s coverage of the ‘waste crisis’. That said, the organisation is committed to restoring the community’s trust in the recycling program and educating us how to recycle properly to ensure recycling is sustainable in Australia. This includes creating a conversation around rethinking our waste, so we eventually see it as a valuable resource that can be used to make new products. It also strives to engage Australians and inform them of the vital nature of closing the recycling loop by purchasing items that are made from recycled content, which is pivotal in generating a sustainable future for all. In fact, this works because it keeps recycled material in circulation for as long as possible, which benefits the environment because it reduces the use of virgin materials for new products as well as cutting down on the energy and water required to make them. Australia needs National Recycling Week to bring these issues into the spotlight. What springs to mind are the COVID-19 hygiene practices that have been introduced and their possible impact on the planet. After so much focus on stamping out single-use items – especially plastics – we’ve seen a resurgence in the use of plastic straws, takeaway containers, coffee cups and masks. Their disposability is key for hygiene and to stop the spread of the disease – but at what cost? While we must follow the Chief Health Officer’s directions for the

majority of these items, why not make a solid effort during National Recycling Week to use or create reusable face masks, or at least cut the mask strings to prevent wildlife getting tangled in them if they end up in our waterways and bushland. What steps can you take to reduce your environmental footprint? KATE SEARS

COMMITTED TO A CLEAN GREEN PENINSULA Choose the peninsula’s longest running, largest circulation glossy To get your message to our readers call 9708 8222

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